display pdf in mvc : Permanently rotate pdf pages software SDK cloud windows wpf web page class 2016.2.4.BoDAgenda%20with%20bookmarks33-part402

D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 18 
January 2016 
by Hokanson et al. (1977) who concluded that the highest constant temperature at which the effects of 
growth and mortality balance out was 23 ºC.
We judged that a 7-day rolling average of 20 ˚C (68 ˚F) or less, with a maximum daily temperature of 
less than 26 ºC (78.8 ˚F), would likely provide an adequate water temperature regime for juvenile 
steelhead in the summer and fall period for San Lorenzo tributaries and the middle mainstem San 
Lorenzo system, upstream of the Zayante Creek confluence. In addition, the lower mainstem River 
below Zayante Creek confluence and the San Lorenzo Lagoon/Estuary may have an appropriate 7-day 
rolling average greater than 20˚C because of higher food abundance. This judgment was based on 1) 
conclusions drawn by Kubicek and Price (1976) for rainbow trout in Big Sulphur Creek, 2) guidelines 
proposed by SYRTAC (2000), 3) laboratory findings on steelhead temperature lethality by Charlon 
(1970), Alabaster (1962) and McAfee (1966) , 4) findings by Farrel et al. (2015) regarding peak 
aerobic capacity at warm temperatures, and 5) our data on juvenile steelhead growth rates and water 
temperature tolerances in Central Coast streams.  
Using our temperature criteria for steelhead alone, the temperature rating for Soquel Creek would be 
“Good,” based on our data collected in 2005 and 2014 (Alley 2015c). Using our temperature criteria 
for steelhead with coho salmon present, the rating would be “Fair,” based on 2001 data. This “fair” 
rating is what the Cap Viability Results Table appropriately rated temperature. If the <16°C MWMT 
(instead of our <18°C MWMT) was actually used for coho salmon, then the rating should have been 
“Poor.” 
Juvenile Densities
The density criteria for rating summer rearing juveniles are inappropriately simplistic for steelhead in 
the San Lorenzo drainage and unfounded in reality. The criteria are based on the assumption that 
approximately 1 fish per square meter is a reasonable benchmark for fully occupied, good habitat. The 
simplifying concept of assigning one density metric to a saturated habitat implies that habitat is fairly 
homogeneous throughout each habitat, throughout a watershed and between watersheds.  This is not 
the case. Although salmonids spread out more to occupy riffles and runs in larger rivers, this does not 
occur so much in small, Central Coast stream settings, where juvenile steelhead congregate around and 
under escape cover. In warmer, larger stream settings along the Central Coast, juvenile steelhead 
congregate in fastwater habitat, and most pool habitat is unused except at the head and tail. The San 
Lorenzo drainage has multiple tributaries with varying baseflows, geomorphology, gradient and escape 
cover. Juvenile steelhead density may vary 5 to 10-fold between sampling sites (Alley 2015). It is 
evident that juvenile densities are dependent on a host of factors, including dispersal of YOY after 
emergence from redds in the vicinity, the amount of overwintering cover for yearlings in the vicinity, 
baseflow, tree canopy (related to food abundance), water depth, the amount of escape cover and the 
pool/riffle ratio (related to food abundance).  
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
21
331
Permanently rotate pdf pages - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate single page in pdf reader; pdf rotate single page reader
Permanently rotate pdf pages - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
change orientation of pdf page; how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 19 
January 2016 
Furthermore, the metric used for juvenile density criteria in the draft Recovery Plan does not 
distinguish between sizes of juveniles. The metric places the same value on small YOY, larger YOY 
and larger yearlings. Total density is a misleading metric.  We have learned from scale analysis of 
returning adult steelhead (J. Smith, unpublished data) that larger juveniles captured in the fall 
(consisting of fast-growing YOY and yearlings) are much more valuable to the population compared to 
small YOY because they are more likely to soon smolt and produce more adult returns than small 
YOY. Shapovalov and Taft (1954) and Hayes et al. (2008) noted that larger smolts had a higher 
survival rate to adulthood than smaller ones. The metric for juvenile density should be based on 
density of juveniles => 75 mm SL in the fall and not total juvenile density. I have not attempted to 
develop rating criteria for juvenile steelhead densities. Smith (1982) evaluated steelhead habitat 
according to density of these larger juveniles, however. This rating scale is more appropriate for the 
San Lorenzo juvenile steelhead population than the one used in the draft Plan. It is provided in the 
following table from Alley (2015). 
Table 41.  Rating of Steelhead Rearing Habitat For Small, Central Coastal Streams.*   
(From Smith 1982.) 
Very Poor
- less than 2 smolt-sized** fish per 100 feet of stream. 
Poor
*** - from 2 to 4       "           "            " 
Below Average
- 4 to 8      "           "            " 
Fair
- 8 to 16              "           "            " 
Good
- 16 to 32             "           "            " 
Very Good
- 32 to 64        "           "            " 
Excellent
- 64 or more      "           "            "      
*   Drainages sampled included the Pajaro, Soquel and San Lorenzo systems, as well as other            
smaller Santa Cruz County coastal streams.  Nine drainages were sampled at over 106 sites. 
** Smolt-sized fish were at least 3 inches (75 mm) Standard Length at fall sampling and would    
be large enough to smolt the following spring. 
***T
he average standard length for smolt-sized fish was calculated for each site. If the average was 
less than 89 mm SL, then the density rating according to density alone was reduced one level. If  
the average was more than 102 mm SL, then the rating was increased one level. 
In the San Lorenzo drainage, average site densities of these larger juveniles ranged between 4 and 44 
juveniles =>75 mm SL/ 100 ft at different mainstem sites for a 17-year sampling period (annually 
discontinuous at some sites) (Alley 2015). Average site densities for larger juveniles ranged between 2 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
22
332
VB.NET PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in vb.net
extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET If you need to permanently removing visible text and our redact function API and redact entire PDF pages.
rotate individual pdf pages reader; save pdf after rotating pages
C# PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Redaction is the process of permanently removing visible our redact function API to redact entire PDF pages.
pdf reverse page order preview; how to rotate a single page in a pdf document
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 20 
January 2016 
and 14 juveniles =>75 mm SL/ 100 ft at different tributary sites for the same period (annually 
discontinuous at some sites). A table of sampling site ratings in the San Lorenzo system in 2006-2014, 
based on potential soon-to-smolt-sized steelhead densities and sizes is listed in the table below from 
Alley (2015). 
Table 43. Summary of Sampling Site Ratings in 4 Santa Cruz Mountain Watersheds in 2006−2014, based 
on Potential Soon-to-Smolt-Sized Steelhead Densities and Sizes.  
Year 
Very Poor 
Poor 
Below Average 
Fair 
Good 
Very Good 
2006 (n=34) 
11 
10 
2007 (n=37) 
12 
12 
2008 (n=36) 
10 
2009 (n=37) 
11 
13 
2010 (n=39) 
16 
12 
2011 (n=37) 
18 
2012 (n=38) 
17 
2013 (n=38) 
10 
2014 (n=39) 
10 
13 
Summary of Sampling Site Ratings in San Lorenzo River Watershed  in 2006−2014, based on Potential 
Soon-to-Smolt-Sized Steelhead Densities and Sizes. 
Year 
Very Poor 
Poor 
Below Average 
Fair 
Good 
Very Good 
2006 (n=16) 
2007 (n=17) 
2008 (n=18) 
2009 (n=18) 
2010 (n=19) 
2011 (n=19) 
2012 (n=22) 
2013 (n=23) 
2014 (n=25) 
In wetter years, such as 2006, 2010 and 2011 (2012 had median baseflow), the majority of sites were 
rated “fair” to “very good.” In drier years, such as 2007−2009, 2013 and 2014, the majority of sites 
were rated “very poor” to “fair.” However, the range of densities was considerable between sites.  In 
drier years the majority of larger juveniles were yearlings, with much of the population consisting of 
small YOY. In wetter years with more food available, a higher proportion of larger juveniles were fast-
growing YOY. 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
23
333
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
VB.NET Image Rotator Add-on to Rotate Image, VB.NET Watermark Maker to VB.NET image editor control SDK, will the original image file be changed permanently?
pdf rotate pages separately; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
to change view orientation by clicking rotate button. users can convert Excel to PDF document, export Users can save Excel annotations permanently by clicking
rotate single page in pdf; rotate all pages in pdf preview
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 21 
January 2016 
B. Volume IV. Comments for Description of San Lorenzo River Steelhead Population 
After reviewing this well-written section, the following changes/additions are recommended: 
On page 1186 (Volume IV)  under Steelhead Abundance and Distribution, in the second sentence it 
should read middle and lower mainstem (Boulder Creek confluence to Paradise Park, with the Zayante 
confluence separating middle and lower) of the San Lorenzo River……… 
On page 1188, in the reference to Shapovalov and Taft (1954), Shapovalov is misspelled. 
On page 1192 it states that data on LWD quantity are lacking for the San Lorenzo watershed. The 
authors appear to be unaware of wood surveys performed in the last 6 years. 
On page 1193 it states that the County has essentially stopped removing LWD since 2009. This is 
untrue. Santa Cruz County Public Works continues to evaluate wood clusters and cut up LWD when it 
determines that LWD poses a danger to safety or infrastucture due to potential bank erosion. 
On page 1198, reference is made to the Newell Dam. It should be the Newell Creek Dam. 
On page 1198, California American Water Company (CalAm) should be deleted as a diverter because 
the San Lorenzo Valley Water District (SLVWD) has taken over CalAm’s water diversion network. 
On page 1198, it states that Reaches 1 and 2 (in the Gorge and below Zayante Creek) are being 
impacted by the diversion at Felton. It should state that according to Alley’s reach designations: 
“mainstem Reaches 1−5 (from Paradise Park through the Gorge to near the Zayante Creek confluence) 
are impacted by the mainstem Felton diversion owned by the City of Santa Cruz.” 
On page 1199, first paragraph, we question the accuracy of the statement that the remaining available 
baseflows in Bean Creek now averages 2 cfs. A long segment of nearly 2 miles upstream of Ruins 
Gulch confluence commonly goes dry in summer except in wet years, resulting in substantial, annual 
juvenile steelhead mortality. The reach for at least a half mile downstream of Lockhart Gulch 
confluence commonly has a baseflow in the range of 0.5 to 1 cfs. It is only in lower Bean Creek nearer 
its mouth in the Mount Hermon reach that baseflow may reach 1.5 to 2 cfs in summer.  
On page 1199, second paragraph first sentence it states, “Of six rearing habitat variables identified by 
D.W. Alley and Associates et al. (2004) in the San Lorenzo River, streamflow rated as the primary or 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
24
334
VB.NET Image: How to Create a Customized VB.NET Web Viewer by
used document & image files (PDF, Word, TIFF btnRotate270: rotate image or document page in burnAnnotationToImages: permanently burn drawn annotation on page in
rotate individual pdf pages reader; how to change page orientation in pdf document
How to C#: Cleanup Images
By setting the BinarizeThreshold property whose value range is 0 to 255, it will permanently modify the image to 1bpp grayscale image of the Detect Blank Pages.
permanently rotate pdf pages; reverse pdf page order online
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 22 
January 2016 
secondary limiting factor for five of the six.” This sentence does not make sense. What are the “five of 
the six?” Please rewrite to indicate that Alley considers streamflow as the primary limiting factor, 
especially in the late spring and early summer, with high sediment content in many reaches as 
secondary. Juvenile steelhead growth rate throughout the watershed and YOY density in tributaries are 
positively correlated with streamflow amount (D.W. Alley & Associates et al. (2004)).  
On page 1200 in the first paragraph under Minimize Diversions and Diversion Effects, add the 
following sentences; “Water diversions reduce water velocity and insect drift for feeding salmonids, 
thus slowing their growth rate. The quantity of water in the wetted stream channel is also reduced, 
which increases diurnal temperature fluctuations and reduces available rearing habitat.” 
The last complete sentence on page 1200 should read, “Critical flow values would include minimum 
bypass flow requirements for upstream adult migration during winter and spring months, as well as 
rearing habitat conditions from late spring to fall.” 
On page 1201 after the partial sentence at the top of the page, add the following 2 paragraphs regarding 
details of fish passage and baseflow issues; 
“Diversions at the Felton Diversion dam should be scheduled to minimize impact on migrating 
salmonids through the San Lorenzo Gorge and the Rincon riffle. The most challenging passage 
locations should be hydraulically modeled for the first time to establish minimum bypass flows for fish 
passage. Manage operations at the Tait Street Diversion to maintain a minimum bypass into the Lower 
River and lagoon to insure both adult and smolt passage to and from the Bay. Modification of the 
major passage barrier that is the Branciforte flood control channel is critical to providing adequate 
adult steelhead access to that sub-watershed. Barker’s dam in the middle mainstem can be a significant 
passage impediment in drier years. Various remnant flashboard dams in lower Bear Creek and the 
upper mainstem (upstream of Boulder Creek confluence) become significant passage impediments 
when wood collects on them, and they should be removed. Plans should be developed to institute 
mandatory water conservation and water rationing in the event that minimum passage flows cannot be 
achieved for successful adult and smolt passage. Streamflow patterns should be monitored closely so 
as to predict the impending water shortage as quickly into the winter as possible so as to take water 
conservation measures as early as possible. The citizenry should be made aware of where their water 
comes from. The connection between water diversion and potential loss of fishery resources should be 
stressed in any water conservation program. 
Focus action to maintain and maximize baseflow and surface flow on Bean Creek between the Ruins 
Creek confluence and the upstream gradient change above the second Glenwood Road crossing 
upstream. This may require streamside residents to store winter rain and winter-pumped groundwater 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
25
335
How to C#: Color and Lightness Effects
Geometry: Rotate. Image Bit Depth. Color and Contrast. Cleanup Images. Effect VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word range is 0 to 255, it will permanently modify
pdf rotate single page and save; how to reverse page order in pdf
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 23 
January 2016 
into storage tanks. It may require increased aquifer recharge by the city of Scotts Valley. Focus action 
to maintain and maximize summer baseflow in upper Branciforte Creek from the point of surface 
diversion near the Vine Hill Road junction with Mountain View Road. Investigate the legality of the 
diversion canal used for this diversion.” 
On page 1201, add the following sentence after the first sentence in the first full sentence,  
“Aquifer recharge possibilities with reclaimed water and/or excess stormflow into Scotts Valley 
quarries or any other feasible location should be of highest priority because the Santa Margarita aquifer 
is currently over-drafted.” 
On page 1201, add the following sentence to the first paragraph under the heading, “Improve Instream 
Habitat Quality and Quantity” 
“Projects to increase habitat complexity should focus on Zayante, Bean, lower Bear and Branciforte 
creeks, as well as on the middle mainstem River in locations where streamside residents are in low 
density. The primary enhancement should be additions of large instream wood. Artificially placed 
instream wood must be adequately secured to reduce liability. Projects that use fewer catcher/digger 
logs (either diagonally or vertically extending into the thalweg) per pool (low cost per pool that 
encourages future cluster building) should be funded instead of more expensive projects that use 
several logs engineered and cabled into a cluster in each pool (high cost per pool with immediate 
benefit that may be short-lived).” 
On page 1201, add the following sentence to the second paragraph under the heading, Improve 
Instream Habitat Quality and Quantity” 
“Instream wood is naturally recruited episodically during large stormflows, such as the one in January 
1982. After the next large stormflow, as much instream wood as possible needs to be retained in 
stream channels. The perceived need to cut up instream wood for flood control must be reduced. The 
Highway 1 bridge near River Street in Santa Cruz has piers in the stream channel which accumulate 
LWD and threaten this heavily used bridge during high flows. The Highway 1 bridge needs to be 
reconstructed as a freespan bridge to reduce this threat.” 
On page 1202, Boulder Creek should be removed as a high priority sedimentation stream. It is the 
tributary streams entering the mainstem from the east side of the watershed that are the main sediment 
contributors. Boulder Creek is a west side tributary. 
On page 1202, add the following 2 paragraphs after the first paragraph regarding sediment sources, 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
26
336
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 24 
January 2016 
“Stabilize active landslides that are chronic sediment sources. Specific landsliding has been identified 
on Zayante, Bean, Lompico, Fall, Newell, Love, Malosky, Upper Bear, Two Bar and Logan (tributary 
to Kings) sub-watersheds (Alley et al. 2004). Educational and incentive programs regarding erosion 
control should all be assigned the highest priority. Conversion of land to vineyards can be a serious 
threat to salmonid recovery because of the potentially high stream sedimentation resulting from 
erosion resulting from poor farming practices. The County should discourage land conversion to 
vineyards on potentially unstable, steep slopes.” 
“It is essential to steelhead recovery that long term sustainable forestry practices are promoted to 
support steelhead habitats. Oversight and post-timber harvest monitoring by agencies should be 
increased to at least 5 years. Erosion control measures and road maintenance should be maintained 
during the entire period between re-entries. Roads that will no longer be used should be 
decommissioned. These measures should be done within recovery areas and upstream in headwater 
timberlands that may contribute sediment to recovery efforts downstream, not just in the core area. 
NOAA staff should be made available to conduct timber harvest plan reviews and post-timber harvest 
monitoring for proposed logging that may impact any core recovery area. This may include headwater 
areas outside recovery areas because potential erosion and sedimentation may result much further 
downstream than the actual logged area. More than encourage, THP reviewers should require that trees 
be retained on the axis of headwall swales. Logging should not be allowed to occur on unstable soils or 
active landslides. Roads should ideally be decommissioned if they are constructed on active slides or 
unstable soils. If access to timber protection zone (TPZ) lands (also called timber preserve lands in 
Santa Cruz County) requires such roads, they should be adequately stabilized. All trees in riparian 
areas within TPZ lands should be allowed to age, die and be recruited into streams naturally. No-
harvest/ no entry buffers should be instituted along all I, II and III stream channels in timber preserve 
lands, following federal guidelines. Timberland owners should be provided monetary incentives to 
leave large redwood behind to be naturally recruited by streams. Conservation easements should be 
purchased on actively harvested timberlands in critical areas of required wood recruitment along 
stream channels within or which flow into core recovery areas.” 
Add to page 1202 the following paragraph at the end of the 
C. Volume IV. Comments on Santa Cruz Mountains Diversity Stratum Results
An overall concern we have for ratings of impairment in the tables is that the ratings pertain to average 
rainfall years and conditions. In my opinion, ratings should pertain to dry years because those are the 
years when impairment has the greatest impact, capable of weakening multiple juvenile age classes in 
the watershed and multiple returning adult year classes in the future. It is the dry years that most 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
27
337
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 25 
January 2016 
challenge population sustainability, especially when they continue for 2 or more years in succession, 
which appears to be occurring with higher frequency.  
Page 37− Remove the word “minor” as the adjective for “minor logging” regarding primary land uses. 
It is misleading. Logging is an active land use although it was more active in the past (1990’s) than at 
present in the San Lorenzo drainage, and may return to that previous level at any time. 27% of the San 
Lorenzo River watershed is zoned timber preserve and may be logged in the future (Table 1). The 
adjective, “minor,” is inconsistent with the threat rating of “High” given in Table 5 from logging and 
wood harvesting in the San Lorenzo River watershed.  The adjective, “minor,” is inconsistent with the 
discussion of logging impacts on page 1195 where timber harvest was rated as one of the major 
sources of sediment contribution in the Zayante Area Sediment Source Study. All Santa Cruz 
Mountain watersheds still suffer from past logging with regard to lack of large conifers along stream 
sides, the shortage of large redwood and Douglas fir as instream wood and the previous heavy 
sedimentation resulting from clear cutting that continued into the 1970’s without recovery. 
Table 1. Timber Production Zoning in the San Lorenzo River watershed 
Acres in 
watershed 
Square miles in 
watershed 
Acres in TP 
zoning 
Square miles in 
TP zoning 
Percent of 
watershed in TP 
zoning 
87,006 
136 
23,783 
37.16 
27 
Source: San Lorenzo Valley Water District GIS Dept., 2010 
On page 37, attribute indicators are discussed. Attributes describe conditions within the watershed that 
are rated as to quality for various life stages. Yet, when discussing limiting factors on page 38, such as 
habitat complexity, sediment and water temperature, also included are low fish densities. Low fish 
densities result from limiting factors and are not limiting factors. Low fish densities are the effect of 
several causes and should not be listed as a cause. 
In Attribute Results, page 37, most populations and life stages in the Santa Cruz Mountains were rated 
good or better for indicators related to hydrology, landscape patterns and fish passage. This is 
misleading, since that is not the case for two larger watersheds in the stratum, namely the San Lorenzo 
and Soquel drainages. When the Plan makes general rating statements for the stratum based on number 
of populations without reference to size, then small rural watersheds are given as much weight as 
larger, more human-populated ones that are essential for steelhead recovery. This makes conditions in 
the stratum appear better than they are in the watersheds that have the potential to maintain 
independent steelhead populations. Adult fish passage due to passage impediments is poor to fair in the 
San Lorenzo drainage in dry years, in my opinion. Urbanization is a significant threat in the San 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
28
338
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 26 
January 2016 
Lorenzo and Soquel drainages. These points should be stated after the blanket statement that these 
indicators are rated good or better for the stratum, overall. As stated earlier, adult fish passage through 
the San Lorenzo River Gorge, the middle and upper mainstem, Bear Creek and the Branciforte flood 
control channel is potentially difficult in dry years or after wetter years that have jammed woody debris 
on remnant flashboard dam abutments, though passage may be better in smaller watersheds in the 
Santa Cruz Mountains.  
For juvenile rearing, hydrology (baseflow) is perhaps the most important limiting factor throughout the 
Santa Cruz Mountains, greatly determining food abundance, growth rate of juveniles and YOY 
survival rate. The sentence in the first paragraph on page 37 should read, “Summer baseflow, 
estuary/lagoon quality and extent, habitat complexity, sediment (gravel embeddedness) and low 
densities of fish are of greatest concerns for summer rearing juveniles,…” Unimpaired baseflow in 
summer and fall before the rainy season begins is naturally suboptimal in nearly all Santa Cruz 
Mountain watersheds except in wet years, whether diversions, well pumping or impoundments are 
present or not. Refer below to the tables of measured baseflows in Central Coast streams (Alley 2015).  
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
29
339
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 27 
January 2016 
Table 5a. Fall STREAMFLOW (cubic feet/ sec) measured by flowmeter at SAN LORENZO sampling sites before 
fall storms (or in 2011 when summer baseflow had resumed after early storm) by D.W. ALLEY & Associates. 
Site # / 
Location 
1995 
1996 
1998 
1999 
2000 
2001 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2010 
2011 
2012 
2013 
2014 
1- SLR/ 
Paradise Pk 
22.9 
25.5 
34.3 
26.2 
21.7 
19.6 
26.2 
18.7 
27.6 
17.2 
12.9 
8.0 
2- SLR/ 
Rincon 
24.0 
21.1 
17.2 
3-SLR Gorge 
23.3 
20.5 
4-SLR/Henry 
Cowell 
18.7 
32.7 
23.3 
21.8 
15.5 
24.1 
5- SLR/ 
Below Zay.  
31.9 
6- SLR/ 
Below Fall  
14.6 
23.4 
12.8 
11.6 
9.4 
10.6 
8.8 
18.9 
14.3 
3.7 
7- SLR/ Ben 
Lomond 
5.8 
5.4 
3.7 
5.4 
3.7 
8.1 
8- SLR/ 
Below Clear  
4.2 
10.3 
4.9 
4.2 
3.1 
4.2 
2.7 
7.1 
6.4 
4.0 
2.8 
1.7 
0.95 
9- SLR/ 
Below Bould.  
4.6 
7.2 
3.5 
3.0 
3.7 
2.1 
5.8 
0.80 
10- SLR/ 
Below Kings  
3.0 
1.1 
1.3 
0.6 
0.52 
1.4 
11- SLR/ 
Teihl Rd 
1.7 
0.8 
0.8 
0.4 
0.9 
0.63 
1.5 
0.94 
1.10 
0.40 
0.38 
0.13 
12a- 
SLR/Lower 
Waterman G  
1.0 
0.7 
0.33 
0.10 
13a/ Zayante 
below Bean  
8.5 
6.3 
5.2 
4.7 
5.4 
5.1 
7.4 
7.8* 
4.9 
7.2 
4.4 
3.9 
3.2 
13b/ Zayante 
above Bean  
3.9 
2.9 
2.8 
1.9 
2.1 
1.7 
3.2 
2.8 
14b/Bean bel 
Lockhart G 
1.5 
1.1 
1.1 
1.0 
1.1 
1.1 
0.77 
1.0 
1.1 
14c/Bean abv 
MacKenzie 
0.03 
0.11 
Dry 
Dry 
Dry 
15/ Fall  
2.0 
3.4 
2.2 
1.7 
1.7 
1.0 
(Balance) 
16/ Newell  
1.6 
0.51 
1.2 
0.92 
0.78 
0.78 
0.08 
17a/ Boulder 
2.0 
2.2 
1.1 
1.0 
1.25 
0.9 
1.6 
1.7 
1.6 
2.2 
1.1 
1.1 
0.76 
(Balance) 
18a/ Bear  
0.45 
0.61 
0.34 
0.6 
0.51 
0.90 
1.1 
0.68 
1.3 
0.23 
0.16 
0.03 
19a/ Lower 
Kings  
1.1 
0.11 
0.17 
0.02 
20a/ Lower 
Carbonera  
0.33 
0.36 
21a-2/ 
Branciforte  
0.80 
0.44 
0.81 
0.32 
0.29 
*Streamflow in lower Zayante Creek done 3 weeks earlier in 2006 than usual and before other locations. 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
30
340
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested