display pdf in iframe mvc : Rotate pdf pages by degrees control application system web page html asp.net console 2007-2008-catalog-final-bookmarks9-part286

PLU 2007 - 2008
89
H
History
HIST 364: England and the Second World War - S1
This course will consider England’s entry into the war, the
evacuation from Dunkirk, the Battle of Britain, the arrival of
American troops, the air war, the invasion of Normandy, 
and the implications of the Holocaust, especially in terms 
of the Kindertransport of Jewish children to safety in 
England. (4)
HIST 370: Environmental History of the United States – S1
An investigation of the complex interrelationship between 
people and their environment. (4)
HIST 380: Asian American History and Culture – A, S1
Surveys the experiences, struggles, ideas, and contributions of
Asian American and Pacific Islander (API) people within the
context of U.S. history. It strongly focuses on API history in the
three coastal states of the U.S. West (including Washington
State), but includes attention to API people in other regions.
Central themes include economic exploitation and contributions
of API people, cultural and social connections to Asia and the
Pacific that API people shaped, racism and discrimination against
API people, legal studies of API people, and recent social and
political issues central to API people in the U.S. (4) 
HIST 381: The Vietnam War and American Society – S1
Through the lectures, assigned readings, films and discussions,
the course will explore the Vietnam War from the perspectives of
the North and South Vietnamese, American elected officials in
Washington, D.C., John Q. Public watching the war every night
on TV, and the average GI fighting in the highlands and jungle.
The lectures are designed to provide an explanation of the origins
and development of American involvement in Vietnam from
President Eisenhower’s decision to support the French to
President Nixon’s Vietnamization policy and the peace
negotiations. They will also examine the consequences and legacy
of America’s involvement in Vietnam. (4)
HIST 387: Special Topics in U.S. History - S1
This course provides specific opportunities for students to
examine chronologically, topically or geographically focused 
areas of study in U.S. History. (4)
HIST 388: Special Topics in European History - S1
This course provides specific opportunities for students to
examine chronologically, topically or geographically focused 
areas of study in European History. (4)
HIST 389: Special Topics in Non-West History - S1
This course provides specific opportunities for students to
examine chronologically, topically or geographically focused 
areas of study in Non-West History. (4)
HIST 401: Workshops – S1
Workshops in special fields for varying periods of time. (1–4)
HIST 451: American Legal History – S1
Dimensions of American law as is relates to changing historical
periods. (4)
HIST 460: West and Northwest – A, S1
The American West in the 19th and 20th centuries. Frontier 
and regional perspectives. Interpretive, illustrative history, and
opportunities for off-campus research. (4)
HIST 461: History of the West and Northwest – S1
A direct, individualized study in one’s hometown in the West or
Northwest. (4)
HIST 471: History of American Thought and Culture – S1
The history of American thought and culture from 1607 to the
present by carefully reading a number of texts and emphasizing
trends in religious, political, intellectual, and social thought. It
will focus on Protestantism and Calvinism, the Enlightenment
and republicanism, revivalism and reform, democracy and
slavery, Social Darwinism, pragmatism, Black social and political
thought, Progressivism, the New Deal, and women’s liberation. It
will investigate such topics as man’s relationship to God, the
Protestant ethic and the success myth, human nature, anti-
intellectualism, America’s place in the world, power, slavery, and
democracy. (4)
HIST 491: Independent Studies (1–4)
HIST 494: Seminar: American History – S1, SR
Prerequisite: HIST 301. (4)
HIST 495: Internship
A research and writing project in connection with a student’s
approved off-campus work or travel activity, or a dimension of it.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing plus one course in history,
and consent of the department. (1–6)
HIST 496: Seminar: The Third World – C, S1, SR
This research seminar alternates its focus from East Asia one year
to the Caribbean/Latin America the next. Prerequisite: HIST
301. (4)
HIST 497: Seminar: European History – S1, SR
Prerequisite: HIST 301. (4)
Rotate pdf pages by degrees - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
save pdf rotate pages; saving rotated pdf pages
Rotate pdf pages by degrees - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pages in pdf and save; rotate pdf pages on ipad
90
PLU 2007 - 2008
Humanities • Individualized Major
H
Division of  Humanities
253.535.7321
www.plu.edu/~huma
huma@plu.edu 
The Humanities faculty at Pacific Lutheran University are
excellent teachers and scholars who model the possibilities of the
life of the mind. The Humanities cultivates an intellectual and
imaginative connection between a living past, embodied in the
diverse array of cultural traditions, and the global challenges of
our contemporary world.
The Division of Humanities at PLU invites students to develop
critical and flexible minds as part of their becoming persons of
commitment, vision, and action in the world. Drawing on the
rich traditions of religion, philosophy, languages and literatures,
students and faculty work together to explore complex
perspectives on a variety of human concerns. Students in the
Humanities are encouraged to develop the critical and reflective
ability to:
• embrace complexity and ambiguity
• engage other peoples and perspectives
• appreciate the living past in the present and future
• engage traditions creatively and critically
• link theory and practice, and the public with the private
• seek connections among diverse cultures and academic 
disciplines
• understand themselves and consider what makes life 
worth living
In short, study in the Humanities teaches ways of living,
thinking, and being in the world. It helps students to situate
their beliefs within a wider frame of reference and to understand
and critically analyze assumptions, traditions, truths, and
histories. Study in the Humanities assists students to see their
responsibility for the quality of the lives they lead. It challenges
students to realize the importance of participating in a larger and
broader service to the common good.
F
aculty:
Oakman, Dean; faculty members of the Departments of
English, Languages and Literatures, Philosophy, and Religion.
As a division within the College of Arts and Sciences, the
Division of Humanities offers programs in each constituent
department leading to the BA degree. Course offerings and
degree requirements are listed under:
• English
• Languages and Literatures
• Philosophy
• Religion
Committed to the interdisciplinary nature of knowledge, the
Humanities supports and participates in the following programs:
Chinese Studies, Classics, Environmental Studies, Global Studies,
the International Core: Integrated Studies of the Contemporary
World, International Programs, Legal Studies, Publishing and
Printing Arts, Scandinavian Area Studies, and Women’s and
Gender Studies.
Individualized Major
253.535.7619
Supervised by the Faculty Council for Individualized Majors, this
program offers junior and senior students the opportunity to
develop and complete a personally designed, interdisciplinary,
liberal arts major. The course of study culminates in a senior thesis,
to be agreed on by the council, the student, and his or her advisor.
Successful applicants to this program will normally have a
cumulative grade point average of 3.30 or higher, although in
exceptional cases, they may demonstrate their potential in other
ways to the Faculty Council for Individualized Majors.
Admission to the Individualized Program
Admission to the program is granted by the council on the basis of
a detailed plan of study, proposed and written by the student, and
submitted to the council any time after the beginning of the
second semester of the student’s sophomore year. The proposal
must outline a complete plan of study for the time remaining until
the granting of a degree. Study plans may include any of the
traditional elements from a standard BA or BS degree program.
Once approved by both the faculty sponsor and the Faculty
Council for Individualized Majors, the study plan supplants
usual degree requirements, and, when completed, leads to
conferral of the BA degree with Special Honors.
STUDY PROPOSALS
Study proposals must include the following:
A. A Statement of Objectives, in which the student describes
what the degree is expected to represent and why the
individualized course of study is more appropriate than a
traditional degree program.
B. A Program of Study, in which the student describes how
the objectives will be attained through sequences of courses,
reading programs, regular course work, independent study,
travel, off-campus involvement, personal consultation with
faculty members, or other means.
C. A Program of Evaluation, in which the student describes
the criteria to be used to measure achievement of the
objectives and specifies the topic of the senior thesis.
D. A Statement of Review, in which the student describes how
previous course work and life experiences have prepared him
or her for the individualized study program.
E. Letters of Recommendation. The study proposal must be
written in close consultation with the chair of the Faculty
Council for Individualized Majors and with a faculty
member who agrees to act as primary sponsor and advisor
to the student throughout the course of study. The faculty
sponsor must comment on the feasibility of the proposal
and on the student’s ability to carry it out. It is strongly
recommended that a secondary faculty sponsor be asked to
co-sponsor and endorse the proposal.
All subsequent changes in the study plan or the senior thesis
must be submitted in writing to the Faculty Council for
Individualized Majors for approval.
Further information is available from the Academic Advising
Office.
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB In general, you are able to rotate any page of
change orientation of pdf page; how to save a pdf after rotating pages
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
Roate90: Rotate the currently displayed PDF page 90 degrees clockwise. Rotate180: Rotate the currently displayed PDF page 180 degrees clockwise.
how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently; how to change page orientation in pdf document
PLU 2007 - 2008
91
Instructional Development and Leadership
I
253.535.7272
www.plu.edu/~educ
educ@plu.edu
The Department of Instructional Development and Leadership
offers undergraduate programs of study leading to certification
for elementary, secondary, and special education teachers.
Additional post-baccalaureate certification is offered for
administrators. The curriculum is designed to provide graduates
with a blend of the liberal arts and a variety of guided field
experiences beginning early in the educational sequence. The
faculty is committed to the development of caring, competent
educational Leaders committed to lives of service. A consistent
emphasis of all programs is the promotion of student learning in
K-12 institutions.
F
aculty:
Lee, Dean; Lewis, Associate Dean; Hillis, Director of
Graduate Studies; Byrnes, Gerlach, Hassen, Jacks, Leitz, Nelson,
Reisberg, Thirumurthy, Weiss, Williams, Woolworth, Yetter.
PROGRAMS OFFERED
The Department of Instructional Development and Leadership is
accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher
Education (NCATE), the Northwest Association of Schools and
Colleges, and the Washington State Board of Education for the
preparation of elementary, secondary, and special education
teachers, reading specialists, and administrators, with the Master of
Arts in Education the highest degree approved. The accreditation
gives PLU graduates reciprocity with many other states.
The Department of Instructional Development and Leadership
offers coursework toward the conversion, renewal, or
reinstatement of teaching certificates. It offers various options to
add endorsements to current certificates. It also offers coursework
and support to individuals seeking Washington State Professional
Certificates or certification under the National Board of
Professional Teaching Standards.
Current graduate programs include Master of Arts in Education
(Project Lead) and Master of Arts with Residency Certification
(Project Impact).
Eligibility Requirements for Admission to Undergraduate or
Certification-Only Programs
All individuals seeking to enter an undergraduate
degree/certification or certification-only program must apply to
the Department of Instructional Development and Leadership. A
completed Department of Instructional Development and
Leadership application must be submitted to the Department of
Instructional Development and Leadership by the first Friday in
March to receive priority consideration for fall term admission.
• Specific requirements include:
• Evidence of verbal and quantitative ability as illustrated by 
a passing score on the Washington Educators Skills Test
Basic (WEST-B). Six test dates are available during the year;
Instructional Development and
Leadership
check the Department of Instructional Development and
Leadership web site for the dates.
• Official transcripts of all college/university work
• Junior standing (60 to 64 or more semester hours)
• Cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.50
• Psychology 101 or equivalent: grade of C or higher
• Writing 101 or equivalent: grade of C or higher
Application forms and procedures for admission to professional
studies in education are available from the Department of
Instructional Development and Leadership. Students who do not
meet all the admission requirements should contact the Manager
of Admissions and Advising in the School of Education and
Movement Studies Office.
Continuation in any program of study in the Department of
Instructional Development and Leadership is subject to continuous
assessment of student development and performance. Students are
required to demonstrate the mastery of knowledge, skills,
professionalism, attitudes, and dispositions required for effective
practice. Records will be reviewed at the end of each semester to
ensure students are meeting standards throughout the program.
B.A.E AND/OR CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS
• Students become candidates for certification when:
• All coursework is completed with a cumulative grade point
average of 2.50 or above and the student’s degree has been
posted.
• All coursework used to fulfill education program
requirements as part of an academic major, minor or
emphasis have been completed with a C grade or better.
• All Education HUB and auxiliary coursework have been
completed with a B- grade or better.
• All additional courses related to and required for education
programs and teacher certification have been completed
with a grade of C or better. For elementary education
students these include: MATH 123 or equivalent (must be
taken prior to EDUC 406, Term II); BIOL 111 or life
science equivalent; physical science equivalent, especially
geosciences; PHED 322 and ARTD 341 and MUSI 341.
• Passage of the WEST-E (currently the Praxis-II) in at least
one endorsement area. The WEST-E must be taken and
passed prior to student teaching.
RESIDENCY TEACHING CERTIFICATE
Students who successfully complete a program of professional
studies in the Department of Instructional Development and
Leadership, who meet all related academic requirements for a
degree or a certificate, and who meet all state requirements will
be recommended by the Department of Instructional
Development and Leadership for a Washington residency
teaching certificate. Additional state requirements include a
Washington State Patrol/FBI fingerprint check, and passing
scores on WEST-Exams. Information regarding all state
requirements and procedures for certification is available from
the Certification Officer in the Department of Instructional
Development and Leadership. State requirements are subject to
immediate change. Students should meet with Department of
Instructional Development and Leadership advisors each
semester and the Certification Officer for updates in program or
application requirements.
VB.NET TIFF: Rotate TIFF Page by Using RaterEdge .NET TIFF
formats are: JPEG, PNG, GIF, BMP, PDF, Word (Docx reImage1, 100) REFile.SaveImageFile( reImage1, "c:/rotate.png", New TIFF page(s), reorder TIFF pages ordered or
pdf rotate just one page; rotate pdf page and save
C# Word: C#.NET Word Rotator, How to Rotate and Reorient Word Page
to rotate all MS Word document pages by 90 viewer application which can help me rotate Word page by powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reverse page order pdf; pdf rotate all pages
92
PLU 2007 - 2008
Undergraduate students have several options for building
a program upon the professional education sequence,
including:
• They may earn a residency teaching certificate and an 
elementary K-8 endorsement. This requires the 
completion of the professional education sequence for
elementary education and 24 semester hour academic 
support area.
• They may earn a residency teaching certificate with an
elementary K-8 and P-12 special education endorsement.
This requires the completion of the professional
education sequence for elementary education students,
the completion of coursework required for endorsement
in special education.
• They may earn a residency teaching certificate with an
elementary K-8 endorsement and qualify for a waiver in
special education (allowing students to teach special
education after graduation for five years under the
assumption that they will complete coursework to earn
endorsement in special education during this time
period). This requires the completion of the professional
education sequence for elementary education students,
the completion of 24 semester hours in an academic area,
and coursework that addresses the special education
competencies.
Note: Information about all state endorsements, including those
in special education, reading and English as a Second Language,
can be obtained from the Manager of Admission and Advising in
the School of Education and Movement Studies.
SPECIAL EDUCATION ENDORSEMENT 
- 29 semester hours
• Course work that leads to the P-12 endorsement:
• SPED 315, 322, 404, 424, 430, 442, 450, 454, 459 
and 460
SECONDARY CERTIFICATION AND ENDORSEMENT
OPTIONS
All undergraduate students seeking secondary certification in a
content area (except those seeking certification in music and
physical education) are required to complete the following four-
term program of study.
• Professional Education Sequence
• Hub I - 11 semester hours
• EDUC 390: Inquiry into Learning I: Investigation into
Learning and Development (4)
• EDUC 392: Inquiry into Learning II: Investigation 
into Learning and Development (4)
• EDUC 394: Technology and Teaching: Laboratory (2)
• SPED 320: Issues of Child Abuse & Neglect (1)
• Hub II - 12 semester hours
• EDUC 424: Inquiry into Teaching I: Diverse Learners (4)
• EPSY 368: Educational Psychology (4)
• SPED 424: Learners with Special Needs in the General
Education Classroom (4)
• Hub III - 8 semester hours
• One course from EDUC 440-449 (4)
• EDUC 425: Inquiry into Teaching II: Diverse Learners (4)
I
Instructional Development and Leadership
ELEMENTARY CERTIFICATION AND ENDORSEMENT
OPTIONS
The basic undergraduate elementary education program consists
of a four-term program starting in the fall term of each year.
ELEMENTARY PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION SEQUENCE
-51 semester hours
• Hub I - 11 semester hours
• EDUC 390: Inquiry into Learning I: Investigation into
Learning and Development (4)
• EDUC 392: Inquiry into Learning II: Investigation into
Learning and Development (4)
• EDUC 394: Technology and Teaching (2)
• SPED 320: Issues of Child Abuse and Neglect (1)
• Hub II - 16 semester hours
• EDUC 406: Mathematics in K-8 Education (4)
• EDUC 408: Literacy in a K-8 Education (4)
• EDUC 424: Inquiry into Teaching I: Diverse 
Learners (4)
• SPED 424: Learners with Special Needs in the General
Education Classroom (4)
• Hub III - 12 semester hours
• EDUC 410: Science/Health in K-8 Education (4)
• EDUC 412: Social Studies in K-8 Education (4)
• EDUC 425: Inquiry into Teaching II: Diverse Learners (4)
Passing scores on at least one WEST-E (currently the
Praxis-II) endorsement test must be presented before a
student can enroll in HUB IV.
• Hub IV - 8 or 12 semester hours
• EDUC 430: Student Teaching in K-8 Education (10)
and EDUC 450: Inquiry into Learning and Teaching:
Reflective Practice and Seminar (2)
• Or EDUC 434: Student Teaching - Elementary (Dual)
(6) and EDUC 450: Inquiry into Learning and Teaching:
Reflective Practice and Seminar (2)
DUAL ELEMENTARY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION
- 76 semester hours
• Includes the above Elementary Education sequence (51 
semester hours), plus the following 25 semester hours in 
special education coursework:
• SPED 315: Assessment (2)
• SPED 322: Moderate Disabilities and Transitions (3)
• SPED 404: Teaming and Collaboration (3)
• SPED 430: Students with Emotional and Behavioral
Disorders (4)
• SPED 442: Technology in Special Education (2)
• SPED 450: Early Childhood Special Education (2)
• SPED 454: Students with Physical Challenges and the 
Medically Fragile (2)
• SPED 459: Student Teaching in Special Education (6)
• SPED 460: Special Education Student Teaching 
Seminar: Issues in Practice (1)
• The Professional Education sequence forms the foundation
of the program for all students seeking certification as an
elementary education (K-8) multi-subject teacher.
VB.NET Word: VB.NET Code to Rotate Word Page Within .NET Imaging
Here, we can recommend you VB.NET PDF page rotating tutorial and multi 0 to 360 degrees using VB code; Able to rotate multiple desired Word pages at the
how to rotate page in pdf and save; how to permanently rotate pdf pages
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
web viewer, users can click rotation button to rotate PDF page 90, 180 and 270 degrees in clockwise erase PDF text, erase PDF images and erase PDF pages online
rotate all pages in pdf file; how to rotate just one page in pdf
PLU 2007 - 2008
93
• Passing scores on at least one endorsement test (WEST-E)
must be presented before a student can enroll in HUB IV.
• Hub IV - 12-14 semester hours
• EDUC 450: Inquiry into Learning and Teaching:
Reflective Practice and Seminar Education (2)
• EDUC 466: Student Teaching - Secondary (Dual) (7)
and SPED 439: Student Teaching in Secondary School (5)
or EDUC 468: Student Teaching - Secondary (10)
Note: Special Education majors should meet with Associate Dean
prior to student teaching.
• The professional education sequence forms the foundation of
the program for all students seeking certification in a content
area (except music and physical education students).
Undergraduate students seeking certification/ endorsement in
a content area (usually to teach in grades 5-12) have several
options for building a program upon the professional
education sequence, including:
• They may earn a residency teaching certificate with a
secondary endorsement in a content area. This requires the
completion of the professional education sequence for
secondary education students and a teaching major or
academic major that meets state endorsement requirements.
• They may earn a residency teaching certificate with a
secondary endorsement in a content area and an
endorsement in special education. This requires the
completion of the professional education sequence for
secondary education students, a teaching major or academic
major and coursework required for endorsement in special
education.
Note: Secondary teaching majors and minors are designed to
align with state endorsement requirements and to meet specific
departmental standards for majors and minors. Course and hour
requirements for teaching and/or academic majors vary according
to department requirements.
• Certification in Music or Health and Fitness
• Undergraduates have the option of completing programs that
lead to bachelor’s degrees in music, as well as health and
fitness or residency teaching certificates. All individuals
seeking a Bachelor of Music Education or a Bachelor of Arts
in Physical Education with a residency teaching certificate
must apply and be accepted into the Department of
Instructional Development and Leadership. They must also
complete the following courses:
• Music education majors must complete EDUC 391 
(offered every fall), EPSY 361 (offered every spring),
SPED 320, and all other course requirements specified by
the Department of Music.
• Students seeking a Bachelor of Arts in Physical Education
must complete EDUC 390 and 392, SPED 320, and all
other requirements specified by the Department of
Movement Studies and Wellness Education.
• Preparation for Teaching in Christian Schools
Students interested in teaching in private or Christian schools
will begin their professional preparation by completing all
requirements for the Washington State Residency Certificate.
In addition, they are required to take the Religion minor
(Teacher Education option) noted under the Religion
I
Instructional Development and Leadership
department course offerings, plus add a private school
practicum to their program.
• Early Advising Options
During the first or sophomore year, prospective Department of
Instructional Development and Leadership majors should
meet with the Manager of Admissions and Advising and/or the
Associate Dean in the Department of Instructional
Development and Leadership to discuss the various options
listed above and to determine their program of study.
• Certification/Endorsement Options for Persons who hold a
Baccalaureate Degree from a Regionally Accredited
Institution
• Persons who hold a baccalaureate degree (or higher) from a
regionally accredited institution and who wish to pursue a
teaching certificate should make an appointment with the
Manager of Admissions and Advising or the Director of
Graduate Studies for a planning session. Options for these
individuals include:
• Certification-only Program or Alternate Routes to
Certification Program. Typically classes in such a program
would be taken in the undergraduate program.
• Master of Arts in Education with Residency Certification
Program. This 14-month cohort program leads to an MA
degree with residency certification and selected
endorsements. Participants move through this full-time
program as a cohort. As a part of their program, they
complete a yearlong internship with a cadre of colleagues
in a local school.
• Alternative Routes to Certification Program (additional
requirements may apply). For information on these
options, see the Department of Instructional
Development and Leadership website or contact the
Manager of Admissions and Advising.
• Professional Teaching Certificate
Certificate requirements in Washington changed on August
31, 2000. The following guidelines govern certification after
that date.
• All teachers earning certification in Washington after 
August 31, 2000 will receive a Residency Teaching Certificate.
• Within a five-year period, after completing the probationary
period for teaching in one district, teachers in Washington
must earn a Professional Certificate. (WAC 180-79A-145)
• Qualifications for the Professional Certificate include:
• To qualify for a Professional Certificate, an individual
must have completed provisional status as a teacher in a
public school pursuant to RCW 28A.405.220 or the
equivalent in a state board of education approved private
school.
• Candidates for the Professional Certificate must complete
an approved Professional Certificate program, which has
been collaboratively developed by the college/university
and the respective Professional Education Advisory Board
(PEAB).
• The candidate must successfully demonstrate competency
in three standards (i.e., Effective Teaching, Professional
Development, and leadership) and the 12 criteria relevant
to the three standards. (WAC 180-79A-206-3 and WAC
180-78A-500-540)
• The Professional Certificate is valid for five years. It may be
Customize, Process Image in .NET Winforms| Online Tutorials
Click "Flip Vertical" to rotate images 180 degrees vertically; More Tutorials! Find more user guides with RasteEdge .NET Image in .NET Winforms applications!
rotate pdf page permanently; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
the order of images & file pages by dragging & used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page This JavaScript API is used to rotate the current
rotate individual pdf pages reader; how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview
94
PLU 2007 - 2008
• Science, Designated
• Biology (5-12)
• Chemistry (5-12)
• Earth Science (5-12)
• Physics (5-12)
• Social Studies (5-12)
• Special Education (P-12)
• Visual Arts (P-12)
• World Languages, Designated
• Chinese (P-12)
• French (P-12)
• German (P-12)
• Norwegian (P-12)
• Spanish (P-12)
Note: The fact that the Department of Instructional
Development and Leadership is authorized to issue certain
endorsements does not indicate that Pacific Lutheran University
has a specified program of study leading to these endorsements.
Listed below are general endorsement requirements followed by a
list of teaching majors, teaching minors or programs of study
that lead to an endorsement.
If there is any question about whether a course not listed below
can be substitute for an endorsement requirement, the candidate
must provide evidence that the course covers a particular essential
area of study. Evidence might include (but is not limited to) a
catalog course description, syllabus, letter from the instructor,
portfolio or presentation of course products.
Note: After September 1, 2005 candidates must pass WEST-E
exams in appropriate endorsement exams.
TEACHING ENDORSEMENTS
Arts - Visual Arts
• State Endorsement Requirements:
• Skills and techniques in multiple media (painting,
sculpture, drawing, computer, photography)
• Composition and production using design principles
• Analysis and interpretation of art
• Social, cultural and historical contexts and connections
• Material, equipment and facilities safety
• Secondary teaching major leading to an endorsement in 
Visual Arts (all levels) - 36 semester hours
• ARTD 160; 180 or 181; 196, 226, 250, 296, 341, 
365, 440
Biology
• State Endorsement Requirements:
• Botany/lab
• Zoology/lab
• Genetics
• Microbiology or Cell Biology/lab
• Chemistry/lab
• Ecology
• Evolution
• Lab safety, practice and management
• Lab, inquiry-based experience
• Contemporary, historical, technological, societal issues
and concepts
I
Instructional Development and Leadership
renewed through the completion of 150 clock hours. The
clock hours must be related to:
• The six state salary criteria used to identify appropriate
clock hours.
• One of the three standards required for the Professional
Certificate.
• Teachers who held a valid Initial Certificate as of August 
31, 2000 will be allowed to have one more renewal of their
Initial Certificate before they must meet requirements for
the Professional Certificate.
• Teachers who hold a Continuing Certificate as of August
31, 2000 will not be affected by changes in certification
requirements.
Note: Information about the Washington State Professional
Certificate and Pacific Lutheran University’s Professional
Certification program is available in the Department of
Instructional Development and Leadership Office. Individuals
should contact the Manager of Admissions and Advising to
discuss options available to them.
GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL OPTIONS FOR
EDUCATORS
The Department of Instructional Development and Leadership
offers professional development programs that allow educators to
earn professional and/or National Board of Professional Teaching
Standards Certificates. Up to four semester hours from these
programs can be applied to a master’s degree program. Current
emphasis/option in the MA program for educators includes the
Master of Arts in Classroom Teaching: Project Lead.
The Department of Instructional Development and Leadership
also offers certification-only programs in educational
administration and programs that will enable teachers to add
additional endorsement in shortage areas such as special
education, reading, English as a Second Language, and specific
content areas.
Detailed information about these options can be found in the
Graduate Studies section of this catalog. Information about
current and anticipated graduate and professional options can be
obtained from the Manager of Admissions and Advising in the
School of Education and Movement Studies.
• Endorsement Requirements and Undergraduate Programs of 
Study that Lead to Endorsements
Endorsement requirements are established by the State of
Washington. Pacific Lutheran University’s Department of
Instructional Development and Leadership currently is
authorized to offer the following endorsements:
• Early Childhood Education (in conjunction with 
coursework at an approved community college)
• English/Language Arts (5-12)
• English as a Second Language (P-12) (in conjunction
with the Washington Academy of Languages).
• Elementary (multisubject, K-8)
• Health and Fitness (P-12)
• History (5-12)
• Mathematics (5-12)
• Music: Choral (P-12); General (P-12); Instrumental 
(P-12)
• Science (5-12)
C# Image: C# Image Web Viewer Processing Tutorial; Process Web Doc
Basic .NET program and process web pages within image In order to rotate a current web image or powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf rotate pages and save; pdf rotate page
PLU 2007 - 2008
95
• Secondary Teaching Major leading to an Endorsement in
Biology - 32 semester hours
• BIOL 161, 162, 323; 328 or 348; 332 or 407; 340;
424 or 475
• CHEM 105 or 115
Chemistry
• State Endorsement Requirements
• General principles of chemistry - inorganic, physical 
and analytical/lab
• Organic chemistry/lab
• Quantitative analysis/lab
• Biochemistry/lab
• Physics
• Laboratory safety, practice and management
• Lab, inquiry-based experience
• Relationship of the concepts of science to contemporary, 
historical, technological and societal issues
• Secondary Teaching Major Leading to an Endorsement 
in Chemistry - 62 semester hours
• CHEM 115, 116; 331, 332; 333, 334; 320, 341, 342, 
343, 344, 403
• PHYS 153, 154; 163, 164
• Required Supporting: MATH 151, 152
Earth Science
• State Endorsement Requirements
• Physical geology
• Historical geology
• Environmental issues related to earth sciences
• Oceanography
• Astronomy
• Meteorology
• Lab safety, practice and management
• Lab, inquiry-based experience
• Relationship of the concepts of science to contemporary, 
historical, technological and societal issues
• Secondary Teaching Major Leading to an Endorsement
in Earth Science - 48 semester hours
• GEOS 102; 103 or 104; 105, 201
• PHYS 110, 125, 135
• Four semester hours from MATH 140 or higher or
CSCE 144
• 12 semester hours from upper-division Geosciences 
courses
• CHEM 104 or 115
English and English Language Arts
• State Endorsement Requirements
• Reading
• Writing
• Communication
• Linguistics
• American, British, world, multicultural and adolescent
literature
• Secondary Teaching Major Leading to a Primary 
Endorsement in English/Language Arts - 40 semester 
hours
• ENGL 214 or 215
• COMA 212 and 213 or 312
• ENGL 241, 251, 301, 403
I
Instructional Development and Leadership
• THEA 250 or 458
• Four semester hours from ENGL 224, 225, 227, 326, 328
• Four semester hours from ENGL 216, 218, 230, 233, 343
• Four semester hours from ENGL 221, 325, 327, 341, 374
English as a Second Language (ESL)
• State Endorsement Requirements
• Language acquisition theory
• Cross-cultural teaching and learning strategies
• Literacy development (reading, writing, listening 
and speaking)
• History and theory of ESL
• Instructional strategies for ESL
Information regarding specific course requirements can be
obtained from the Manager of Admissions and Advising in the
School of Education and Movement Studies.
Health and Fitness
• State Endorsement Requirements
• Foundations of health and fitness
• Safe living, including first aid and CPR
• Scientific foundations for health and fitness (anatomy,
exercise, physiology, kinesiology/biomechanics,
psychomotor maturation and development and motor
learning)
• Movement, activities and application with attention to
special needs populations
• Coordinator health education (alcohol and other drugs,
diseases, injury prevention, human relationships,
nutrition, HIV prevention and abuse prevention)
Please see requirements for Bachelor of Arts in Physical
Education (BAPE) with Certification under Department of
Movement Studies and Wellness Education.
History
• State Endorsement Requirements
• Pacific Northwest history
• United States history
• World history
• Civics/political science/United States government
• Geography
• Economics
• Secondary Teaching Major Leading to an Endorsement
in History - 32 semester hours
• HIST 301, 460 or 461
• Four semester hours from HIST 107, 108 or 215
• Eight semester hours of upper-division electives in
U.S./European history
• Four semester hours of upper-division electives in non-
Western history from HIST 335, 337, 338, 339, 
340, 344
• Eight semester hours from HIST 251, 252, 253
Mathematics
• State Endorsement Requirements
• Geometry (Euclidean and non-Euclidean)
• Probability and statistics
• Calculus (integral and differential)
• Discrete mathematics
• Logic and problem solving
• History of math or foundations of math
96
PLU 2007 - 2008
I
• Secondary Teaching Major Leading to an Endorsement 
Social Sciences - 20 semester hours
• HIST 460 or 461
• Eight semester hours from HIST 251, 252, 253
• Four semester hours from HIST 107, 108
• Four semester hours from HIST 335, 337, 338, 339, 
340, 344
• POLS 151
• Twelve semester hours; four from each of the following
lines:
• Any anthropology course other than ANTH 102 or 210
• Any psychology course other than PSYC 101
• SOCI 101 or 330
• Four semester hours from ECON 101 or 102, 111
Special Education
• State Endorsement Requirements
• Exceptionality
• Curriculum modification and adaptation
• Inclusion
• Assessment, including behavior analysis, Individualized 
Education Plan (IEP), accommodations
• Legal issues
• Specially designed instruction in all content areas
• Pro-social skills and behavioral problems
• School, family, community partnerships
• Transition
• Organization and management systems
• Methods in early childhood education
• Collaboration with para-educators
For P-12, see Special Education section in this catalog for
endorsement requirements.
Information regarding the Special Education waiver can be
obtained from the Manager of Admissions and Advising in the
School of Education and Movement Studies.
World Languages
• State Endorsement Requirements
• Communication - speaks, understands, reads and writes
in a variety of contexts and situations
• Culture
• Interdisciplinary integration
• Language acquisition theory
• Methodological study
• Chinese - 28 semester hours
• CHIN 101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 371; LANG 445
• French - Secondary Teaching Major Leading to an
Endorsement - 32 semester hours
• FREN 201, 202, 301, 302, 321, 421, 422; LANG 445
• German - Second Teaching Major Leading to an 
Endorsement - 32 semester hours
• GERM 201, 202, 301, 302, 321, 421, 422; LANG 445
• Spanish - Secondary Teaching Major Leading to an 
Endorsement - 32 semester hours
• SPAN 201, 202, 301, 321, 325
• Eight semester hours from SPAN 421, 422, 431, 432;
LANG 445
Instructional Development and Leadership
• Secondary Teaching Major Leading to an Endorsement 
in Mathematics - 40 or 41 semester hours
• MATH 151, 152, 203, 253, 317, 321, 331, 341, 433;
351 or 356
• OR PHYS 153, 163
Music
• State Endorsement Requirements
• Choral music, General music, Instrumental music
See requirements for Bachelor of Music Education under 
Music.
Physics
• State Endorsement Requirements
• General principles of physics/lab
• Lab safety, practice and management
• Lab, inquiry-based experience
• Relationships of the concepts of science to contemporary,
historical, technological and societal issues
• Secondary Teaching Major Leading to an Endorsement 
in Physics - 38 semester hours
• PHYS 153, 163; 154, 164; 240, 331, 336, 354
• MATH 151, 152, 253
Reading
• State Endorsement Requirements
• Assessment and diagnosis of reading skills and deficiencies
• Strategies of how to teach reading
• Language acquisition/integration
• Social/cultural contexts for literacy
• Reading process, including decoding, encoding and student 
response to child and adolescent literature
• Beginning literacy (reading, writing, spelling and 
communication)
• Reading in the content areas
• Literacy for a second language learner
• Meta-cognitive strategies
• Risk factors for reading difficulties and intervention
strategies for students experiencing reading difficulties.
Information regarding specific course requirements can be
obtained form the Manager of Admissions and Advising in the
School of Education and Movement Studies.
Science
• State Endorsement Requirements
• A primary endorsement in biology, chemistry, earth science
or physics (as described under designated sciences)
• A minimum of one course from each of the other
designated sciences.
Social Sciences
• State Endorsement Requirements
• Pacific Northwest history
• United States history, including chronological, thematic, 
multicultural, ethnic and women’s history
• World, regional or country history
• Geography
• Political science, civics or government
• Anthropology, psychology or sociology
• Economics
PLU 2007 - 2008
97
I
Course Offerings – Education (EDUC)
EDUC 205: Multicultural Perspectives in the Classroom - A
Examination of issues of race, class, gender, sexual orientation,
etc. as they relate to educational practices. (4)
EDUC 262: Foundations of Education
Introduction to teaching; historical, philosophical, social, political,
ethical and legal foundations. Federal and state legislation for
special populations. Concurrent with EDUC 263. (3)
EDUC 263: School Observation
Graded observation in schools. Concurrent with EDUC 262. (1)
EDUC 385: Comparative Education - C
Comparison and investigation of materials and cultural systems
of education throughout the world. Emphasis on applying
knowledge for greater understanding of diverse populations in
the K-12 educational system. (4)
EDUC 390: Inquiry into Learning I: Investigation into
Learning and Development
Investigation into theories of learning and development and into
historical and current practices, values, and beliefs that influence
efforts to shape learning in educational settings. Topics include:
self as learner, theories of learning, others as learners,
exceptionalities, technology, values, literacy and factors
influencing learning and literacy (fieldwork included).
Concurrent with EDUC 392. (4)
EDUC 391: Foundations of Learning
Investigation into theories of learning and development and into
historical and current practices, values, and beliefs that influence
efforts to shape learning in educational settings. Topics include:
self as learner, theories of learning, others as learners,
exceptionalities, technology, values literacy and factors
influencing learning and literacy. Limited to music education
majors. (3)
EDUC 392: Inquiry into Learning II: Investigation into
Learning and Development
Continued investigation into theories of learning and
development and into historical and current practices, values,
and beliefs that influence efforts to shape learning in educational
settings. Topics include: self as learner, theories of learning,
others as learners, exceptionalities, technology, values, literacy
and factors influencing learning and literacy (fieldwork
included). Concurrent with EDUC 390. (4)
EDUC 394: Technology and Teaching: Laboratory
Laboratory in which students explore instructional uses of
technology and develop and apply various skills and
competencies. Concurrent with EDUC 390. (2)
EDUC 406: Mathematics in K-8 Education
Exploration of mathematical principles and practices consistent
with NCTM curriculum standards. For elementary students.
Practicum included, concurrent with EDUC 408 and EDUC
424. (4)
EDUC 408: Literacy in K-8 Education
Participation in the development of appropriate curricular
strategies and instructional methods for supporting the diversity
Instructional Development and Leadership
of learners’ language/literacy growth. For elementary students.
Practicum included, concurrent with EDUC 406 and EDUC
424. (4)
EDUC 410: Science/Health in K-8 Education
Strategies for teaching science by using inquiry methods and
problem-solving techniques will be employed to explore
interactive curricula from an environmental point of view. Issues
of nutrition and health. Practicum included, concurrent with
EDUC 412 and EDUC 425. (4)
EDUC 411: Strategies for Language/Literacy Development
Cross-listed with EDUC 511. (2)
EDUC 412: Social Studies in K-8 Education
Focus on drawing connections between the content of social
studies curricula and the lived experiences of human lives.
Practicum included. Concurrent with EDUC 410 and EDUC
425. (4)
EDUC 413: Language/Literacy Development: Assessment and
Instruction
Cross-listed with EDUC 513. (4)
EDUC 424: Inquiry into Teaching I: Diverse Learners
Focus on general principles of instructional design and delivery
with special emphasis on reading and language, assessment,
adaptation, and classroom management. For elementary and
secondary students not majoring in music or physical education.
For elementary students, concurrent with EDUC 406 and
EDUC 408. (4)
EDUC 425: Inquiry into Teaching II: Diverse Learners
Extension and expansion of ideas introduced in 424. Continued
emphasis on instructional design and delivery with a focus on
reading and language, assessment, adaptation, and classroom
management. For elementary and secondary students outside of
music and physical education, concurrent with EDUC 410 and
EDUC 412. (4)
EDUC 426: Special Topics in Children’s Literature
Cross-listed with EDUC 526. (2)
EDUC 427: Multicultural Children’s Literature
Cross-listed with EDUC 527. (2)
EDUC 428: Children’s Literature in the K-8 Curriculum
Cross-listed with EDUC 528. (2)
EDUC 429: Adolescent Literature in the Secondary
Curriculum
Cross-listed with EDUC 529. (2)
EDUC 430: Student Teaching in K-8 Education - SR
Teaching in classrooms of local public schools under the direct
supervision of School of Education faculty and classroom
teachers. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Education
courses Terms I-III. Concurrent with EDUC 450. (10)
EDUC 434: Student Teaching - Elementary (Dual) - SR
Designed for persons who do dual student teaching. Ten weeks
of teaching in classrooms of local public schools under the direct
supervision of School of Education faculty and classroom
teachers. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Education
courses Terms I-III. Concurrent with EDUC 450. (6) 
98
PLU 2007 - 2008
I
EDUC 457: The Arts, Media, and Technology
Students use a variety of techniques, equipment, and materials to
explore ways of seeing and expressing how they see and
experience their environment. (2)
EDUC 466: Student Teaching - Secondary (Dual) - SR
Designed for students who do dual student teaching. Ten weeks
of teaching in classrooms of local public schools under the direct
supervision of School of Education faculty and classroom
teachers (taken with SPED 439, 5 hours, and EDUC 450, 4
hours) (secondary students). (7)
EDUC 468: Student Teaching - Secondary - SR
Teaching in public schools under the direction of classroom and
university teachers. Prerequisites: formal application; senior
standing; cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher. Concurrent with
EDUC 450. (10)
EDUC 470: Curriculum, Materials and Instruction for
Teaching English as a Second Language
Application of language teaching methodology to various
instructional situations. Cross-listed with LANG 470. (4)
EDUC 473: Parent-Teacher Relationships
Issues and skills important in conferencing and parent-teacher
relationships. (2)
EDUC 485: The Gifted Child
A study of the gifted child, characteristics and problems, and
school procedures designed to further development. (2)
EDUC 490: Acquisition and Development of Language
Investigation of how young children acquire their first language
and what they know as a result of this learning. Cross-listed with
EDUC 510. (2)
EDUC 491: Independent Study (1 to 4)
EDUC 493: Effective Tutoring Methods
A practical course for students interested in applying theories of
learning to one-on-one tutoring situations and receiving training
about group dynamics and communication styles for
presentations and group sessions. Readings, role-playing exercises,
research, student presentations, class discussion, and continuous
written reflection. (1)
EDUC 495: Internship (1 to 12)
EDUC 496: Laboratory Workshop
Practical course using elementary-age children in a classroom
situation working out specific problems; provision will be made
for some active participation of the university students.
Prerequisites: Conference with the instructor or the dean of the
School of Education. 
EDUC 497: Special Project
Individual study and research on education problems or
additional laboratory experience in public school classrooms.
Prerequisite: Consent of the dean. (1-4)
Educational Psychology
See the Educational Psychology (EPSY) section of this catalog to view
course offerings.
Instructional Development and Leadership
EDUC 436: Alternate Level Student Teaching - Elementary
Designed to give some knowledge, understanding, and study of
children, subject matter fields, and materials in the student’s
alternate teaching level plus student teaching on that level.
Students who have completed secondary preferred-level student
teaching should enroll in this course. (6)
EDUC 437: Alternate Level Student Teaching - 
Secondary - SR
Designed to give some knowledge, understanding, and study of
children, subject matter fields, and materials in the student’s
alternate teaching level plus student teaching on that level.
Students who have completed elementary preferred level student
teaching should enroll in this course. Independent study card
required. (6)
EDUC 438: Strategies for Whole Literacy Instruction (K-12)
Cross-listed with EDUC 538. (2)
EDUC 440: Art in the Secondary School
Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning,
curriculum, and other considerations specific to the disciplines. (4)
EDUC 444: English in the Secondary School
Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning,
curriculum, and other considerations specific to the disciplines. (4)
EDUC 445: Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages and
English as a Second Language
Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning,
curriculum, and other considerations specific to the disciplines.
Required for foreign language endorsement. (4)
EDUC 446: Mathematics in the Secondary School (4)
Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning,
curriculum, and other considerations specific to the 
disciplines. (4)
EDUC 447: Science in the Secondary School (4)
Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning,
curriculum, and other considerations specific to the disciplines. (4)
EDUC 448: Social Studies in the Secondary School (4)
Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning,
curriculum, and other considerations specific to the disciplines. (4)
EDUC 449: Computer Science in the Secondary School (4)
Instructional strategies, long- and short-range planning,
curriculum, and other considerations specific to the disciplines. (4)
EDUC 450: Inquiry into Learning and Teaching: Reflective
Practice Seminar
A seminar for all education students (except music and physical
education) focusing development of professionalism and
competence in inquiry and reflective practice (elementary and
secondary). Taken with student teaching Term IV Hub. (2) 
EDUC 456: Storytelling
A combination of discovery and practicum in the art of story-
telling. Investigates the values and background of storytelling, the
various types of and forms of stories, techniques of choosing and
of telling stories. Some off-campus practice. Demonstrations and
joint storytelling by and with instructor. (2)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested