display pdf in iframe mvc : Rotate pdf page and save software application project winforms windows web page UWP 2009-05_dpctw2-part289

21 
3.7.1  UK Legal Landscape 
In the UK there are significant legal issues around the access and re-use of geospatial 
data, particularly data that is produced by, or on behalf of, government agencies and 
protected by Crown Copyright. As an example from a major data provider, Ordnance 
Survey
69
data is typically licensed in return for a regular payment, and entitles the 
user access to the data for a period of time. If the licence is not renewed, the normal 
disposition is that the data must be deleted once the licence term has expired. If the 
data is required for preservation purposes then it is important to ensure that the data is 
covered by an appropriate licence. For instance, the ―Plan, Design and Build‖
70
licence for OS MasterMap provides the right to archive the data for up to 13 years 
beyond the licence term but the data can only be used for certain purposes during that 
period. Ordnance Survey has recently published a new strategy that aims to simplify 
and improve access to geospatial data, including reforming the licensing framework, 
although details are not currently available. 
Preservation of Ordnance Survey data for the long term is carried out under the 
―guidance, supervision and coordination‖
71
of The National Archives (TNA)
72
However the UK Legal Deposit Libraries have an agreement
73
with Ordnance Survey 
whereby they receive an updated snapshot copy every year of detailed mapping, 
including OS MasterMap. The legal deposit libraries provide a facility
74
whereby 
users in the libraries can view contemporary and historic versions of OS MasterMap 
and Land-Line (the precursor dataset to OS MasterMap) going back to 1998 as online 
mapping and to print out small extracts. However, it is the responsibility of users of 
OS MasterMap data to maintain their own archives of data (e.g. in GML format) as 
necessary for future use. 
As an example of some of the issues relating to licensing, Ordnance Survey data 
obtained for educational purposes though the EDINA Digimap
75
service can only be 
used as for long as the user is an authorised Digimap user. If a user leaves a 
subscribing institution then the user must delete any data that they have obtained 
through Digimap. There are also cases (for instance Land-Line data) where the 
licence for a particular product may not be renewed or the product withdrawn and so 
that data must be deleted when the licence period ends. This raises issues regarding 
future access to datasets which may have been used in research or used to derive other 
datasets which have inherited the same licensing conditions and residual IPR as the 
source data.  
69
http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/
70
http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/products/ossitemap/pricing.html
71
Eunice Gill and Jonathon Holmes, The Cartographic Journal, Vol 41 No. 1 pp55-57, June 2004.  See 
also the article in http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documents/winter2005.pdf
, pages 16-18 
72
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
73
http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/media/news/2008/march/depositlibraries.html
74
See the British Library website 
http://www.bl.uk/reshelp/findhelprestype/maps/digitalmapping/ordnancesurvey/osdigitalmaps.html
or 
the National Library of Scotland website at: http://www.nls.uk/collections/maps/subjectinfo/os-
mastermap.html
for further information. 
75
http://edina.ac.uk/digimap/
Rotate pdf page and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate one page in pdf reader; how to save a pdf after rotating pages
Rotate pdf page and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate all pages in pdf preview; how to reverse pages in pdf
22 
3.7.2  US Legal Landscape 
In the US, the philosophy is that if the data has been paid for using taxpayers funding 
then the data should be available without additional cost (except for distribution 
costs). Works by the US government are not eligible for copyright protection. 
While public agency data is typically in the public domain, there are a number of 
rights-related issues that can complicate preservation. Public Records Law varies 
from state to state, and even within a single state interpretation may vary widely. 
Restrictions on commercial use or resale of data can result in restrictions on open 
secondary redistribution of that data. In general there has been a trend towards more 
open access to data in recognition of the positive societal benefit that derives from 
free data access, and the negative burden on local agencies related to mediated or fee-
based data request handling. However, since 9/11 some geospatial data resources have 
been subject to restricted access in accordance with FGDC security guidelines
76
.  
The situation in other jurisdictions can be quite different. For instance, in Canada, 
much government spatial data has recently been made freely available through portals 
such as GeoGratis
77
and GeoBase
78
with very limited restrictions on what can be done 
with the data. 
3.7.3  ‘Open’ Geospatial Data 
As a response to the complex licensing issues arising from geospatial data produced 
by national and local governments, private companies and others, there is a strong and 
growing movement for more availability, openness and transparency in licensing 
geospatial data, including making data more accessible and with less restrictive 
licensing terms. There are several licensing initiatives that have been created 
including Creative Commons
79
and the Open Data Commons Licences
80
that aim to 
achieve these goals. These licences let data creators specify less restrictive licensing 
conditions up to and including putting the work in the ‗public domain‘. Initiatives 
such as OpenStreetMap
81
have adopted this approach with user contributed geospatial 
data currently being licensed under a Creative Commons licence, however this may 
be changed to the Open Database Licence (ODbL)
82
in the future
83
3.8  Geospatial Metadata  
Metadata plays a central role in the current and future use of geospatial data by 
making data discoverable through data catalogues and search systems, by providing 
the means for prospective users to evaluate the data for use, and by allowing data 
producers to better manage their data holdings and encourage use of the data in the 
manner in which it was intended. Metadata also provides end users with key 
information about geographic positioning information including coordinate reference 
information (such as projection and datum), entity and attribute information, data 
quality, provenance and rights information that are essential for proper use of the data. 
76
http://www.fgdc.gov/policyandplanning/Access%20Guidelines.pdf
77
http://geogratis.cgdi.gc.ca/geogratis/en/index.html
78
http://www.geobase.ca/geobase/en/index.html
79
http://creativecommons.org/
80
http://www.opendatacommons.org/licenses/
81
http://www.openstreetmap.org/
82
http://www.opendatacommons.org/licenses/odbl/
83
http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Open_Data_License
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
this RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK, you can simply delete a single page from a PDF document using VB.NET or remove any page from a PDF document and save to local
rotate pdf pages; how to rotate all pages in pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
those page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File in
how to reverse page order in pdf; pdf rotate single page reader
23 
3.8.1  Metadata Standards 
In 2003 the ISO standard: 19115 Geographic Information - Metadata
84
, was finalized, 
providing a new international standard for geospatial metadata. Prior to that, a number 
of national metadata standards had emerged around the world, providing several years 
of initial experience as a starting point to inform the development of the international 
standard. For example, in the United States the Federal Geographic Data Committee 
(FGDC) Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata
85
was released in 1994 
(version 2.0 was released in 1998). Federal agencies were mandated to begin using 
the standard in 1995, and the standard came into wide use by state agencies and 
commercial data producers as well. Profiles of the standard have also been developed, 
for example the NBII (National Biological Information Infrastructure) Profile and the 
ESRI Profile.  
In the UK, EDINA
86
have developed and implemented a metadata profile based on 
the ISO 19115 standard but with extensions to support the needs of the UK academic 
community, called AGMAP (Academic Geospatial Metadata Application Profile 
(AGMAP)
87
which is used in the Go-Geo!
88
metadata portal. Gigateway
89
is another 
UK based metadata portal and implements the UK GEMINI
90
metadata standard 
(based on ISO 19115). It is run by the Association for Geographic Information (AGI) 
and provides access to UK geospatial metadata.  Work is also ongoing to develop an 
application profile of Dublin Core called the Geospatial Application Profile (GAP)
91
which is focusing on geospatial data. 
INSPIRE (Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe) is an initiative of the EU 
that ―intends to trigger the creation of a European spatial information infrastructure 
that delivers to the users integrated spatial information services‖.
92
One of the first 
deliverables of the INSPIRE initiative has been the development of regulations and 
rules
93
regarding the implementation of geospatial metadata to describe relevant 
datasets. The INSPIRE metadata specifications are based on ISO 19115 and other 
appropriate ISO standards. 
Although INSPIRE does not currently address preservation issues specifically,  it has 
the aim of making environmental data available for applications such as monitoring 
climate change which by its nature necessitates accessing data that covers a 
significant period of time. 
3.8.2  Metadata Challenges for Archives 
Geospatial metadata, either by its presence or its absence, creates numerous archival 
challenges, if: 
  Metadata is not created by the data producer  
84
http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_tc/catalogue_detail.htm?csnumber=26020
85
http://www.fgdc.gov/standards/projects/FGDC-standards-projects/metadata/base-
metadata/index_html
86
http://edina.ac.uk/
87
http://www.gogeo.ac.uk/Help/AGMAP_Introduction.htm
88
http://www.gogeo.ac.uk/cgi-bin/index.cgi
89
http://www.gigateway.org.uk/
90
http://www.gigateway.org.uk/metadata/standards.html
91
http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/repositories/digirep/index/Geospatial_Application_Profile
92
http://inspire.jrc.ec.europa.eu/whyinspire.cfm
93
http://inspire.jrc.ec.europa.eu/reports/ImplementingRules/metadata/MD_IR_and_ISO_20081219.pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Related APIs (PDFDocument.cs): public override void DeletePage(int pageId). Description: Delete specified page from the input PDF file
change orientation of pdf page; rotate pdf page
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
outPutFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 doc2.InsertPage(page, pageIndex) ' Output the new document. doc2.Save(outPutFilePath
how to rotate just one page in pdf; pdf rotate just one page
24 
  Metadata is not distributed with the data  
  The metadata is not concurrent with the data (i.e., the data has been updated 
but the metadata has not)  
  The metadata file does not adhere to a widely supported encoding standard, 
making automated handling of the metadata difficult  
  Different versions of the same metadata record are available from different 
sources  
If metadata is not available or has not been created, a recipient archive can attempt to 
assemble a metadata record. Many elements of metadata records may be auto-
extracted by software and metadata templates for different producer agencies or data 
collections can further help aid the metadata production process. Unfortunately, many 
portions of a metadata record, including data quality information, lineage information, 
and detailed explanations of the meaning of attribute information, can only be 
provided by the data producer. 
If metadata does exist, the recipient archive will often find it necessary to:  
a) Normalize the structure of the metadata to some understood schema,  
b) Synchronize the metadata to reflect the current state of the data, or  
c) Remediate errors found in the metadata. 
3.8.3  Geospatial Metadata vs. Preservation Metadata 
Geospatial metadata standards lack some features which would be useful in the 
archival management of data. Most notably, geospatial metadata standards do not 
provide a wrapper function that would allow additional technical or administrative 
metadata elements to be associated with (rather than replace) the data producer-
originated metadata. Examples of such metadata elements that archives might wish to 
associate with data include: 
 
Archival rights information, either in text form or in a rights expression 
language, that does not replace any rights statements provided by the data 
producer in the original metadata record  
 
Administrative metadata related to the manner of the data acquisition  
 
Technical metadata related to the actual transfer of the data, including 
provision of assurances about data integrity  
 
Metadata related to any transformations carried out by the archive post-
acquisition  
 
The outcomes of any assessments of data validity or any assessments of risk 
associated with the data  
In the digital library community efforts have been made to use a combination of 
METS
94
(Metadata Encoding and Transfer Standard) and PREMIS
95
(Preservation 
Metadata: Implementation Strategies) to address the metadata wrapper need, however 
there is no parallel in the geospatial community to date. 
There is also much work going on in the area of identifying ―significant properties‖ of 
digital objects which aims to help the development of preservation metadata and to 
94
http://www.loc.gov/standards/mets/
95
http://www.oclc.org/research/projects/pmwg/
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
int pageIndex = 2; doc.UpdatePage(page, pageIndex); // Save the PDFDocument. String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; doc.Save
rotate one page in pdf; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. Parameters: zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
how to rotate a single page in a pdf document; how to rotate all pages in pdf at once
25 
assist in other aspects of digital preservation. Although not dealing specifically with 
geospatial data many of the studies that have been carried out, including one on 
Vector Images, are applicable to geospatial data. For more details see the relevant 
JISC website
96
for studies and related documents. 
3.8.4  Metadata Creation 
A particular challenge with some pre-ISO geospatial metadata standards created 
before the arrival of XML has been the absence of standard methods of encoding 
metadata. The lack of consistent structure to metadata records makes receipt and 
management of metadata from other sources difficult. To accompany the ISO 19115 
geospatial metadata standard a separate XML schema implementation standard, ISO 
19139, was finalized in 2007. 
Desktop and online tools are available for creating metadata in appropriate standards 
including: ESRI ArcCatalog which supports FGDC, ISO 19115 and UK Gemini 
among others; the MetaGenie tool from Gigateway; GeoDoc from Go-Geo! and the 
Ramona
97
GIS inventory tool in the U.S. 
 Standards Bodies and Working Groups 
The following are a selection of international standards bodies and working groups 
that are addressing the issues of geospatial data preservation. 
4.1  Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)
98
The OGC is an international industry consortium of companies, government agencies 
and universities that work together to develop publicly available interface 
specifications. OGC specifications support interoperable solutions that ―geo-enable‖ 
the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream information 
technology. Examples of OGC specifications include Web Mapping Service (WMS), 
Web Feature Service (WFS), Geography Markup Language (GML), and OGC KML. 
The OGC has a close relationship with ISO/TC 211, which addresses standardization 
in the field of digital geographic information, and a subset of OGC standards are now 
ISO standards. The OGC also works with other international standards bodies such as 
W3C, OASIS, WfMC, and the IETF. 
4.1.1  OGC Data Preservation Working Group
99
In December 2006 the OGC Data Preservation Working Group was formed ―to 
address technical and institutional challenges posed by data preservation, to interface 
with other OGC working groups that address technical areas that are affected by the 
data preservation problem, and to engage in outreach and communication with the 
preservation and archival information community.‖ A goal of the group is to ―create 
and dialog with the broad spectrum of geospatial community and archival community 
constituents that have a stake in addressing data preservation issues.‖ To date the 
work of the group has been focused on identifying points of intersection between data 
preservation issues and OGC standards efforts, and to introduce temporal data 
management use cases into OGC discussions. 
96
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/preservation/2008sigprops.aspx
97
http://staging.gisinventory.net/
98
http://www.opengeospatial.org/
99
http://www.opengeospatial.org/projects/groups/preservwg
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Description: Convert to PDF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. DocumentType.PDF. zoomValue, The magnification of the original tiff page size.
permanently rotate pdf pages; pdf rotate one page
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. Parameters: zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
pdf rotate pages separately; reverse pdf page order online
26 
4.2  U.S. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC)
100
The FGDC is an interagency committee that promotes the coordinated development, 
use, sharing, and dissemination of geospatial data within the U.S as part of the 
National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), a physical, organizational, and virtual 
network designed to enable the development and sharing of geospatial data. A wide 
range of stakeholder organizations participate in FGDC activities representing the 
interests of state and local government, industry, and professional organizations.  
4.2.1  FGDC Historical Data Working Group
101
The FGDC Historical Data Working Group was established to promote and 
coordinate activities among Federal agencies relating to the historical dimension to 
geospatial data. The role of the Working Group is to ―promote an awareness among 
Federal agencies of the historical dimension to geospatial data; to facilitate the long-
term retention, storage, and accessibility of selected historically valuable geospatial 
data; and to establish a mechanism for the coordinated development, use, sharing, and 
dissemination of historically valuable geospatial data which have been financed in 
whole or part by Federal funds.‖ The Working Group has played a coordinating role 
in the development of a Historical Collections community within the national 
Geospatial One Stop portal.  
 Technology and Tools 
In addition to the tools and technologies described above, there are a number of 
facilities that may contribute to effective long term management of geospatial data. 
5.1  Digital Globe Tools 
Increasingly virtual or digital globe tools such as Google Earth
102
, Microsoft Virtual 
Earth
103
, NASA Worldwind
104
and ESRI ArcGIS Explorer
105
are being used for 
accessing geospatial data in many communities. These tools provide a simple means 
of visualising, analysing and integrating different datasets based on a ‗global‘ view. 
The tools allow the user to display their own data, or data from another source 
overlaid on top of existing base map imagery and vector layers. 
Google Earth has recently (Feb 2009) added an easily accessible historic imagery 
layer
106
and an ability to move through a timeline of available images for an area, 
although currently imagery is available only over a relatively short period of time for 
some areas. 
Google also offers the possibility to share current and historical imagery with them 
through the Imagery Partner Program
107
. Other datasets can also be shared including 
vector and terrain datasets. However, Google maintains discretion over what is 
included and when, and Google does not provide a data download facility, so it is 
‗view-only‘ data.  
100
http://www.fgdc.gov/
101
http://www.fgdc.gov/participation/working-groups-subcommittees/hdwg/index_html
102
http://earth.google.com/
103
http://www.microsoft.com/virtualearth/
104
http://worldwind.arc.nasa.gov/
105
http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis/explorer/index.html
106
http://google-latlong.blogspot.com/2009/02/new-in-google-earth-50-historical.html
107
http://maps.google.com/help/maps/imagery/
27 
Other examples of online access to historic mapping include the Rumsey Map 
Collection
108
, a subset of which is available as a layer in Google Earth, and the 
National Library of Scotland (NLS)
109
Map Library, which has geo-referenced 
historic maps and allows its data to be displayed overlaid on a variety of mapping 
backgrounds, including Google Maps and Virtual Earth layers. 
Tools have been developed to aid geo-referencing and registration of historic maps 
with imagery or basemaps such as the tools developed by the Old Maps Online
110
project which provides simple means of registering a scanned image to an existing 
source. Tools are also available for tiling
111
data so it can be displayed more easily in 
web mapping applications. 
5.2  Geospatial Format Registries and Validation Tools 
Format registries support preservation by maintaining knowledge of file formats. 
Registries under development include PRONOM 
112
from the National Archives, the 
Global Digital Format Registry (GDFR)
113
from Harvard University, and geospatial 
specific registries such as that being developed by the National Geospatial Digital 
Archive (NGDA)
114
. Commercial companies and projects directly involved in 
translating and manipulating data in various formats such as Safe Software or the 
GDAL/OGR open source project also maintain extensive knowledge bases of 
geospatial formats. 
5.3  ESRI Geodatabase Archiving 
Maintenance of archived versions of datasets within an ESRI Geodatabase is a 
challenge that was addressed in ArcGIS version 9.2 by the Geodatabase Archiving 
feature.  Previously, data change could only be tracked by managing transactional 
versions of the data, and the history of the data could easily be lost if the versions 
were deleted or if versioning was disabled.  Geodatabase Archiving supports the 
creation of an historical version that represents the data at a specific moment in time 
and provides a read-only representation of the Geodatabase. The ArcGIS ―History 
Viewer‖ tool allows user examination of data at specific points of time, and ArcMap 
provides the capability to run queries to show how the data has evolved over time. 
5.4  Digital Repository Software 
Digital repository software such as Fedora
115
and DSpace
116
are increasingly being 
used for retention and management of some types of geospatial data, and tools such as 
OpenLayers
117
are being used to construct access services, including mapping 
functionality, on top of such repositories. For example, the ShareGeo
118
geospatial 
data sharing facility uses DSpace as the underlying repository with an OpenLayers 
108
http://www.davidrumsey.com/
109
http://geo.nls.uk/maps/
110
http://blog.oldmapsonline.org/search/label/about
111
http://www.maptiler.org/
112
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/pronom/
113
http://www.gdfr.info/
114
http://www.ngda.org/research.php#FR
115
http://www.fedora-commons.org/
116
http://www.dspace.org/
117
http://openlayers.org/
118
http://edina.ac.uk/projects/sharegeo/index.shtml
28 
map interface for searching and GDAL/OGR for data identification.  A major 
challenge in adapting some types of geospatial data with digital repository 
environments is that of reconciling the ―item‖ orientation of many repositories with 
the ―collection‖ orientation of many geospatial data types.  The item formation 
process associated with repository ingest can lead to atomization of large, complex, 
and interrelated sets of geospatial content unless proper component relationships are 
built into the repository structure.  Data that is item-like in nature (e.g. individual 
digital maps or datasets, which may themselves be multi-file and multi-format in 
nature) may fit best in digital repositories, while more complex content might need to 
be managed in a file system structure or within a spatial database. 
 Conclusions and Recommendations 
There is no single best approach to preserving geospatial data. Each of the various 
types of geospatial data will likely call for a mix of seemingly redundant approaches, 
each of which is intended to mitigate a different perceived risk to the data in terms of 
technical failure or loss of content.  These are early days for geospatial data 
preservation and further exploration of each of these approaches is necessary, and a 
longer history of documented successes and failures in preservation efforts is needed 
in order to arrive at a set of more mature approaches to preserving geospatial data. 
Geospatial data is valuable and faces similar risks and vulnerabilities as other types of 
data. While some of these risks can be offset by the adoption and adaptation of 
generic best practice for preservation, and while geospatial data need to be 
incorporated into the mainstream of digital preservation planning, there are specific 
actions that need to be considered: 
1) Formats: 
  Vector data  
 Retain in their original format 
 AND, if proprietary or not widely supported, migrate into widely 
supported (and openly documented) format 
  Raster data 
 Retain in their original format 
 AND, if proprietary or not widely supported, migrate into widely 
supported (and openly documented) format and compression scheme 
 If possible, retain pre-processed and processed data 
  Spatial databases  
 Manage forward in time in active spatial database  
 AND replicate snapshots of spatial database  
 AND extract individual datasets (e.g. feature classes) into stable format  
  Dynamic Data and Web Services 
 Take snapshot copies of data and service state and save locally 
2) Metadata: 
  Maintain technical and administrative metadata in addition to geospatial 
metadata  
  Implement ISO descriptive keywords  
29 
  Implement regionally-appropriate profile of ISO 19115 as encoded per ISO 
19139  
  Retain original metadata AND synchronize/remediate/normalize if feasible  
3) Systems: 
  Keep archival data in live access systems  
  Provide access to superseded datasets  
  Avoid ‗atomization‘ of data in digital repository systems  
  Capture data as well as representations deemed of value  
  Maintain independence of data from specific storage/repository environment  
4) Legal: 
  Secure archival rights and rights for access to older data 
  Develop appropriate rights mechanisms so that future users of the data can be 
presented with suitable background information 
5) Community Actions:    
  Develop and promote the business case for preserving geospatial data 
  Work with the data producer community to cultivate best practices for 
frequency of capture of key data layers 
  The archival and preservation community needs to engage with existing 
spatial data infrastructure (SDI) efforts.  SDI, in its varying forms, provides an 
organizational and technical framework for geospatial data access and is 
instrumental in the development of data sharing networks, the cultivation of 
metadata, and the implementation of content standards, all of which can prove 
beneficial to preservation efforts 
 Glossary of Acronyms 
Acronym 
Meaning 
API 
Application Programming Interface 
COU 
Change Only Update 
DCC 
Digital Curation Centre 
DEM 
Digital Elevation Model 
DPC 
Digital Preservation Coalition 
ESRI 
Environmental Systems Research Institute 
FGDC 
Federal Geographic Data Committee 
FME 
Feature Manipulation Engine 
GDAL 
Geospatial Data Abstraction Library 
GIS 
Geographic Information System 
GML 
Geography Markup Language 
INSPIRE 
Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe 
ISO 
International Organization for Standardization 
KML 
Keyhole Markup Language 
METS 
Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard 
NCGDAP 
North Carolina Geospatial Data Archiving Project 
30 
NDIIPP 
National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program 
NGDA 
National Geospatial Digital Archive 
NTF 
National Transfer Format 
OGC 
Open Geospatial Consortium 
OS 
Ordnance Survey (GB) 
PDF 
Portable Document Format 
PREMIS 
Preservation Metadata Implementation Strategies 
SDI 
Spatial Data Infrastructure 
SDTS 
Spatial Data Transfer Standard 
TOID 
Topographic Identifier 
USGS 
United States Geological Survey 
WCS 
Web Coverage Service 
WFS 
Web Feature Service 
WMS 
Web Map Service 
 Selected References and Resources 
The following are a selection of useful references and resources: 
The AHDS (Arts and Humanities Data Service) produced a series of handbooks in 
its Repository Policies and Procedures section. These Preservation Handbooks 
identify significant properties of various data types and provides information on how 
best to preserve them. A full list is available at: http://ahds.ac.uk/preservation/ahds-
preservation-documents.htm
including one on Geographical Information Systems 
written by Jo Clarke and Jenny Mitcham (2005) at: http://ahds.ac.uk/preservation/gis-
preservation-handbook.pdf
The ADS (Archaeology Data Service) has produced a series of ―Guides to Good 
Practice‖. Specifically there is one devoted to GIS called: GIS Guide to Good 
Practice, with contributions by Mark Gillings, Peter Halls, Gary Lock, Paul Miller, 
Greg Phillips, Nick Ryan, David Wheatley, and Alicia Wise (1998); 
http://ads.ahds.ac.uk/project/goodguides/gis/index.html
A list of other guides in the series (including ones on CAD data) can be found at: 
http://ads.ahds.ac.uk/project/goodguides/g2gp.html
General preservation and curation resources, including a briefing paper on geospatial 
data are available on the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) website under Resources: 
http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resource/
The Digital Preservation Coalition has produced various other Technology Watch 
Reports which may be relevant, particularly ones on PDF/A and JPEG2000: 
http://www.dpconline.org/graphics/reports/index.html#techwatch
EDINA – Digimap service and various other projects on preservation, repositories, 
metadata and geospatial interoperability: 
http://edina.ac.uk/
Go-Geo provides a range of geospatial data resources including links to standards, 
books, case studies and metadata: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested