display pdf in mvc : Rotate individual pages in pdf reader software SDK project winforms windows web page UWP 3793011-part430

3.3 – States with Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) 
A Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) is a policy that obligates a retail electricity supplier to 
include renewable resources in its electricity generation portfolio. Retail suppliers can meet 
the obligation by constructing or owning eligible renewable resources or purchasing the 
power from eligible generators. To date, 16 states have adopted RPS policies or renewable 
purchase obligations. Initially, most states adopted RPS policies as part of electric industry 
restructuring; but, more recently, a number of states have implemented policies by legislation 
or proceedings that are separate from restructuring activities. In conjunction with system 
benefits funds, RPS policies are expected to lead to the development of more than 17,000 
MW of new renewable energy capacity by 2017 (see Figure 3.3.1). 
Source: Updated by NREL July 2004 based on original map prepared by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 
and Union of Concerned Scientists. 
Figure 3.3.1.  Renewable Portfolio Standards and Renewables Purchase Obligations 
by State 
WI: 2.2% by 2011
NV: 15% by 2013
TX: 2880 MW by 2009
PA: varies by utility
NJ: 6.5% by 2008
CT: 10% by 2010
MA: 4% new by 2009
ME: 30% by 2000
NM: 10% by 2011
AZ: 1.1% by 2007                              
CA: 20% by 2017
MN: 1235 MW by 2010
IA: 105aMW
MD: 7.5% by 2019
HI: 20% by 2020
RI: 16% by 2019
105
Rotate individual pages in pdf reader - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pages in pdf online; pdf reverse page order online
Rotate individual pages in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
how to rotate a page in pdf and save it; rotate pages in pdf expert
Table 3.3.1.  State Renewable Portfolio Standards and Purchase Requirements 
State  Purchase 
Requirements 
Eligible Resources 
Credit 
Trading 
Penalties 
Outside of 
state? 
AZ 
0.2% in 2001, rising 
by 0.2%/yr to  
1% in 2005, then to  
1.05% in 2006, and 
to 1.1% from  
2007-2012. 
(2001: 50% from 
solar electric, 
2004:60% from 
solar electric)  
PV and solar thermal 
electric, R&D, solar hot 
water, and in-state landfill 
gas, wind, and biomass. 
No central 
credit trading 
system 
30 cents/kWh 
starting in 2004. 
Proceeds go to 
solar electric 
fund to finance 
solar projects. 
Out-of-state 
solar eligible 
if power 
reaches AZ. 
Landfill gas, 
wind, and 
biomass 
must be in-
state. 
CA 
Investor-owned 
utilities must add 
minimum 1% 
annually to 20% by 
2017. 
Biomass, solar thermal, 
photovoltaic, wind, 
geothermal, existing 
hydro  
< 30MW, fuel cells using 
renewable fuels, digester 
gas, landfill gas, ocean 
energy. 
WREGIS 
system under 
development 
To be 
determined 
Out-of-state 
eligible if 
meets criteria 
for approval. 
CT 
3% Class I or II 
Technologies by 
Jan 1, 2004 
Class I 1% Jan 1, 
2004 increasing to 
1.5% by 2005, 2% 
by 2006, 3.5% by 
2007, 5% by 2008, 
6% by 2009, and 
7% by Jan 1, 2010   
Class I: solar, wind, new 
sustainable biomass, 
landfill gas, fuel cells, 
ocean thermal, wave, 
tidal, advanced 
renewable energy 
conversion technologies, 
new run of river hydro (<5 
MW). 
Class II: licensed hydro, 
MSW, and other biomass.
Yes. Using 
NEPOOL 
Generation 
Information 
System. 
Penalty of 
5.5¢/kWh paid to 
the Renewable 
Energy 
Investment Fund 
for the 
development of 
Class I 
renewables  
New England 
resources or 
electricity 
delivered to 
New England 
are eligible. 
IA  
Investor-owned 
utilities to purchase 
105 average MW 
(~2% of 1999 
sales) 
Solar, wind, methane 
recovery, and biomass 
No 
Unspecified  
Out-of-state 
renewables 
not eligible. 
HI 
8% by end of 2005, 
10% by 2010, 15% 
by 2015 and 20% 
by 2020 
Wind, solar, hydropower, 
biomass including landfill 
gas, waste to energy, and 
fuels derived from organic 
sources, geothermal, 
ocean energy, fuel cells 
using hydrogen from 
renewables 
Unspecified 
Unspecified; 
standard to be 
revisited if 
utilities can not 
meet it in cost-
effective manner 
Unspecified 
ME 
30% of retail sales 
in 2000 and 
thereafter. PUC will 
revisit within 5 
years. 
Fuel cells, tidal, solar, 
wind, geothermal, hydro, 
biomass, and MSW (< 
100MW); high efficiency 
cogeneration. Self-
generation is not eligible. 
Resource supply under 
this definition exceeds 
RPS requirement. 
No. However, 
PUC is 
considering 
adoption of 
NEPOOL 
Generation 
Information 
System. 
Possible 
sanctions at 
discretion of 
PUC including 
license 
revocation, 
monetary 
penalties, or 
payment into 
renewables fund. 
New England 
resources or 
electricity 
delivered to 
New England 
are eligible.  
106
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Specified Pages from PDF.
rotate pdf pages in reader; pdf rotate single page and save
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
rotate one page in pdf reader; how to rotate all pages in pdf
State  Purchase 
Requirements 
Eligible Resources 
Credit 
Trading 
Penalties 
Outside of 
state? 
MD 
3.5% by 2006 with 
1% from Tier 1 
sources, Tier 1 
increasing by 1% 
every other year 
from 2007 to 2018, 
Tier II remains at 
2.5%, 7.5% total by 
2019 and in 
subsequent years 
Tier 1: solar, wind, 
geothermal, qualifying 
biomass, small 
hydropower (<30MW), 
and landfill methane 
Tier II: existing large 
hydropower, poultry litter 
incineration, existing 
waste to energy  
Yes 
Alternative 
Compliance fee 
of 2¢/kWh for 
Tier 1 and 
1.5¢/kWh for Tier 
2 paid to 
Maryland 
Renewable 
Energy Fund 
Trading 
system to 
work in 
conjunction 
with PJM 
system 
MA 
1% of sales to end-
use customers from 
new renewables in 
2003, +0.5%/yr to 
4% in 2009 
1%/yr increase 
thereafter until 
determined by 
Division of Energy 
Resources 
New renewables placed 
into commercial operation 
after 1997, including 
solar, wind, ocean 
thermal, wave, tidal, fuel 
cells using renewable 
fuels, landfill gas, and 
low-emission advanced 
biomass. Excess 
production from existing 
generators over historical 
baseline eligible. 
Yes. Using 
NEPOOL 
Generation 
Information 
System. 
Entities may 
comply by 
paying 5¢/kWh. 
Non-complying 
retailers must 
submit a 
compliance plan. 
Revocation or 
suspension of 
license is 
possible. 
New England 
resources or 
electricity 
delivered to 
New England 
are eligible. 
MN 
(Not true RPS) 
Applies to Xcel 
Energy only: 425 
MW wind by 2002 
and 110 MW 
biomass.  
Additional 400 MW 
wind by 2006 and 
300 MW by 2010  
Wind, biomass. 
No, other 
than standard 
regulatory 
oversight. 
No 
Unspecified 
NV 
5% by 2003 
increase  
2%/yr until  
15% in 2013. 
Minimum 5%/yr 
must come from 
solar. 
Solar, wind, geothermal, 
& biomass (includes 
agricultural waste, wood, 
MSW, animal waste and 
aquatic plants). 
Distributed resources 
receives extra credit 
(1.15). 
Yes. RECs 
valid for 4 
years 
following year 
issued. 
Financial 
penalties may be 
applied for 
noncompliance.  
Out-of-state 
resources 
eligible with 
dedicated 
transmission 
line. 
NJ 
Class I or II: 2.5% 
Class I: 4% by 
2008, with solar 
requirement of 
0.16% retail sales 
(90MW) 
Class I.: Solar, PV, wind, 
fuel cells, geothermal, 
wave, tidal, landfill 
methane, and sustainable 
biomass.  
Class II: hydro <30 MW 
and MSW facilities that 
meet air pollution 
requirements. 
Legislation 
allows credit 
trading, PJM 
credit trading 
system under 
development. 
Shortfalls must 
be made up in 
the following 
year or financial 
penalties, license 
revocation or 
suspension. 
Eligible if 
power flows 
into PJM or 
NYISO. 
Class II must 
come from 
states open 
to retail 
competition. 
107
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
reverse page order pdf online; rotate one page in pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. Demo Code: How to Delete Specified Pages from PDF in C#.NET.
how to rotate page in pdf and save; how to rotate just one page in pdf
State  Purchase 
Requirements 
Eligible Resources 
Credit 
Trading 
Penalties 
Outside of 
state? 
NM 
5% of retail sales 
by 2006. Increase 
by 1%/yr to 10% by 
January 1, 2011 
and thereafter. 
Solar, wind, hydro (<=5 
MW), biomass, 
geothermal, and fuel 
cells. 1 kWh solar = 
3kWh; 1 kWh biomass, 
geothermal, landfill gas, 
or fuel cells =2 kWh 
toward compliance 
Yes. RECs 
valid for 4 
years from 
date of 
issuance. 
Yes, but to be 
determined. 
Must be 
delivered in 
state. 
PA 
For PECO, West 
Penn, & PP&L, 
20% of residential 
consumers served 
by competitive 
default provider: 
2% in 2001 rising 
0.5%/yr. For GPU 
0.2% in 2001 for 
20% customers, 
40% of customers 
in 2002, 60% in 
2003, 80% in 2004. 
Solar, wind, ocean, 
geothermal, sustainable 
biomass. 
No. 
Unspecified. 
Eligible 
RI 
3% by 2003, 
increasing 0.5% 
annually 2008-
2010, increasing 
1% annually 2011-
2014, increasing 
1.5% annually 
2015-2019 
Solar, wind, eligible 
biomass, including co-
firing, geothermal, small 
hydropower, ocean, fuel 
cells using hydrogen 
derived from renewables. 
Yes. Using 
NEPOOL 
Generation 
Information 
System. 
Alternative 
compliance 
payments can 
be made to 
Renewable 
Energy 
Development 
Fund. 
New England 
resources or 
electricity 
delivered to 
New England 
are eligible. 
TX 
1280 MW by 2003 
increase to 2880 
MW by 2009 (880 
MW from existing) 
~2.3% of 2009 
sales. 
Solar, wind, geothermal, 
hydro, wave, tidal, 
biomass, including landfill 
gas. New (operational 
after Sept. 1, 1999) or 
small (<2MW) facilities 
eligible. 
Yes.  
Lesser of 
5¢/kWh or 
200% of 
average market 
value of 
renewable 
energy credits. 
Under certain 
circumstances, 
penalty may not 
be assessed. 
Not eligible 
unless 
dedicated 
transmission 
line into 
state. 
WI 
0.5% by 2001 
increasing to 2.2% 
by 2011 (0.6% can 
come from facilities 
installed prior to 
1998). 
Wind, solar, biomass, 
geothermal, tidal, fuel 
cells that use renewable 
fuel, & hydro under 60 
MW. Eligibility may be 
extended by PUC. 
Yes. Utilities 
with excess 
RECs can 
trade or bank 
them. 
Penalty of 
$5,000-
$500,000 is 
allowed in 
legislation. 
Eligible 
Source: Table updated by NREL July 2004.  Derived from table in Wiser, R. Porter, K., Grace, R., Kappel, C. Creating 
Geothermal Markets: Evaluating Experience with State Renewables Portfolio Standards, report prepared for the 
National Geothermal Collaborative, 2003.  
108
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
Individual Products. XDoc.SDK for .NET. XImage.SDK for .NET. Edit. Insert Pages into Tiff File. Delete Tiff Pages. Move Tiff Page Position. Rotate a Tiff Page. Extract
rotate single page in pdf file; change orientation of pdf page
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Individual Products. XDoc.SDK for .NET. XImage.SDK for .NET. Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF
pdf save rotated pages; how to rotate pdf pages and save
Table 3.3.2.  State Renewable Energy Goals (Nonbinding) 
State 
Purchase Requirements 
Eligible Resources 
Illinois 
5% by 2010; 15% in 2020 
Wind, solar thermal, PV, organic waste 
biomass, & existing run-of-river hydro. 
Minnesota  1% by 2005 increasing by at least 
1%/year to 10% by 2015  
Wind, solar, hydro (<60 MW), and biomass 
109
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; how to rotate a single page in a pdf document
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
Rotate270: Rotate the currently displayed PDF page 90 degrees counterclockwise. for you to create and add a PDF document viewer & reader in Windows
rotate pages in pdf and save; pdf rotate pages separately
3.4 – States with Net-Metering Policies 
Net metering allows customers with generating facilities to turn their electric meters 
backward when their systems are producing energy in excess of their on-site demand.  In this 
way, net metering enables customers to use their own generation to offset their consumption 
over a billing period. This offset means that customers receive retail prices for the excess 
electricity they generate. Without net metering, a second meter is usually installed to measure 
the electricity that flows back to the provider, with the provider purchasing the power at a rate 
much lower than the retail rate. 
Source: J. Green, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, updated July 2004. 
http://www.eere.energy.gov/greenpower/resources/maps/netmetering_map.shtml
Figure 3.4.1.  Net-Metering Policies by State
None
Individual Utilities
Investor-Owned Utilities Only, Not
Rural Cooperatives
Investor-Owned Utilities and
Rural Cooperatives
None
Individual Utilities
Investor-Owned Utilities Only, Not
Rural Cooperatives
Investor-Owned Utilities and
Rural Cooperatives
Net Metering By State
Revised:   9Jul04
10 kW 
50 kW
1MW
100 kW
No Limit
100 kW
10 kW
100 kW,
25,000
kWh/y
40 kW
20 kW
25/100 kW
1,000 
kWh/
mo
60 kW
30 kW
10/400 kW
PV Only
25 kW
15/150 kW
25 kW
10/500
kW
50 kW
25 kW
No
Limit
25 kW
100 kW
100 kW
25 kW
80 kW
Solar Only
40 kW
10 kW
Monthly Net Metering
Annual Net Metering
Varies by Utility or Unknown
Monthly Net Metering
Annual Net Metering
Varies by Utility or Unknown
25 kW
25/100
kW
10/100
kW
50 kW
25 kW
10/25 kW
PV
Only
25/
100 kW
20 
kW
110
Table 3.4.1.  Summary of State Net-Metering Policies 
State 
Allowable 
Technology 
and Size 
Allowable 
Customer 
Statewide
Limit 
Treatment of 
Net Excess 
Generation (NEG)
Authority 
Enacted
Scope of 
Program 
AZ 
≤10 kW; 
eligible 
technologies 
vary by utility 
All customer 
classes 
None 
Annual NEG 
granted to utility 
ACC; Utility 
Tariffs 
1981 
SRP and 
TEP 
AR 
Renewables, 
fuel cells and 
microturbines 
≤25 kW 
residential 
≤100 kW 
commercial 
All customer 
classes 
None 
Monthly NEG 
granted to utilities 
Legislature  2001 
All utilities 
CA 
Solar and wind
≤1000 kW 
All customer 
classes 
0.5% of 
utilities peak 
demand 
Annual NEG 
granted to utilities 
Legislature  2002; 
2001; 
1995 
All utilities 
CO 
Wind and PV 
3 kW, 10 kW 
Varies 
NA 
Varies 
Utility tariffs  1997 
Four 
Colorado 
utilities  
CT 
Renewables 
and fuel cells 
≤100 kW 
Residential  None 
Not specified 
Legislature  1990, 
updated 
1998 
All IOUs,  
No REC in 
state. 
DE 
Renewables 
≤25 kW 
All customer 
classes 
None 
Not specified 
Legislature  1999 
All utilities 
FL 
JEA: PV and 
wind ≤10 kW 
JEA: 
Residential 
only; NSB: 
All customer 
classes 
None 
JEA and NSB: 
Monthly NEG 
granted to 
customer 
Individual 
Utility Tariffs 
2003 
(JEA) 
JEA, New 
Smyrna 
Beach 
GA 
Solar, wind, 
fuel cells 
≤10 kW 
residential 
≤100 kW 
commercial 
Residential 
and 
commercial 
0.2% of 
annual peak 
demand 
Monthly NEG or 
total generation 
purchased at 
avoided cost or 
higher rate if green 
priced 
Legislature  2001 
All utilities 
HI 
Solar, wind, 
biomass, 
hydro 
≤50 kW 
Residential 
and small 
commercial 
0.5% of 
annual peak 
demand 
Monthly NEG 
granted to utilities 
Legislature  2001 
All utilities 
ID 
Eligible 
technologies 
vary by utility 
≤25 kW 
residential 
≤100 kW 
commercial 
(Avista ≤25 
kW) 
Residential 
and small 
commercial  
None 
NEG varies by 
utility 
Public Utility 
Commission 
1980 
IOUs only,
RECs are 
not rate-
regulated 
IL 
Solar and wind  
≤40 kW 
All customer 
classes; 
ComEd only 
0.1% of 
annual peak 
demand 
NEG purchased at 
avoided cost 
ComEd 
tariff 
2000 
Common-
wealth 
Edison 
111
State 
Allowable 
Technology 
and Size 
Allowable 
Customer 
Statewide
Limit 
Treatment of 
Net Excess 
Generation (NEG)
Authority  Enacted Scope of 
Program 
IN 
Renewables 
and 
cogeneration 
≤1,000 
kWh/month 
All customer 
classes 
None 
Monthly NEG 
granted to utilities 
Public Utility 
Commission 
1985 
IOUs only,
RECs are 
not rate-
regulated 
IA 
Renewables 
and 
cogeneration 
(No limit per 
system) 
All customer 
classes 
105 MW 
Monthly NEG 
purchased at 
avoided cost 
Iowa Utility 
Board 
1993 
IOUs only, 
RECs are 
not rate-
regulated 
[2] 
KY 
Residential PV 
≤ 15 kW 
Not specified 0.1% of a 
supplier's 
single-hour 
peak load for 
previous 
year 
Monthly NEG 
granted to 
customer 
Legislature  2004 
IOUs and 
RECs 
LA 
Residential 
≤25 kW; ≤100 
kW 
commercial 
and farm 
Residential, 
commercial, 
farm 
None 
Not specified 
Legislature  2003 
All utilities 
ME 
Renewables 
and fuel cells 
≤100 kW 
All customer 
classes 
None 
Annual NEG 
granted to utilities 
Public Utility 
Commission 
1998 
All utilities 
MD 
Solar and wind
≤80 kW 
Residential, 
commercial, 
and nonprofit
0.2% of 
1998 peak 
Monthly NEG 
granted to utilities 
Legislature  1997  
All utilities 
MA 
Qualifying 
facilities 
≤60 kW 
All customer 
classes 
None 
Monthly NEG 
purchased at 
avoided cost 
Legislature  1997 
All utilities 
MN 
Qualifying 
facilities 
≤40 kW 
All customer 
classes 
None 
NEG purchased at 
utility average 
retail energy rate 
Legislature  1983 
All utilities 
MT 
Solar, wind 
and hydro 
≤50 kW 
All customer 
classes 
None 
Annual NEG 
granted to utilities 
at the end of each 
calendar year. 
Legislature  1999 
IOUs only 
NV 
Biomass, 
geothermal, 
solar, wind, 
hydro 
≤30 kW 
All customer 
classes 
None 
Monthly or annual 
NEG granted to 
utilities 
Legislature  2001; 
1997 
All utilities 
NH 
Solar, wind 
and hydro 
≤25 kW 
All 
customers 
classes 
0.05% of 
utility's 
annual peak 
NEG credited to 
next month 
Legislature   1998 
All utilities 
NJ 
PV and wind 
≤100 kW 
Residential 
and small 
commercial 
0.1% of peak 
or $2M 
annual 
financial 
impact 
Annualized NEG 
purchased at 
avoided cost 
Legislature  1999 
All utilities 
112
State 
Allowable 
Technology 
and Size 
Allowable 
Customer 
Statewide
Limit 
Treatment of 
Net Excess 
Generation (NEG)
Authority  Enacted Scope of 
Program 
NM 
Renewables 
and 
cogeneration  
≤10 kW 
All customer 
classes 
None 
NEG credited to 
next month, or 
monthly NEG 
purchased at 
avoided cost (utility 
choice) 
Public Utility 
Commission 
1999 
All utilities 
NY 
Solar 
residential ≤10 
kW; wind 
residential ≤ 
25 kW; Farm 
biogas 
systems <400 
kW; Farm wind 
≤ 125 kW 
Residential; 
farm 
systems 
0.1% 1996 
peak 
demand 
Annualized NEG 
purchased at 
avoided cost 
Legislature  2002; 
1997 
All utilities 
ND 
Renewables 
and 
cogeneration 
≤100 kW 
All customer 
classes 
None 
Monthly NEG 
purchased at 
avoided cost 
Public Utility 
Commission 
1991 
IOUs only,
RECs are 
not rate-
regulated 
OH 
Renewables, 
microturbines, 
and fuel cells  
(no limit per 
system) 
All customer 
classes 
1.0% of 
aggregate 
customer 
demand 
NEG credited to 
next month 
Legislature  1999 
All utilities 
OK 
Renewables 
and 
cogeneration 
≤100 kW and 
≤25,000 
kWh/year 
All customer 
classes 
None 
Monthly NEG 
granted to utility 
Oklahoma 
Corporation 
Commission 
1988 
All utilities 
OR 
Solar, wind, 
fuel cell and 
hydro  
≤25 kW 
All customer 
classes 
0.5% of peak 
demand 
Annual NEG 
granted to low-
income programs, 
credited to 
customer, or other 
use determined by 
Commission 
Legislature  1999 
All utilities 
PA 
Renewables 
and fuel cells 
≤10 kW 
Residential  None 
Monthly NEG 
granted to utility 
Legislature  1998 
All utilities 
RI 
Renewables 
and fuel cells 
≤25 kW 
All customer 
classes 
1 MW for 
Narragansett 
Electric 
Company 
Annual NEG 
granted to utilities 
Public Utility 
Commission 
1998 
Narragans
ett Electric 
Company 
TX 
Renewables 
only 
≤50 kW 
All customer 
classes 
None 
Monthly NEG 
purchased at 
avoided cost 
Public Utility 
Commission 
1986 
All IOUs 
and RECs 
VT 
PV, wind, fuel 
cells 
≤15 kW 
Farm biogas 
≤150 kW 
Residential, 
commercial 
and 
agricultural 
1% of 1996 
peak 
Annual NEG 
granted to utilities 
Legislature  1998 
All utilities 
113
State 
Allowable 
Technology 
and Size 
Allowable 
Customer 
Statewide
Limit 
Treatment of 
Net Excess 
Generation (NEG)
Authority  Enacted Scope of 
Program 
VA 
Solar, wind 
and hydro 
Residential 
≤10 kW 
Non-residential 
≤500 kW 
All customer 
classes 
0.1% of peak 
of previous 
year 
Annual NEG 
granted to utilities 
(power purchase 
agreement is 
allowed) 
Legislature  1999 
All utilities 
WA 
Solar, wind, 
fuel cells and 
hydro 
≤25 kW 
All customer 
classes 
0.1% of 
1996 peak 
demand 
Annual NEG 
granted to utility 
Legislature  1998 
All utilities 
WI 
All 
technologies 
≤20 kW 
All retail  
customers 
None 
Monthly NEG 
purchased at retail 
rate for 
renewables, 
avoided cost for 
non-renewables 
Public 
Service 
Commission 
1993 
IOUs only,
RECs are 
not rate-
regulated 
WY 
Solar, wind, 
hydro, and 
biomass ≤ 25 
kW 
All customer 
classes 
None 
Annual NEG 
purchased at 
avoided cost 
Legislature  2001 
All IOUs, 
RECs, and 
munis 
Source: National Renewable Energy Lab based on original table by Tom Starrs of Kelso Starrs and Associates.  July 2004. 
http://www.eere.energy.gov/greenpower/markets/netmetering.shtml
Notes:  
IOU — Investor-owned utility  
GandT — Generation and transmission cooperatives  
REC — Rural electric cooperative
114
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested