display pdf in iframe mvc : How to rotate page in pdf and save software application project winforms windows web page UWP 2009-05_dpctw1-part288

11 
different physical files with different file extensions (in the same way that an ESRI 
Shapefile is composed of a number of files). 
The Autodesk DXF (Drawing eXchange Format) is a common vector format used for 
geospatial data, primarily in CAD environments. There are many versions of the 
format in use, some dating back many years. It is a proprietary format controlled by 
Autodesk; however the latest DXF reference documentation
22
is available from the 
Autodesk web site. Documentation for some previous versions
23
can also be found on 
the Autodesk website. The DWG format is a binary, proprietary format maintained by 
Autodesk but also used in a number of other software systems. There is also an 
organisation called the Open Design Alliance
24
that provides software libraries to read 
and write DWG and publishes an open version of the specification. 
3.2.2  Open Vector Data Formats 
While commercial vector data formats may dominate the global market space, there 
are a number of ―open‖ options for vector data creation, management, and 
distribution.  
SDTS 
An outcome of an early effort to define a means for open exchange of data was the 
Spatial Data Transfer Standard (SDTS)
25
, which was created in the 1990s by the U.S. 
Geological Survey (USGS) to support exchange of geospatial data. While SDTS was 
used extensively by USGS and other US government agencies to distribute vector as 
well as raster digital elevation model data, the format has not gained traction in the 
wider geospatial data community.  
GML 
Geography Markup Language (GML)
26
is a standard first introduced in 2000 by the 
Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)
27
and subsequently published as ISO standard 
19136. The GML specification declares a large number of elements and attributes 
intended to support a wide range of capabilities. Since the scope of GML is so wide, 
profiles of GML that deal with a restricted subset of GML capabilities have been 
created in order to encourage interoperability within specific domains that share those 
profiles. While GML can be used for handling file-based data, it has wider use in web 
services-oriented environments.  
While GML would appear to provide a promising alternative for data preservation, 
there are a number of complicating factors. GML is not so much a single format as it 
is an XML language for which there are a wide range of different community 
implementations as embodied by specific GML profiles associated with specific GML 
versions, and for which different application schemas might be available.  
The GML specification is highly complex, and that complexity, combined with the 
diversity of profiles and application schemas, can present a barrier to vendor and tool 
22
http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/ps/item?siteID=123112&id=2882295&linkID=9240617
23
http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/item?siteID=123112&id=12272454&linkID=10809853
24
http://www.opendwg.org/
25
http://mcmcweb.er.usgs.gov/sdts/whatsdts.html
26
http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/gml
27
http://www.opengeospatial.org/
How to rotate page in pdf and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate all pages in pdf; save pdf after rotating pages
How to rotate page in pdf and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pdf pages and save; rotate pdf pages in reader
12 
support. In light of these problems, in 2006 the OGC released the Simple Features 
Profile which, as a constrained set of GML, was designed to lower the barrier to 
implementation. While the Simple Features Profile might provide the basis for 
creation of a supportable archival profile of GML, something roughly analogous to 
PDF/A
28
, there would still be the question of quality and functionality tradeoffs, 
including data loss that might comprise the cost of transferring data into a sustainable 
GML-based archival format. 
Prominent examples of national GML implementations are UK Ordnance Survey 
MasterMap, based on GML 2.1.2, and TIGER/GML, which has been in development 
in the U.S. for use with census geography datasets released by the Census Bureau. A 
notable domain implementation of GML is CityGML
29
, implemented as an 
application schema for the representation, storage and exchange of virtual 3D city and 
landscape models. Each different GML implementation will raise its own preservation 
challenges in terms of schema evolution, ongoing tool support, and dependencies on 
any data resources or content that might be externally referenced. 
NTF 
The format is officially British standard BS 7567 ―Electronic transfer of geographic 
information (NTF)‖
30
and is primarily used by Ordnance Survey (UK)
31
. NTF defines 
a number of levels of differing complexity that support different types of features and 
data, from Level 1 for simple vector features, to Level 5 which allows users to define 
their own data model and is used to transfer data such as Digital Terrain Models 
(DTM). Although still used by Ordnance Survey for a number of products, newer 
products such as OS MasterMap vector layers are supplied in GML format only. The 
use of NTF outside of Ordnance Survey is limited and is mostly used by consumers 
who typically convert the data into other formats for use in their GIS. 
OS MasterMap
® 
GML 
Ordnance Survey uses GML as the data format for the transfer of its OS MasterMap
32
product (except for the Imagery Layer which is supplied in common raster formats). 
The OS MasterMap Topography Layer
33
is a large-scale continuous dataset covering 
all of Britain and is continually maintained and updated. A key aspect of OS 
MasterMap is the ability to supply Change Only Updates (COU) to users. Using 
COU, only features that have changed since a specified date are supplied to a user. It 
is then up to the user‘s GIS to process these COU and apply them to a data holding. 
Another key feature of OS MasterMap is the ability to associate and integrate a user‘s 
own data with features in OS MasterMap using the TOID
®
(a unique 16-digit string 
identifier) as a reference. As features in OS MasterMap can be updated and modified 
without changing their TOID, it is necessary in some circumstances to know and 
access not only the TOID but the specific version of the TOID (and by implication the 
version of the dataset) that is being referred to. For future use it will be necessary for 
organisations to ensure they have sufficient archives of their own OS MasterMap 
28
http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_tc/catalogue_detail.htm?csnumber=51502
29
http://www.citygml.org/
30
http://www.standardsuk.com/shop/products_view.php?prod=6534
31
http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/
32
http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/products/osmastermap/
33
http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/products/osmastermap/layers/topography/index.html
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
this RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK, you can simply delete a single page from a PDF document using VB.NET or remove any page from a PDF document and save to local
how to reverse page order in pdf; rotate all pages in pdf preview
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
those page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File in
rotate pdf page by page; rotate single page in pdf file
13 
data, at sufficiently frequent intervals, so that they can recreate the correct 
associations with their own data. 
3.3  Raster Data 
Raster geospatial data is organized on a regularly-spaced, multidimensional grid of 
cells or lattice points. Such data can generally be characterized by the number of 
dimensions (most often two, but occasionally three); the number of bands (i.e. the 
number of coincident layers); and the data type of the cell values in each layer 
(whether drawn from a continuous or discrete domain, or categorical in nature). For 
continuous and discrete data types, the data can be further characterized by the range 
(or ―depth‖) of the data values. For categorical data types, the category semantics (at 
minimum, the category labels such as ―desert‖ or ―ocean‖) are critical metadata 
without which the data loses meaning. Depending on the file format, such metadata 
may be stored with the raster data, in a separate data dictionary, or along with external 
metadata. Topology is not a concern with raster data since the relationships between 
cells are inherent in the raster itself. 
Raster data is closely related to image data and many of the issues associated with the 
use and preservation of images
34
pertain also to raster geospatial data. In some cases 
raster data is imagery, that is, the raster bands contain colorimetric information such 
as visible wavelength radiances. In other cases, such as with elevation or bathymetric 
data and many other examples that have no direct visual interpretation, image formats 
nevertheless provide a natural and convenient way to store such raster data. As a 
consequence, many of the issues that arise with the preservation of image data apply 
to geospatial raster data as well. The evaluation factors identified
35
for still images—
clarity (resolution and bit depth) and colour maintenance—apply to raster data as 
well, though colour maintenance generalizes here to maintenance of the semantics of 
the data. 
3.3.1  Georeferencing and Rectification 
As with vector data, an issue in preserving geospatial raster data is the need to 
maintain coordinate reference system information. Because raster data has a regular 
organization, it is sufficient to describe the geospatial reference of the raster grid only, 
and not individual data points or features therein. 
Raster data may undergo a process of georeferencing and rectification to bring the 
data into a known coordinate system (projection and datum). For imagery data (e.g. 
satellite or aerial photography) a further process of ortho-rectification corrects for 
scale differences due to surface topography and requires a digital elevation model. In 
the latter case, since the accuracy of the data is dependent on the accuracy of the 
elevation model, the source elevation model and ortho-rectification software should 
be recorded as part of the data‘s lineage. 
3.3.2  Compression 
An issue that arises in preserving geospatial raster data specifically is sensitivity to 
lossy compression. Lossy image compression techniques subtly change data values. 
34
See the JISC Digital Media for resources and advice on still images 
http://www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk/stillimages/
35
http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/formats/content/still_quality.shtml
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Related APIs (PDFDocument.cs): public override void DeletePage(int pageId). Description: Delete specified page from the input PDF file
pdf expert rotate page; pdf rotate pages separately
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Dim outPutFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 inputFilePath2) ' Get page 0, page 1 and page 2 from doc2.Save(outPutFilePath).
rotate pdf pages individually; rotate single page in pdf reader
14 
For example, JPEG changes data values in ways that are not readily noticeable to 
human vision because the changes are designed to exploit limitations and 
characteristics of human vision. As a consequence, formats such as JPEG are most 
suitable for images intended for human consumption. However, such changes may be 
very significant to analytic functions the data is intended to support. As a general rule, 
if the data is to support analysis, only lossless compression should be used. 
3.3.3  Raster Formats 
As with vector data, there are a number of formats in common use for raster data. 
Simple Raster Formats 
A number of simple raster formats, some dating back to the days when data was read 
directly from tape drives, remain in active use today. BIL (band interleaved by line), 
BIP (band interleaved by pixel), and BSQ (band sequential) are formats for multi-
band raster data, though it would be more accurate to describe these as generic data 
organization techniques that can be employed by formats. For example, colour USGS 
digital orthophotos were initially organized as BIP, divided into fixed-length records 
with an ASCII header (the USGS has since switched to GeoTIFF). 
Arc/Info ASCII GRID
36
and USGS DEM
37
are simple, open, ASCII formats for 
single-band raster data.  Each simply lists raster cell values in left-to-right and top-to-
bottom order, augmented with georeferencing information in the header and/or trailer 
records.  These formats still find use in converting and processing raster data. 
From a preservation perspective, these simple raster formats pose little curation 
difficulty due to their open standards, widespread support, and ease of 
transformability. 
More Complex Raster Formats 
TIFF
38
has emerged as a common format for storing and delivering raster data owing 
to its open standard (the standard is controlled by Adobe, but openly published and 
not subject to license), its flexibility in describing multiple bands and data types, its 
extensible framework for embedded metadata (―tags‖), and its popularity in the 
desktop publishing world. TIFF itself defines the semantics of a few tags; GeoTIFF
39
is an open standard that defines additional tags applicable to geospatial raster data, 
including complete coordinate reference information. 
JPEG 2000
40
is a relatively new standard that supports progressive, wavelet-based 
compression. It offers a wealth of other features, including lossy and lossless 
compression techniques, selective and adaptive compression, etc. JPEG 2000 also 
allows arbitrary XML metadata to be embedded in image files, and the OGC has 
defined a standard for embedding GML documents in JPEG 2000
41
. By exploiting the 
full capabilities of GML, this opens up the possibility of embedding in image fields 
not just coordinate reference system information, but also coverage metadata, 
36
http://docs.codehaus.org/display/GEOTOOLS/ArcInfo+ASCII+Grid+format
37
http://rmmcweb.cr.usgs.gov/nmpstds/demstds.html
38
http://partners.adobe.com/public/developer/en/tiff/TIFF6.pdf
39
http://trac.osgeo.org/geotiff/
40
http://www.jpeg.org/jpeg2000/
41
http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/gmljp2
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
pageIndex = 2; doc.UpdatePage(page, pageIndex); // Save the PDFDocument. String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; doc.Save(outputFilePath
pdf reverse page order; rotate pages in pdf expert
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
Convert Tiff to Jpeg Images. Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PDF to Tiff. Move Tiff Page Position. Rotate a Tiff Page. Extract Tiff Pages.
pdf page order reverse; rotate pdf page few degrees
15 
annotations, and even vector features. More detailed information about JPEG 2000 
from a preservation point of view can be found in the relevant DPC Technology 
Watch Report
42
.  
A number of proprietary formats have also emerged for handling very large geospatial 
imagery datasets including ECW
43
from ER Mapper (now part of ERDAS) and 
MrSID
44
from LizardTech, which use wavelet compression methods to reduce file 
sizes. 
Support for JPEG 2000 is increasing, but today GeoTIFF is arguably the most 
survivable format for geospatial raster data due to its widespread use and support. 
3.3.4  Mosaicked Raster Data 
Raster data is often used to represent continuous phenomena (e.g., surface elevation), 
but for convenience of data management and delivery it is packaged into fixed-size 
tiles divided along arbitrary tile boundaries. This means that it is often desirable to 
mosaic the tiles back together into a seamless whole, and to thereby allow users to 
browse and crop out just the portion of the entire dataset that is of interest to them. 
The ramifications of mosaicking for preservation purposes depend greatly on the 
implementation specifics. If the raster tiles are stored as files in a filesystem, for 
example as GeoTIFFs, each independently carrying metadata and georeferencing 
information, and if the mosaicking system is entirely automated, then the preservation 
problem may be no more difficult than the problem of preserving a collection of files. 
In this case, the mosaic can be viewed purely as an access mechanism. Preservation of 
the raster tile files alone is sufficient to recreate the mosaic in the future, but only if 
the coordinates of the tiles are preserved. 
However, sophisticated mosaicking systems often perform edge alignment and colour 
balancing across tile boundaries, and even allow for fully manual and/or manually 
directed adjustments. In this case, the mosaicked image may effectively become a 
new data product derived from source raster tiles, and as such it may merit 
preservation independent of the source tiles. 
3.3.5  Stereo, Oblique and Ground-Level Imagery 
Our discussion of raster data so far has focused on data that can serve as a 
representation of the Earth‘s surface, and hence is suitable for projection and layering. 
Stereo and oblique imagery are types of imagery that are captured at varying angles to 
the vertical, and are used to create stereo pair images and 3D models. Such imagery 
requires additional metadata to describe the 3D spatial orientation of the images. 
Ground-level photographs are not suitable for projection, but they can be point 
georeferenced. The EXIF
45
metadata standard defines a means of capturing coordinate 
reference system information in JPEG files, and is compatible with GPS systems that 
are often the source of such metadata. 
42
http://www.dpconline.org/docs/reports/dpctw08-01.pdf
43
http://www.erdas.com/tabid/84/currentid/1142/default.aspx
44
http://www.lizardtech.com/
45
http://www.digicamsoft.com/exif22/exif22/html/exif22_1.htm
How to C#: Rotate Image according to Specified angle
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET 30); //If the input image has multiple frames,> //it will only rotate the second page of the
pdf reverse page order; saving rotated pdf pages
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. Parameters: zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
rotate pdf page permanently; pdf expert rotate page
16 
3.3.6  Raster Data Size 
Because raster data is continuous over an area it can require several orders of 
magnitude more storage than the equivalent area represented through a vector data 
source. There is little that can be done about this. While it is possible to convert data 
from raster to vector representation (and vice versa), doing so is a highly analytic, 
lossy process that changes the essential character and functionality of the data. Thus, 
raster data generally must be preserved as raster data. 
Compounding the problem of size is that automatic capture methods such as digital 
aerial photography and satellite remote sensing make it possible to quickly amass 
volumes of raster data that are large by any measure: MODIS
46
, for example, acquires 
a terabyte of imagery per day. Raster data access mechanisms may impose additional 
storage requirements. Image tile pyramids that support efficient panning and zooming 
of large images add at least 30% to the data size. 
As a consequence, in comparing raster data to vector, preservation of raster data is a 
quantitatively larger problem to such a degree that it is a qualitatively different 
problem. Large raster datasets will generally require custom engineered storage and 
processing systems. If raster data is stored in a spatial database the preservation 
problems due to size may compound the inherent migration and snapshot problems of 
preserving spatial databases. 
3.4  Emerging Data Formats 
Additional geospatial data formats are used for data representation, data visualization, 
and as network payloads occurring within web-based transfers of information. A 
number of new formats such as KML, which is used for geographic visualization, 
annotation, and navigation, and GeoRSS
47
, which is used for geographically enabling 
RSS and Atom feeds, have emerged. These have especially found use in 
‗Neogeography‘
48
applications. These formats might not be used in the creation or 
management of geospatial information; rather data files occurring in these formats are 
often created by transforming existing geospatial data. Data in some of these formats 
might not be obvious targets for archival acquisition since the original data will tend 
to be more complete. Yet the manner in which such data is represented in 
visualization environments may be of importance in recording how information has 
been shown and to record the basis for decision-making.  
3.4.1  KML 
KML
49
, formerly known as Keyhole Markup Language, is an XML language focused 
on geographic visualization, including annotation of maps or images in digital globe 
or mapping environments. KML was initially used solely within Google Earth
50
but is 
now used in a range of software environments, and in April 2008 KML version 2.2 
was approved as an international implementation standard by the OGC. KML 
46
http://modis.gsfc.nasa.gov/
47
http://georss.org/
48
In, Introduction to Neogeography, by Andrew J. Turner, O‘Reilly 2006, Neogeography is described 
as ―‗new geography‘ and consists of a set of techniques and tools that fall outside the realm of 
traditional GIS‖. 
49
http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/kml/
50
http://earth.google.com/
17 
provides support for both feature data, in the form of points, lines, and polygons, and 
image data, in the form of ground and photo overlays.  
KML files may be associated with images, models, or textures that exist in separate 
files. KMZ files are archive files which allow one or more KML files to be bundled 
together along with other ancillary files required for the presentation, allowing for 
ease of transfer of the entire collection. KMZ files are also compressed in the ZIP 
archive format, resulting in reduced file size. KML files may refer to external 
resources and other KML files via ―network links‖ (a link to a local or remote 
resource), which are used to link related data files and to facilitate data updates. Large 
data resources such as imagery datasets may be divided into a large number of smaller 
image files which are then made available via network links on an as needed basis. 
KML presentations using network links pose a preservation challenge in that any data 
available via the links may no longer be available in the future. 
3.4.2  PDF and GeoPDF 
PDF
51
is commonly used to provide end-user representations of data in which 
multiple datasets may be combined and other value-added elements may be added 
such as annotations, symbolization and classification of the data according to data 
attributes. While these finished data views, typically maps, can be captured in a 
simple image format, PDF provides some opportunity to add additional features such 
as attribute value lookup and toggling of individual data layers. 
GeoPDF
52
, which specifies a method for geopositioning of map frames within a PDF 
document, originated as a proprietary format developed by TerraGo Technologies
53
, a 
strategic partner of Adobe. GeoPDF has proven to be a powerful format for 
presentation of complex geospatial content to diverse audiences that are not familiar 
with geospatial technologies. In September 2008 TerraGo Technologies approached 
the OGC with a proposal to introduce the GeoPDF encoding specification to the OGC 
standards process to make it an open standard and it is now published as a ―Best 
Practices‖ document
54
. In parallel, Adobe introduced its own method for geo-
registration into the ISO standards process for PDF.  
The preservation challenges
55
that accrue to complex PDF documents will accrue to 
these documents as well. While the PDF/A specification has been developed to define 
an archive-friendly version of PDF, some of the more advanced functionality that is 
put to use in geospatial implementations are not supported by the current PDF/A 
specification. The history of complex geospatial PDF documents is rather short and 
risks associated with external dependencies (e.g., fonts) and reliance on specialized 
software will require close attention by the preservation community. 
3.5  Spatial Databases 
Spatial databases reach a higher level of complexity than individual data files, as they 
are capable of storing multiple datasets along with dataset relationships, behaviours, 
51
http://www.adobe.com/devnet/pdf/pdf_reference.html
52
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GeoPDF
53
http://www.terragotech.com/
54
http://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=33332
55
See the DPC Technology Watch Report at http://www.dpconline.org/docs/reports/dpctw08-02.pdf
for an analysis of PDF for preservation 
18 
annotations, and data models, all of which are hosted in a relational database system. 
Spatial databases have played an increasingly prominent role in data production and 
management, while dataset-oriented formats are often still used for data distribution.  
A variety of commercial database management systems, some using spatial 
extensions, have the ability to store geospatial data including: Oracle Spatial
56
, IBM 
Informix Spatial DataBlade
57
and Microsoft SQLServer
58
. A prominent open source 
option is the PostgreSQL-based PostGIS
59
spatial database. These spatial extensions 
generally allow the user to store raster and vector data by adding spatial data types to 
the database that supports storing and querying of spatial data. Access to the spatial 
data in these databases can be directly through the database or, more commonly, 
through a connection to a desktop or web-based client. 
Spatial databases have a number of features in common, including support for: 
 Continuous (large geographic extent) datasets 
 Large volumes of data (raster and vector) 
 Complex data models (spatial data and business models) 
 Long transactions, multi-user editing and versioning 
These features make the long term preservation of data in spatial databases much 
more complex as it is often not possible to extract and transfer individual components 
of this data into other systems without losing some information.  Preserving 
geospatial databases in general is likely to be particularly challenging as all the 
problems of preserving relational databases
60
are inherited: the need to take snapshots 
of running databases; storage of snapshots in proprietary database dump formats; 
complex dump formats; and large, monolithic sizes of snapshots. 
3.5.1  ESRI Geodatabases 
A prominent spatial database format is the ESRI Geodatabase
61
. The ESRI 
Geodatabase (often just referred to as Geodatabase) came into use in the late 1990s 
with the advent of the ArcGIS software environment. The Geodatabase can store a 
range of data types including geographic features, attribute information, satellite and 
aerial imagery, surface modelling data, and survey measurements. In addition to 
storing data, Geodatabases can also model the relationships between data and handle 
data validation and versioning.  
Until recently, there were two forms of the Geodatabase:
62
ArcSDE Geodatabases and 
Personal Geodatabases. ArcSDE Geodatabases store the data in a relational database 
management system (RDBMS) and support multiple users; Personal Geodatabases are 
stored in Microsoft Access and cannot be larger than two gigabytes in size. The 
requirement of a commercial relational database connection has made transfers of 
ESRI Geodatabases greater than two gigabytes of size difficult.  
56
http://www.oracle.com/technology/products/spatial/htdocs/data_sheet_9i/9iR2_spatial_ds.html
57
http://www-01.ibm.com/software/data/informix/blades/spatial/
58
http://www.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2008/en/us/spatial-data.aspx
59
http://postgis.refractions.net/
60
Database preservation as such is outside the scope of this report. However there is much research 
going on in this area, see http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resource/briefing-papers/database-archiving/
for a brief 
summary of the topic. 
61
http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis/geodatabase/index.html
62
http://webhelp.esri.com/arcgisdesktop/9.3/index.cfm?TopicName=Types_of_geodatabases
19 
In ArcGIS version 9.2 the File Geodatabase was created as a standalone database not 
requiring a commercial back-end database. All information is stored in a directory of 
files that can scale up to one terabyte of size, potentially increasing portability and 
making the format more useful in archival transfers. However, as yet the format 
specifications of the File Geodatabase have not been made publicly available and 
there are issues over compatibility between versions
63
making its immediate appeal 
for preservation problematic. 
There are a number of approaches to exporting content from the ESRI Geodatabase. 
Feature classes (vector layers) may be extracted as Shapefiles or converted to other 
formats such as GML for distribution or archiving. Raster datasets may also be 
extracted from a Geodatabase in a number of formats, including ERDAS Imagine, 
JPEG and TIFF. Starting with ArcGIS version 9 a new, openly specified XML export 
option
64
became available for the Geodatabase, making it possible to interchange 
Geodatabase content with other technical environments, yet it is not clear what 
support there will be in future versions of ArcGIS for re-importing XML exports 
created from previous versions of the Geodatabase.  
3.6  Dynamic Geospatial Data  
Geospatial web services allow end-user applications as well as server applications to 
make requests for sets of data over the web. Requests might also be made for 
particular data processes, such as finding a route or locating a street address. 
In web service client applications, data is drawn from one or possibly many different 
sources and presented in map form to the user. These mapping environments take the 
burden of data acquisition and processing away from the user. While it is typically 
possible for the user to save service state (e.g., map area or view, zoom level, what 
data is shown etc.), it is usually not possible to save the state of the data within the 
service, creating a preservation challenge with regard to capturing such interactions. 
3.6.1  Web Map Services (WMS) 
The OGC WMS specification was released in 2000 and by virtue of its simplicity 
gained wide adoption and vendor support. WMS is a lightweight web service at the 
core of which is the ―Get Map‖ request, which allows the client application to request 
an image representation of a specific data layer. Requests can be made from 
individual clients such as desktop GIS software, web browsers, as well as other map 
servers which might blend data sources from a number of different servers. The Web 
Map Context specification was developed by the OGC to formalize how a specific 
grouping of one or more maps from one or more map servers can be described in a 
portable, platform-independent format. The Styled Layer Descriptor profile of the 
Web Map Service (SLD) provides a means of specifying the styling of features 
delivered by a WMS using the Symbology Encoding (SE) language.  If preservation 
of the cartographic representation of a map delivered by a WMS is important then it 
may be necessary to preserve the associated SLD (if there is one). WMS tiling efforts 
have come as a response to the experience of Google Maps and other commercial map 
services, which demonstrated the speed with which static tiled imagery could be 
63
http://webhelp.esri.com/arcgisdesktop/9.3/index.cfm?TopicName=Client_and_geodatabase_compatibility
64
http://webhelp.esri.com/arcgisdesktop/9.3/index.cfm?TopicName=Geodatabase_XML
20 
presented in user applications.  Efforts have been made to develop a standard 
approach to provide access to static map tiles and the OGC have produced a candidate 
Web Map Tiling Service (WMTS) Interface Standard
65
3.6.2  Web Feature Services (WFS) 
Web Feature Services, which handle vector data, stream the actual data in the form of 
GML. WFS which was first released as a standard in 2002 has not been implemented 
on as wide of a scale as WMS, partly due to a higher level of complexity. WFS could 
potentially be used in the future to automate data harvests, perhaps using 
Transactional Web Feature Service (WFS-T) for making updates to a central archive. 
3.6.3  Other OGC Web Services 
Many other web services specifications have been released by the OGC, including the 
Web Coverage Service (WCS), which addresses content such as satellite images, 
digital aerial photos, digital elevation data, and other phenomena represented by 
values at each measurement point. OGC members are also specifying a variety of 
interoperability interfaces and metadata encodings that enable real time integration of 
sensor webs into the information infrastructure. In general OGC services will pose 
data persistence challenges related to schema evolution, URI/URN persistence and 
schema access. 
Due to the ephemeral nature of the data in web services, new challenges in 
maintaining data persistence are also created. It might also be argued that the 
availability of web services-based access to data has decreased the incentive to 
replicate data resources to additional locations that might otherwise retain copies of 
the data. Details of all the OGC specifications can be found on the Open Geospatial 
Consortium (OGC) website.
66
3.7  Legal Issues 
The legal framework in which geospatial data is made available can cause a 
considerable amount of uncertainty, and this may have an impact on the ability to 
preserve and make use of geospatial data in the future. Intellectual property rights in 
geospatial data are carefully – sometimes aggressively – protected. Most geospatial 
data originates with an underlying dataset licensed from a third party – either from a 
mapping agency or through a satellite imagery supplier. This means that many 
geospatial datasets have an implied dependence on a third party supplier who may 
take a view on preservation and access.  Consequently, archivists and repository 
managers would be well advised to examine the licences under which data is 
presented to them. There have been various studies and books
67
written about GIS 
legal issues including a report produced by the JISC funded GRADE
68
project which 
considered the licensing issues for sharing and re-using geospatial data within the UK 
research and education sector. 
65
http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/requests/54
66
http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards
67
For example, George Cho, Geographic Information Science: Mastering the Legal Issues 
(WileyBlackwell, 2005) 
68
http://edina.ac.uk/projects/grade/gradeDigitalRightsIssues.pdf
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested