display pdf in mvc : Rotate pdf pages individually Library application class asp.net html winforms ajax 2015-2016%20Curriculum%20Guide%20with%20bookmarks6-part370

61
JBS Voices 
(Grades 9 - 12; by audition; 3 periods/week; full year; 1/2 credit) 
This advanced group is geared to the student who has excellent vocal and musical 
skills and wants to perform challenging choral literature of various styles. JBS 
Voices  prepares  one  concert  each  semester.  Optional  activities  include 
participation in the traditional Holiday Program, participation in the solo and 
ensemble festival, All-District and All-State Choir, and performance tours or 
festivals out of town. 
Men’s A Cappella 
(Grades 9-12; by audition; 2 periods/week; full year; 1/3 credit) 
This chorus explores music written specifically for men’s voices, including styles 
as diverse as pop, doo-wop, jazz, barbershop harmony, and plainchant. The course 
focuses on developing vocal techniques and skills in listening and in singing in 
close harmony. Students perform in a least one concert per semester. Optional 
activities may include participation the  traditional  Holiday  Program  and in 
contests or festivals. 
Rotate pdf pages individually - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate all pages in pdf; how to reverse page order in pdf
Rotate pdf pages individually - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf rotate single page reader; pdf expert rotate page
62
Instrumental 
Junior Orchestra 
(Grades 7 - 8; by audition; 3 periods/week; full year) 
This class is offered to students with two years' prior experience reading music in 
a string ensemble or by instructor approval. Students prepare music for at least 
one  concert  per  semester.  Optional  activities  include  participation  in  the 
traditional Holiday Celebration. 
Beginning Band 
(Grade 7; 3 periods/week; full year) 
Students who have not previously played a band instrument may begin learning 
flute, clarinet, trumpet, or trombone. Students must provide their own instruments. 
Junior Band 
(Grades 7 - 8; by audition; 3 periods/week; full year) 
This class is offered to students with prior experience on an instrument. Students 
continue studying the fundamentals of the instrument as well as concert repertoire. 
Students perform at least twice during the school year. Instruments offered are 
flute, oboe, clarinet, trumpet, alto sax, tenor sax, baritone sax, French horn, 
trombone, baritone, tuba, electric bass and percussion. 
8th Grade Band 
(By audition; 3 periods/week; full year) 
This class is offered to students  with at least one year’s experience on an 
instrument. Students continue studying the fundamentals of the instrument as well 
as concert repertoire. Genres include concert band and jazz band literature.  
Instruments offered are flute oboe, clarinet, trumpet, alto sax, tenor sax, baritone 
sax,  French  horn,  trombone,  baritone,  tuba,  electric  bass,  and  percussion.  
Students will perform on one fall and one spring concert. 
How to C#: Modify Color and Contrast
will adjust red, green and blue three channels with gamma parameter, or you can choose the GammaImageChannel method to adjust the three channels individually.
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; how to rotate page in pdf and save
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Process TIFF, RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .
image and document formats are: TIFF, JPEG, GIF, BMP, PNG, PDF, Word and You can also reorder or remove pages from Tiff files public void Rotate(RotateOder order
rotate pdf page permanently; pdf rotate page and save
63
Orchestra 
(Grades 9 - 12; by audition; 3 periods/week; full year; 1/2 credit) 
Senior Orchestra is designed to provide a performance opportunity for students 
who play string, woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments.  Genres include 
compositions from the Classical, Pop, Broadway, and World Music traditions.  
Mastery of performance fundamentals will be emphasized during rehearsals.  
Senior Orchestra will prepare one concert each semester. Optional activities 
include participation in the traditional Holiday Program, participation in District 
and State solo and ensemble festivals, All-District Band for Woodwind, Brass and 
Percussion Players, All-State Orchestra and/or Band for String, Woodwind, Brass 
and Percussion Players and performance tours or festivals out of town. 
Jazz Band  
(Grades 9 - 12; departmental approval required; 3 periods/week; full year; 1/2 
credit) 
Jazz Band is designed to help students master the performance skills needed to 
perform music in the jazz idioms of Blues, Swing, Latin, Fusion, Afro-Cuban, and 
other contemporary jazz styles.  Jazz Improvisation will also be emphasized.   
Students will prepare one concert each semester.  Optional activities include solo 
improvisation in performance, participation in the solo and ensemble festival, and 
All-District and All-State Bands. 
JBS Percussion Ensemble 
Grades: 9 - 12; departmental approval required; 3 periods/week/; full year, 1/2 
credit) 
Students with percussion experience study and perform repertoire specifically 
written for percussion ensemble. Genres studied may include traditional pitched, 
non-pitched, and Afro-Cuban music. The ensemble performs in at least two 
concerts during the year.  Students are expected to supply their own sticks and 
mallets. 
64
History and Theory 
Music History 
(Grades 9 - 12; no prerequisites; 2 periods/week; full year; 1/3 credit, E/S/U 
grading) 
The evolution of western classical music is explored through music from the 
ancient Greeks to today’s minimalists. Each period includes a brief explanation 
of the composers and styles under scrutiny, introducing a series of recorded 
illustrations. Students listen to sacred & secular music, lieder & opera, and 
instrumental  &  orchestral  works.  The  development  of  different  genres  is 
examined, from folksong to ‘nationalist schools’ of composition and beyond. 
Guest lecturers include visiting composers, and opportunities are provided to 
attend live performances by professional ensembles. 
Music Theory I 
(Grades 9 - 12; Prerequisite: ability to read sheet music; 3 periods/week; semester 
1 only; l/3 credit) 
This course is designed for those students who wish to learn the rudiments of 
music. Scales, intervals, chord structures, sight-reading drills and elementary 
keyboard use are explored. 
Music Theory II 
(Grades  9  -  12;  Prerequisites:  Music  Theory  I,  keyboard  knowledge;  3 
periods/week; semester 2; 2/3 credit) 
This advanced theory course is for those who have completed Theory I or its 
equivalent. Part-writing, harmonizing simple melodies, counterpoint exercises 
and original creative work make up the course content. Students who qualify may 
take the Advanced Placement Theory examination. 
65
B. THEATRE, SPEECH & DANCE 
Speech 7 
(Required; 2 periods/week; 1 semester) 
Students  prepare  short,  original  oral  presentations.  Emphasis  is  placed  on 
enunciation, poise, and choice of language. Through practice before a critical 
audience of their peers, students gain skill in expression and become accustomed 
to speaking with confidence in public.
Fundamentals of Acting 
(Required, grade 8; 1 period/week; 1 semester) 
Students learn the basic fundamentals of performance through concentration, 
relaxation, and self-discipline, with an emphasis on improvisational acting.
Debate 8 
(Required; 1 period/week; 1 semester) 
This introductory course can be seen as a continuation of many aspects of the 7th 
grade speech course in that students strive to refine their  ability  to speak 
confidently in public.  Students deliver speeches, write resolutions, and debate 
one-on-one and in teams using current-event topics and credible sources.  The 
ability to develop educated opinions and conduct a civil exchange of ideas is an 
essential aspect of this course.  
*Intermediate Debate 
(Grades  9  - 10;  limit 16; 2 periods/week; 1 semester course offered both 
semesters; 1/4 credit) 
This intermediate course is designed for students who have debate experience and 
wish to continue their study of the discipline.  Students carry out individual and 
team debates as well as learn about techniques and strategies for effective 
discourse. Question and answer techniques are acquired, as are different forms of 
argumentation and rebuttal.  A focal point of this course is an emphasis on 
research skills and the use of concrete evidence when debating. 
*Advanced Debate 
(Grades 11 - 12; limit 16; 2 periods/week; 1 semester course offered both 
semesters; 1/4 credit) 
This advanced course  enhances  and  hones debate  and  judging  techniques; 
students debate in teams, and sophisticated research and resolution-writing are 
expected.  Students  focus  on policy debate and work  with  specific  topics 
established by the National Forensic League. 
66
*Public Speaking 
(Grades 9
-
12; 2 periods/week; 1 semester course offered both semesters; 1/4 
credit) 
This course gives further practice in public address. With current events and 
personal interest as a focal points, students generate their own material for original 
speeches to be delivered in a variety of styles. Memorization is not required. The 
semester will conclude with a final speech, conceived and presented in emulation 
of a T.E.D. Talk. 
*NOTE: In Speech and Debate courses for grades 9 - 12 preference is 
given to students who 
a) signed up last year but were not given a slot in the course 
AND 
b) have not taken the course before. 
Unless space is available, no one may enroll in both semesters in one year. 
Theatre 9 - 10:  Intermediate Acting 
(2 periods/week, full year; 1/3 credit) 
This course covers a range of activities from monologues to scene work. Four 
“production credits” are required by year’s end. (*see end note on production 
credits)
Improvisation 
(Grades
10
-
12;
Prerequisites:
departmental
approval,
Theatre 9
10: Intermediate 
Acting
2
periods/week; 1 semester; 1/4 credit) 
Theatre  skills  are  developed  through  intensive  use  of  theatre  games  and 
non-scripted material. The course emphasizes stretching the boundaries of the 
performer’s ability in voice, movement  and  imagination. Two “production 
credits” are required by semester’s end. (*see end note on production credits)
Theatre 11 - 12: Advanced Acting 
(Prerequisites: departmental approval, Theatre 9
-
10;
2
periods/week; full year; 
1/3 credit) 
This course continues with training in the theatre disciplines. The first semester is 
dedicated to styles of acting, with students learning various styles (i.e. Classical, 
Elizabethan, Naturalistic) through work with monologues. The second semester 
is a scene study workshop with special attention paid first to Chekhov and then to 
a variety of contemporary writers. By the end of this course, all students will have 
prepared a professional-caliber audition, which will be performed publicly at a 
year-end showcase. Four “production credits” are required by year’s end. (*see 
end note on production credits)
67
Theatre Production 
(Grades 9-12; 2 periods/week, full year; 1/3 credit) 
The course is designed to train students for technical roles in support of the 
performing arts. Students gain a background in the technology of lighting and 
electricity, rigging, sound reproduction, construction, and design. The history of 
theatre technology is covered, with studies of the form of production space 
emphasized. Safety is stressed in all aspects of the course. The majority of the 
class  time  is  laboratory-oriented,  in  support  of  John  Burroughs  Players 
productions. Students may pursue a special area of interest (lights, sound, set and 
prop construction), in which individualized assignments are arranged with the 
instructor. These may include, but are not limited to, lighting design, sound 
design, stage management, prop and set design, technical direction, and stage 
carpentry and rigging. 
Playwriting 
(Grades 10-12; Prerequisite: Theatre 9-10, departmental approval; 2 
periods/week; full year; 1/3 credit) 
Through creative writing exercises and reading a variety of scripts, this seminar 
style  course  will  introduce  the  fundamental  elements  of  crafting  dramatic 
narrative and creating characters for the stage. Students will write monologues, 
scenes, and an original one-act play. Performances of completed pieces and works 
in progress will be an important part of the creative process. 
Contemporary Theatre 
(Grades 9-12; Prerequisite: departmental approval; 2 periods/week; full year; 1/3 
credit) 
This course will broaden and deepen students’ understanding and appreciation for 
the performing arts by exploring the vibrant and varied offerings of St. Louis’ 
professional theatre community. At various points throughout the year, students 
will attend performances and meet with professional theatre artists. These live 
experiences will guide the in-class discussions and readings, which will touch on 
script analysis, acting, directing, production design as well as the role of the 
professional critic and the business of theatre.  While this course will benefit an 
aspiring actor, it is primarily designed to enhance the audience experience of any 
student regardless of his or her experience as a performer. Four “production 
credits” are required by year’s end. (*see end note on production credits) 
*Note:  Production Credits are easily obtained by participating in some aspect of 
the JBS Players’s production season. Examples of activities that earn a credit 
include, but are not limited to: ushering/house managing a performance; assisting 
with costumes and props; working on set construction; working on light & sound 
for a production; being a member of the cast/crew for a production. Production 
credits are required of all elective performance and appreciation classes (Theatre 
9-10, Theatre 11-12, Improvisation, and Contemporary Theatre). Production 
credits are not required for Theatre Production and Playwriting. 
68
Dance – Instructional 
(Grades 9-12; Fitness) 
Instruction in various genres and forms of dance is available as a fitness option 
during the spring season. The program provides training for intermediate dancers 
and also serves as an appropriate introduction for beginners with no previous 
experience. (See PE/Athletics) 
Dance – Performance 
(Grades 9-12; Team Sport) 
Students rehearse for and perform in the annual Dance Show as a team sport 
option during the winter season. Dancers of all abilities and experience levels are 
welcome as performers, and experienced upper school students can also work as 
choreographers. (See PE/Athletics) 
69
II. FINE ARTS 
The Fine Arts department offers a structured introduction to the visual arts and to 
techniques, methods, and concepts common to the creative disciplines. It aims to 
develop  visual  literacy,  encourage  artistic  perception  and  cultivate 
resourcefulness and character. It forms the base that establishes the fundamental 
studio  practice  and  principles for  all  visual art expression.  In  addition  to 
presenting traditional vocabulary, theory, media and technique, the program 
encourages creative thinking and problem solving, visual thinking and perceptual 
and imaginative abilities. Most importantly, and beyond the pedagogy of art, we 
want to share with young artists the power and beauty of the visual arts and help 
them understand its potential in their lives. 
The Fine Arts Foundation Program is presented in 7th and 8th grade.  There are 
five important areas for growth that we explore in 7th and 8th grade visual arts 
classes:  perception, resourcefulness, character, craftsmanship and vocabulary. 
We vary our activities and assignments, but generally cover complementary skills 
and ideas and refer to these areas across media for these two years. 
Painting/Drawing 7 
(Required; 2 periods/week; 1 semester) 
This course teaches students to observe and react to their surroundings in deeper 
and clearer ways.  Explorations of portraiture, still life and landscape form the 
basis for observational study of fine arts at this level.  Students can expect to work 
with charcoal, pastel, pen, graphite, watercolor and acrylics.
Painting/Drawing 8 
(Required; 2 periods/week; 1 semester) 
In addition to the introduction of figure drawing, studies from observation begun 
in Painting/Drawing 7 are continued on a more advanced level.
Sculpture 7 
(Required; 2 periods/week; 1 semester) 
Important areas of growth that we explore in our 7th and 8th Grade Foundation 
Program  include  perception,  resourcefulness,  character,  craftsmanship  and 
vocabulary.  Students are guided through activities that complement the concepts 
and vocabulary of their Painting and Drawing experience.  The 7th grade sculptors 
can  expect  to  sculpt  from  observation, use a  variety of  clays and  glazing 
techniques, including Raku and sawdust firing, and will mine clay on campus and 
construct and fire their own kiln.  They will also braze steel portraits or animals 
and will cast small bronzes in cuttlebone molds into which they will carve in 
reverse. 
70
Sculpture 8 
(Required; 2 periods/week; 1 semester) 
The 8th grade sculpture experience is an extension of the 7th grade foundation 
program in structure, but is broader and deeper in scope.  Students are introduced 
to the role of content in art and to the concept of meaning in art.  Exercises will 
again complement their 2-D experience and include learning to appreciate and 
control proportion, perspective and composition and can expect activities that will 
challenge their resourcefulness.  The 8th grade sculptor will learn to throw on the 
potter’s wheel and can expect to learn a variety of new skills including extruding, 
slab building and more advanced modeling using perspective.  Some 8th grade 
students will also enjoy a unit on the Japanese Tea Ceremony. 
Painting and Drawing 
(Grades 9 - 12; 2 periods/week minimum for credit; full year; 1/3 credit) 
Principles of composition and the fundamental elements of art such as form, line, 
mark, shape, value and color are studied through assignments in a variety of 
subject areas, which include portrait, landscape, figure, and still life.  Students 
draw from observation, disabuse themselves of visual stereotypes, become self-
evaluating of their work, and learn how to see. To that end, students are taught 
observational techniques such as measuring, and are encouraged to draw what 
they see rather than what they know. Media used in the studio include tempera, 
watercolor, acrylic, pastel, charcoal, ink, and pencil. The studio houses a small 
library for reference, as the examination of great works of art is a continuing part 
of study. The program is enhanced through the school’s collection of original art 
works, gallery exhibits and lectures by visiting artists. 
Sculpture 
(Grades 9 - 12; 2 periods/week; full year; 1/3 credit) 
Sculpture presents the art student with the same types of issues faced by the 
professional  -  from  compositional  and  aesthetic concerns  to  technical  and 
structural requirements. The sculptors  make use of a  variety of  techniques 
including  welding,  brazing,  bronze  casting,  clay  modeling,  mold-making, 
aluminum riveting, etc. In periodic critiques, the sculptor is encouraged to become 
fluent and comfortable talking about sculptural issues.
Ceramics 
(Grades 9 - 12; 2 periods/week; full year; 1/3 credit) 
This course explores design concepts through ideas developed during wheel 
work and hand building.  Technical information covers glazing and low-fire 
techniques using Raku and earthenware clay and commercial low-fire glazes. 
Ideas are augmented by slides and group critiques. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested