Power Technologies Energy Data Book
April 2005 • NREL/TP-620-37930
Third Edition
Pdf rotate single page and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf rotate one page; rotate all pages in pdf and save
Pdf rotate single page and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf reverse page order; how to save a pdf after rotating pages
National Renewable Energy Laboratory 
1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 
303-275-3000 • www.nrel.gov 
Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy 
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 
by Midwest Research Institute • Battelle 
Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 
Technical Report 
NREL/TP-620-37930 
April 2005 
Power Technologies Energy  
Data Book 
Third Edition 
Compiled by J. Aabakken 
Prepared under Task No(s). ASA4.6065 
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
this RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK, you can simply delete a single page from a PDF document using VB.NET or remove any page from a PDF document and save to local
pdf save rotated pages; rotate pdf pages
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
How to delete a single page from a PDF document. PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(filepath); // Detele page 2 (actually the third page).
how to rotate one pdf page; how to rotate just one page in pdf
NOTICE 
This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. 
Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any 
warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or 
usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not 
infringe privately owned rights.  Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by 
trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, 
recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or any agency thereof.  The views and 
opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States 
government or any agency thereof. 
Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge
Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy 
and its contractors, in paper, from: 
U.S. Department of Energy 
Office of Scientific and Technical Information 
P.O. Box 62 
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 
phone:  865.576.8401 
fax: 865.576.5728 
email:  mailto:reports@adonis.osti.gov
Available for sale to the public, in paper, from: 
U.S. Department of Commerce 
National Technical Information Service 
5285 Port Royal Road 
Springfield, VA 22161 
phone:  800.553.6847 
fax:  703.605.6900 
email: orders@ntis.fedworld.gov
online ordering:  http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm
Printed on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 20% postconsumer waste
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multi-page Tiff image files String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath
how to rotate a single page in a pdf document; save pdf rotated pages
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Similarly, Tiff image with single page or multiple pages is supported. Description: Convert to PDF and save it on the disk. Parameters:
how to reverse pages in pdf; permanently rotate pdf pages
iii
Table of Contents 
1.0 Introduction..............................................................................................................................1 
2.0 Technology Profiles 
Biopower..............................................................................................................................3 
Geothermal.........................................................................................................................11 
Concentrating Solar Power................................................................................................19 
Photovoltaics......................................................................................................................25 
Wind...................................................................................................................................37 
Hydrogen............................................................................................................................45 
Advanced Hydropower......................................................................................................51 
Solar Buildings...................................................................................................................57 
Reciprocating Engines.......................................................................................................65 
Microturbines.....................................................................................................................69 
Fuel Cells...........................................................................................................................73 
Batteries.............................................................................................................................81 
Advanced Energy Storage..................................................................................................87 
Superconducting Power Technology.................................................................................93 
Thermally Activated Technologies....................................................................................99 
3.0 Electricity Restructuring 
3.1 States with Competitive Electricity Markets.......................................................101 
3.2 States with System Benefit Charges (SBC).........................................................102 
3.3 States with Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS)..............................................105 
3.4 States with Net Metering Policies........................................................................110 
3.5 States with Environmental Disclosure Policies...................................................115 
3.6 Green Power Markets..........................................................................................116 
3.7 States with Competitive Green Power Offerings.................................................118 
3.8 States with Utility Green Pricing Programs.........................................................126 
3.9 Renewable Energy Certificates............................................................................139 
3.10 State Incentive Programs.....................................................................................143 
3.11 Federal Agency Purchases of Green Power.........................................................148 
4.0 Forecasts/Comparisons 
4.1 Projections of Renewable Electricity Net Capacity.............................................149 
4.2 Projections of Renewable Electricity Net Generation.........................................150 
4.3 Projections of Renewable Electricity Carbon Dioxide Emissions Savings.........151
5.0 Electricity Supply 
5.1 U.S. Primary and Delivered Energy Overview....................................................153 
5.2 Electricity Flow Diagram.....................................................................................155 
5.3 Electricity Overview............................................................................................156 
5.4 Consumption of Fossil Fuels by Electric Generators..........................................157 
5.5 Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption .......................................................158 
5.6 Fossil Fuel Generation by Age of Generating Units............................................160 
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
file to the end of another and save to a Remarkably, all those C#.NET PDF document page processing functions and then saved and output as a single PDF with user
save pdf rotate pages; rotate pages in pdf
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Office 2003 and 2007, PDF. 4. -. 8. rotate page. In the mode of single page view, click to rotate file page 90 degrees in clockwise.
pdf rotate pages separately; rotate pdf pages and save
iv
5.7 Nuclear Generation by Age of Generating Units ................................................161 
5.8 Operational Renewable Energy Generating Capacity ........................................162 
5.9 Number of Utilities by Class of Ownership and Nonutilities..............................163 
5.10 Top 10 Investor-Owned Utilities.........................................................................164 
5.11 Top 10 Independent Power Producers Worldwide..............................................166 
5.12 Utility Mergers and Acquisitions.........................................................................167 
5.13a North American Electric Reliability Council (NREC) Map for the 
United States........................................................................................................168 
5.13b Census Regions Map............................................................................................169 
6.0 Electricity Capability 
6.1 Electric Net Summer Capability..........................................................................171 
6.2 Electric-Only Plant Net Summer Capability........................................................172 
6.3 Combined-Heat-and-Power Plant Net Summer Capability.................................173 
6.4 Regional Noncoincident Peak Loads...................................................................174 
6.5 Electric Generator Cumulative Additions and Retirements.................................175 
6.6 Transmission and Distribution Circuit Miles.......................................................176 
7.0 Electricity Generation 
7.1 Electricity Net Generation...................................................................................177 
7.2 Net Generation at Electric-Only Plants................................................................178 
7.3 Electricity Generation at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants..............................179 
7.4 Generation and Transmission/Distribution Losses..............................................180 
7.5 Electricity Trade...................................................................................................181 
8.0 Electricity Demand 
8.1 Electricity Sales...................................................................................................183 
8.2 Demand-Side Management..................................................................................184 
8.3 Electricity Sales, Revenue, and Consumption by Census Division and  
State, 2003............................................................................................................185 
9.0 Prices 
9.1 Price of Fuels Delivered to Electric Generators..................................................187 
9.2 Electricity Retail Sales.........................................................................................188 
9.3 Prices of Electricity Sold ....................................................................................189 
9.4 Revenue from Electric Utility Retail Sales by Sector..........................................190 
9.5 Revenue from Sales to Ultimate Consumers by Sector, Census Division,  
and State, 2003.....................................................................................................191 
9.6 Production, Operation, and Maintenance Expenses for Major U.S. 
Investor-Owned and Publicly Owned Utilities....................................................193
9.6a Operation and Maintenance Expenses for Major U.S. Investor-Owned  
Electric Utilities...................................................................................................194 
9.6b Operation and Maintenance Expenses for Major U.S. Publicly Owned Generator 
and Nongenerator Electric Utilities.....................................................................195 
9.7 Environmental Compliance Equipment Costs.....................................................196 
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
toolkit, designed particularly for manipulating and managing single-page and multi delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s), etc.
rotate pages in pdf permanently; rotate pdf page permanently
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
and save as new PDF, without changing the previous two PDF documents at all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one
change orientation of pdf page; rotate pdf pages in reader
v
10.0 Economic Indicators 
10.1 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy Purchases................................................197 
10.2 Economy-Wide Indicators...................................................................................198 
10.3 Composite Statements of Income for Major U.S. Publicly Owned Generator  
and Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2003.......................................................199 
11.0 Environmental Indicators 
11.1 Emissions from Electricity Generators, 2003......................................................201 
11.2 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Utility Steam-Electric Generators with 
Environmental Equipment...................................................................................203 
11.3 EPA-Forecasted Nitrogen Oxide, Sulfur Dioxide, and Mercury Emissions  
from Electric Generators......................................................................................204 
11.4 Market Price Indices for Emissions Trading in the South Coast Air-Quality 
Management District............................................................................................205 
11.5 Origin of 2003 Allowable SO
2
Emissions Levels................................................206 
12.0 Conversion Factors 
12.1 Renewable Energy Impacts Calculation..............................................................207 
12.2 Number of Home Electricity Needs Met Calculation..........................................208 
12.3 Coal Displacement Calculation............................................................................209 
12.4 National SO
2
and Heat Input Data.......................................................................210 
12.5 SO
2
, NO
x
, CO
2
Emission Factors for Coal-Fired and Non-Coal Fired Title IV  
Affected Units......................................................................................................211 
12.6a Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxide, and Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors,  
2003 – Electricity Generators..............................................................................212 
12.6b Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxide, and Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors,  
2003 – Combined Heat and Power Producers.....................................................213 
12.7 Global Warming Potentials (GWP).....................................................................215 
12.8 Approximate Heat Content of Selected Fuels for Electric Power Generation.....216 
12.9 Approximate Heat Rates for Electricity...............................................................217 
12.10 Heating Degree Days by Month..........................................................................218 
12.11 Cooling Degree Days by Month..........................................................................219 
1.1 - Introduction 
About the Power Technologies Energy Data Book (PTEDB), Third Edition 
In 2002, the Energy Analysis Office of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory 
(NREL) developed the first version of the Power Technologies Energy Data Book for the 
Office of Power Technologies of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).   
The main purpose of the data book is to compile – in one central document – a 
comprehensive set of data about power technologies from diverse sources. The need for 
policymakers and analysts to be well informed about power technologies suggests the 
need for a publication that includes a diverse, yet focused, set of data about power 
technologies.   
This edition updates the same type of information that is in the previous edition. Most of 
the data in this publication is taken directly from the source materials, although it may be 
reformatted for presentation. Neither NREL nor DOE endorses the validity of these data. 
This Third Edition of the Power Technologies Energy Data Book, and previous editions, 
are available on the Internet at http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/power_databook/
, where the 
PTEDB may be downloaded as PDF files. Selected data also is available as Excel 
spreadsheets.   
The Web site also features energy-conversion calculators and features links to the 
Transportation Energy Data Book and Buildings Energy Data Book. Readers are 
encouraged to suggest improvements to the PTEDB through the feedback form on the 
Web site.   
1
2
Biopower 
Technology Description 
Biopower, also called biomass power, is the generation of electric power from biomass resources – 
now usually urban waste wood, crop and forest residues; and, in the future, crops grown specifically for 
energy production. Biopower reduces most emissions (including emissions of greenhouse gases-GHGs) 
compared with fossil fuel-based electricity. Because biomass absorbs CO
2
as it grows, the entire 
biopower cycle of growing, converting to electricity, and regrowing biomass can result in very low CO
2
emissions. Through the use of residues, biopower systems can even represent a net sink for GHG 
emissions by avoiding methane emissions that would result from landfilling of the unused biomass. 
Representative Technologies for Conversion of Feedstock to Fuel for Power and Heat 
• Homogenization is a process by which feedstock is made physically uniform for further processing or 
for combustion (includes chopping, grinding, baling, cubing, and pelletizing). 
• Gasification (via pyrolysis, partial oxidation, or steam reforming) converts biomass to a fuel gas that 
can be substituted for natural gas in combustion turbines or reformed into H
2
for fuel cell applications. 
• Anaerobic digestion produces biogas that can be used in standard or combined heat and power (CHP) 
applications. Agricultural digester systems use animal or agricultural waste. Landfill gas also is 
produced anaerobically. 
• Biofuels production for power and heat provides liquid-based fuels such as methanol, ethanol, 
hydrogen, or biodiesel. 
Representative Technologies for Conversion of Fuel to Power and Heat 
• Direct combustion systems burn biomass fuel in a boiler to produce steam that is expanded in a 
Rankine Cycle prime mover to produce power. 
• Cofiring substitutes biomass for coal or other fossil fuels in existing coal-fired boilers.  
• Biomass or biomass-derived fuels (e.g. syngas, ethanol, biodiesel) also can be burned in combustion 
turbines (Brayton cycle) or engines (Otto or Diesel cycle) to produce power. 
• When further processed, biomass-derived fuels can be used by fuels cells to produce electricity 
System Concepts 
• CHP applications involve recovery of heat for steam and/or hot water for district energy, industrial 
processes, and other applications. 
• Nearly all current biopower generation is based on 
direct combustion in small, biomass-only plants with 
relatively low electric efficiency (20%), although total 
system efficiencies for CHP can approach 90%.  Most 
biomass direct-combustion generation facilities utilize 
the basic Rankine cycle for electric-power generation, 
which is made up of the steam generator (boiler), 
turbine, condenser, and pump. 
• For the near term, cofiring is the most cost-effective of 
the power-only technologies. Large coal steam plants 
have electric efficiencies near 33%. The highest levels 
of coal cofiring (15% on a heat-input basis) require 
separate feed preparation and injection systems. 
• Biomass gasification combined cycle plants promise 
comparable or higher electric efficiencies (> 40%) using 
only biomass, because they involve gas turbines (Brayton cycle), which are more efficient than 
Rankine cycles. Other technologies being developed include integrated gasification/fuel cell and 
biorefinery concepts.   
3
Technology Applications 
• The existing biopower sector – nearly 1,000 plants – is mainly comprised of direct-combustion plants, 
with an additional small amount of cofiring (six operating plants). Plant size averages 20 MW
e
, and the 
biomass-to-electricity conversion efficiency is about 20%. Grid-connected electrical capacity has 
increased from less than 200 MW
e
in 1978 to more than 9700 MW
e
in 2001. More than 75% of this 
power is generated in the forest products industry’s CHP applications for process heat. Wood-fired 
systems account for close to 95% of this capacity. In addition, about 3,300 MW
e
of municipal solid 
waste and landfill gas generating capacity exists. Recent studies estimate that on a life-cycle basis, 
existing biopower plants represent an annual net carbon sink of 4 MMTCe. Prices generally range from 
8¢/kWh to 12¢/kWh. 
Current Status 
• CHP applications using a waste fuel are generally the most cost-effective biopower option. Growth is 
limited by availability of waste fuel and heat demand. 
• Biomass cofiring with coal ($50 - 250/kW of biomass capacity) is the most near-term option for 
large-scale use of biomass for power-only electricity generation. Cofiring also reduces sulfur dioxide 
and nitrogen oxide emissions. In addition, when cofiring crop and forest-product residues, GHG 
emissions are reduced by a greater percentage (e.g. 23% GHG emissions reduction with 15% cofiring). 
• Biomass gasification for large-scale (20 - 100MW
e
) power production is being commercialized. It 
will be an important technology for cogeneration in the forest-products industries (which project a need 
for biomass and black liquor CHP technologies with a higher electric-thermal ratio), as well as for new 
baseload capacity. Gasification also is important as a potential platform for a biorefinery.  
• Small biopower and biodiesel systems have been used for many years in the developing world for 
electricity generation. However, these systems have not always been reliable and clean. DOE is 
developing systems for village-power applications and for developed-world distributed generation that 
are efficient, reliable, and clean. These systems range in size from 3kW to 5MW and completed field 
verification by 2003. 
• Approximately 15 million to 21 million gallons of biodiesel are produced annually in the United 
States. 
• Utility and industrial biopower generation totaled more than 60 billion kWh in 2001, representing 
about 75% of non-hydroelectric renewable generation. About two-thirds of this energy is derived from 
wood and wood wastes, while one-third of the biopower is from municipal solid waste and landfill gas.  
Industry consumes more than 2.1 quadrillion Btu of primary biomass energy. 
• Current companies include:
Cargill-Dow                                                          Foster Wheeler  
Energy Products of Idaho 
Genecor International  
Future Energy Resources, Inc. (FERCO)              PRM Energy Systems
Technology History 
• In the latter part of the 19
th
century, wood was the primary fuel for residential, commercial, and 
transportation uses. By the 1950s, other fuels had supplanted wood. In 1973, wood use had dropped to 
50 million tons per year. 
• At that point, the forest products and pulp and paper industries began to use wood with coal in new 
plants and switched to wood-fired steam power generation. 
• The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978 stimulated the development of 
nonutility cogeneration and small-scale plants, leading to 70% self-sufficiency in the wood processing 
and pulp-and-paper sectors. 
• As incentives were withdrawn in the late 1980s, annual installations declined from just more than 600 
MW in 1989, to 300-350MW in 1990. 
• There are now nearly 1,000 wood-fired plants in the United States, with about two-thirds of those 
providing power (and heat) for on-site uses only.  
4
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested