display pdf in iframe mvc : Rotate single page in pdf file SDK Library API .net asp.net winforms sharepoint 2013-2014%20UG%20Catalog%20with%20bookmarks16-part300

161
then advanced skills in remote sensing, GIS, and GPS using cutting edge tech-
nologies in our state-of-the-art teaching laboratory.
Degree seeking students will earn both the certificate and minor whereas non-
degree seeking students may earn only the certificate. Also, training and profes-
sional development opportunities are available through the GIT center for non-
credit field training in areas such as: agriculture, emergency management, USNG
mapping, and etc. 
Requirements for Admission to the GIT Program
Applicants to the Geospatial Information Technologies Program must meet all
regular admission requirements for entrance into Delta State University. Students
over 21 years of age who do not meet minimum admission requirements may
register for GIT courses as non-degree students and complete this program of
study as a Certificate in Geospatial Information Technologies.
Requirements for Completion of the GIT Program
Successful completion of the Program requires the student to complete the fol-
lowing Program of Study: 
I.  Core Courses  .
Hours
GIS 200-Computerized Mapping and Cartography ..
3
GIS 202-Intro. to Geospatial Science and GSI (GIS I)....
3
GIS 310-Advanced GIS (GIS II) 
3
REM 316-Remote Sensing..
3
GIS 490-GIS Capstone
3
TOTAL CORE HOURS..
15
II. Elective Courses (Student chooses one 300 level or greater elective in GIS or
REM)
TOTAL ELECTIVE HOURS..
3
TOTAL PROGRAM HOURS...
18
GEOSPATIAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS
All courses offered through the Center may be taken by both matriculated and
non-matriculated students; however, the stated prerequisites must be satisfied by
the first day of class unless prior written consent is provided by the Center direc-
tor.
GIS 100. GEOSPATIAL PRIMER. A broad, elementary introduction to geospatial
technology and its applications. Topics directed toward individuals who (at least
initially) do not intend to specialize in substantial further coursework or hands-on
activity in the field. 3
Rotate single page in pdf file - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pdf page few degrees; rotate single page in pdf reader
Rotate single page in pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pages in pdf; how to rotate pdf pages and save
162
GIS 200. COMPUTERIZED MAPS AND CARTOGRAPHY. Presented as an intro-
ductory-level course, students will explore spatial technologies through cartogra-
phy.  Students will explore scale, projections, coordinate systems, layout styles,
color ramps, font selection, generalization, symbol selection and similar concepts
through review of existing map products and the opportunity to create their own
maps.  Students will learn about the history of maps and their impact as visualiza-
tion tools to influence governance/decision making, public opinion (maps in the
news), and online-based mapping technologies. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 1
hour. 3.
GIS 202. INTRODUCTION TO GEOSPATIAL SCIENCE AND TECH (GIS I). This
course is an introduction to the theory and practice of spatial science and tech-
nology using the scientific method as a learning gateway. Fundamental concepts
include geodesy, coordinate systems and projections, basic computer science,
inductive/deductive reasoning skills, data structures, hypothesis development and
testing, map reading, land navigation, and GIS software skills.  Practical exercises
using GIS software, GPS, and map reading skills will reinforce theoretical discus-
sions. Satisfies the General Education Lab Science requirement for non-science
majors. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 1 hour. 3.
GIS 211. ONLINE. DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING I. The art and science of digi-
tal image processing of satellite and aircraft-derived remotely-sensed data for
resource management, including how to extract biophysical information from
remote sensor data for almost all multidisciplinary land-based environmental pro-
jects, is presented. Includes the fundamental principles of digital image process-
ing applied to remotely sensed data. Prerequisites: MAT 104 and 105 or equiva-
lents. 3
GIS 221. ONLINE. AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC INTERPRETATION. Introduction
to the principles and techniques utilized to interpret aerial photography.
Emphasis is on interpreting analog photographs visually in a range of application
areas; also includes an introduction to acquiring and analyzing aerial photo-
graphic data digitally. Prerequisites: MAT 104 and 105 or equivalents. 3
GIS 231. ONLINE. PHOTOGRAMMETRY I. Provides the fundamental principles
of photogrammetry. Topics introduced include a review of photogrammetry
developments and processes, methods for obtaining aerial photographs including
cameras and camera calibration, image coordinate measurement and refinement,
correction of lens distortion, principal point offset, atmospheric refraction Earth
curvature distortion scale and relief displacement in vertical and tilted pho-
tographs. Prerequisites: MAT 104 and 105 or equivalents. 3
GIS 310. ADV GEOSPATIAL SCIENCE & TECH (GIS II). Advanced geospatial
science and technology theory and skills.  Topics include GIS planning and man-
agement, workflow management, systems architecture, data conflation/defla-
tion/manipulation, 3-D surface generation and analysis, intermediate-level spatial
analysis techniques, and network design and analysis.  Software skills develop-
ment will accompany each lecture topic.  Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 1 hour. 3.
Prerequisite: GIS 202.
GIS 311. ONLINE. DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING II. Advances in science and
technology in aerial and satellite image processing and pattern recognition are
presented. Prerequisites: GIS 211, GIS 221 or equivalents. 3
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a single page from a PDF document.
how to save a pdf after rotating pages; rotate pdf pages individually
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
x86. Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to delete a single page from a PDF document. String
rotate pages in pdf online; rotate pages in pdf permanently
163
GIS 316. INTRO REMOTE SENSING. Students will learn the fundamentals of
remote sensing, including the principles of electromagnetic radiation, wave theo-
ry, the concept of a blackbody, how energy interacts with the atmosphere and
terrestrial objects, and the principles of feature/object identification based upon
spectral properties. Students will use remote sensing software to develop basic
skills such as ortho-rectification, color balancing, tiling imagery, and automated
feature recognition (supervised and unsupervised classification). Students will be
exposed to a wide range of remote sensing products and their application areas
including aerial photography, hyper-spectral imagery, multi-spectral imagery,
LiDAR, microwave, and RADAR. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 1 hours. 3
GIS 320. GIS AND COMMUNITY. This course focuses on the utilization of
Geographic Information Systems for resolving socio-economic issues, with a
focus on public involvement and participation. Prerequisites: GIS 200 or 202 or
equivalent. 3
GIS 330. SPATIAL SOLUTIONS TO NATURAL RESOURCE ISSUES. This course
focuses on the use of GIS and remote sensing for understanding, modeling, and
resolving issues in natural resource management using a spatially-based
approach. Students are expected to gain an understanding about the use of geo-
statistics to model terrain/data and to resolve issues involving oil and gas, mining,
pollution (land, water, and air), conservation planning, species/ecosystem diversi-
ty through case studies and practical exercises.  Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 1
hour 3. Prerequisites: GIS 202 and REM 316.
GIS 361. ONLINE. GEOSPATIAL DATA SYNTHESIS AND MODELING. Detailed
conceptual and analytical methods, and the knowledge to support synthesis and
modeling of Geospatial data in the solution of scientific and policy problems.
Prerequisites: GIS 200 or 202, MAT 300 or equivalents. 3
GIS 371. ONLINE. DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS. The course contains infor-
mation about Decision Support Systems (DSS) from a general data processing
point of view. The major components of the course are divided into three major
sections: elements of decision analysis, evaluation of multiple criteria, alternative,
and decision rules, and evaluation of outcomes and alternatives. Prerequisites:
GIS 200 or 202, REM 316 or equivalents. 3
GIS 381. COMMUNITY GROWTH. The use of remote sensing and GIS tech-
nologies to facilitate urban planning and infrastructure development for commu-
nity growth. Students are expected to gain an understanding about the use of GIS
and allied technologies with respect to understanding census/demographic data,
municipal needs (roadways/tax
mapping/sewer/water/electric/police/fire/EMS/Emergency Management), the inter-
dependencies of infrastructure elements, and basic principles for urban/municipal
planning. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 1 hour. 3. Prerequisite: GIS 202.
GIS 391. TOPOGRAPHIC MAPPING. Students will learn to read, interpret, cre-
ate, and publish topographic map products in accordance with current USGS
standards.  This includes the production of detailed marginalia, Geo-PDF formats,
and the use of production editing and mapping tools to achieve a standardized
map products at multiple scales and print sizes.  Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 1
hour. 3. Prerequisites: GIS 202 and REM 316.
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently; reverse pdf page order online
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
PDF file to the end of another and save to a single PDF file. NET document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
how to rotate a page in pdf and save it; pdf rotate just one page
164
GIS 431. ONLINE. PHOTOGRAMMETRY II. Advanced photogrammetric sys-
tems for production of highly accurate digital map products and three-dimension-
al representations for use and modeling. Prerequisites: MT 442 or 3D Vector and
Matrix Algebra, Statistics, GIS 231 or equivalents. 3
GIS 441. ONLINE. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND GEOPROCESSING. The
artificial intelligence theory, principles and applications specific to geospatial
processing and analysis in the files of both remote sensing and geographic infor-
mation systems. Prerequisites: GIS 200 or 202, GIS 211, MAT 104 or equiva-
lents. 3
GIS 451. ONLINE. BUSINESS GEOGRAPHICS. Key concepts in the field of busi-
ness geographics, including motivation for using geospatial technology in busi-
ness applications, the different geographic data sets available for use by business
analysts, and modeling of spatial data for business applications. Prerequisites:
GIS 221, GIS 361 or equivalents. 3
GIS 461. ONLINE. GEOSPATIAL MATHEMATICS, ALGORITHMS, AND STATIS-
TICS. This is a geostatistics and geomathematics course, presenting the underly-
ing principles and theory of GIS operations (raster, vector, or other data models),
such as surface analysis, interpolation, network analysis, path optimization,
topology, etc. Prerequisites: GIS 200 or 202, GIS 361, MAT 441, REM 316 or
equivalents. 3
GIS 470. PROGRAMMING GIS. This course is intended as an in-depth look at
computer programming within Geographic Information Systems. The focus will
be on GIS programming and methodology, utilizing practical GIS software skills
and basic scientific computing skills. Software skills development will accompa-
ny each lecture topic. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 1 hour. 3. Prerequisite: GIS
202.
GIS. 480. INTERNET GIS AND SPAT DATABASES. The purpose of this course is
to provide students with an understanding of how Internet GIS and spatial data-
bases work and to help them develop the skills requisite for success in this field.
Software skills development will accompany each lecture topic. Lecture 2 hours,
laboratory 1 hour. 3. Prerequisite: GIS 202.
GIS 490. SPATIAL TECH. INTERNSHIP. This is a variable hour course.  A mini-
mum of three (3) semester hours of this course are required for the BSIS-GIS con-
centrations, the undergraduate-level certificate program, and minor. Students will
learn how to give a technical presentation, manage GIS projects, and perform
deadline-sensitive work through a cooperative education or research program
performed at their place of work, with a designated sponsor or through the
Center. Students will be expected to meet/discuss progress and lessons learned
with the instructor on a regular basis, maintain a journal of activities and hours
worked, and prepare and deliver final project presentation and written report.
Students may not successfully complete more than nine (9) semester hours of this
course per academic degree or certificate program. Prerequisite: GIS 202.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
pdf rotate single page reader; pdf expert rotate page
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Users can view PDF document in single page or continue
pdf reverse page order preview; how to rotate a single page in a pdf document
165
Remote Sensing
REM 301. ONLINE. SENSORS AND PLATFORMS. Basic design attributes of
imaging sensor systems and the platforms on which they operate. An introduction
to cameras, scanners, and radiometers operating in the ultraviolet, visible,
infrared, and microwave regions of the spectrum. Prerequisites: GIS 200 or 201;
PHY 231 and 232 or equivalents. 3
REM 401. ONLINE. ORBITAL MECHANICS. Uses elementary principles of math-
ematics, physics, and mechanics to introduce traditional science required to
place a spacecraft into orbit, keep it there, determine its position, and maneuver
it. Course provides a basic understanding of orbital mechanics. Prerequisites:
MAT 205 and 206, PHY 231 and 232 or equivalents. 3
REM 411. ONLINE. REMOTE SENSING OF THE ENVIRONMENT. Remote sens-
ing and geographic information systems (GIS) are used as powerful tools in envi-
ronmental research. Prerequisites: GIS 200 or 202, GIS 211, REM 301 or equiva-
lents. 3
REM 421. ONLINE. INFORMATION EXTRACTION USING MICROWAVE
DATA. Presents the basic concepts, theory, and applications of microwave
remote sensing. Topics include unique aspects of microwave radiation, passive
microwave, fundamental principles of microwave (active), synthetic aperture
radar, backscatter principles and models, interferometry, phase relationships, pro-
cessing radar data. Environmental influences on radar returns and applications of
these principles are presented. Prerequisites: GIS 200 or 202, REM 301 or equiv-
alents. 3
REM 431. ONLINE. INFORMATION EXTRACTION USING MULTI-, HYPER-,
AND ULTRA-SPECTRAL DATA. This course addresses the two main components
of a VNIR remote sensing study: preparation of the imagery and information
extraction techniques for both multi-spectral and hyper-spectral imagery.
Prerequisites: PHY 231 and 232, GIS 211, REM 301 or equivalents. 3
REM 441. ONLINE. ADVANCED SENSOR SYSTEMS AND DATA COLLECTION.
The newest active and passive sensors, including advanced synthetic aperture
radar, lidar, radiometers, spectrometers, microwave sounders, advanced hyper-
spectral sensors, and the advanced platforms which carry these sensors are pre-
sented. Prerequisites: PHY 231 and 232, REM 301 or equivalents. 3
REM 451. ONLINE. APPLICATIONS OF REMOTE SENSING TO ECOLOGICAL
MODELING. Techniques and applications of remote sensing to a broad spectrum
of issues related to ecological modeling are presented. Prerequisites: PHY 202, or
BIO 111 or 201 or 449, REM 316 or equivalents. 3
REM 461. ONLINE. FORESTRY MONITORING AND MANAGEMENT.
Fundamental principles of photographic and non-photographic remote sensing
and the application of these principles specifically to detect, map, measure, and
monitor forest tree, stand, and canopy attributes. Prerequisites: REM 316, BIO
449 or Forest Management, or equivalents. 3
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
With VB.NET PDF SDK, PDF document page can be rotated to 90, 180, and 270 in clockwise. Both a single page and whole file pages can be rotated and saved as
rotate all pages in pdf file; save pdf rotated pages
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
TIFF conversion control, C# developers can render and convert PDF document to TIFF image file with no loss in original file quality. Both single page and multi
save pdf after rotating pages; rotate individual pages in pdf
166
REM 471. ONLINE. AGRICULTURAL APPLICATIONS IN REMOTE SENSING.
The applications of remote sensing, global positioning system technologies, and
geographic information systems (GIS) for the management and conservation of
soil, vegetation, and water resources that are important to agricultural production;
the use of these technologies for inventorying and monitoring agricultural condi-
tions for improving the information base on a local, regional and global basis;
and for decision-making in the management of agricultural conditions at different
spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions. Prerequisites: MAT 104 and 105, CHE
100 or 101, PHY 231 and 232 or equivalents. 3
REM 481. ONLINE. LAND USE AND LAND COVER APPLICATIONS. The funda-
mental issues in creating, updating, assessing, and using land cover and land use
information that has been derived from remotely sensed data. Prerequisites: REM
316 or equivalent. 3
REM 491. ONLINE. REMOTE SENSING OF WATER. An overview of how satel-
lite remote-sensing technologies may be used for the study and monitoring of sur-
face waters (rivers, streams, lakes, and wetlands). The remote sensing of snow
and ice is also covered. 3
INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
Karen G. Bell, Ph.D., Director
(662) 846-4279
The Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies (BSIS) is a unique degree for
the Delta region. It provides a program of study targeted toward students who
desire a non-traditional approach to learning within a broad range of disciplines.
The Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies program allows students to
prepare for careers requiring functional knowledge of multiple disciplines.
The Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies program (BSIS) is a university-
wide degree program that enables students to create interdisciplinary specialties
that prepare them for careers in a world that increasingly bridges academic disci-
plines. Students pursue two or three subject-area concentrations that represent
academic interests they wish to integrate into a meaningful program.
A four-course core offers students the intellectual tools to identify connections
between their concentrations and engage in interdisciplinary problem solving.
The interdisciplinary core is issues-driven and provides pragmatic and thought-
provoking approaches to thinking, research, problem solving, and communica-
tion.
Students will choose either two or three areas of concentration. Areas of study
may be selected from established minors offered at the University (pages 112-114
of the Undergraduate University Bulletin) or other areas to be determined in con-
sultation with the program director. If three areas of concentration are chosen, a
minimum of 18 semester hours of study is required in each discipline. If only two
areas of concentration are elected, the minimum requirement is 27 semester
hours in each.
167
Requirements for Admission to BSIS Program
Application for admission to the Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies
program is made to the Director whose office is located in Bailey 211. Students
seeking full admission to the BSIS program must meet the following requirements:
* Good academic standing
* Must have completed 62 semester hours of academic credit
* Must meet with a BSIS advisor to declare the major and to define the 
program of study.
Students who do not satisfy all requirements for full admission to the major may
declare pre-BSIS status while working to become eligible for admission.
Requirements for Completion of the Program
In addition to the graduation requirements stated in the Undergraduate University
Bulletin, successful completion of the BSIS program requires satisfactory perfor-
mance in all major courses. These courses are composed of Core courses and
Areas of Concentration courses.
* Core Courses- Successful students must attain a 2.5 GPA in the four 
core courses. No grade below a C will be allowed. Any grade below 
C must be removed by repeating the course.
* Concentration Courses - Students must maintain a 2.5 GPA in 
each of their declared major areas of concentration.
These requirements are in addition to the University requirement for maintaining
a 2.0 GPA for all course work. Every graduate of the BSIS program is expected to
meet all requirements for graduation. Exceptions may be granted if deemed war-
ranted by the BSIS director in consultation with the dean and/or provost.
BIS 300. INTRODUCTION TO INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES. Introduction to
the concepts and methods of interdisciplinary study by critically examining antic-
ipated workplace and civic trends. The course focuses on ethics and effective
decision-making in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on development of
critical and analytical thinking skills, and written and oral communication. Key
ethical questions will be addressed from a variety of perspectives both past and
present as a basis for informed decision-making.  3
BIS 310. INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS. Critical analy-
sis of quantitative and qualitative information. Emphasis will be placed on under-
standing and using methods of qualitative and quantitative analysis, including
issues such as understanding variability in data and making decisions in the face
of uncertainty. Multiple methods of presenting findings of such research to sup-
port an argument are also explored. Prerequisites: BIS 300 or permission of the
instructor. 3
168
BIS 400. APPLIED INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES. Applications of interdiscipli-
nary thought and research. Students will use concepts and methods learned in
previous BIS courses to explore issues in their chosen areas of emphasis. May
involve individual or group projects combining concentrations. Over the course
of the semester, students will develop a proposal for their Capstone Projects.
Prerequisites: BIS 300, 310.  3
BIS 410. CAPSTONE PROJECT. Integration of classroom and experiential learn-
ing. The culminating academic activity of the BSIS program, the Capstone Project
requires students to apply interdisciplinary concepts and practices to one or more
of their chosen areas of emphasis. Students must successfully complete BIS 400
with an approved proposal and a grade of C or better before registering for the
Capstone Project. Prerequisite: BIS 400.  3
BIS 470. INTERNSHIP. Field studies with an approved academic or professional
agency, or industry. 1-6
BIS 492. SPECIAL TOPICS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES. Current develop-
ments in Interdisciplinary Studies. Prerequisites: BIS 300 and permission of
instructor. 1-6
DIVISION OF LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE
Professors: Burgos-Aguilar, S. Ford, Hays (Chair), King,
Sarcone, J. Tomek
Associate Professors: Mitchell, Roberts, Schultz, Smithpeters
Assistant Professors: G. Clark, Paulson,
Smith, Tibbs
Instructors: Billingsley, Owen, Phillips, Y. Tomek
Part-time Instructors: Watts
(662) 846-4060
The Division of Languages and Literature offers baccalaureate degrees in English
(with three options for concentration), Foreign Language (with concentrations in
French, German, and Spanish), Journalism, and Communication Studies and
Theatre Arts (with an emphasis in communication studies or theatre). Courses in
the Division teach students the values and function of the written and spoken
word. Freshman and sophomore English courses teach effective writing as well as
critical appreciation of literature. Advanced English courses help students to
understand and evaluate literature of particular ages and types. Foreign language
courses teach students proficiency in reading and speaking French, German, or
Spanish; at the same time, students are learning to understand and appreciate the
manners and aspirations conveyed through those languages. Philosophy courses
offer students opportunities to pose and respond to fundamental questions about
human existence and human values. In speech courses, students learn to express
their ideas with clarity and confidence and learn major modes of public address
and discussion. In theatre courses, they learn to achieve vitality in performances
as actors, directors, or technicians.
DIANE REED STEWART FOREIGN LANGUAGE LABORATORY. The University
provides a professionally staffed laboratory where computers, CDs and DVDs
are available. The staff provides individual assistance to students upon request.
169
Use of the laboratory is encouraged for all foreign language students and is re-
quired in most elementary and intermediate courses. The University has a great
number of literary masterpieces on cassette tapes available in the laboratory.
THE WRITING CENTER. The Writing Center, under the direction of the English
faculty, is a campus-wide service providing consultation to undergraduate and
graduate students and to faculty on any of their writing projects. Students may be
referred to the Center or may voluntarily use its services.
SIX HOURS OF ENGLISH COMPOSITION ARE PREREQUISITE TO ALL OTHER
ENGLISH COURSES. A 2.0 GPA (MINIMUM) ON ALL COURSES IN THE
MAJOR IS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION FROM DELTA STATE UNIVERSITY
ENGLISH
ENG 090, 091. DEVELOPMENTAL ENGLISH. Practice in grammar, usage, punc-
tuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraph development as they relate to
prose composition. 3
ENG 099. BASIC WRITING SKILLS. Practice in grammar, usage, punctuation,
spelling, sentence structure, and paragraph development as they relate to prose
composition. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 1 hour. 3
ENG 100. ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE. Skills of language acquisition,
including listening, reading, speaking, and writing. Emphasis on verbal and writ-
ten communication. Does not meet any degree requirements. 3
ENG 101. ENGLISH COMPOSITION. Introduction to and practice of the writing
process, including discovering, ordering, and editing. 3
ENG 102. ENGLISH COMPOSITION. Review and practice of the writing pro-
cess, emphasizing exposition and including the research paper. Prerequisite:
ENG 101. 3
ENG 103. HONORS ENGLISH COMPOSITION. Intensive introduction to and
practice of the writing process involved in a range of writing situations, including
expository, argumentative, and research writing. Open to students recommended
by ENG 101, 102 instructors; not open to students completing ENG 102; recom-
mended for students receiving ACT ENG 101 credit. 3
ENG 203. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE. Short story and novel. Prerequi-
site: ENG 101 and 102, or 103. 3
ENG 204. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE. Poetry and drama. Prerequisite:
ENG 101 and 102, or 103. 3
ENG 206. WORLD LITERATURE SURVEY. World literature with an emphasis on
non-Western literature and culture. Prerequisite: ENG 101 and 102, or 103.  3
ENG 220. LITERARY MAGAZINE WORKSHOP. Experience in editing, writing,
and print production of a literary magazine. Prerequisite: permission of the
Confidante faculty committee. May be repeated up to seven times for credit. 1
ENG 300. EXPOSITION (WRITING PROFICIENCY EXAM). Review of the writing
process for students taking the Writing Proficiency Examination (WPE). Graded
CR or NC. Prerequisite or corequisite: Enrollment in second semester of ENG lit-
erature. 1
170
ENG 301. EXPOSITORY WRITING. Review of and practice in the writing pro-
cess, including its application to various disciplines; for students who wish to
improve writing skills and for students who do not receive credit for ENG 300.
Not applicable to a major or minor in English. 3
ENG 302. CREATIVE WRITING. Introduction to writing various literary genres,
organized in a workshop setting, but with attention to individual needs.  3
ENG 303. TECHNICAL WRITING. Practice in reporting technical information
with attention to purpose and audience, logic and clarity, design and graphics,
and documentation. Prerequisite: ENG 300 or 301. 3
ENG 304. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. Advanced analytical writing and
research methods designed primarily for the English major, with attention to stu-
dents writing processes. Prerequisite: ENG 101 and 102, or 103; 6 hours of liter-
ature. 3
ENG 305. APPLIED WRITING. Individualized and sustained writing support and
instruction provided by Writing Center personnel. Graded CR. May be repeated
up to 7 times for credit. Not applicable to any major or minor. Prerequisite:
Approval of the instructor. 1
ENG 307. LINGUISTICS. The scientific study of language and its development
from classical to modern times. 3
ENG 309. ENGLISH LITERATURE. From the beginnings through the eighteenth
century. 3
ENG 310. ENGLISH LITERATURE. From the nineteenth century to the present. 3
ENG 312. AMERICAN LITERATURE. Puritanism through Romanticism. 3
ENG 313. AMERICAN LITERATURE. Realism through Modernism. 3
ENG 334. SCIENCE FICTION. Exploration of the history and development of the
genre through the study of novels, short stories, and films that represent different
branches of science fiction. 3
ENG 402. POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP. Writing poetry and understanding
how poetry works are emphasized in this course. Poetic forms, sound effects,
rhythm, diction, line breaks, and imagery are studied in depth. Revising and sub-
mitting poems for publication are discussed. Open to both beginning and experi-
enced poets. 3
ENG 404. CREATIVE NONFICTION. Reading and writing of personal essays,
memoirs, autobiography, narrative nonfiction, travel/nature/science writing and
biography/profiles. Attention to issues of publication. 3
ENG 406. HISTORY AND GRAMMARS OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 3
ENG 408. ENGLISH WORDS-THEIR MEANINGS AND ORIGINS. A practical
study of English etymology and vocabulary enrichment. Special emphasis on
Latin and Greek elements as well as other word origins. 3
ENG 410. CREATIVE DRAMA. (See THE 410)
ENG 411. CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE. Fiction, poetry, and drama since 1945. 3
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested