display pdf in iframe mvc : Save pdf rotated pages Library control class asp.net web page html ajax 2009-05_dpctw0-part287

Technology Watch Report 
Preserving Geospatial Data 
Guy McGarva 
EDINA, University of Edinburgh 
Steve Morris 
North Carolina State University (NCSU) 
Greg Janée 
University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) 
DPC Technology Watch Series Report 09-01 
May 2009 
© 2009 
Save pdf rotated pages - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate one page in pdf reader; rotate pages in pdf
Save pdf rotated pages - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate one page in pdf; save pdf rotated pages
Executive Summary: 
Geospatial data are becoming an increasingly important component in decision 
making processes and planning efforts across a broad range of industries and 
information sectors. The amount and variety of data is rapidly increasing and, while 
much of this data is at risk of being lost or becoming unusable, there is a growing 
recognition of the importance of being able to access historical geospatial data, now 
and in the future, in order to be able to examine social, environmental and economic 
processes and changes that occur over time.   
The geospatial domain is characterized by a broad range of information types, 
including geographic information systems data, remote sensing imagery, three-
dimensional representations and other location-based information. The scope of this 
report is limited to two-dimensional geospatial data and data that would typically be 
considered comparable to paper maps or charts including vector data, raster data and 
spatial databases.  
There are a number of significant preservation issues that relate specifically to 
geospatial data, including:  
  the complexity and variety of data formats and structures;  
  the abundance of content that exists in proprietary formats;  
  the need to maintain the technical and social contexts in which the data exists;  
  and the growing importance of web services and dynamic (and ephemeral) 
data.   
Standards for geospatial metadata have been defined at both the national and 
international levels, yet metadata often becomes dissociated from the data, or is 
incorrect, non-standard in nature, or not created in the first place. Additional 
considerations to be taken into account in preserving geospatial data include 
coordinate reference systems, cartographic representations, topology, project files and 
data packaging. 
Standards bodies are in place at the national and international levels to address 
general geospatial data standardization issues, yet working groups addressing 
preservation issues have only recently been formed. A number of technologies and 
tools that are, or may be, of relevance to geospatial data preservation efforts have 
emerged, although the nature of the problem is such that there is not a single tool or 
technology that will be relevant in all cases.   
A number of projects and activities have been addressing various aspects of geospatial 
data preservation, creating an initial body of experience from which some initial 
recommendations can be made. While these recommendations provide a basic 
checklist of issues to be considered when preserving geospatial data, it must be 
emphasized that the collective experience in preserving such data is still very much in 
an early stage and that further investigations are needed. 
Keywords: 
Geographic Information Systems, geospatial data, preservation, spatial databases, 
geospatial formats, web mapping services 
VB.NET TIFF: Rotate TIFF Page by Using RaterEdge .NET TIFF
specific formats are: JPEG, PNG, GIF, BMP, PDF, Word (Docx Save the rotated page(s) to new a TIFF Multiple image formats support for saving rotated TIFF page(
rotate all pages in pdf and save; pdf rotate single page reader
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
VB.NET image rotator control SDK allows developers to save rotated image as are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
rotate a pdf page; pdf rotate single page and save
Contents: 
1
Introduction: why preserve geospatial data? ................................................................................... 4
2
Background: key challenges with geospatial data ........................................................................... 4
3
Geospatial Data Preservation Issues ............................................................................................... 6
3.1
Generic Geospatial Data Issues ............................................................................................. 6
3.1.1
Coordinate Reference Systems ......................................................................................... 6
3.1.2
Cartographic Representation ............................................................................................ 7
3.1.3
Topology ........................................................................................................................... 7
3.1.4
Project Files ...................................................................................................................... 8
3.1.5
Data Packaging ................................................................................................................. 8
3.2
Vector Data ........................................................................................................................... 9
3.2.1
Commercial Vector Data Formats .................................................................................... 9
3.2.2
Open Vector Data Formats ............................................................................................. 11
3.3
Raster Data .......................................................................................................................... 13
3.3.1
Georeferencing and Rectification ................................................................................... 13
3.3.2
Compression ................................................................................................................... 13
3.3.3
Raster Formats ................................................................................................................ 14
3.3.4
Mosaicked Raster Data ................................................................................................... 15
3.3.5
Stereo, Oblique and Ground-Level Imagery ................................................................... 15
3.3.6
Raster Data Size .............................................................................................................. 16
3.4
Emerging Data Formats ....................................................................................................... 16
3.4.1
KML ............................................................................................................................... 16
3.4.2
PDF and GeoPDF ........................................................................................................... 17
3.5
Spatial Databases ................................................................................................................. 17
3.5.1
ESRI Geodatabases ......................................................................................................... 18
3.6
Dynamic Geospatial Data .................................................................................................... 19
3.6.1
Web Map Services (WMS) ............................................................................................. 19
3.6.2
Web Feature Services (WFS) ......................................................................................... 20
3.6.3
Other OGC Web Services ............................................................................................... 20
3.7
Legal Issues ......................................................................................................................... 20
3.7.1
UK Legal Landscape ...................................................................................................... 21
3.7.2
US Legal Landscape ....................................................................................................... 22
3.7.3
‗Open‘ Geospatial Data .................................................................................................. 22
3.8
Geospatial Metadata ............................................................................................................ 22
3.8.1
Metadata Standards ......................................................................................................... 23
3.8.2
Metadata Challenges for Archives .................................................................................. 23
3.8.3
Geospatial Metadata vs. Preservation Metadata ............................................................. 24
3.8.4
Metadata Creation ........................................................................................................... 25
4
Standards Bodies and Working Groups ........................................................................................ 25
4.1
Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) .................................................................................. 25
4.1.1
OGC Data Preservation Working Group ........................................................................ 25
4.2
U.S. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) ............................................................ 26
4.2.1
FGDC Historical Data Working Group .......................................................................... 26
5
Technology and Tools ................................................................................................................... 26
5.1
Digital Globe Tools ............................................................................................................. 26
5.2
Geospatial Format Registries and Validation Tools ............................................................ 27
5.3
ESRI Geodatabase Archiving .............................................................................................. 27
5.4
Digital Repository Software ................................................................................................ 27
6
Conclusions and Recommendations ............................................................................................. 28
7
Glossary of Acronyms .................................................................................................................. 29
8
Selected References and Resources .............................................................................................. 30
8.1
Current Activities and Projects ............................................................................................ 31
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB Tiff page, like sorting and saving the rotated Tiff page 0); page.Rotate(RotateOder.Clockwise90); doc.Save(@"C:\rotate
how to rotate pdf pages and save; permanently rotate pdf pages
How to C#: Rotate Image according to Specified angle
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Twain, VB Save the rotated image to
rotate pdf pages by degrees; rotate pages in pdf permanently
 Introduction: why preserve geospatial data? 
Several influential reports have recently been produced highlighting the current and 
future importance of geospatial data. In the US the National Geospatial Advisory 
Committee produced the report ―The Changing Geospatial Landscape‖
1
which 
provides a history of the developments in the geospatial industry and possible future 
directions. In the UK the ―Place matters: the Location Strategy for the United 
Kingdom‖
2
report highlighted the importance of geographic information to the UK. 
Although not directly addressing geospatial data preservation, these reports show the 
increased awareness and value of geospatial data to a wide range of users. 
Geospatial data inherits the preservation challenges inherent to all digital information. 
This report does not attempt to address the more general aspects of digital 
preservation. Focus is instead given to significant issues and technologies which relate 
specifically to preservation and management of geospatial data. 
The geospatial domain is characterized by a broad range of information types, with 
content types such as geographic information systems data and remote sensing 
imagery increasingly being complemented by three-dimensional representations and 
other location-based information. The scope of this report is limited to two-
dimensional geospatial data and data that would typically be considered comparable 
to paper maps or charts but which may be supplied in various forms including raster, 
vector, database or dynamically through web services. 
This report is mainly aimed at repository and archive managers and digital 
preservation specialists who are increasingly dealing with geospatial data; however it 
will also be useful to geospatial data specialists, academics and researchers who are 
becoming involved with the preservation challenges of geospatial data.  
 Background: key challenges with geospatial data 
Geospatial data, also termed ‗geographic information‘ or ‗spatial data‘ depending on 
the context, can be defined as data that describe features on the earth. Typically 
datasets such as transportation networks, property boundaries, coastlines, aerial 
imagery, or terrain models can all be considered to be geospatial data. 
When discussing geospatial data it is useful to have an understanding of Geographic 
Information Systems (GIS). There are many textbooks
3
available that can provide in-
depth information and online resources such as the GIS Files
4
from Ordnance Survey 
can give a brief introduction to the subject. GIS are the software environments that are 
commonly used to create, visualise, edit and analyse geospatial data. There are a wide 
variety of GIS available from commercial suppliers as well as open source projects. 
They range from simple, general purpose, web-based clients to large, highly complex, 
1
http://www.fgdc.gov/ngac/NGAC%20Report%20-
%20The%20Changing%20Geospatial%20Landscape.pdf
2
http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/communities/locationstrategy
3
For example: Geographic Information Systems and Science 
by Paul Longley, Michael F. Goodchild, David Maguire, David Rhind (Wiley, 2001) or An 
Introduction to Geographical Information Systems  
by Ian Heywood, Sarah Cornelius, Steve Carver (Prentice Hall, 2006) 
4
http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/gisfiles/
VB.NET Imaging - Data Matrix Plug-in SDK Control
Generated Data Matrix barcode image can be freely rotated, resized and code page.AddImage(image, New PointF(100F, 100F)) docx.Save("C:\\Sample_Barcode.pdf").
reverse page order pdf online; rotate all pages in pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
documents, CSV file and Text file are allowed to be rotated. PowerPoint (.ppt, .pptx) on webpage, Convert CSV to PDF file online Users can save annotations to
how to rotate a page in pdf and save it; rotate pages in pdf online
integrated systems aimed at specific application domains. The sheer variety of types 
of geospatial data, taken together with the variety of GIS used to manipulate that data, 
is one of the main factors in making the preservation of geospatial data a highly 
complex issue. 
GIS applications excel at conflating (or combining) data from multiple sources 
including data with different accuracy levels and based on different geographic 
referencing systems, for example combining terrain models, aerial imagery and 
transportation networks, regardless of whether these combinations are compatible or 
whether the results obtained are warranted. For these reasons it is important that key 
metadata such as coordinate referencing systems and accuracy measures are recorded 
and preserved along with the data. 
Additional preservation risk arises from the inherent nature of geospatial data itself:  
 
Geospatial data spans a wide variety of data structures: vector and 
raster; unstructured and topological; over domains both discrete and continuous. 
Geospatial applications and data formats support differing subsets and aspects of 
these data structures, and to varying degrees. Attempts at defining a universal data 
model for geospatial data have been made (for example the Spatial Data Transfer 
Standard (SDTS)
5
) but have not achieved widespread adoption. As a consequence, 
it is not possible to speak of ―geospatial data‖ as a single type of information that 
can be handled by multiple, functionally equivalent applications and formats. 
 
In contrast to textual information, which can be successfully modelled 
using multi-page (hyper) textual documents as the sole granule size, geospatial 
data are regularly processed at varying levels of granularity. The granule sizes 
range from individual features having geographic location, geometry, and related 
attributes; to homogeneous, thematic layers of features; to integrated, 
heterogeneous databases. Data can be aggregated, disaggregated, and operated on 
with fluidity. Each of these granule sizes has its uses, affords different 
functionalities, and poses different preservation challenges. As a consequence, 
there is no single preservation problem for geospatial data; instead, choosing 
which level or levels of granularity to address, and therefore identifying the 
preservation problem(s), is a first step in the process. 
 
Many, if not most, geospatial formats are proprietary and therefore 
closely tied to applications, and are frequently subject to backwardly incompatible 
revisions over time. 
The net result of these characteristics is that, today, there is no single, easy or 
universal solution to the problem of preservation of geospatial data. There are many 
formats and applications, all of which have overlapping but different capabilities. 
Because conversion of geospatial data across formats, data structures, and 
applications often results in loss of data or data alteration, the migration of geospatial 
formats over time is not easily automated, but instead must be evaluated on a case-by-
case basis.  
5
http://mcmcweb.er.usgs.gov/sdts/whatsdts.html
VB.NET Word: VB.NET Code to Rotate Word Page Within .NET Imaging
Here, we can recommend you VB.NET PDF page rotating tutorial and multi any original quality during or after the Word page rotating; Save the rotated Word page
how to rotate one pdf page; how to rotate one page in a pdf file
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
permanently? A 2: This VB.NET image editor control SDK allows developers process target image file and save edited image as new file.
pdf rotate one page; pdf reverse page order preview
Furthermore, the general preservation problem for geospatial data will simply 
compound over time with increasing quantities of data being produced by collection 
systems such as satellites and sensor networks. Historical geospatial data is of great 
value in understanding and modelling climate and land use change, for example, and 
hence future users and archivists are likely to want to use and curate increasing 
quantities of increasingly older geospatial data.
 Geospatial Data Preservation Issues 
The following sections identify and describe in more detail some of the main issues 
related to the preservation of geospatial data. There are two principal data types 
associated with geospatial data: vector data which has similarities to Computer Aided 
Design (CAD) data; and raster data which has similarities to image data. These and a 
number of emerging data types are introduced in the sections that follow but it is 
worth noting that most GIS will incorporate both forms of data to a greater or lesser 
extent. In fact it is in the interaction of different data types that geospatial data finds 
its greatest value. 
3.1  Generic Geospatial Data Issues 
This initial section deals with aspects of geospatial data that are common to different 
types of geospatial data including: coordinate reference systems which define how 
locations on the earth are described; cartographic representations of data (the 
equivalent of a paper map); the topological model used to represent vector data 
relationships; the formats used to define project files used by different systems; and 
how geospatial data can be ‗packaged‘ so that all elements required for a dataset can 
be tied together. 
3.1.1  Coordinate Reference Systems 
A coordinate reference system is a means of identifying the location of features on the 
earth by coordinates, for instance WGS 84 Latitude/Longitude values or National 
Grid easting/northing values. A coordinate reference system comprises a number of 
elements including a spheroid, datum and projection (in the case of a projected 
coordinate system). Knowledge of the coordinate reference system is important for 
the accurate use of geospatial data.  
Some geospatial data formats (both raster and vector) directly contain information 
about the coordinate reference system the dataset is based on, either embedded as part 
of the file itself (e.g. a GeoTIFF
6
file) or as an additional, tightly-bundled file (e.g. a 
―.prj‖ projection metadata file
7
stored as part of an ESRI Shapefile). However, some 
other formats that are spatially referenced do not directly contain coordinate reference 
system information, for example plain TIFF image files. A plain TIFF file may have 
an associated TIFF World File
8
(TFW), but the association is loose and prone to 
breakage. 
6
http://www.remotesensing.org/geotiff/spec/contents.html
– see section on Coordinate Systems 
7
ESRI WKT  as used in .prj file and used by ESRI Projection Engine is described at: 
http://support.esri.com/index.cfm?fa=knowledgebase.techArticles.articleShow&d=14056
8
http://webhelp.esri.com/arcgisdesktop/9.3/index.cfm?id=3046&pid=3034&topicname=World_files_fo
r_raster_datasets
There are several ways of specifying a coordinate reference system including using 
EPSG
9
codes or OGC Well Known Text Representation for Spatial Reference 
Systems (WKT)
10
. Regardless of which format is used to specify a coordinate 
reference system, this information should be included in the dataset‘s metadata 
record, especially if the format that the dataset is in does not explicitly provide this 
information in a readily accessible way. It should be noted that TFW files on their 
own do not specify a coordinate reference system. They should be accompanied by 
information (such as WKT or an EPSG code) that specifies the coordinate reference 
system.  
Metadata profiles that have been designed to describe geospatial data will generally 
include an element to describe the coordinate reference system (if applicable), 
however in some cases this may be included as part of another element. It should also 
be noted if the coordinate reference system applies both to the metadata (e.g. 
bounding box coordinates) as well as to the actual dataset. 
3.1.2  Cartographic Representation 
Cartographic representations are a common output from geospatial data, often taking 
the form of simple digital maps in image format. Such maps may in some cases be 
geo-referenced to permit use of the map as an overlay in geospatial applications. 
Cartographic output may also take the form of more complex documents such as PDF 
or GeoPDF files which support more advanced options for user interaction with the 
resulting digital map. These finished information products typically don‘t include the 
actual data that was used to make the document, though some formats, such as PDF or 
GeoPDF, support the retention of some amount of data intelligence derived from the 
original data. 
Preservation of data and preservation of documents derived from the data comprise 
two separate and non-exclusive objectives. The data itself must be saved to allow for 
re-creation of earlier analyses or to engage the data in some new project work. The 
finished information product, whether a map, chart, or other output, is an information 
product that is very different from the data and includes synthesized information that 
is not a part of the underlying data. Decision-makers often interact with end product 
representations rather than directly with the underlying data, bolstering the 
importance of these end products as records for preservation. 
3.1.3  Topology 
Topology is the spatial relationship between features such as their connectivity (e.g. a 
road network) or adjacency (e.g. countries sharing a boundary). Vector datasets can 
model these relationships in different ways depending on the software being used and 
the data model being implemented. Topological data models can range from what are 
termed ‗spaghetti‘ or ‗unstructured‘ datasets where there are no explicit relationships 
between vector features, to ‗fully‘ or ‗structured' topological datasets in which every 
feature has a relationship. The preservation issue here is that topology information is 
often stored in proprietary vector formats and data structures, and any conversion 
9
http://www.epsg.org/
and the online EPSG Geodetic Parameter Registry: http://www.epsg-
registry.org/
9
For a description of the OGC WKT format see the OGC specifications for Simple Feature Access – 
Part 1: Common Architecture http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/sfa
process or data transfer may result in a loss of information. It is thus important when 
looking to preserve data that contains such information to identify and pay particular 
attention to the data structures that the target data format supports. 
3.1.4  Project Files  
GIS software ―project files‖ are complex digital documents that tie together a wide 
variety of components including: data, instructions on how the data will be presented, 
metadata, data models, scripts and other ancillary components. One typical feature of 
a project file is some manner of data view in which a combination of data is presented 
in a tailored manner that involves classification, symbolization, and annotation based 
upon the data content. These data views typically appear as maps, charts, or tables, or 
some combination thereof. In order for an end user to render this content it is 
necessary to have the project file, the software that supports the project file, related 
components (possibly including software add-ons or extensions), as well as the actual 
data. The required use of specific software, the complexity of the project file formats, 
and the tenuous links to the actual data, which is often simply pointed to, put these 
project files at high risk for failure over time. 
Examples of project files include the ESRI ArcView .apr file, the ESRI ArcGIS .mxd 
file, and the MapInfo Workspace (.wor).  It should be noted however, that simply 
preserving a project file does not preserve the underlying data or auxiliary files that 
are needed to display and use the data. 
There is a growing recognition in the GIS community of the need to be able to archive 
not just data but also projects and their various components in order to preserve the 
ability to revisit how different data processes and analyses were carried out. Yet 
project file incompatibilities with software upgrades point to possible future 
preservation challenges in maintaining this content, and vendor commitment to 
forward compatibility of current project files with future software releases remains 
unclear.  
3.1.5  Data Packaging 
Geospatial data frequently consists of complex, multi-file, multi-format objects, 
including one or more data files as well as: geo-referencing files, metadata files, 
licensing information, and other ancillary documentation or supporting files. The 
absence of a standard scheme for content packaging can make transfer and 
management of these complex data objects difficult both for archives and for users of 
the data. Some other information industries have complex XML-based wrapper 
formats or content packaging standards, including METS (digital libraries), MPEG 21 
DIDL (multimedia), XFDU (space data), and IMS-CP (learning technologies), yet no 
similar activity has occurred in the geospatial industry. 
In practice, in the geospatial community archive formats such as Zip
11
commonly 
function as rudimentary content packages for multi-file datasets or groups of related 
datasets. Such archive files typically lack data intelligence about file relationships and 
functions within the data bundle. In some cases formalized approaches to the use of 
Zip files are beginning to appear, for example KMZ files that are used to package 
11
http://www.pkware.com/support/zip-application-note
KML files and their ancillary components. The Metadata Exchange Format (MEF)
12
developed for use in the open source GeoNetwork
13
catalogue environment, uses Zip 
as the basis for a formalized packaging of geospatial metadata as well as associated 
data and ancillary components. MEF, which is explicit in packaging of metadata but 
non-explicit in packaging of the actual data and ancillary components, might provide 
a starting point for exploration of geospatial data packaging solutions. 
3.2  Vector Data 
A common form of geospatial data is vector data, which models features on the 
earth‘s surface as points, lines, and polygons. Attribute data is often associated with 
vector data, carrying values for individual characteristics of the data features. For 
example, a line section representing a portion of a street might have attribute 
information for characteristics like ―street name‖, ―number of lanes‖, ―speed limit‖ 
etc. Attribute data may either be stored directly within the vector dataset or stored 
externally in a spreadsheet or database. 
Changes in vector data 
Real world features that are represented by vector data are typically subject to change 
and the corresponding data may be updated accordingly. The updated dataset typically 
replaces the previous version and, unless a snapshot of that earlier dataset is set aside 
and archived, it becomes impossible to look at historical changes in the data.  
In some cases the dataset itself may be designed to store the historical changes within 
the active dataset. In some spatial databases, previous versions of a vector dataset may 
be stored along with the current dataset but with a different date attribute. There is 
also the possibility that only changes to features in a dataset are provided and the 
receiving system is required to apply updates to the dataset.  
Vector formats 
Geospatial vector data formats tend to be specific to the geospatial industry. These 
formats can be highly complex and are extremely sensitive to both format migration 
and software environment changes. The absence of vector data formats that are both 
non-commercial and widely supported has led to a preponderance of vector data that 
is available only in commercial or proprietary formats. 
3.2.1  Commercial Vector Data Formats 
A range of commercial vector data formats exists, each of which is most directly 
associated with a particular commercial software environment. Options for conversion 
between common commercial formats exist as built-in features within desktop GIS 
software, as a function provided by open source conversion tools such as Geospatial 
Data Abstraction Library (GDAL/OGR)
14
or as a service provided by specialized 
commercial tools and services that focus on data conversion such as the Feature 
Manipulation Engine (FME) from Safe Software
15
. Due to the complexity of the data, 
migration from a proprietary or poorly-supported data format into another more 
preservation-friendly format can lead to unacceptable distortion or loss of data.  
12
http://www.fao.org/geonetwork/docs/Manual.pdf
13
http://www.fao.org/geonetwork/srv/en/main.home
14
http://www.gdal.org/
15
http://www.safe.com/
10 
Shapefiles 
One commercial format in particular, the ESRI Shapefile
16
, has come into wide use as 
a distribution format that is supported by a range of both commercial and open source 
tools. Since Shapefiles do not support advanced features such as topology (the spatial 
relationships between features), they have a simple data structure and lend themselves 
to rapid drawing and analysis. While the Shapefile format is owned by ESRI
17
, it is 
openly documented, making it feasible to support Shapefiles in a variety of software 
tools.  
A Shapefile consists of at a minimum three files, a .shp file (feature geometry), an 
.shx file (index of the feature geography), and a .dbf file (a dBASE database file that 
stores the attribute information of the features). Additional files can also be included, 
including projection files (.prj), metadata files (.xml) and spatial index files (.sbx and 
.sbn). Although the Shapefile format is by today‘s standards ‗old‘ it is still widely 
used and supported. 
In GIS operations that use ESRI software it is increasingly common for vector data to 
be created and managed within the ESRI Geodatabase spatial database format, with 
Shapefile versions of the data used for distribution and access outside of the 
maintaining organization. Since the ESRI Geodatabase format is proprietary and not 
openly documented, many commercial and open source software tools still use the 
Shapefile for both data management and data distribution. 
Coverage Files 
The ESRI coverage file
18
is a proprietary vector data format that preceded the 
Shapefile. Coverage files include some information, such as topology and annotation, 
which is not directly transferred to Shapefiles in data conversions. Coverage files are 
more awkward to manage than Shapefiles since coverages have a multi-file, multi-
directory structure that makes the data susceptible to corruption in data transfers. The 
.e00 format is a coverage export format that can more easily be transferred because it 
can be contained in a single file. However, the specifications for these formats are not 
publicly available. 
Other Commercial Vector Formats 
A wide range of additional commercial vector formats are available and in use. 
Notable examples include MapInfo‘s
19
TAB and MIF/MID formats and Autodesk‘s
20
DXF/DWG formats. These tend to be used in specialist markets such as for business 
market analysis in the case of MapInfo or planning and design for AutoCAD.  
The MapInfo MIF/MID
21
format is a relatively simple published format with the 
graphics stored in the MIF file and attributes in the MID file. To use MIF/MID files in 
MapInfo they need to be imported and converted to TAB files. The MapInfo TAB 
format is the native format used by MapInfo and allows data to be read directly. The 
TAB format is proprietary to MapInfo and is a logical file made up of a number of 
16
http://www.esri.com/library/whitepapers/pdfs/shapefile.pdf
17
http://www.esri.com/
18
http://webhelp.esri.com/arcgisdesktop/9.3/index.cfm?TopicName=What_is_a_coverage
19
http://www.mapinfo.com/
20
http://www.autodesk.com/
21
http://www.directionsmag.com/mapinfo-l/mif/AppJ.pdf
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested