display pdf in iframe mvc : Reverse page order pdf online application control utility azure html asp.net visual studio 2013-2014%20UG%20Catalog%20with%20bookmarks19-part303

191
MUS 384. INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE (Percussion). Prerequisite: Consent of
instructor. 1
MUS 385. INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE (Woodwinds). Prerequisite: Consent of
instructor. 1
MUS 386. INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE (Brass). Prerequisite: Consent of
instructor. 1
MUS 387. MUSIC THEATRE WORKSHOP. Training and performance in musical
drama; opera, operetta, and musicals. Emphasis on acting techniques and skills
relating to dialogue, single arias and songs, scenes, and complete productions.
Open to all students. 1
WOODWIND INSTRUMENTS
FLUTE
AMU 101. FLUTE. 1-4
AMU 301. FLUTE. 1-4
OBOE
AMU 111. OBOE. 1-4
AMU 311. OBOE. 1-4
CLARINET
AMU 121. CLARINET. 1-4
AMU 321. CLARINET. 1-4
BASSOON
AMU 131. BASSOON. 1-4
AMU 331. BASSOON. 1-4
SAXOPHONE
AMU 141. SAXOPHONE. 1-4
AMU 341. SAXOPHONE. 1-4
BRASS INSTRUMENTS
TRUMPET
AMU 151. TRUMPET. 1-4
AMU 351. TRUMPET. 1-4
FRENCH HORN
AMU 161. FRENCH HORN. 1-4
AMU 361. FRENCH HORN. 1-4
TROMBONE
AMU 171. TROMBONE. 1-4
AMU 371. TROMBONE. 1-4
EUPHONIUM
AMU 181. EUPHONIUM. 1-4
AMU 381 EUPHONIUM. 1-4
Reverse page order pdf online - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf rotate page; rotate pages in pdf and save
Reverse page order pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf expert rotate page; rotate pdf page
192
TUBA
AMU 191. TUBA. 1-4
AMU 391. TUBA. 1-4
VOICE
AMU 185. VOICE. 1-4
AMU 385. VOICE. 1-4
KEYBOARD INSTRUMENTS
AMU 125. PIANO PROFICIENCY. 1-2
PIANO
AMU 135. PIANO. 1-4
AMU 335. PIANO. 1-4
ORGAN
AMU 115. ORGAN. 1-4
AMU 315. ORGAN. 1-4
PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS
PERCUSSION
AMU 110. PERCUSSION. 1-4
AMU 310. PERCUSSION. 1-4
JUNIOR RECITAL
AMU 300. JUNIOR RECITAL. 1-4
SENIOR RECITAL
AMU 450. SENIOR RECITAL. 1-4
INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE
AMU 210. INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE. 1-2
VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Support to reverse page order in adobe PDF document in both .NET Enable move, sort and reorder PDF page in preview. Provide online Visual Basic .NET source code.
rotate pages in pdf permanently; pdf rotate single page reader
C# PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Free online C# code solutions for sorting PDF page order users to move, sort and reorder all PDF page in preview. Support to reverse page order in PDF document.
rotate pdf pages in reader; pdf rotate single page
193
DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HISTORY
Professors: Jennings, Routman
Associate Professors: Barton, Meikle-Yaw (Chair)
Assistant Professors:Becker, Brock, Fadiga-Stewart, Green-Pimental
Laub, Lee, Mitra, Pazzani, Schmidt, Westmoreland
Instructors: Lamb, Sanders
(662) 846-4065
The objectivesof the Divisionof Social Sciences and History are toprovide for the
intellectual, cultural, and professional development of students desiring a career
in teaching, criminal justice, or one of the subfields of social science and history,
or preparation for graduate or professional study. It also aims to serve students
majoring in other academic areas by introducing them to the various areas of
social science and history.
The Division offers a major in social sciences toward the Bachelor of Science in
Education degree and majors in history and political science leading to Bachelor
of Arts degrees. A major in Social Justice and Criminology may be earned in the
Bachelor of Science in Social Justice and Criminology degree. The Bachelor of
Science is available with a major in social science and concentrations in applied
development studies, geography, and sociology. Minor fields of study offered in
the Division are criminal justice, geography, paralegal studies, political science,
pre-law, and sociology.
The Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees are designed to provide a
well-rounded liberal arts education. They are particularly recommended for stu-
dents contemplating graduate work in one of the social science and hisotry
fields, theology, or law. 
The Bachelor of Science in Social Justice and Criminology degree is for the stu-
dent interested in the professions of law enforcement, corrections, or juvenile jus-
tice.
Students planning to enter law school may adopt a program leading to the Bache-
lor of Arts degree or Bachelor of Science degree. A broad background is recom-
mended for those preparing for law school.
No grade below C in a required major course or special degree requirements
may be applied toward graduation. Any grade below C must be removed by
repeating the course and earning a C or better grade.
Bachelor of Science degree in Social Sciences
Full admission to the Social Sciences major is granted upon satisfactory comple-
tion of the following social science core:
ANT  101  Introduction  to  Anthropology  or  ECO  210  Principles  of
Macroeconomics or ECO 211 Principles of Microeconomics
GEO 201 Introduction to Human Geography
PSC 103 Introduction to Political Science
PSC 201 American National Government
SOC 101 Principles of Sociology
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
document pages in original or reverse order within entire C# Class Code to Print Certain Page(s) of powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
save pdf after rotating pages; rotate all pages in pdf
194
Satisfactory completion is defined as having completed a course with a grade of
C or better. Any grade below C must be removed by repeating the course and
earning a C or better grade. Students should be aware that repeating courses may
increase the time required for graduation.
When students fulfill the core requirements, they are considered to be adequately
prepared to continue with advanced social science courses and are granted full
admission to the program.  A student who has not been granted full admission
will not be permitted to register for any upper-division social science course.
ANTHROPOLOGY
ANT 101. INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY. Introduction to socio-cul-
tural anthropology. 3
ANT 470. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. Adjustments to physical and social
environments and means by which customs are learned, retained, and changed;
a descriptive survey of cultures. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or ANT 101. 3
ANT 471. ARCHAEOLOGICAL STUDIES. This course is designed to introduce
you to the methods of science and archaeology, then to explore the diverse ways
humans in prehistory and history have developed to adapt to their environments.
3
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
COD 414. GENDER IN A CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE. This course is
designed to understand gender issues from local, regional, national, and global
perspectives. It addresses a range of gender roles related to social, cultural, eco-
nomic and political institutions in a select number of countries in Africa, Asia, the
Caribbean and the United States. Prerequisites: SOC 101 or PSC 201 or GEO 201
or ANT 101 for undergraduates. 3
SOCIAL JUSTICE AND CRIMINOLOGY
CRJ 300. INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE POLICY AND PRACTICE.
An overview of the American criminal justice system; an examination of the his-
tory, philosophy, and contemporary functions of the institutions which contribute
to the process of crime and justice; and overview of the foundations of substan-
tive and procedural law. 3
CRJ 305. ORGANIZATION AND PHILOSOPHY OF LAW ENFORCEMENT.
History, development, and contemporary functions of law enforcement in a
democratic society; an introduction to local, state, and federal agencies involved
in the administration of justice.  3
CRJ 310. ORGANIZATION AND PHILOSOPHY OF CORRECTIONS. An analy-
sis of the philosophical foundations of American penology; with emphasis on the
sociological and psychological application of organizational theory to correction-
al goals, structures and processes; an overview of the federal and state correction-
al systems and methods of treatment employed.  3
CRJ 315. ORGANIZATION AND PHILOSOPHY OF JUVENILE JUSTICE. A sur-
vey of the common law roots of juvenile law; juvenile offenders and law enforce-
ment policy and procedures; the development of the juvenile courts; the adjudi-
cation process, and the treatment of juveniles taken into custody. 3
195
CRJ 405. INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGICAL THEORY. An overview of
the theories related to why individuals engage in criminal activities. 3
CRJ 407. CRIMINAL LAW. A survey of applied substantive law with an emphasis on
the most common criminal offenses; development, application, and enforcement of
local, state, and federal statutory law. 3
CRJ 410. APPLIED CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. An overview of the crime solving
process with emphasis on methodology, corpus delecti, and evidence; theory of inves-
tigation, case preparation, and legal issues relating to criminal investigations are stud-
ied. 3
CRJ 413. WHITE COLLAR CRIME. An examination of the types of crime considered to
be white collar crime, the reasons for such crime, the consequences, and the reaction
of the criminal justice system and the public. 3
CRJ 414. RACE, CRIME AND THE LAW. An examination of the historical and contem-
porary issues that impact the way race and the criminal justice system interact. 3
CRJ 416. MYTHS IN CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE. An examination of
many popularly held beliefs about crime and the criminal justice system and a study of
the research related to these beliefs. 3
CRJ 420. SEMINAR ON PRISONS AND JAILS. An overview of issues related to pris-
ons and jails including the philosophical foundations and history of American penolo-
gy, prison life, and treatment and rehabilitation in prison. 3
CRJ 421. PSYCHOLOGY AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROCESS. Covers the con-
tributions of psychology to the practice of law, law enforcement, and other related
areas, illustrated in terms of testimony and court procedures, psychopathology, correc-
tional services, the development of laws, and social psychology. 3
CRJ 426. VICTIMOLOGY. Covers theories related to the causes of victimization, the
response to victimization by the victim and those in helping professions, as well as
issues related to specific types of criminal victimization such as sexual victimization,
intimate partner violence, and other violent and non-violent crimes. 3
CRJ 431. GENDER, LAW AND CRIME. Examines landmark cases in gender equality
and how gender and law interact, as well as covers the differences between males and
females in terms of criminality, the response of the criminal justice system, and crimi-
nal victimization and the social structural reasons for these differences. 3
CRJ 434. GLOBAL TERRORISM. This course examines issues of global and domestic
terrorism, including the structure of such groups, how they form and are sustained, as
well as various perspectives that purport to explain the use of terrorist tactics in modern
society. Students will also examine law enforcement responses to such groups and
acts. 3
CRJ 436. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. A study of juvenile offenders including the-
ories of delinquency, the creation of the juvenile justice system and its evolution
over time, the adjudication process, and how juvenile offenders are dealt with. 3
CRJ 437. SPECIAL POPULATIONS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE. An examination of
legal and ethical issues surrounding the incarceration and treament of special
populations within the US criminal justice system, including (but not limited to)
the mentally ill, the elderly, and the disabled. 3
196
CRJ 438. COMPARATIVE JUSTICE SYSTEMS. An overview of comparative and
international issues among different justice agencies around the world. Focuses
on the courts, corrections, and policing of different countries with regards to:
organization, hierarchy of authority, qualifications, jurisdictions, and duties. This
course is designed to encourage a continuation of international interest and pro-
vide a knowledge base about justice systems in other countries around the world.
3
CRJ 441. ORGANIZED CRIME. This course examines the issue of domestic and
international organized crime (OC). Students will consider the formation of such
groups as well as their historic origins, ethnic ties, and domestic and international
activities. Student will also examine key legal and law enforcement issues sur-
rounding OC in the United States. 3
CRJ 443. POLICING. Examines the history of policing, legal issues surrounding
policing, and covers research in policing topics including organization, discre-
tion, and subculture. 3
CRJ 447. DEVIANCE. An analysis of definitions of deviance, causes of deviance,
and societal reaction to deviance. The relationship between deviant behavior and
social justice will be explored. 3
CRJ 451. HOMICIDE. An examination of the types of homicide and reasons for
committing homicide, with focus on perpetrators, victims, and the response of
the criminal justice system. 3
CRJ 452. MISCARRIAGES OF JUSTICE. This course examines failures in the jus-
tice system that result in people being wrongfully detained or convicted. There is
focus on the causes of wrongful convictions, how to avoid them, detection mech-
anisms, and the remedies that may be provided when a miscarriage of justice has
occurred. 3
CRJ 455. ETHICS IN SOCIAL JUSTICE AND CRIMINOLOGY. An examination of
ethical issues that confront the criminal justice professional and a comprehensive
study of situational ethics and moral dilemmas within the criminal justice profes-
sion. 3
CRJ 457. SEX CRIMES. An examination of sexual offenses and deviance, with
emphasis on classification of these crimes, perpetrators, victims, treatment, and
criminal justice response. 3.
CRJ 461. DRUGS AND SOCIETY. The course focuses on drug and alcohol use
and abuse as a social--rather than as a medical or psychopathological--phenome-
non. Specifically, the course deals with the history of drug use and regulatory
attempts in the United States and around the world; the relationship between
drug use and racism/class conflict; use patterns related to specific drugs; harm
reduction interventions; drug using subcultures; drug policy, legislation, and
enforcement; the promotion and condemnation of drug activities in the mass
media. 3
CRJ 463. THE DEATH PENALTY. The purpose of this course is to provide stu-
dents with an understanding of the social, political, and historical forces that
have helped shape the practice of the death penalty in America and the interna-
tional community. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between race,
class, and gender and imposition of capital punishment as well as the influence
of U.S. Supreme Court rulings on the administration of the death penalty. 3
197
CRJ 470. CRIMINAL FORENSICS. The study of forensic science as used to deter-
mine the outcome of an issue in court. The study of a broad arrangement of sci-
ences to answer questions of interest to the legal system (e.g. Forensic evidence,
Questioned Document Examination, forensics in the media) and the policy issues
surrounding forensics. 3
CRJ 475. FAMILY VIOLENCE. A study of child maltreatment and spouse abuse
within the family emphasizing detection, investigation, and deterrence; an exam-
ination of the legal, medical, and social perspectives necessary to the understand-
ing of, and structured inquiry into, domestic violence.  3
CRJ 480. CRIMINAL JUSTICE PRACTICUM. Work preparation and field experi-
ence with approved agency. Students may register for three credit hours to com-
plete 120 hours of internship work, or for six credit hours to complete 240 hours
of internship work. In addition to work with a criminology/criminal justice related
agency, students will create a resume and reflect in wiritng on their learning
experience. 3-6
CRJ 490. SPECIAL TOPICS IN LAW ENFORCEMENT. Current issues and devel-
opments in law enforcement. 1-6
CRJ 491. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CORRECTIONS. Current issues and developments
in corrections. 1-6 
CRJ 492. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE. Current issues and develop-
ments in Criminal Justice. 1-6
GEOGRAPHY
GEO 201. INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GEOGRAPHY. Study of the spread of
cultural, economic, and political human activities and institutions across the
earth through time. 3
GEO 202. PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. Introduction to the Earths natural environ-
ment. Includes weather and climate, oceans and water resources, natural vegeta-
tion and ecology, soils, geology and geomorphology, biodiversity and conserva-
tion. A laboratory and lecture course for non-science majors. Same as PHY 202.
(Does not meet general education Social Science requirements. Does meet
requirements for a concentration or minor in Geography.) 3
GEO 256. APPLIED METEOROLOGY. Basic weather theory and information ser-
vices available, including how to interpret various reports and forecasts provided
by the National Weather Service and the Federal Aviation Administration. Same
as CAV 256. (Does not meet general education Social Science requirements.
Does meet requirements for a concentration or minor in Geography.) 3
GEO 303. WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY. Physical and human (cultural,
economic, and political) characteristics of the principal regions of the world. 3
GEO 404. GEOGRAPHY OF TOURISM. Addresses the relationships between
tourism and the landscapes, places, and regions that it affects. This course con-
tains a strong field-based component and is focused on the economic, cultural,
historical, and natural aspects of this important industry. 3
GEO 405. CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY. Study of intercultural group differences
and the significance of their origins and distribution in the contemporary world.
Includes the cultural landscape, language and dialect, folk culture, architecture,
foods, sport, and music. 3
198
GEO 406. POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY. Geographic dimensions of U.S. and global
political issues. Topics include electoral geography, geopolitics, nationalism,
international political systems, state formation, and boundary disputes. 3
GEO 407. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY. Contemporary and historical spatial
dimensions of economic activities. Topics include subsistence systems, agricul-
tural location theory, trade, international development, transportation, manufac-
turing, and economic planning. 3
GEO 416. CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES. Spatial arrangement of
abiotic and biotic resources as well as ways in which humans can ensure their
continued availability and utility.  3
GEO 430. GEOGRAPHY OF TERRORISM. Examines economic, political, and
cultural aspects of both U.S. domestic and international terrorism. Focuses on
State, para-State, and sub-State actors and networks as they relate to political and
religious agendas, organized crime, and intelligence-gathering.  3
GEO 435. GEOGRAPHY OF RELIGIONS. Comparative study of major world
belief systems (e.g. Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, traditional
religions) in geographical context. Themes include cultural and political aspects
such as: the sacred landscape; religion and conquest; the role of religion in
geopolitics; religion and the environment. 3
GEO 440. GEOGRAPHY OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH. A spatial-regional exami-
nation of the United States South. Particular attention is given to the cultural, his-
torical, and physical patterns of the southern landscapes. 3
GEO 441. HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF THE DEEP SOUTH. A field course
that exposes students to the historical aspects of cultural and physical landscapes
in the Deep South. Topics and sites include the Tennessee Valley Authority; Civil
War battlefields; Civil Rights; antebellum sites; Indian reservations; industrial
geography. 3
GEO 442. CULTURAL-HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF THE YAZOO-MISSISSIP-
PI DELTA. A learning community focused on the Delta and its people. Covers the
Deltas natural setting, pre-history, history, and contemporary scene from a cul-
tural perspective. Themes include Delta Blues and sense of place; the role of the
Mississippi River; the Civil rights era; agriculture; archaeology. 3
GEO 443. MILITARY GEOGRAPHY. Historical geography of military landscapes
in the U.S. South, often focusing on the Civil War landscapes of Shiloh, TN and
vicinity. This course contains a strong field component.  3
GEO 445. GEOGRAPHY OF THE UNITED STATES. Study of physical and human
diversity, economic resources and activities, historic settlement patterns, and
cultural landscapes of the United States. 3
GEO 446. GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA. Interrelated physical, social-
cultural, economic, political, and historical characteristics of Latin America and
its subregions. 3
GEO 447. GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE. Regional overview of the major contem-
porary and historical geographic aspects of the continent of Europe. Includes the
internal spatial dimensions of European reality as well as the geographic role of
Europe in the world. Covers Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Former
Soviet Republics west of the Urals (including Russia-in-Europe). 3
199
GEO 448. GEOGRAPHY OF AFRICA. Human (cultural, economic, and political)
and physical aspects of North and sub-Saharan Africa. Particular emphasis is
placed on the geographical background of human origins, slavery, colonialism,
the nation-state, cultural diversity, human-nature interactions, and current con-
flicts. 3
GEO 449. GEOGRAPHY OF ASIA AND THE PACIFIC. Regional overview of the
major contemporary and historical geographic aspects of the continent of Asia
and the region of Oceania. Regions covered in detail vary by semester but
include Southwest Asia (Middle East); Central Asia; South Asia (Indian
Subcontient); Russia-in-Asia; East and Southeast Asia; Austrialia and the Pacific. 3
GEO 462. CHINA AND JAPAN. (See HIS 462.) 3
GEO 492. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GEOGRAPHY. Current developments in
Geography. 1-6
HISTORY
The general education history requirement (six hours from: HIS 101, 102, 201,
202, 203, 204) is prerequisite to all other history courses
HIS 101. HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION TO 1648. Ancient and Medieval periods
and factors involved in the transition to the modern world. Emphasis on Western
Civilization. 3
HIS 102. HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION, 1648-PRESENT. Age of Absolutism to
contemporary times. Emphasis on Western Civilization. 3
HIS 103. WORLD HISTORY TO 1500. Principal civilizations of Asia, Africa,
Europe, and the Americas from prehistory to the 1500s, with a focus on religious
ideas, patterns of economic and cultural development, and artistic and literary
achievements of these civilizations, as well as their influences on one another. 3
HIS 104. WORLD HISTORY 1500 TO PRESENT. A survey of world history from
1500 to present that examines the worlds major cultural areas and their unique
achievements, and emphasizes interactions and relations to other societies. 3
HIS 201. UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1877. Political, social, cultural, and
economic survey. 3
HIS 202. UNITED STATES HISTORY, 1877-PRESENT. Political, social, cultural,
and economic survey. 3
HIS 400. HISTORIOGRAPHY AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY. Method,
literature, and philosophical approach to history. 3
HIS 406. THE AMERICAN MILITARY EXPERIENCE, 1775-PRESENT. The role of
the military with emphasis on the relationship of military policy, organization,
and technology to political, social, and economic developments. 3
HIS 409. MODERN ARCHIVAL MANAGEMENT. The theories of archives admin-
istration and the application of archival concepts and principles. 3
HIS 410. AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY. A study of American philoso-
phy and thought from colonial times to the present. 3
200
HIS 411. MISSISSIPPI HISTORY. Social, political, economic, and cultural history
of the state of Mississippi. 3
HIS 416. THE ANCIENT WORLD TO 500 A.D. Political, social, and cultural
development. 3
HIS 418. HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY. The history of Christianity from its ori-
gins in the Ancient Near East through the Middle Ages. 3
HIS 419. EARLY ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION. Survey of the origins and develop-
ments of Islamic societies from the rise of Islam in the seventh century through
the fall of the Mamluk Sultanate(1517). The geographical emphasis of this course
will be on the Islamic Middle East (Arab world, Iran, and Turkey). 3
HIS 420. MEDIEVAL HISTORY, 500-1500. Political, social, cultural, and eco-
nomic development in Western Civilization. 3
HIS 422. RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION, 1300-1648. Renaissance and
Reformation as elements in the transition from Medieval to Modern Europe. 3
HIS 423. EUROPE, 1648-1815: ABSOLUTISM, ENLIGHTENMENT, FRENCH
REVOLUTION, AND NAPOLEON. Divine Right Monarchy, the rise of science,
the enlightenment, and background of the French Revolution. 3
HIS 424. EUROPE, 1815-1914. Political, social, and intellectual developments
from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of World War I. 3
HIS 426. EUROPE, 1914-PRESENT. Political, social, and intellectual develop-
ments from the outbreak of World War I. 3
HIS 429.  THE HOLOCAUST. An investigation into the origins, nature, and
development of Antisemitism, climaxed by the Nazi attempt to exterminate the
Jews of Europe in the mid-twentieth century. 3
HIS 430. THE HISTORY OF TERRORISM. History of terrorism in its global con-
text, from the Ancient to the Post-911 world. Though focusing on the social, eco-
nomic, and ideological motivations of the terrorist over time, attention will also
be paid to both the tactics of terror, and the threat both pose to civil liberties. 3
HIS 432. ATLANTIC WORLD, 1500-1800. This course explores the relationships
between European, African, and American cultures throughout the early modern
period (1500-1800), including examination of economic, political, and religious
exchanges. 3
HIS 433. AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY. Role of the African-American in the
social, economic, political, and cultural development of the United States. 3
HIS 434. COLONIAL AMERICA TO 1763. Social, political, and economic devel-
opment of the North American British colonies. 3
HIS 435. THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY ERA, 1763-1789. Social, political,
and economic aspects of the American Revolution, including the United States
Constitution. 3
HIS 436. FEDERAL AND MIDDLE PERIOD, 1789-1850. Social, political, and
economic development of the United States. Emphasis on nationalism and sec-
tionalism. 3
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested