display pdf in mvc : How to rotate pdf pages and save control Library platform web page asp.net .net web browser 2016.2.4.BoDAgenda%20with%20bookmarks34-part403

D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 28 
January 2016 
Table 5b. Fall/Late Summer STREAMFLOW (cubic feet/ sec) Measured by Santa Cruz County Staff in 
2006−2014 and from Stream Gages; Measurements by D.W. ALLEY & Associates;  2010 (September),  
2011−2014 (October) at fall baseflow conditions, County Staff  (Date specified). 
Location 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
2011 
2012 
2013 
2014 
SLR at Santa Cruz 
Gage 
13 
(25 
Oct) 
14 
(30 
Oct) 
0.6 
(4 Sep) 
0.3 
(3 Sep) 
0.6 
(3 Sep) 
5.5 
(2 Oct) 
12 
(23 Sep) 
5.2 
(19 Oct) 
5.6 (23 Oct) 
9.1 (27 Oct) 
3.2 (7 Jan 14 
0.6−7.1 
(17 Oct) 
1.2  
(19 Oct) 
SLR at Sycamore 
Grove 
34.8  
14.6 
14.2 
− 
18.7  
Paradise P. 
(DWA) 
27.6  
Paradise P. 
(DWA) 
17.2  
Paradise P. 
(DWA) 
12.9 Paradise 
P. (DWA) 
8.0 Paradise 
P. (DWA) 
SLR at Big Trees 
Gage 
22 
(25 
Oct) 
21  
(30 
Oct) 
11  
(4 Sep) 
11  
(3 Sep) 
12  
(3 Sep) 
11  
(11 Oct)  
15  
(2 Oct) 
22  
(23 Sep)  
15  
(9 Oct); 
16  
(19 Oct) 
11.0 
(27 Oct) 
7.8 
(17 Oct) 
SLR above Love Cr 
13.14 
5.4 
After* 
3.8 
− 
6.7 (9/7) 
4.68 (8/14) 
SLR below Boulder 
Cr 
7.49 
2.9 After 
3.1 
− 
5.9 (9/7) 
1.75 (8/15) 
0.80 (DWA) 
SLR @ Two Bar 
Cr 
1.8 
0.78 
0.39 
− 
2.0 (8/4) 
2.4 (8/16) 
1.46 (8/1) 
0.32 (10/10) 
0.11(8/6) 
SLR @ Teihl Rd 
0.97 (DWA) 
1.1 (DWA) 
0.40 (DWA) 
0.38 (DWA) 
0.13 (DWA) 
Zayante  Cr @ 
SLR 
6.5 
3.80 
− 
− 
4.9 Below Bean 
(DWA) 
7.2 Below Bean 
(DWA); 9.1 
(8/3) 
4.4 Below 
Bean (DWA); 
5.1 (9/16) 
3.9 Below 
Bean (DWA) 
4.9 (10/10)  
3.2 Below 
Bean (DWA) 
3.1 (10/23) 
Zayante Cr below 
Lompico Cr 
1.2 
0.96 
0.41 
0.43 
1.51 (8/24) 
0.47 (8/15) 
Lompico Cr @ 
Carrol Ave 
0.3 (8/10) 
0.39 (6/13) 
0.26 (8/2) 
0.18 (6/13) 
0.06 (8/20) 
Bean Cr  adjacent  
Mt. Hermon  
2.6 
1.9 
2.1 
2.2 
3.1  
(9/2) 
3.5  
(8/25) 
2.27  
(8/13) 
1.75 (10/23) 
Bean Cr Below 
Lockhart Gulch 
1.4 
0.72 
0.79 
0.89 
0.68 (9/2) 
0.83 
(8/13) 
0.56 
(10/16) 
Newell Cr @ 
Rancho Rio 
1.2 
1.2 
1.1 
− 
1.17 (DWA) 
0.92 (DWA);  
1.6 (8/17) 
0.78 (DWA); 
1.14 (11/4) 
0.78 (DWA) 
1.05 @ 
mouth (10/9)  
0.08 (DWA) 
0.23 (8/20) 
Boulder Cr @ SLR 
2.19 
0.84 
1.0 
0.97 
1.6 (DWA) 
2.2 (DWA); 2.6 
(8/17) 
1.3 (DWA) 
1.1 (DWA) 
0.81 (10/10) 
0.76 (10/2) 
(Balance 
Hydrologics) 
0.55 (8/21) 
Bear Cr above 
Hopkins Gulch 
0.68 (DWA) 
1.3 (DWA) 
0.23 (DWA) 
0.16 (DWA) 
0.03 (DWA) 
Bear Cr @ SLR 
1.9 
0.37 
0.27 
− 
1.6 (8/4) 
2.0 (8/16) 
0.69 (8/1) 
0.19 (10/10) 
0.12 (8/6) 
Branciforte @ 
Isabel Lane 
0.3 
0.25 
0.42 (8/26) 
0.57 (8/22) 
0.59 (6/20) 
0.31 (8/7) 
Soquel Cr above 
Lagoon 
2.3(DWA) 
4.9 (DWA) 
1.8 (DWA) 
0.33 (DWA) 
0.19 (DWA) 
(Walnut St.) 
Soquel Cr @ USGS 
Gage 
5.0** 
6.6** 
1.4** 
0.65** 
1.2** 
3.4** 
5.8** 
1.8** 
0.36** 
0.35** 
Soquel Cr @ Bates 
Cr 
5.73 
1.08 
4.2  
(9/1) 
7.3  
(8/31) 
2.0  
(9/19) 
0.95  
(9/11) 
0.22 
(9/17) 
Soquel Cr above 
Moores Gulch 
2.16  
(DWA) 
4.3  
(DWA) 
2.0  
(DWA) 
1.26 (DWA) 
0.72 (7/16) 
0.80 (DWA) 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
31
341
How to rotate pdf pages and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate single page in pdf reader; how to rotate one page in pdf document
How to rotate pdf pages and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pdf page; rotate individual pages in pdf
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 29 
January 2016 
Location 
2005 
2006 
2007 
2008 
2009 
2010 
2011 
2012 
2013 
2014 
W. Branch Soquel  
Cr @ Old S.J. 
Road Olive Springs 
Bridge 
2.2 
1.75 
After 
− 
− 
1.2  
@ Mouth  
(DWA) 
2.2  
@ Mouth 
(DWA); 
3.0 (8/31) 
1.1 
@ Mouth 
(DWA); 1.21 
(9/05) 
0.91  
@ Mouth 
(DWA) 
1.73 (5/14) 
0.80 (9/16) 
0.74  
@ Mouth 
(DWA) 
W. Branch Soquel 
Cr above Hester 
Creek (SCWD 
Weir/ Kraeger-
prelim.)  
1.5 
(15 
Sep) 
1.0 
(15 Sep) 
− 
− 
− 
− 
− 
− 
E. Branch Soquel  
Cr @ 152 Olive 
Springs Rd. 
1.0 After 
− 
− 
0.77  
@ Mouth  
(DWA) 
2.1  
@ Mouth 
(DWA); 
2.7 (8/31) 
0.54  
@ Mouth 
(DWA); 0.43 
(9/05) 
0.16  
@ Mouth 
(DWA) 
2.0 (5/14) 
0.0 (7/16) 
Trickle 
@ Mouth; 
Dry above 
(DWA) 
E. Branch Soquel 
Cr below Amaya 
and above Olive 
Springs Quarry 
(SCWD Weir/ 
Kraeger- prelim.) 
1.5 
(15 
Sep) 
0.43 
(15 Sep) 
− 
− 
− 
− 
E. Branch Soquel 
Cr above Amaya 
Creek 
Trickle 
(DWA) 
0.44  
(DWA) 
0.03 (DWA) 
Dry (DWA) 
Aptos Cr below 
Valencia Cr 
2.5 
1.2 After 
0.77 
0.53 
0.85 (9/1) 
0.87  
(DWA); 
1.10 (9/05) 
0.75 (DWA) 
0.84 (9/11) 
(Valencia Cr. 
dry) 
0.47 (9/16) 
Aptos Cr above 
Valencia Cr 
0.97  
(DWA) 
1.6  
(DWA) 
0.63 (DWA) 
Valencia Cr @ 
Aptos Cr 
0.007 
0.34 
(May) 
0.09  
Adj. School 
(DWA) 
0.8  
Adj. School 
(7/27) 
0.20  
(9/05) 
0.105 (9/11) 
Valencia Cr  below 
Valencia Rd  
0.22 (DWA) 
Corralitos Cr 
below Browns 
Valley Road Bridge 
15.9 
(May) 
0.49 
(May) 
dry 
1.71 
(May) 
0.47  
(9/2) 
0.2  
(9/8) 
0.10 (9/5) 
Below 
Browns Cr. 
0.51 (9/11) 
Below 
Browns Cr. 
Corralitos Cr 
above Los Cosinos 
Road Br 
2.0 (DWA) 
2.6 (DWA) 
2.0 (DWA) 
1.54 (DWA) 
1.29 (DWA) 
Corralitos Cr @ 
Rider Cr 
3.35 
2.5 After 
1.44 
− 
2.4  
(9/2) 
1.73  
(9/13) 
1.12  
(9/5) 
1.24 
(9/11) 
Corralitos above 
Eureka Gulch 
0.63  
(DWA) 
0.71  
(DWA) 
0.23  
(DWA) 
0.16 (DWA) 
0.07 (DWA) 
Browns above 
diversion dam 
0.96 
0.30 
After 
0.32 
− 
0.41  
(DWA) 
0.79  
(DWA); 0.5 
(9/8) 
0.30  
(DWA); 
0.14 (9/13) 
0.10 (DWA) 
0.21 (9/5) 
0.33 (DWA) 
0.21 (9/11) 
  After 2 early October storms that increased baseflow. 
** Estimated from USGS Hydrographs for September 1. 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
32
342
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a range of pages from a PDF document.
how to rotate a page in pdf and save it; pdf reverse page order
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.DeletePage(2); // Save the file. doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. How
rotate pdf pages in reader; pdf reverse page order preview
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 30 
January 2016 
So, additional reduction in baseflow from human use represents impairment. Yet baseflow is not 
mentioned as an important limiting factor on page 38. It should be.  In the San Lorenzo drainage, 
juvenile steelhead experience optimal streamflow for growth only in spring and early summer in most 
years and grow little during the remainder of the dry season. The exception is in the lower mainstem 
below the Zayante Creek confluence and in the lagoon where food is sufficiently abundant in most 
years to allow growth to continue through the dry season. The city of Santa Cruz diverts a significant 
portion of surface flows from north coast streams (Liddell, Laguna, Majors) and the lower San 
Lorenzo (Tait Street). The San Lorenzo Valley Water District diverts a significant portion of surface 
flow from Fall Creek and has other surface diversions in the Boulder Creek sub-watershed, as well as 
wells along Zayante Creek. The city of Scotts Valley has wells adjacent to Bean and Carbonera Creek. 
The Soquel Creek Water District has wells in the Soquel Creek and Aptos Creek watersheds. 
Hydrology should be rated poor to fair throughout the stratum with regard to juvenile rearing. 
Water temperature was included as an impaired attribute (assumed higher than what would be suitable) 
for steelhead where coho salmon may overlap in distribution. It should be pointed out that the 
impairment is warranted for coho only and not steelhead, for which temperature is not impaired 
throughout the Santa Cruz Mountains except during severe drought in the lower and middle mainstem 
of the San Lorenzo drainage and regularly in certain lagoons, such as in Pescadero, San Lorenzo and 
Aptos estuaries/lagoons after artificial breaching. Northern California temperature criteria used in the 
draft Plan are inappropriate for Central Coast steelhead populations. As stated earlier, juvenile 
steelhead grow faster in warmer, downstream portions of the San Lorenzo and Soquel watersheds than 
cooler upper reaches. The temperature criteria for coho should be consistent with findings on the 
Mattole River (Welsh et al. 2001) (MWMT of 18°C being the relevant metric) instead of MWMT of 
16°C, as is used in the Plan. Water temperature does not reach lethal levels for steelhead or coho 
salmon and does not restrict distribution of steelhead except possibly in artificially breached 
lagoons/estuaries, which leads to a hot, stagnant, saline layer along the bottom and stratification of 
water temperature and oxygen concentration where the only habitable portion of the water column is 
near the surface.  Except for impaired lagoons that are artificially breached, the water quality parameter 
of water temperature is not a significantly impaired attribute for any life stage.  
D. Review of Tables 3 and 4 of DPS CAP Viability Results
The ratings in Table 3 appear to lump all types of water years into one rating, which is not detailed 
enough. I recommend that impairment be rated according to level of impacts during dry years. The 
sustainability of the steelhead population depends on success in dry years and extended drought and 
not just average and wet years. The likelihood of extended drought may increase with climate change.   
In Table 3 (CCC steelhead DPS CAP Viability Summary by Attribute, page 48), the San Lorenzo 
River lagoon/estuary was rated “fair” for summer rearing juveniles. The San Lorenzo estuary/lagoon 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
33
343
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page doc2.Save(outPutFilePath Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using
rotate pdf page and save; rotate pages in pdf and save
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract PDF pages and save changes to original PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET.
rotate one page in pdf reader; rotate pdf pages
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 31 
January 2016 
should be rated “poor” due to lack of freshwater conversion and stratification of water temperature and 
oxygen in summer due to artificial breaching of the rivermouth and large freshwater water diversion 
rates upstream of the estuary/lagoon that prevent adequate freshwater inflow.  
In Table 3, for smolts the attribute hydrology is rated “fair” for the San Lorenzo, with regard to 
number, condition and/or magnitude of diversions. The “fair” rating appears appropriate for the San 
Lorenzo at this point. The sandbar at the San Lorenzo rivermouth may close prior to completion of 
smolt outmigration in drier years when inflow to the estuary is low due to water diversion at Tait 
Street. During the late 1980’s the San Lorenzo went subsurface below the Tait Street diversion during 
the smolt migration. Further research should be done to determine the minimum estuary inflow that is 
necessary to keep the San Lorenzo rivermouth open during smolt outmigration.  
In Table 3, hydrology is rated “good” and “very good” for the San Lorenzo, with regard to adult 
passage flows. In our judgment, conditions in dry years, especially drought, should be those in which 
the rating is determined. Drier years are when human water use causes greatest impairment. We 
recommend that the hydrology rating be reduced to “fair” for the San Lorenzo drainage with regard to 
adult passage flows. During dry years, the city of Santa Cruz mainstem water diversions at Tait Street 
and Felton are potentially sufficiently high to impair adult fish passage at the beach and through the 
lower San Lorenzo mainstem, downstream of the Zayante Creek confluence. The high gradient San 
Lorenzo Gorge has a wide, split channel in the Rincon reach and numerous boulder clusters (Four 
Rock) further upstream that become migrational delay bottlenecks at flows less than approximately 
100 cfs, which is greater than the 20 cfs, which is the minimum bypass requirement at the Felton 
Diversion.  
Water quality in Table 3 is rated “fair” for the San Lorenzo with regard to toxicity. How is toxicity 
defined? Does this mean there is a high risk for toxic spills from road traffic or streamside 
construction? I am unaware of toxicity problems in the San Lorenzo drainage. 
Attribute landscape pattern ratings related to the indicator timber harvest in Tables 3 and 4 in the San 
Lorenzo watershed (target watershed processes and attribute landscape patterns) are too high with 
regard to attribute quality. The ratings of “very good” in tables 3 and 4 for the San Lorenzo are 
inconsistent with the threat rating of  “high”  attributed to timber harvest as a threat in Table 5 (page 
60). Attribute rating should be rated “poor” instead of “very good”.  As stated earlier, the metric used 
for measuring impairment (percent of the watershed actively under THP management in the last 10 
years) is flawed. A small total area of the watershed (6% reported for the San Lorenzo) being logged 
may contribute very significant sedimentation during high stormflow events that impacts all stream 
channels downstream of the logging operation. Loss of large trees along stream channels in logged 
areas negatively impacts the density of large instream wood in all of the stream channels downstream. 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
34
344
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
outPutFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document doc2.Save(outPutFilePath
pdf page order reverse; pdf rotate all pages
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Similarly, Tiff image with single page or multiple pages is supported. Description: Convert to PDF and save it on the disk. Parameters:
rotate pages in pdf permanently; rotate pdf page by page
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 32 
January 2016 
Logging was more active in the 1990’s than in the last 10 years (double what it is now) and may 
increase in the future (Appendix A). 27% of the San Lorenzo River watershed is zoned Timber 
Preserve land and may be logged. During wet winters, logging roads fail, gullies form in skid trails, 
and culverts plug up without routine maintenance. (Appendix B). Unstable slopes are logged, with 
roads traversing unstable areas prone to landslides during large storm events. These lead to 
sedimentation of streams (Appendix C).  
In Table 4 (CCC steelhead DPS CAP Viability Summary by Conservation Target, page 49) for 
summer rearing juveniles in the Estuary/lagoon, it should be rated “poor” for the San Lorenzo because 
of artificial sandbar breaches that allow saltwater to periodically enter with insufficient freshwater 
inflow to prevent stratification of water temperature and oxygen.  
In Table 4 for summer rearing juveniles regarding hydrology, what is the difference between baseflow 
and instantaneous condition? What is instantaneous condition? Why would the ratings differ? 
In Table 4 for summer rearing juveniles regarding water quality as turbidity, there is no turbidity 
problem that I know of in the summer, except during severe drought in the lower mainstem. It should 
be rated “good” for the San Lorenzo instead of “poor,” as occurs in the table. 
Table 4 rates the San Lorenzo “fair” with regard to juvenile steelhead densities. Since juvenile 
densities are greatly reduced since the late 1990’s at lower and middle mainstem sites and densities of 
larger juveniles has trended downward during the last series of dry years (most sites rated as poor and 
below average by the Smith (1982) scale, we recommend ratings for summer rearing juveniles to be 
“poor” in the San Lorenzo drainage.   
Review of San Lorenzo CAP Viability Results Table (beginning on page 1209 of Volume IV)
Adults-Condition-Hydrology-Passage Flows- Current rating should be “fair” instead of “Good.” 
Adults-Condition-Passage/Migration-Physical barriers- Current rating should be “fair” instead of 
“Good.” 
Summer Rearing Juveniles-Condition-Estuary/lagoon-Quality & Extent- Current rating should be 
“poor” instead of “fair.” 
Summer Rearing Juveniles-Condition-Water Quality-Temperature- Current rating should be “good” 
(using 7-day rolling average in summer of 20° C or less). The criteria used in the recovery plan are for 
northern California and inappropriate for Central Coast steelhead. 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
35
345
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it on the disk.
pdf rotate page; rotate pdf page few degrees
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. Parameters: zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
pdf reverse page order online; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 33 
January 2016 
Summer Rearing Juveniles-Condition-Water Quality-Turbidity- Current rating should be “good” 
instead of “poor.” 
Summer Rearing Juveniles-Size-Viability- The underlying assumption about density of juveniles 
saturating good habitat is without basis in reality, and the metric does not distinguish between small 
YOY and larger YOY and yearlings =>75 mm SL in the fall. No details were provided on how they 
determined the density of juveniles in the San Lorenzo from existing data.  We recommend using 
Smith’s (1982) criteria. If there are to be only 4 categories, then the recommended rating would be 
“poor” in dry years and “fair” in average and higher baseflow years. 
Watershed Processes- Landscape context-Hydrology-Impervious Surfaces- Should be rated “fair” 
instead of “good” because the metric in the recovery plan is too simplistic, and more than 10% of the 
watershed is impaired from the impacts of increased runoff from urbanized Scotts Valley, Boulder 
Creek, Ben Lomond, Felton and Santa Cruz. Impervious surfaces are correlated with urbanization. It is 
inconsistent to rate impervious surfaces as “good” in the watershed when urbanization is rated “poor” 
in the same table. 
Watershed Processes- Landscape context-Landscape patterns-Timber Harvest- Should be rated “poor” 
because the metric is flawed and should be the percent of the channel miles impacted by increased 
sedimentation and loss of instream wood as a result of logging at the rate prior to the economic 
downturn. If surface area of timber harvest is to be used, it should be the accumulated area harvested in 
the last 30 years. Each time an area is re-entered for logging, it should be added to the total. 
E. Review of Steelhead Historical Intrinsic Potential
The map of steelhead distribution and intrinsic potential on page 1208 overestimates the extent of 
steelhead distribution and intrinsic potential. After reviewing this map and associated IP values 
assigned to various stream reaches the following changes are recommended: 
1. Field data should be collected and stream gage data should be used to verify the accuracy of 
inputs for model variables in the IP model (channel confinement, mean annual discharge and 
channel gradient) before steelhead  recovery targets are finalized. If this cannot be done, the IP 
values should be changed as recommended below. The following recommendations are based on 
personal observations of channel geomorphology and passage impediments, and baseflows measured 
by fisheries biologist, Donald Alley, over the past 33 years.  
a). To prevent misguided recovery efforts and an error in the adult steelhead recovery target 
population size, the historic IP should be reduced in tributary reaches, including Carbonera, Glenwood 
Canyon, Granite, Crystal, Love, Eagle, Fall, Lockhart Gulch, Boulder, Kings, creeks, Gold Gulch and 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
36
346
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 34 
January 2016 
the upper mainstem San Lorenzo above Boulder Creek confluence where the IP model provides 
unrealistically high ratings. (See specific recommendations below.) Estimates of channel confinement 
were probably imprecise for these small watercourses and estimates of channel gradient were likely 
either improperly made or improperly applied, and because the mean annual discharge was 
inaccurately determined or inadequately portrayed the summer baseflow.  
b). Increase the historic IP in the mainstem San Lorenzo up to the Boulder Creek confluence.  
c). The model used to calculate historical steelhead intrinsic potential (IP) was based on only 
three variables that were estimated without field data collection and required no familiarity with the 
watershed (Burnett, et al., 2003). It is a model that provides predictions based on present day channel 
confinement, channel gradient and mean annual discharge, combined with suitability curves generated 
from empirical data collected on present day steelhead distributions in northern Oregon watersheds. 
Estimates of mean annual discharge in the San Lorenzo were not generated from actual streamflow, 
but instead from a ratio of surface area to mean annual precipitation. No measured streamflows were 
utilized. Differences in soil types and geology were not considered. The estimate of channel 
confinement was not based on field measurements, but instead came from valley widths generated by a 
digital elevation model that provided elevations at 10 m intervals combined with estimates of active 
channel width based on mean annual discharge (which assumes similar geology throughout the 
watershed).  
2. Average summer baseflow should be used as a metric instead of estimated mean annual 
discharge. High historical IP values are assigned to very small channels that provide little habitat. 
Based on steelhead densities measured by myself, I find that smaller tributaries with naturally very low 
baseflows have lower steelhead densities and likely had low historic intrinsic potential for steelhead.  
3. Stream gradients should actually be measured in the watershed.   I have observed consistently 
poor pool development and passage impediments in higher gradient tributaries, indicating low 
historical steelhead IP. 
4. Knowledge of total and partial natural passage impediments should be incorporated in 
assigning and mapping historical IP. Estimates of IP are inaccurately high in most tributaries 
because complete spawning access was assumed when impediments exist to steelhead anadromy. IP 
values should be reduced in tributaries having partial or total natural barriers that would have impeded 
adult access in drier years. These tributaries include Bull, Bennett and Shingle Mill, Zayante, Lompico, 
Love, Fritch, Newell, Boulder, Jamison, and Kings creeks and the upper San Lorenzo. (See specific 
recommendations below.) 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
37
347
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 35 
January 2016 
5. Increase the historical IP rating to “high” throughout for the mainstem River from the 
rivermouth to the Boulder Creek confluence.  
This reach likely had favorable rearing habitat qualities for steelhead with stretches of reduced 
confinement and productive fastwater habitat in riffles, runs and heads of deep pools, and abundant 
instream wood. In addition, the reach has hydraulically optimal spawning glides that likely had high 
quality spawning gravel before substrate degradation documented by CDFG in the 1970’s.  
6. Decrease the historical IP rating to “low” on the mainstem River upstream from a point 2.8 
miles upstream from San Lorenzo Park (3.3 miles upstream of the Kings Creek confluence), 
which is the beginning of Reach 12 in steelhead monitoring (Alley 2000). The gradient and channel 
confinement increase above that point and passage impediments due to debris jams in a steep-walled 
canyon were likely high. Anadromy should end at the point where Castle Rock State Park is labeled. 
There are no tributaries upstream of Kings Creek on the mainstem that likely provided any 
steelhead habitat except for the one from the west, downstream of San Lorenzo Park. This 
tributary should be assigned a low IP rating due to its very small size and limited streamflow. 
7. The Branciforte tributaries- Glen Canyon Creek, Granite Creek, Crystal Creek, and any 
stream reach upstream of Tie Gulch on Branciforte Creek should be assigned a low historical IP 
because of high channel confinement, higher gradient and very low summer baseflow. Glen Canyon 
Creek has an estimated gradient of 2% for the first 1.1 miles that increases rapidly above, based on 
map contour intervals. Granite Creek has an estimated gradient of 3% for the first 0.7 miles that 
increases rapidly above. Crystal Creek has an estimated gradient of 2.6% for the first 0.8 miles that 
increases rapidly above and is shown as ephemeral. Tie Gulch is shown as ephemeral. Streamflow was 
likely very minimal in Branciforte Creek, historically, upstream of Tie Gulch. 
8. Carbonera Creek should have an IP rating of “medium” for the first 0.5 miles where the 
gradient is less and stretches of less confinement exist but summer baseflow was likely low, 
historically. The reach from CM 0.5 to impassable Moose Lodge Falls at CM 4.2 should be given 
a “low” IP rating because 1) the channel becomes very confined in a deep canyon, gradient increases, 
2) pool development is poor, 3) three low flow passage impediments begin at CM 2.0 that may impede 
adult passage in drier years and 4) summer baseflow was likely low, historically. 
9. Gold Gulch should be assigned a “low” historical IP rating because of its small channel size, 
high confinement, sporadically high gradient, very low summer baseflow and poor pool development. 
Gold Gulch has an estimated stream gradient of 2.6% for the first 0.9 miles that increases rapidly 
above, based on map contour intervals. 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
38
348
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 36 
January 2016 
10. The map shows steelhead habitat in an unnamed tributary to the San Lorenzo from the west, 
downstream of Gold Gulch that should have no historical IP. It does not appear on the USGS map. 
However, there is a very tiny, confined and ephemeral stream in the vicinity that rapidly increases 
gradient. If that is the one described as an unnamed tributary, it should be removed from potential 
steelhead habitat.  
11. Powder Mill and Eagle Creek should be assigned a “low” IP because of their small size and 
low baseflow.  
12. The Felton tributaries to the mainstem from the west− Bull, Bennett and Shingle Mill creeks 
should be excluded from steelhead habitat, because all but Bull were historically inaccessible to 
salmonids, and now Bull is inaccessible due to a 600-foot underground culvert at its mouth. If Newell 
Creek above the dam is excluded, then Bull Creek should also be. 
13. On Zayante Creek, two tributaries from the north below Lompico Creek should be excluded 
from historical steelhead habitat due to their historic spawning inaccessibility, steep drops into 
Zayante Creek, and their likely historically ephemeral natures. The tributary from the north between 
the Lompico and Mt. Charlie Gulch confluences should be removed due to its high gradient and 
ephemeral nature.  
14. Zayante Creek from its mouth to Lompico Creek should have a high historical IP rating due 
to relatively high present-day juvenile steelhead densities, relatively high summer baseflow, good 
spawning access, good pool development and periodic sunny stretches that are very productive with 
relatively high YOY growth rates and densities. 
15. Zayante Creek between Lompico Creek confluence and Mt. Charlie Gulch confluence should 
be given a medium historical IP rating because of the partial passage impediments at Quail Hollow 
Falls (now laddered) and a wide bedrock chute downstream of the Lompico Creek confluence (now a 
narrow slot jack-hammered into it). Mt. Charlie Gulch and Zayante Creek above its confluence 
should continue with “medium” IP values throughout because baseflow is often very low and 
intermittent at times (1981) above the confluence, though good pool development exists.  Where 
Zayante Creek branches at a point upstream of Mt. Charlie Gulch confluence, the IP rating should be 
“low” because of increased gradient and very low summer baseflow. 
16. Exclude Lompico Creek from historical steelhead habitat. Steelhead inhabit the creek in most 
years only because of a well-maintained fish ladder. A natural bedrock falls exists near its mouth (now 
laddered), combined with a bedrock segment immediately above the falls, containing other drops 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
39
349
D.W. ALLEY & ASSOCIATES Review and Comments    
Re: Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan for the San Lorenzo River Watershed- January 2015- Public Version 
DWA Comments on Draft Multispecies Recovery Plan- San Lorenzo River 
Page 37 
January 2016 
without approach pools, that would have made Lompico Creek historically unavailable to steelhead 
except in the rarest of high stormflow conditions.  
17. Regarding tributaries to Bean Creek, exclude the tributary from the south, below the 
Lockhart Gulch confluence from historical steelhead habitat because of its impassable high 
gradient and sometimes ephemeral nature.  
18. In Lockhart Gulch, the historical IP rating should be “low” because of the small, confined 
nature of the stream channel, the bedrock chute within 1/2-mile of its mouth that is only sometimes 
passable to adult salmonids and because of the Gulch’s very low summer baseflow.  
19. Ruins and Mackenzie creeks, small tributaries to Bean Creek, should be removed from 
historical habitat because of the tiny, confined, intermittent summer baseflow of the creeks. In 
most years they are ephemeral. 
20. Exclude the reach above Love Creek Falls on Love Creek and all of Fritch Creek from 
historical steelhead habitat. Love Creek has a natural 12-15-foot vertical waterfall approximately 1/3 
mile from its mouth which would have made the reach above seldom historically accessible to 
steelhead. An additional bedrock chute and cascade exist downstream of the falls, which would be 
passable only at moderate stormflows (>500 cfs at Big Trees). This reach below Love Creek Falls 
should be rated “low” IP because of Love Creek’s high confinement, poor pool development through 
a bedrock-dominated reach with very low summer baseflow.  
21. In Newell Creek, the historical IP rating should be “medium” for the first mile and “low” 
above. Newell Creek historically had a low baseflow, offering limited rearing habitat. Spawning 
habitat was likely poor due to high sedimentation from sandy geological conditions.  One mile from 
the creek mouth there is a flat bedrock chute 50 feet wide and 6 feet high that was likely a substantial 
passage impediment for steelhead, historically. 
22. In Fall Creek, the historical IP rating should be “high” for the first 0.8 miles and “medium” 
for the next 0.8 miles. Above that it was likely inaccessible historically due to high gradient and 
should be given no historical IP. Steelhead are typically in high densities in Fall Creek with its good 
escape cover and high baseflow. But YOY grow slowly due to its heavily shaded condition, high 
gradient and limited potential for pool development. Fall Creek has an estimated stream gradient of 
3.3% for the first 0.7 miles and 6.1% for the next 0.6 miles, based on map contour intervals. It has less 
confinement than typical tributaries. It retains instream wood. It is low in the upper watershed above 
the San Lorenzo Gorge for good spawning access. The unnamed tributary that confluences with 
Fall Creek in the first 200 feet and empties out of the high school property should be given a 
Agenda:  2.4.16 
Item:  12a1iii
40
350
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested