display pdf in mvc : How to save a pdf after rotating pages control Library system web page asp.net azure console 379303-part442

Photovoltaics 
Technology Description 
Photovoltaic (PV) arrays convert sunlight to electricity without moving parts and without producing 
fuel wastes, air pollution, or greenhouse gases (GHGs). Using solar PV for electricity and eventually 
transportation (from hydrogen production) will help reduce CO
2
worldwide. 
System Concepts 
•  Flat-plate PV arrays use global sunlight; concentrators use direct sunlight. Modules are mounted on 
a stationary array or on single- or dual-axis sun trackers. Arrays can be ground-mounted or on all types 
of buildings and 
structures (e.g., see 
semi-transparent solar 
canopy, right). PV dc 
output can be 
conditioned into grid-
quality ac electricity, 
or dc can be used to 
charge batteries or to 
split water to produce 
H
2
Representative 
Technologies  
•  Flat-plate cells are either constructed from crystalline silicon cells, or from thin films using 
amorphous silicon. Other materials such as copper indium diselinide (CIS) and cadmium telluride also 
hold promise as thin-film materials. The vast majority of systems installed today are in flat-plate 
configurations where multiple cells are mounted together to form a module. These systems are 
generally fixed in a single position, but can be mounted on structures that tilt toward the sun on a 
seasonal basis, or on structures that roll east to west over the course of the day. 
•  Photovoltaic concentrator systems use optical concentrators to focus direct sunlight onto solar cells 
for conversion to electricity. A complete concentrating system includes concentrator modules, support 
and tracking structures, a power-processing center, and land. PV concentrator module components 
include solar cells, an electrically isolating and thermally conducting housing for mounting and 
interconnecting the cells, and optical concentrators. The solar cells in today's concentrators are 
predominantly silicon, although gallium arsenide-based (GaAs) solar cells may be used in the future 
because of their high-conversion efficiencies. The housing places the solar cells at the focus of the 
optical concentrator elements and provides means for dissipating excess heat generated in the solar 
cells. The optical concentrators are generally Fresnel lenses but also can be reflectors. 
Technology Applications 
•  PV systems can be installed as either grid supply technologies or as customer-sited alternatives to 
retail electricity. As suppliers of bulk grid power, PV modules would typically be installed in large 
array fields ranging in total peak output from a few megawatts on up. Very few of these systems have 
been installed to-date. A greater focus of the recent marketplace is on customer-sited systems, which 
may be installed to meet a variety of customer needs. These installations may be residential-size 
systems of just one kilowatt, or commercial-size systems of several hundred kilowatts. In either case, 
PV systems meet customer needs for alternatives to purchased power, reliable power, protection from 
price escalation, desire for green power, etc. Interest is growing in the use of PV systems as part of the 
building structure or façade (“building integrated”). Such systems use PV modules designed to look 
like shingles, windows, or other common building elements. 
25
How to save a pdf after rotating pages - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf reverse page order online; pdf rotate single page
How to save a pdf after rotating pages - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; pdf reverse page order
•  PV systems are expected to be used in the United States for residential and commercial buildings; 
distributed utility systems for grid support; peak power shaving, and intermediate daytime load 
following; with electric storage and improved transmission, for dispatchable electricity; and H
2
production for portable fuel. 
•  Other applications for PV systems include electricity for remote locations, especially for billions of 
people worldwide who do not have electricity. Typically, these applications will be in hybrid minigrid 
or battery-charging configurations. 
•  Almost all locations in the United States and worldwide have enough sunlight for PV (e.g., U.S. 
sunlight varies by only about 25% from an average in Kansas). 
•  Land area is not a problem for PV. Not only can PV be more easily sited in a distributed fashion 
than almost all alternatives (e.g., on roofs or above parking lots), a PV-generating station 140 km-by-
140 km sited at an average solar location in the United States could generate all of the electricity 
needed in the country (2.5 × 10
6
GWh/year), assuming a system efficiency of 10% and an area packing 
factor of 50% (to avoid self-shading). This area (0.3% of U.S.) is less than one-third of the area used 
for military purposes in the United States. 
Current Status 
•  The cost of PV-generated electricity has dropped 15- to 20-fold; and grid-connected PV systems 
currently sell for about $5–$8/W
p
(20 to 32¢/kWh), including support structures, power conditioning, 
and land. They are highly reliable and last 20 years or longer.  
•  Crystalline silicon is widely used and the most commercially mature photovoltaic material. Thin- 
film PV modules currently in production include three based on amorphous silicon, cadmium telluride, 
and CIS alloys. 
•  About 288 MW of PV were sold in 2000 (more than $2 billion worth) and 510 MW of PV were 
sold in 2002; total installed PV is more than 2 GW. The U.S. world market share is about 20%. Annual 
market growth for PV has been about 25% as a result of reduced prices and successful global 
marketing. Specifically, sales grew 36% in 2001 and 31% in 2002. Hundreds of applications are cost-
effective for off-grid needs. Almost two-thirds of U.S.-manufactured PV is exported. However, the 
fastest growing segment of the market is grid-connected PV, such as roof-mounted arrays on homes 
and commercial buildings in the United States. California is subsidizing PV systems because it is 
considered cost-effective to reduce their dependence on natural gas, especially for peak daytime loads 
for air-conditioning, which matches PV output. 
•  Highest efficiency for wafers of single-crystal or polycrystalline silicon is 25%, and for commercial 
modules is 13%–17%. Silicon modules currently cost about $2/W
to manufacture. 
•  In the past few years, world record solar cell sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiencies were set 
by federally funded universities, national laboratories, or industry in copper indium gallium diselenide 
(19% cells and 13% modules) and cadmium telluride (16% cells, 11% modules). Cell and module 
efficiencies for these technologies have increased more than 50% in the past decade. Efficiencies for 
commercial thin-film modules are 5%–11%, with the best cells offering 12-19% efficiency. A new 
generation of thin-film PV modules is going through the high-risk transition to first-time and large-
scale manufacturing. If successful, market share could increase rapidly. 
•  Highest efficiencies for single-crystal Si and multijunction gallium arsenide (GaAs)-alloy cells for 
concentrators are 25%–34%; and for commercial modules are 15%–17%.  Prototype systems are being 
tested in the U.S. desert SW. 
•  Current leading PV companies in 2000 and associated production of cells/modules are listed below: 
Top PV Producers (2002) 
U.S. Production  
World Production 
MW 
MW 
Sharp  
198.0 
Shell Solar 
52.0 
73.0 
26
VB.NET Word: VB.NET Code to Rotate Word Page Within .NET Imaging
Here, we can recommend you VB.NET PDF page rotating tutorial Without losing any original quality during or after the Word page rotating; Save the rotated
how to rotate a page in pdf and save it; rotate one page in pdf
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
rotator control SDK allows developers to save rotated image That is to say, after you run following powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to reverse pages in pdf; saving rotated pdf pages
Kyocera 
72.0 
BP Solar 
13.4 
70.2 
RWE (ASE) 
4.0 
44.0 
Mitsubishi 
42.0 
Isofoton 
35.2 
Sanyo 
35.0 
Q-Cells 
28.0 
Photowatt 
20.0 
AstroPower 
17.0 
17.0 
USSC 
7.0 
Global Solar 
3.0 
First Solar 
3.0 
Evergreen 
Solar 
2.8 
Other* 
2.0 
Total 
104.22 
632.4 
World Total 
744.1 
Source: US: PV News, Vol. 23, No. 3, Page 2; World: PV News, Vol. 23, No. 4, Page 2 
Technology History 
•  French physicist Edmond Becquerel first described the photovoltaic (PV) effect in 1839, but it 
remained a curiosity of science for the next three quarters of a century. At only 19, Becquerel found 
that certain materials would produce small amounts of electric current when exposed to light. The 
effect was first studied in solids, such as selenium, by Heinrich Hertz in the 1870s. Soon afterward, 
selenium PV cells were converting light to electricity at more than 1 percent efficiency. As a result, 
selenium was quickly adopted in the emerging field of photography for use in light-measuring devices.  
•  Major steps toward commercializing PV were taken in the 1940s and early 1950s, when the 
Czochralski process was developed for producing highly pure crystalline silicon. In 1954, scientists at 
Bell Laboratories depended on the Czochralski process to develop the first crystalline silicon 
photovoltaic cell, which had an efficiency of 4%. Although a few attempts were made in the 1950s to 
use silicon cells in commercial products, it was the new space program that gave the technology its first 
major application. In 1958, the U.S. Vanguard space satellite carried a small array of PV cells to power 
its radio. The cells worked so well that PV technology has been part of the space program ever since.  
•  Even today, PV plays an important role in space, supplying nearly all power for satellites. The 
commercial integrated circuit technology also contributed to the development of PV cells. Transistors 
and PV cells are made from similar materials and operate on similar physical mechanisms. As a result, 
advances in transistor research provided a steady flow of new information about PV cell technology. 
(Today, however, this technology transfer process often works in reverse, as advances in PV research 
and development are sometimes adopted by the integrated circuit industry.)  
•  Despite these advances, PV devices in 1970 were still too expensive for most "down-to-Earth" 
uses. But, in the mid-1970s, rising energy costs, sparked by a world oil crisis, renewed interest in 
making PV technology more affordable. Since then, the federal government, industry, and research 
organizations have invested billions of dollars in research, development, and production. A thriving 
industry now exists to meet the rapidly growing demand for photovoltaic products. 
27
VB.NET Image: Web Image and Document Viewer Creation & Design
and print such documents and images as JPEG, BMP, GIF, PNG, TIFF, PDF, etc. Upload, Open, Save & Download Images & Docs with Web Viewer. After creating a
save pdf rotate pages; save pdf rotated pages
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
of this VB.NET image cropping process: decode the source image file to bitmap, crop bitmap and save cropped bitmap to original image format. After you run this
how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently; rotate individual pages in pdf
Technology Future
The levelized cost of electricity (in constant 1997$/kWh) for PV are projected to be: 
2000
2010
2020
Utility-owned Residential     
29.7 
17.0 
10.2 
(crystalline Si) 
Utility-Scale Thin-Film  
29.0 
8.1 
6.2 
Concentrator 
24.4 
9.4 
6.5 
Source: Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations, EPRI TR-109496, 1997. 
(Note that this document is currently being updated by DOE, and the values most likely will change). 
•  Crystalline Silicon - Most PV systems installed to-date have used crystalline silicon cells. That 
technology is relatively mature. In the future, cost-effectiveness will be achieved through incremental 
efficiency improvements, enhanced yields, and advanced lower-cost manufacturing techniques. 
•  Even though some thin-film modules are now commercially available, their real commercial impact 
is only expected to become significant during the next three to 10 years. Beyond that, their general use 
should occur in the 2005-2015 time frame, depending on investment levels for technology development 
and manufacture.  
•  Thin films using amorphous silicon, which are a growing segment of the U.S. market, have several 
advantages over crystalline silicon. It can be manufactured at lower cost, is more responsive to indoor 
light, and can be manufactured on flexible or low-cost substrates. Improved semiconductor deposition 
rates will reduce manufacturing costs in the future. Other thin-film materials will become increasingly 
important in the future. In fact, the first commercial modules using indium gallium diselinide thin-film 
devices were produced in 2000. Improved manufacturing techniques and deposition processes will 
reduce costs and help improve efficiency. 
•  Substantial commercial interest exists in scaling-up production of thin films. As thin films are 
produced in larger quantity, and as they achieve expected performance gains, they will become more 
economical for the whole range of applications. 
•  Multijunction cells with efficiencies of 38% at very high concentrations are being developed. 
•  Manufacturing research and supporting technology development hold important keys to future cost 
reductions. Large-scale manufacturing processes will allow major cost reductions in cells and modules. 
Advanced power electronics and non-islanding inverters will lessen barriers to customer adoption and 
utility interface. 
•  A unique multijunction GaAs-alloy cell developed at NREL was spun off to the space power 
industry, leading to a record cell (34%) and a shared R&D100 Award for NREL/Spectrolab in 2001. 
This device configuration is expected to dominate future space power for commercial and military 
satellites. 
Source: National Renewable Energy Laboratory. U.S. Climate Change Technology Program.  
Technology Options: For the Near and Long Term. DOE/PI-0002. November 2003 
28
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
Q 2: After I apply various image processing functions to source image file editor control SDK allows developers process target image file and save edited image
rotate pdf pages on ipad; change orientation of pdf page
VB.NET Image: Creating Hotspot Annotation for Visual Basic .NET
hotspot annotation styles before and after its activation img = obj.CreateAnnotation() img.Save(folderName & & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
rotate pdf pages by degrees; reverse page order pdf
Photovoltaics 
Market Data 
PV Cell/Module 
Production (Shipments) 
Source:  PV News, Vol. 15, No. 2, Feb. 1996; Vol. 16, No. 2, Feb. 1997; Vol. 20, No. 2, Feb. 2001, Vol. 22, 
No. 5, May 2003 and Volume 23, No. 4, April 2004. Paul Maycock, www.pvenergy.com 
Annual (MW) 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001 
2002 
2003 
U.S. 
8
15
35
39
51
54 
61
75
100
121
103
Japan 
10
17
16
21
35
49 
80
129
171
251
364
Europe 
3
10
20
19
30
34 
40
61
87
135
193
Rest of World 
1
5
6
10
9
19 
21
23
33
54
84
World Total 
23
47
78
89
126
155 
201
288
391
560
744
Cumulative (MW) 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001 
2002 
2003 
U.S. 
45
101
219
258
309
363 
424
499
599
720
823
Japan 
26
95
185
206
241
290 
370
499
670
921
1,285
Europe 
13
47
136
155
185
219 
259
320
407
542
735
Rest of World 
3
20
45
55
65
83 
104
127
160
214
298
World Total 
87
263
585
674
800
954  1,156
1,444
1,835
2,395
3,139
U.S. % of World Sales 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001 
2002 
2003 
Annual  
71% 
34% 
32% 
44% 
44% 
41% 
35%  30% 
26% 
26% 
22% 
14% 
Cumulative 
75% 
52% 
39% 
37% 
38% 
39% 
38%  37% 
35% 
33% 
30% 
26% 
Annual Capacity 
(Shipments retained, 
MW)* 
Source: Strategies Unlimited 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996  1997  1998  1999  2000 
U.S. 
1.4 
4.2 
5.1 
8.4 
9.2 
10.5 
13.6 
18.4 
21.3 
Total World 
15 
39 
68 
79 
110 
131 
170 
246 
*Excludes indoor consumer 
(watches/calculators). 
2
9
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Add Rubber Stamp Annotation to Image
on image or document files; Able to save created rubber Suitable for VB.NET PDF, Word & TIFF document Method for Drawing Rubber Stamp Annotation. After you have
rotate pdf page; pdf rotate just one page
VB.NET PDF: VB Code to Create PDF Windows Viewer Using DocImage
What's more, after you have created a basic PDF document viewer in your VB.NET Windows application, more imaging viewer Save current PDF page or the
rotate pdf page by page; pdf rotate single page
Cumulative Capacity 
(Shipments retained, 
MW)* 
Source: Strategies Unlimited 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996  1997  1998  1999  2000 
U.S. 
23
43
76
85
96
109 
128
149
Total World 
61
199
474
552
663
794 
964
1,210
*Excludes indoor consumer (watches/calculators). 
U.S. Shipments (MW) 
Source: EIA, Annual Energy Review 2003, DOE/EIA-0384(2003) (Washington, D.C., September 2004), 
Tables 10.5 and 10.6, and EIA, Renewable Energy Annual 2003, DOE/EIA-0603(2003) (Washington, D.C., 
December 2004) Table 26. 
Annual Shipments 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 
2000 
2001 
2002 
2003 
Total 
5.8
13.8
31.1
35.5
46.4
50.6 
76.8
88.2
97.7
112.1
109.4
Imports 
0.3
1.4
1.3
1.9
1.9
1.9 
4.8
8.8
10.2
7.3
9.7
Exports 
1.7
7.5
19.9
22.4
33.8
35.5 
55.6
68.4
61.4
66.8
60.7
Domestic Total On-Grid* 
0.4
0.2
1.7
1.8
2.2
4.2 
6.9
4.9
10.1
13.7
NA
Domestic Total Off-Grid* 
3.7
6.1
9.5
11.2
10.3
10.8 
14.4
15.0
26.2
31.6
NA
Cumulative Shipments 
(since 1982) 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 
2000 
2001 
2002 
2003 
Total 
35.2
84.7
193.3
228.8
275.2
325.7  402.5
490.7
588.4
700.5
809.8
Imports 
1.0
5.6
14.3
16.2
18
19.9 
24.7
33.5
43.7
51.0
60.8
Exports 
5.7
32.9
104
126.5
160.3
195.8  251.3
319.7
381.0
447.8
508.5
Domestic Total On-Grid* 
2.9
4.7
8.2
10.0
12.2
16.5 
23.3
28.2
38.3
52.0
NA
Domestic Total Off-Grid* 
26.6
47.2
81.1
92.3
102.7
113.5  127.9
142.8
169.0
200.6
NA
* Domestic Totals include imports and exclude exports. 
NA = Not Available; 2003 data not available at time of publication 
U.S. Shipments (MW) 
Source: Renewable Energy World, July-August 2003, Volume 6, Number 4, and PV News, Vol. 23, No. 5, 
May 2004 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001 
2002 
2003 
Total 
34.8
38.9
51.0
53.7 
60.8
75.0
100.3
120.6
103.0
Imports 
2.0
4.0
5.0
9.0
18.0
Exports 
24.0
25.1
36.3
37.9 
39.8
55.0
73.3
81.2
54.0
3
0
VB.NET Word: VB.NET Code to Draw and Write Text and Graphics on
After creating text on Word page, users are able doc, fileNameadd, New WordEncoder()) 'save word End powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
rotate pdf pages on ipad; how to rotate page in pdf and save
Annual U.S. Installations 
(MW) 
Source: The 2002 National Survey Report of Photovoltaic Power Applications in the United States, prepared 
by Paul D. Maycock and Ward Bower, May 31, 2003, prepared for the IEA, Table 1. http://www.oja-
services.nl/iea-pvps/nsr02/download/usa.pdf; and PV News, Vol. 23 No. 5. 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001 
2002 
2003 
Grid-Connected 
Distributed 
1.5
2.0
2.0
2.2 
3.7
5.5
12.0
22.0
32.0
Off-Grid Consumer 
3.5
4.0
4.2
4.5 
5.5
6.0
7.0
8.4
9.0
Government 
0.8
1.2
1.5
1.5 
2.5
2.5
1.0
1.0
1.0
Off-Grid 
Industrial/Commercial 
4.0
4.4
4.8
5.2 
6.5
7.5
9.0
13.0
16.0
Consumer (<40 w) 
2.0
2.2
2.2
2.4 
2.5
2.5
3.0
4.0
4.0
Central Station 
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5.0
Total 
11.8
13.8
14.7
15.8 
20.7
24.0
32.0
48.4
67.0
Cumulative U.S. 
Installations* (MW) 
Source: The 2002 National Survey Report of Photovoltaic Power Applications in the United States, prepared 
by Paul D. Maycock and Ward Bower, May 31, 2003, prepared for the IEA, Table 1  
http://www.oja-services.nl/iea-pvps/nsr02/usa2.htm. 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999  2000 
2001  2002  2003 
Off-grid Residential 
19.3
23.3
27.5
32.0 
37.5
43.5
50.5
Off-grid Nonresidential 
25.8
30.2
35.0
40.2 
46.7
55.2
64.7
On-grid Distributed 
9.7
11.0
13.7
15.9 
21.1
28.1
40.6
On-grid Centralized 
12.0
12.0
12.0
12.0 
12.0
12.0
12.0
Total 
66.8
76.5
88.2
100.1  117.3 138.8
167.8
* Excludes installations less than 40kW. 
Annual World Installations 
(MW) 
Source:  Renewable Energy World, July-August 2003, Volume 6, Number 4. 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996  1997  1998  1999  2000 
2001 
2002 
Consumer Products 
16
22
26
30 
35
40
45
60
U.S. Off-Grid Residential 
3
8
9
10 
13
15
19
25
World Off-Grid Rural 
6
15
19
24 
31
38
45
60
Communications/ Signal 
N/A 
N/A
14
N/A
23
28
31 
35
40
46
60
PV/Diesel, Commercial 
7
12
16
20 
25
30
36
45
Grid-Conn Res., 
Commercial 
1
7
27
36 
60
120
199
270
Central Station (>100kW) 
1
2
2
2
5
5
5
Total 
48
89
127
153 
201
288
395
525
3
1
Annual U.S. Shipments by 
Cell Type (MW) 
Source:  PV News, Vol. 15, No. 2, Feb. 1996; Vol. 16, No. 2, Feb. 1997; Vol. 17, No. 2, Feb. 1998; Vol. 18, 
No. 2, Feb. 1999; Vol. 19, No. 3, March 2000; Vol. 20, No. 3, March 2001; Vol. 21, No. 3, March 2002; Vol. 
22, No. 5, May 2003; and Renewable Energy World, July-August 2003, Volume 6, Number 4. 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001 
2002 
Single Crystal 
22.0
24.1
31.8
30.0 
36.6
44.0
63.0
71.9
Flat-Plate Polycrystal (other than 
ribbon) 
9.0
10.3
14.0
14.7 
16.0
17.0
20.6
24
Amorphous Silicon 
1.3
1.1
2.5
3.8 
5.3
6.5
7.3
11   
Crystal Silicon 
Concentrators 
0.3
0.7
0.7
0.2 
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
Ribbon Silicon 
N/A 
N/A
N/A
2.0
3.0
4.0
4.0 
4.2
5.0
6.9
6.9
Cadmium Telluride 
0.1
0.4
0
0
0
0.6
1.6
Microcrystal SI/Single SI 
0
-
SI on Low-Cost-Sub 
0.1
0.3
0.5
1.0 
2.0
2.0
1.7
1.7
A-SI on Cz Slice 
0
0
-
Total 
34.8
39.9
53.5
53.7 
64.6
75
100.6
120.6
Annual World Shipments 
by Cell Type (MW) 
Source:  PV News, Vol. 15, No. 2, Feb. 1996; Vol. 16, No. 2, Feb. 1997; Vol. 17, No. 2, Feb. 1998; Vol. 18, 
No. 2, Feb. 1999; Vol. 19, No. 3, March 2000; Vol. 20, No. 3, March 2001; Vol. 21, No. 3, March 2002; Vol. 
22, No. 5, May 2003; and Renewable Energy World, July-August 2003, Volume 6, Number 4. 
1980  1985  1990 
1995 
1996 
1997 
1998 
1999 
2000 
2001 
2002 
Single Crystal 
46.7
48.5
62.8
59.8 
73
89.7 150.41 162.31
Flat-Plate Polycrystal 
20.1
24
43
66.3 
88.4
140.6
278.9 306.55
Amorphous Silicon 
9.1
11.7
15
19.2 
23.9
27
28.01
32.51
Crystal Silicon 
Concentrators 
0.3
0.7
0.2
0.2 
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
Ribbon Silicon 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
2
3
4
4.2
14.7
16.9
16.9
Cadmium Telluride 
1.3
1.6
1.2
1.2 
1.2
1.2
2.1
4.6
Microcrystal SI/Single SI 
3.7
3.7
SI on Low-Cost-Sub 
0.1
0.3
0.5
2
2
1.7
1.7
A-SI on Cz Slice 
8.1
12
30
30
Total 
79.5
89.8
126.7
151.7  201.3
287.7 512.22 561.77
3
2
Annual U.S. Shipments by 
Cell Type (MW) 
Source: EIA, Solar Collector Manufacturing Activity annual reports, 1982-1992 and EIA, Renewable Energy 
Annual 1997, Table 27, REA 2000 Table 26, REA 2002, Table 28. 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001 
2002 
Single-Crystal Silicon 
19.9
21.7
30
30.8 
47.2
51.9
54.7
74.7
Cast and Ribbon Crystalline Silicon 
9.9
12.3
14.3
16.4 
26.2
33.2
29.9
29.4
Crystalline Silicon Total 
5.5
12.5
29.8
34
44.3
47.2 
73.5
85.2
84.7
104.1
Thin-Film Silicon 
N/A 
0.3
1.3
1.3
1.4
1.9
3.3 
3.3
2.7
12.5
7.4
Concentrator Silicon 
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.1 
0.1
0.3
0.5
0.6
Other 
Total 
5.8
13.8
31.2
35.6
46.3
50.6 
76.8
88.2
97.7
112.1
Annual Grid-Connected 
Capacity (MW) 
Source: The 2002 National Survey Report of Photovoltaic Power Applications in the United States, prepared 
by Paul D. Maycock and Ward Bower, May 31, 2003, prepared for the IEA, derived from Table 1 
http://www.oja-services.nl/iea-pvps/nsr02/usa2.htm. Japan data from PV News, Vol. 23, No. 1, January 
2004. 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001 
2002 
2003 
U.S. 
1.3
2.7
2.2 
5.2
7.0
12.5
Japan 
3.9
7.5
19.5
24.1 
57.7
74.4
91.0
155.0
168.0
Note: Japan data not necessarily grid-connected 
Cumulative Grid-
Connected Capacity (MW) 
Source: The 2002 National Survey Report of Photovoltaic Power Applications in the United States, prepared 
by Paul D. Maycock and Ward Bower, May 31, 2003, prepared for the IEA, derived from Table 1 
http://www.oja-services.nl/iea-pvps/nsr02/usa2.htm. Japan data from PV News, Vol. 23, No. 1, January 
2004. 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001 
2002 
2003 
U.S. 
21.7
23.0
25.7
27.9 
33.1
40.1
52.6
Japan 
5.8
13.3
32.8
56.9  114.6
189.0
280.0
435.0
603.0
Japan Grid-Connected 
Capacity (MW) 
Source: IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Program, National Survey Report of PV Power Applications in 
Japan 2002, http://www.oja-services.nl/iea-pvps/nsr02/jpn2.htm Table 1. 
1980 
1985 
1990 
1995 
1996  1997  1998  1999  2000  2001 
2002 
Annual 
6.0
9.7
22.6
34.7 
71.3
114.8
119.3
178.2   
Cumulative 
13.7
23.4
46.0
80.7  151.9
266.7
386.0
564.2   
3
3
Annual U.S.-Installed Capacity (MW) 
Source: Renewable Electric Plant Information System (REPiS), Version 7, NREL, 2003. 
Top 10 States 
1980
1985
1990
1995
1996
1997 
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
California 
0.034
0.016
0.720
0.900
0.606 
0.577
2.993
5.833
7.236 16.072
7.452
Arizona 
0.004
0.026
0.067
0.724 
0.301
0.574
0.177
2.516
1.333
0.008
New York 
0.013
0.067
0.425
0.021 
0.246
0.041
0.377
1.078
Ohio 
0.001 
0.001
0.010
0.144
0.004
1.986
Hawaii 
0.000
0.046
0.008 
0.291
0.113
0.250
0.275
Texas 
0.006
0.015
0.002
0.008
0.010 
0.133
0.248
0.089
0.028
0.020
Colorado 
0.018
0.100
0.006 
0.132
0.344
0.137
Georgia 
0.352
0.019
0.221
0.003
0.032
Florida 
0.009
0.008
0.018
0.036 
0.047
0.106
0.202
0.031
0.050
Illinois 
0.002 
0.005
0.034
0.043
0.449
0.044
Total U.S. 
0.015
0.078
0.049
1.029
2.131
1.670 
1.899
5.140
8.244 10.807 21.251
8.008
2003 data not complete as REPiS database is updated through 2002. 
Cumulative U.S.-Installed Capacity (MW)  Source: Renewable Electric Plant Information System (REPiS), Version 7, NREL, 2003. 
Top 10 States 
1980
1985
1990
1995
1996
1997 
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
California 
0.002
1.369
2.803
6.495
7.396
8.002 
8.579 11.572 17.405 24.641 40.713 48.164
Arizona 
0.008
0.032
0.048
0.097
0.164
0.888 
1.190
1.764
1.941
4.457
5.790
5.798
New York 
0
0
0.013
0.226
0.650
0.671 
0.917
0.958
1.334
1.334
2.412
2.412
Ohio 
0
0
0
0
0
0.001 
0.002
0.012
0.155
0.159
2.145
2.145
Hawaii 
0
0.014
0.033
0.033
0.079
0.087 
0.378
0.491
0.741
1.016
1.016
1.016
Texas 
0.006
0.021
0.366
0.437
0.437
0.446 
0.579
0.828
0.917
0.945
0.965
0.965
Colorado 
0
0
0.010
0.040
0.140
0.146 
0.278
0.622
0.759
0.759
0.759
0.759
Georgia 
0
0
0
0
0.352
0.352 
0.352
0.371
0.592
0.592
0.595
0.627
Florida 
0.009
0.093
0.117
0.135
0.135
0.171 
0.218
0.325
0.527
0.558
0.609
0.609
Illinois 
0
0
0.021
0.021
0.021
0.023 
0.029
0.062
0.105
0.554
0.598
0.598
Total U.S.
1
0.025
2.104
4.170
8.560 10.691 12.362  14.261 19.401 27.645 38.452 59.703 67.710
There are an additional 3.4 MW of photovoltaic capacity that are not accounted for here because they have no specific online date. 
2003 data not complete as REPiS database is updated through 2002. 
3
4
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested