display pdf in iframe mvc : How to rotate all pages in pdf at once application software cloud windows html wpf class 2013-2014%20UG%20Catalog%20with%20bookmarks17-part301

171
ENG 412. FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP. Short story and/or novel writing (and
reading) in workshop setting. Attention to issues of publication. 3
ENG 414. MODERN POETRY. Twentieth-century poetry. 3
ENG 415. SOUTHERN LITERATURE. Poetry and prose of leading writers of the
South from colonial to modern times with special emphasis on Mississippi 
writers. 3
ENG 416. UNDERSTANDING FILM. An introduction to the analysis of film.
Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours.  3
ENG 426. THE ENGLISH NOVEL. The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. 3
ENG 432. CHAUCER. Selected works, with emphasis on the General Prologue to
the Canterbury Tales and selected tales representative of literary types in the Mid-
dle Ages. 3
ENG 435, 436. SHAKESPEARE. Representative comedies, tragedies, histories, and
romances with an introduction to the poetry. 3, 3
ENG 437. GREAT ENGLISH DRAMA. 3
ENG 439. RENAISSANCE. Non-dramatic literature of the sixteenth and early
seventeenth centuries. 3
ENG 440. MILTON. Paradise Lost and other selected poetry and prose. 3
ENG 441. RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. Prose and poetry from
Dryden to Johnson. 3
ENG 442. JANE AUSTEN. The study of the novels, juvenilia, and unfinished work
as well as the critical approaches and social and cultural contexts. 3
ENG 443. EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY. Literature of the Romantic period,
Blake through Byron. 3
ENG 444. LATER NINETEENTH CENTURY. Literature of the Victorian Period,
Tennyson through Hopkins. 3
ENG 445. TONI MORRISON AND HER CONTEMPORARIES. Examination of
works by Toni Morrison and her contemporary writers. Prerequisites: ENG 101
and 102 or 103. 3
ENG 446. THE AMERICAN NOVEL. From the beginnings to the present. 3
ENG 447. MODERN DRAMA. Representative drama of America, Britain, and
Europe. 3
ENG 448. MODERN NOVEL. Representative novels of America, Britain, and
Europe. 3
ENG 450. MYTHOLOGY. Mythology as background to literature. 3
ENG 451. ENGLISH SEMINAR IN ____________. Concentration on specified
author(s), genre(s), literary currents, or topic(s). 3
ENG 452. LITERATURE BY WOMEN. Womens voices in prose and poetry from
the fourteenth century to the present. 3
How to rotate all pages in pdf at once - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf rotate pages separately; rotate all pages in pdf
How to rotate all pages in pdf at once - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pdf page; how to rotate one page in a pdf file
172
ENG 453. AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE. The study of major and minor
works by African-American writers. 3
ENG 454. NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE AND ART. Works by Native
American writers and artists and from oral tradition. (See ART 454). 3
ENG 455. YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE. Survey of young adult literature with
pedagogical applications. 3
ENG 456. GRAMMAR FOR TEACHERS. Study of grammar as a rational, dynamic
system composed of structural forms carrying meaning, its pragmatics, and
methodologies for teaching syntax and writing conventions. Prerequisites: 12
hours of English or permission of the instructor.  3
ENG 460. DETECTIVE FICTION. The history and subgenres of detective fiction. 3
ENG 461. BLUES LITERATURE. This course will examine how the Blues changed
America and the world. In general, it is an interdisciplinary analysis of African
American literature, history, music and culture. In particular, it is an investigation
of The Mississippi Delta Blues and the social, political, and economic context
from which it arose. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 or 103. 3
ENG 470. WRITERS OF THE MISSISSIPPI DELTA. Examination of works by
authors born in or otherwise connected to the Mississippi Delta Region from the
era of native American dominance to the present. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and
102 or 103. 3
ENG 481. SPORTS LITERATURE. The interface between literature/film and sport
from the classical to the present, with emphasis on contemporary works. Lecture
2 hours, laboratory 2 hours.  3
ENG 486. SENIOR SEMINAR IN TEACHING ENGLISH IN THE SECONDARY
SCHOOL. Language assessment and cognitive development in young adults,
internship problems and solutions, and portfolio preparation and evaluation.
Prerequisite: Enrollment in student teaching. 3
ENG 490. SENIOR PORTFOLIO IN CREATIVE WRITING. Directed production
of a creative writing manuscript of 40-60 pages. Prerequisites: ENG 302 and a
minimum of 6 additional creative writing credit hours to be elected from ENG
402, 404, or 412. 1
ENG 492. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGLISH. Current developments or independent
study in English. 1-6
ENG 493. INTERNSHIP IN PUBLISHING. Internship in academic publishing,
including manuscript preparation and editorial and computer assistance under
the supervision of the publication editors. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
1-3
ENG 495. APPROACHES TO TUTORING WRITERS. Theoretical and practical
approaches to individual writing instruction for Writing Center tutors. Prerequi-
site: permission of instructor. 1 (maximum 6 semesters)
ENG 499. THEATRE TOUR OF LONDON. 3
CUR 456. TRENDS IN THE TEACHING OF LANGUAGE ARTS. See CUR 456 in
the Division of Teacher Education.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on Visual Studio .NET
pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Compatible with all Windows operating system in both 32 HTML5 Viewer Demo or XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Editor
rotate a pdf page; rotate one page in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF - Deploy VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer on Visual Studio.NET
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Introduction to How to Build Online VB.NET PDF Viewer in Visual All Rights Reserved
how to change page orientation in pdf document; pdf rotate page and save
173
CUR 485. TEACHING OF LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL.
See CUR 485 in the Division of Teacher Education.
FOREIGN LANGUAGES
Major World Languages
For students interested in foreign languages other than the French, German and
Spanish regularly offered by the Division, opportunities exist for regular classes or
individualized instruction in other select major world languages, subject to
instructor availability. When offered, such courses will be creditable through
course numbers 101-102, Elementary, for three hours each, with the course pre-
fix and title designating the particular language offered. Students may certify to
teach high school French, German, and Spanish.
Interested students should contact the Chair of the Division of Languages and
Literature.
Note: Only French, German, or Spanish will fulfill Special Degree Requirements
in the B.A. and the B.S. degrees.
French
FRE 101, 102. ELEMENTARY FRENCH. Basic grammar and practice in conversa-
tion, reading, and composition. For beginning students and those with not more
than one year of high school French. Thirty-minute laboratory sessions twice
weekly. 3, 3
FRE 201, 202. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH. Grammar review, conversation, and
introduction to French literature. Both courses prerequisite to advanced French
courses. 3, 3
FRE 301, 302. ADVANCED FRENCH. Advanced grammar and practice in read-
ing, writing, listening, and speaking. 3, 3
FRE 401, 402. FRENCH LITERATURE. Practice in reading French from selected
passages from the Middle Ages to the present. 3, 3
FRE 403. FRENCH CONVERSATION. Practice in speaking French. For students
with three semesters of college French. 3
FRE 404. CONTEMPORARY FRENCH SOCIETY. Exploration of political, eco-
nomic, and other cultural aspects of life in France. 3
FRE 410. FRENCH WOMEN WRITERS. Exploration of French literary history
through womens voices. 3
FRE 430. FRENCH POETRY. Reading strategies of poetry with emphasis on
Rimbaud, Mallarme, and Baudelaire. 3
FRE 440. FRENCH THEATRE. Reading strategies of performance literature with
emphasis on contemporary theatre. 3
FRE 442. CONTEMPORARY LITERARY THEORY. Application of contemporary
literary theories, including structuralism, deconstruction, reader response criti-
cism, gender studies, and the new historicism, to literature and film. 3
FRE 451. FRENCH SEMINAR IN ____________. Concentration on specified
author(s), genre(s), literary currents, or topic(s). 3
FRE 492. SPECIAL TOPICS IN FRENCH. Current developments in French. 1-6
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Once the photo is inserted, its attributes, for instance Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save All Rights Reserved.
pdf rotate all pages; change orientation of pdf page
C# PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc the new order for all pages // 1. the be in the array and only once // otherwise, the
how to reverse pages in pdf; rotate pdf pages on ipad
174
German
GER 101, 102. ELEMENTARY GERMAN. Basic grammar and practice in conver-
sation, reading, and composition. For beginning students and those with not
more than one year of high school German. Thirty-minute laboratory sessions
twice weekly. 3, 3
GER 201, 202. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN. Grammar review, conversation, and
reading in German literature. Thirty-minute laboratory sessions twice weekly.
Both courses prerequisite to advanced German courses. 3, 3
GER 301, 302. ADVANCED GERMAN. Advanced grammar and practice in lis-
tening, speaking, reading, and writing. Thirty-minute laboratory sessions twice
weekly. Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent. 3, 3
GER 401, 402. SURVEY OF GERMAN-LANGUAGE LITERATURE. Literature from
the Enlightenment to the present. 3, 3
GER 403, 404. CONTEMPORARY GERMAN SOCIETY. Exploration of German
society through reading, writing, and speaking. For students with six semesters of
college German. Thirty-minute laboratory sessions twice weekly. 3, 3
GER 430. EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY GERMAN-LANGUAGE LITERATURE. 3
GER 440. NINETEENTH-CENTURY GERMAN-LANGUAGE LITERATURE. 3
GER 442. TWENTIETH-CENTURY GERMAN-LANGUAGE LITERATURE. 3
GER 451. GERMAN SEMINAR IN ____________. Concentration on specified
author(s), genre(s), literary currents, or topic(s). 3
GER 492. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GERMAN. Current developments in German. 1-6
Spanish
SPA 101, 102. ELEMENTARY SPANISH. Basic grammar and practice in conversation,
reading, and composition. For beginning students and those with not more than one
year of high school Spanish. Thirty-minute laboratory sessions twice weekly. 3, 3
SPA 201, 202. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH. Grammar review, conversation, and
reading in Spanish literature. Thirty-minute laboratory sessions twice weekly.
Both courses prerequisite to advanced Spanish courses. 3, 3
SPA 301, 302. ADVANCED SPANISH. Advanced grammar and practice in listen-
ing, speaking, reading, and writing. 3,3
SPA 401, 402. THE LITERATURE OF SPAIN. Literature from the Middle Ages to
the present. 3, 3
SPA 403. SPANISH CONVERSATION. Practice in speaking Spanish. For students
with three semesters of college Spanish. 3
SPA 430, 431. LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE. From colonial times to 1888 in
the first semester, from 1888 to the present in the second semester. 3, 3
SPA 440. SPANISH DRAMA OF THE GOLDEN AGE. The drama from its begin-
ning to 1681. 3
SPA 442. CERVANTES. 3
VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc define the new order for all pages ' 1. the be in the array and only once ' otherwise, the
rotate individual pdf pages reader; pdf rotate pages and save
VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.
If the source PDF document is with multiple pages, it may be Dim document As BaseDocument If filePath.EndsWith(".pdf") Then document = New All Rights Reserved.
pdf rotate single page and save; rotate single page in pdf file
175
SPA 451. SPANISH SEMINAR IN ____________. Concentration on specified
author(s), genre(s), literary currents, or topic(s). 3
SPA 492. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SPANISH. Current developments in Spanish. 1-6
Journalism
JOU 201. WRITING FOR THE MASS MEDIA. Introduction to basic news writing.
Attention to both print and broadcast news styles. Techniques of news gathering,
with practical experience in interviewing and writing for publication. 3
JOU 202. NEWS REPORTING. Continuation of JOU 201, with more emphasis on
news gathering, interviewing and writing, plus techniques in editing and page
design. Lab required. Prerequisite: JOU 201. 3
JOU 203. PHOTOJOURNALISM. Introduction to news, features, and sports pho-
tography and related elements for use in print media. The course will cover basic
photography techniques as they relate to the print media. 3
JOU 204. PHOTOJOURNALISM II. Advanced photography techniques as they
relate to the print media, imaging software, lighting techniques, history of photo-
journalism, legal and ethical issues, photo illustration, editing, becoming a pro-
fessional, the photo story, composition. Prerequisites: JOU 203.  3
JOU 215. NEWSPAPER WORKSHOP. Students gain practical newspaper writing,
editorial, digital photography, and advertising experience and are expected to
submit work for review by the instructor and by the editors of the camups news-
paper. May be repeated up to 7 times for credit. 1
JOU 220. YEARBOOK WORKSHOP. Practical experiences for University year-
book staff. One hour per semester not to exceed 8 hours. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor. 1
JOU 301. EDITING FOR PRINT MEDIA. Practice with editorial roles such as
assigning stories to reporters, correcting and revising copy on the computer, and
writing editorials. 3
JOU 302. PRINT LAYOUT AND DESIGN. The fundamental building blocks of
print design: headlines, text, photos, cutlines. 3
JOU 303. HISTORY OF JOURNALISM. American mass media from colonial
days to present in the context of social, economic, and political change. A review
of the important periods in American journalism and how it has evolved. 3
JOU 304. FEATURE WRITING. Practice in finding subjects and writing feature
stories. Prerequisites: JOU 201, 202. 3
JOU 305. SPORTS WRITING. Techniques of writing and editing news stories
about sports. 3
JOU 401. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING. Locating, understanding, and using
public records, documents, and other legitimate sources to determine and write
the story. 3
JOU 492. SPECIAL TOPICS IN JOURNALISM. Current developments in journal-
ism. 1-6
JOU 493. INTERNSHIP IN JOURNALISM. 3-6
VB Imaging - VB Code 128 Generation Guide
PointF(100F, 100F)) docx.Save("C:\\Sample_Barcode.pdf"). All the properties above are included in the 96 'set rotation barcode.Rotate = Rotate.Rotate0 barcode
rotate all pages in pdf preview; saving rotated pdf pages
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
new order for all pages // 1. the length of the array MUST BE equal to pageCount // 2. each page index SHOULD be in the array and only once // otherwise, the
reverse page order pdf; how to rotate one page in pdf document
176
COMMUNICATION STUDIES AND THEATRE ARTS
Communication Studies
COM 101. PUBLIC SPEAKING. An introduction to the theory and practice of
public speaking. Prerequisite for Communication Studies courses 200-level and
higher. 3
COM 202. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION. Exchanges of meaning
through verbal and nonverbal behavior in informal face-to-face speaking.  3
COM 301. COMMUNICATION THEORY. An historical overview of the major
theoretical paradigms in the speech communication discipline. Prerequisite:
COM 101. 3
COM 305. DEBATE. Debate in theory and practice. Emphasis on debate as a tool
for democratic decision-making. Prerequisite: COM 101 3
COM 306. SMALL GROUP DISCUSSION. Group discussion in problem-solving
and learning situations. 3
COM 318. MASS COMMUNICATION. An examination of the forms of media,
their development and influence on society.  3
COM 319. AUDIO/VIDEO PRODUCTION. Planning and production of pro-
grams for mass media, including radio and television. Prerequisite: SPE 318, or
permission of instructor. 3
COM 325. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION. Introductory survey of the
major concepts and issues in the field of intercultural communication. Topics
range from ethnocentrism to ethics. A critical analysis of various intercultural and
intracultural case studies.  3
COM 326. INDIVIDUAL STUDY. 3
COM 400. RHETORIC OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS. A rhetorical analysis of social
movements and social protest.  3
COM 440. RHETORICAL CRITICISM. An examination of methods used to ana-
lyze rhetorical texts.  3
COM 492. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SPEECH. Current developments in Speech.  1-6
COM 493. INTERNSHIP IN COMMUNICATION. Projects and experiences in
the public speaking professions, including radio or television, under the supervi-
sion of experienced personnel. Minimum of 150 or 300 hours. Prerequisites: per-
mission of instructor. 3, 6
Theatre
THE 221. THEATRE ACTIVITIES. Practical experience for students interested in
theatre and drama. One hour per semester not to exceed 8 hours.1
THE 225. INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE. Dramatic art and its relation to other
fine arts. 3
THE 226. TECHNICAL THEATRE PRODUCTION. Experiences in dramatic pro-
duction. Two lectures and two workshops per week. 3
THE 309. ACTING. Introductory training in acting. Two hours lecture, two hours
laboratory. 3
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
set resolution barcode.Rotate = Rotate.Rotate0 'set rotate barcode.AddCheckSum to decode, encode and process PDF file independently All Barcodes Types in VB.NET.
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; how to rotate just one page in pdf
VB.NET Image: Using VB.NET Web Image Viewer to Process Web Images
including JPEG, PNG, GIF, BMP, TIFF, PDF, Word the trial package demo project that provides all rotation buttons It makes you easy to rotate image and document
rotate pdf pages in reader; rotate single page in pdf
177
THE 310. ACTING II. Intermediate training in acting. Two hour lecture, two hour
laboratory. Prerequisites: THE 309 or permission of the instructor. 3
THE 311. PERFORMANCE STUDIES. Techniques for oral reading of literature.
Prerequisites: COM 101 or 202. 3
THE 320. HISTORY OF THE THEATRE. Development of the theatre from the
Greeks to the present. 3
THE 331. DIRECTING FOR THEATRE. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory. 3
THE 339. DRAMATIC PERFORMANCE AND PRODUCTION. Theatre produc-
tion on an internship basis. Credit varies with amount of time and responsibility
involved. May be repeated for maximum of twelve semester hours credit. 1-6
THE 350. SEMINAR IN PLAY PRODUCTION. 3
THE 410. CREATIVE DRAMA. Creative drama as it contributes to the intellectual
and social growth of children. 3
PHILOSOPHY
PHI 201. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY. Philosophical methods, prob-
lems, values, and themes through a study of representative philosophers. 3
PHI 405. CREATIVE AND CRITICAL THINKING. Correct principles of reasoning,
semantics, propaganda, common fallacies, and scientific methodology. 3
PHI 406. ETHICS. Principal theories of the ideal approach to life, the status of
value, and the problems of morality in relation to specific areas of modern life. 3
PHI 408. BIOMEDICAL ETHICS. An overview of contemporary issues in biomed-
ical ethics: doctor/patient relationships, medical research, genetics, allocation of
scarce resources, abortion, confidentiality, cloning, gene therapy, organ trans-
plants and euthanasia. 3
PHI 410, 411. HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY. First semester studies
Greeks through Renaissance. Second semester continues survey to modern times.
Prerequisite: PHI 201. 3, 3
PHI 412. A HISTORY OF WOMEN PHILOSOPHERS. This course is a survey of
women thinkers in the history of philosophy, including Hypatia of Alexandria,
Hildegard of Bingen, Heloise, Julian of Norwich, Catherine of Siena, Margaret
Cavendish, Anne Finch, Mary Astell, Mary Wollstonecraft, Emilie du Châtelet,
Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, Ayn Rand, Hannah Arendt, Simone de Beauvoir,
Simone Weil and others. 3
PHI 441. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION. Systematic consideration of such con-
cepts as existence of God, faith, creation, revelation, miracles, and problem of
evil. 3
PHI 442, 443. RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD. PHI 442, considers Judaism,
Christianity, and Islam. PHI 443 considers Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism,
and Taoism. 3, 3
PHI 470. PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE. Philosophical issues and implica-
tions of selected literary works. 3
178
PHI 492. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY. Current developments in
Philosophy. 1-6
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS
Professors: Norris, Wingard (Chair)
Associate Professors: Hebert, Virden 
Assistant Professor: Horton
Instructor: Smith
(662) 846-4475
The purposes of the Department of Mathematics are to prepare teachers of math-
ematics for the elementary and secondary schools, to provide a foundation for
professional careers in mathematics, and to provide for the mathematical needs
of the general student.
The Department offers a major in mathematics in the B.S. degree and a major in
mathematics education in the B.S. in Education degree. A student who plans to
teach may take either the B.S. or B.S. in Education degree, but the person who
takes the B.S. degree should elect the general education and professional educa-
tion courses necessary to meet certification requirements. MAT 121, 131, 231,
and 331 may not be applied toward a major or minor in mathematics. MAT 300
may not be applied toward a B.S. major or minor in mathematics. 
Mathematics majors in the B.S. degree interested in a career in computer work
should include MAT 441, 442, and 444 in their programs. Computer language
courses offered by the College of Business are recommended. A minor in Com-
puter Information Systems would include such courses.
The Department of Mathematics offers a program of pre-engineering designed for
the student who wishes to complete a portion of an engineering curriculum
before attending an engineering school. Proper electives enable students to direct
their work toward the particular phase of engineering desired.
Admission Policy for Programs Offered Through
The Mathematics Department
Provisional Admission
Students entering Delta State University who declare a major offered through the
Department of Mathematics are initially admitted with 
p
r
o
v
i
s
i
o
n
a
l
s
t
a
t
u
s
.
Students who demonstrate satisfactory performance in a core of introductory
mathematics courses (as defined below) are granted 
f
u
l
l
a
d
m
i
s
s
i
o
n
to the pro-
gram.  The intent of this policy is to insure that all students gain basic knowledge
and skills in introductory core courses that are required for the level of scholar-
ship expected from them in their advanced studies and in their future professions.
179
Full Admission
Full admission is granted upon satisfactory completion of the following introduc-
tory mathematics core:
MAT 104/105 or 106
College Algebra and Trigonometry or Precalculus
MAT 251
Calculus I
Satisfactory completion is defined as having completed a course with a grade of
C or better. Any grade below C must be removed by repeating the course and
earning a grade of C or better. Students should be aware that repeating courses
may increase the time required for graduation. When students fulfill the core
requirements, they are considered to be adequately prepared to continue with
advanced mathematics courses and are granted full admission to the program. A
student who has not been granted full admission will not be permitted to regis-
ter for any upper-division mathematics course. Upper division courses are
those MAT courses numbered above 251.
At the close of each semester, students records will be reviewed by their advi-
sors and the Chair of the Curriculum Committee. The Curriculum Committee
will notify students by letter when they achieve full admission status.  Students
may check their status at any time by contacting their advisors.
Requirements for full admission also apply to students who transfer credit from
other institutions. Courses equivalent to the core courses listed above must have
been completed with grades of C or better to be accepted for transfer credit.
Verification of transcripts should be completed prior to the start of the first
semester of enrollment. Upon enrolling for the first semester, a transfer student
whose transcript has not been verified will be given provisional status. When it
has been verified that students have fulfilled the requirements, they will be
granted full admission status. Enrollment in upper division courses will not be
permitted until full admission status has been granted.
Requirements for Graduation
In addition to the graduation requirements stated in the University Bulletin, the
Department requires satisfactory academic performance in major courses.
Specifically, this means that the GPA in upper-level courses within the major
must be at least 2.5 overall and at least 2.5 on upper-level major courses com-
pleted at DSU. No grade below C in a required major course may be applied
toward graduation. Any grade below C must be removed by repeating the
course and earning a C or better grade. In addition, students will take the
Educational Testing Service Major Field Test in Mathematics, and pass at a
published level (see the department for the most current information).
Failure to Maintain Satisfactory Academic Standing
A student with full admission status who fails to maintain good academic stand-
ing will be placed on departmental academic probation. When students GPA s
in upper-level mathematics courses have fallen below 2.0, they will be warned
that they are in danger of being placed on probation and that the problem
course or courses should be retaken. A student who fails to improve the GPA in
180
upper-level mathematics to 2.0 or above within two semesters of being warned
will be placed on 
p
r
o
b
a
t
i
o
n
a
r
y
s
t
a
t
u
s
. A student on probation will not be per-
mitted to advance in mathematics coursework until such time that the proba-
tionary problems have been corrected.  Students should be aware that being on
probation may increase the time required for graduation.
MATHEMATICS
MAT 090, 091. DEVELOPMENTAL MATHEMATICS. Operations with whole
numbers, fractions, and decimals; percent; and measurement. 3
MAT 099. INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA. Fundamentals of elementary algebra. Stu-
dents who have not had two years of high school algebra (or the equivalent) must
take this course before taking MAT 103 or 104. Does not meet any degree
requirement. 3
MAT 103. QUANTITATIVE REASONING. Numerical, visual, verbal, and sym-
bolic aspects of quantitative reasoning with emphasis on interpretation of quanti-
tative information in real-world problems. Satisfies general education require-
ments. Prerequisites: 2 years of high school algebra or equivalent. 3
MAT 104. COLLEGE ALGEBRA. Review of fundamentals; linear and quadratic
equations and inequalities; functions and graphs; systems of equations and ine-
qualities; and theory of equations. A student who has earned credit in MAT 106
cannot receive credit for this course. Prerequisite: 2 years of high school algebra
or equivalent. 3
MAT 105. PLANE TRIGONOMETRY. Trigonometric functions; identities; trigono-
metric equations; applications. A student who has earned credit in MAT 106 can-
not receive credit for this course. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MAT 104. 3
MAT 106. PRECALCULUS. Emphasis on algebraic and trigonometric functions,
including exponential and logarithmic functions. A student who has earned credit
in MAT 104 or 105 cannot receive credit for this course. Prerequisites: 2 years of
high school algebra, 1 year of geometry, and senior mathematics. 3
MAT 121. FINITE MATHEMATICS AND INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS. In-
troduction to linear and quadratic functions, inequalities, matrices, linear pro-
gramming, counting techniques, probability, exponential functions, calculus of
the polynomials, and the use of technology in mathematical modeling. Prerequi-
site: MAT 103 or 104. 3
MAT 131. NUMBER SYSTEMS OF ARITHMETIC. Structure and properties of the
number systems of arithmetic. Primarily for prospective or in-service teacher.
Prerequisites: MAT 103 or 104 with a C or better. 3
MAT 203. BUSINESS CALCULUS. Graphs, lines, functions, limits, continuity,
curve sketching, differentiation, optimization and their application to business
with polynomial, algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions, functions of
several variables and partial derivatives. Prerequisite: A grade of at least C in
MAT 104 or 106. 3
MAT 205. UNIFIED CALCULUS AND ANALYTICS. First course of a three-semes-
ter sequence covering essentials of analytic geometry and concepts of differentia-
tion and integration of algebraic functions. May serve as a terminal course for
those who need the basics of differentiation and integration. Prerequisites: MAT
104 and 105, or MAT 106 (or equivalent). 5
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested