display pdf in mvc : Reverse page order pdf SDK control project winforms azure web page UWP 379305-part444

Hydrogen 
Technology Description 
Similar to electricity, hydrogen can be produced from many sources, including fossil fuels, renewable 
resources, and nuclear energy. Hydrogen and electricity can be converted from one to the other using 
electrolyzers (electricity to hydrogen) and fuel 
cells (hydrogen to electricity). Hydrogen is an 
effective energy storage medium, particularly 
for distributed generation. When hydrogen 
produced from renewable resources is used in 
fuel cell vehicles or power devices, there are 
very few emissions
the major byproduct is 
water. With improved conventional energy 
conversion and carbon-capture technologies, 
hydrogen from fossil resources can be used 
efficiently with few emissions. 
The Hydrogen Economy vision is based on a 
clean and elegant cycle: separate water into 
hydrogen and oxygen using renewable or 
nuclear energy, or fossil resources with carbon sequestration. Use the hydrogen to power a fuel cell, 
internal combustion engine, or turbine, where hydrogen and oxygen (from air) recombine to produce 
electrical energy, heat, and water to complete the cycle. This process produces no particulates, no 
carbon dioxide, and no pollution. 
System Concepts 
•  Hydrogen made via electrolysis from excess nuclear or renewable energy can be used as a 
sustainable transportation fuel or stored to meet peak-power demand. It also can be used as a feedstock 
in chemical processes. 
•  Hydrogen produced by decarbonization of fossil fuels followed by sequestration of the carbon can 
enable the continued, clean use of fossil fuels during the transition to a carbon-free Hydrogen 
Economy. 
•  A hydrogen system is comprised of production, storage, distribution, and use.  
•  A fuel cell works like a battery but does not run down or need recharging. It will produce electricity 
and heat as long as fuel (hydrogen) is supplied. A fuel cell consists of two electrodes—a negative 
electrode (or anode) and a positive electrode (or cathode)—sandwiched around an electrolyte. 
Hydrogen is fed to the anode, and oxygen is fed to the cathode. Activated by a catalyst, hydrogen 
atoms separate into protons and electrons, which take different paths to the cathode. The electrons go 
through an external circuit, creating a flow of electricity. The protons migrate through the electrolyte to 
the cathode, where they reunite with oxygen and the electrons to produce water and heat. Fuel cells can 
be used to power vehicles, or to provide electricity and heat to buildings. 
Representative Technologies 
Hydrogen production 
•  Thermochemical conversion of fossil fuels, biomass, and wastes to produce hydrogen and CO
2
with 
the CO
2
available for sequestration (large-scale steam methane reforming is widely commercialized) 
•  Renewable (wind, solar, geothermal, hydro) and nuclear electricity converted to hydrogen by 
electrolysis of water (commercially available electrolyzers supply a small but important part of the 
super-high-purity hydrogen market) 
•  Photoelectrochemical and photobiological processes for direct production of hydrogen from 
sunlight and water. 
45
Reverse page order pdf - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate a single page in a pdf document; pdf rotate single page and save
Reverse page order pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pdf page permanently; rotate pdf page few degrees
Hydrogen storage 
•  Pressurized gas and cryogenic liquid (commercial today) 
•  Higher pressure (10,000 psi), carbon-wrapped conformable gas cylinders 
•  Cryogenic gas 
•  Chemically bound as metal or chemical hydrides or physically adsorbed on carbon nanostructures 
Hydrogen distribution 
•  By pipeline (relatively significant pipeline networks exist in industrial areas of the Gulf Coast 
region, and near Chicago) 
•  By decentralized or point-of-use production using natural gas or electricity 
•  By truck (liquid and compressed hydrogen delivery is practiced commercially) 
Hydrogen use 
•  Transportation sector: internal combustion engines or fuel cells to power vehicles with electric 
power trains. Potential long-term use as an aviation fuel and in marine applications 
•  Industrial sector: ammonia production, reductant in metal production, hydrotreating of crude oils, 
hydrogenation of oils in the food industry, reducing agent in electronics industry, etc. 
•  Buildings sector: combined heat, power, and fuel applications using fuel cells 
•  Power sector: fuel cells, gas turbines, generators for distributed power generation 
Technology Applications 
•  In the United States, nearly all of the hydrogen used as a chemical (i.e. for petroleum refining and 
upgrading, ammonia production) is produced from natural gas. The current main use of hydrogen as a 
fuel is by NASA to propel rockets. 
•  Hydrogen's potential use in fuel and energy applications includes powering vehicles, running 
turbines or fuel cells to produce electricity, and generating heat and electricity for buildings. The 
current focus is on hydrogen's use in fuel cells. 
The primary fuel cell technologies under development are:  
Phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) - A phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) consists of an anode and a 
cathode made of a finely dispersed platinum catalyst on carbon paper, and a silicon carbide matrix that 
holds the phosphoric acid electrolyte. This is the most commercially developed type of fuel cell and is 
being used in hotels, hospitals, and office buildings. More than 250 commercial units exist in 19 
countries on five continents. This fuel cell also can be used in large vehicles, such as buses.  
Proton-exchange membrane (PEM) - The proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell uses a 
fluorocarbon ion exchange with a polymeric membrane as the electrolyte. The PEM cell appears to be 
more adaptable to automobile use than the PAFC type of cell. These cells operate at relatively low 
temperatures and can vary their output to meet shifting power demands. These cells are the best 
candidates for light-duty vehicles, for buildings, and much smaller applications.  
Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) - Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) currently under development use a thin 
layer of zirconium oxide as a solid ceramic electrolyte, and include a lanthanum manganate cathode 
and a nickel-zirconia anode. This is a promising option for high-powered applications, such as 
industrial uses or central electricity generating stations.  
Direct-methanol fuel cell (DMFC) - A relatively new member of the fuel cell family, the direct-
methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is similar to the PEM cell in that it uses a polymer membrane as an 
electrolyte. However, a catalyst on the DMFC anode draws hydrogen from liquid methanol, eliminating 
the need for a fuel reformer.  
Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - The molten carbonate fuel cell uses a molten carbonate salt as the 
electrolyte. It has the potential to be fueled with coal-derived fuel gases or natural gas. 
Alkaline fuel cell - The alkaline fuel cell uses an alkaline electrolyte such as potassium hydroxide. 
Originally used by NASA on missions, it is now finding applications in hydrogen-powered vehicles.  
Regenerative or Reversible Fuel Cells - This special class of fuel cells produces electricity from 
hydrogen and oxygen, but can be reversed and powered with electricity to produce hydrogen and 
oxygen. 
46
C# PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
page. Enable C# users to move, sort and reorder all PDF page in preview. Support to reverse page order in PDF document. RasterEdge
reverse pdf page order online; rotate single page in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Support to reverse page order in adobe PDF document in both .NET WinForms application and ASP.NET webpage. Enable move, sort and reorder PDF page in preview.
pdf reverse page order online; pdf rotate all pages
Current Status 
•  Currently, 48% of the worldwide production of hydrogen is via large-scale steam reforming of 
natural gas. Today, we safely use about 90 billion cubic meters (3.2 trillion cubic feet) of hydrogen 
yearly.   
•  Direct conversion of sunlight to hydrogen using a semiconductor-based photoelectrochemical cell 
was recently demonstrated at 12.4% efficiency.   
•  Hydrogen technologies are in various stages of development across the system: 
Production - Hydrogen production from conventional fossil-fuel feedstocks is commercial, and results 
in significant CO
emissions. Large-scale CO
2
sequestration options have not been proved and require 
R&D. Current commercial electrolyzers are 70-80% efficient, but the cost of hydrogen is strongly 
dependent on the cost of electricity. Production processes using wastes and biomass are under 
development, with a number of engineering scale-up projects underway. 
Storage - Liquid and compressed gas tanks are available and have been demonstrated in a small 
number of bus and automobile demonstration projects. Lightweight, fiber-wrapped tanks have been 
developed and tested for higher-pressure hydrogen storage. Experimental metal hydride tanks have 
been used in automobile demonstrations. Alternative solid-state storage systems using alanates and 
carbon nanotubes are under development. 
Use - Small demonstrations by domestic and foreign auto and bus companies have been undertaken.  
Small-scale power systems using fuel cells are being beta-tested. Small fuel cells for battery 
replacement applications have been developed. Much work remains. 
•  There have been important advances in storage energy densities in recent years: High-pressure 
composite tanks have been demonstrated with 7.5 wt.% storage capacity, exceeding the current DOE 
target, and new chemical hydrides have demonstrated a reversible capacity of 5 wt.% hydrogen. The 
composite tank development is a successful technology partnership among the national labs, DOE, and 
industry. Industrial investment in chemical hydride development recently has been initiated. 
•  SunLine Transit receives support to operate a variety of hydrogen production processes for its bus 
fleet. The California Fuel Cell Partnership has installed hydrogen refueling equipment (liquid delivered 
to the facility) 
•  Major industrial companies are pursuing R&D in fuel cells and hydrogen reformation technologies 
with a mid-term time frame for deployment of these technologies for both stationary and vehicular 
applications. These companies include:  
ExxonMobil   
Toyota 
Shell    
Daimler-Chrysler 
Texaco   
Honda 
BP     
International Fuel Cells 
General Motors  
Ballard 
Ford    
Air Products 
Daimler-Chrysler 
Praxair 
Toyota   
Plug Power Systems 
Technology History 
•  From the early 1800s to the mid-1900s, a gaseous product called town gas (manufactured from 
coal) supplied lighting and heating for America and Europe. Town gas is 50% hydrogen, with the rest 
comprised of mostly methane and carbon dioxide, with 3% to 6% carbon monoxide. Then, large natural 
gas fields were discovered, and networks of natural gas pipelines displaced town gas. (Town gas is still 
found in limited use today in Europe and Asia.)  
•  From 1958 to present, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has continued 
work on using hydrogen as a rocket fuel and electricity source via fuel cells. NASA became the 
worldwide largest user of liquid hydrogen and is renowned for its safe handling of hydrogen. 
•  During the 20th century, hydrogen was used extensively as a key component in the manufacture of 
47
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
document pages in original or reverse order within entire C# Class Code to Print Certain Page(s) of powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
rotate all pages in pdf file; how to reverse page order in pdf
ammonia, methanol, gasoline, and heating oil. It was—and still is—also used to make fertilizers, glass, 
refined metals, vitamins, cosmetics, semiconductor circuits, soaps, lubricants, cleaners, margarine, and 
peanut butter.  
•  Recently, (in the late 20th century/dawn of 21st century) many industries worldwide have begun 
producing hydrogen, hydrogen-powered vehicles, hydrogen fuel cells, and other hydrogen products. 
From Japan’s hydrogen delivery trucks to BMW’s liquid-hydrogen passenger cars; to Ballard’s fuel 
cell transit buses in Chicago and Vancouver, B.C.; to Palm Desert’s Renewable Transportation Project; 
to Iceland’s commitment to be the first hydrogen economy by 2030; to the forward-thinking work of 
many hydrogen organizations worldwide; to Hydrogen Now!’s public education work; the dynamic 
progress in Germany, Europe, Japan, Canada, the United States, Australia, Iceland, and several other 
countries launch hydrogen onto the main stage of the world’s energy scene. Specific U.S.-based 
examples of hydrogen production and uses are as follows: 
- A fully functional integrated renewable hydrogen utility system for the generation of hydrogen using 
concentrated solar power was demonstrated by cooperative project between industry and an Arizona 
utility company. 
- A renewable energy fuel cell system in Reno, Nevada, produced hydrogen via electrolysis using 
intermittent renewable resources such as wind and solar energy. 
- An industry-led project has developed fueling systems for small fleets and home refueling of 
passenger vehicles. The refueling systems deliver gaseous hydrogen up to 5,000 psi to the vehicle. 
A transit agency in California installed an autothermal reformer, generating hydrogen for buses and 
other vehicles. This facility also operates a PV-powered electrolysis system to provide renewable 
hydrogen to their fleet. 
Technology Future 
•  Fuel cells are a promising technology for use as a source of heat and electricity for buildings, and 
as an electrical power source for electric vehicles. Although these applications would ideally run off 
pure hydrogen, in the near-term they are likely to be fueled with natural gas, methanol, or even 
gasoline. Reforming these fuels to create hydrogen will allow the use of much of our current energy 
infrastructure—gas stations, natural gas pipelines, etc.—while fuel cells are phased in. The electricity 
grid and the natural gas pipeline system will serve to supply primary energy to hydrogen producers.  
•  By 2005, if DOE R&D goals are met, (1) onboard hydrogen storage in metal hydrides at >5 wt% 
will be developed; (2) complete engineering design of a small-scale, mass-producible reformer for 
natural gas will be completed; and (3) an integrated biomass-to-hydrogen system will be demonstrated. 
•  By 2010, advances will be made in photobiological and photoelectrochemical processes for 
hydrogen production, efficiencies of fuel cells for electric power generation will increase, and advances 
will be made in fuel cell systems based on carbon structures, alanates, and metal hydrides. The RD&D 
target for 2010 is $45/kW for internal combustion engines operating on hydrogen; the cost goal is 
$30/kW by 2015. 
•  Although comparatively little hydrogen is currently used as fuel or as an energy carrier, the long-
term potential is for us to make a transition to a hydrogen-based economy in which hydrogen will join 
electricity as a major energy carrier. Furthermore, much of the hydrogen will be derived from 
domestically plentiful renewable energy or fossil resources, making the Hydrogen Economy 
synonymous with sustainable development and energy security. 
•  In summary, future fuel cell technology will be characterized by reduced costs and increased 
reliability for transportation and stationary (power) applications. 
•  To enable the transition to a hydrogen economy, the cost of hydrogen energy is targeted to be 
equivalent to gasoline market prices ($1.50/gallon in 2001 dollars). 
•  For a fully developed hydrogen energy system, a new hydrogen infrastructure/delivery system will 
be required. 
48
•  In the future, hydrogen also could join electricity as an important energy carrier. An energy carrier 
stores, moves, and delivers energy in a usable form to consumers. Renewable energy sources, such as 
the sun or wind, can't produce energy all the time. The sun doesn't always shine nor the wind blow. But 
hydrogen can store this energy until it is needed and it can be transported to where it is needed.  
•  Some experts think that hydrogen will form the basic energy infrastructure that will power future 
societies, replacing today's natural gas, oil, coal, and electricity infrastructures. They see a new 
hydrogen economy to replace our current energy economies, although that vision probably won't 
happen until far in the future. 
Sources: National Renewable Energy Laboratory. U.S. Climate Change Technology Program.  
Technology Options: For the Near and Long Term. DOE/PI-0002. November 2003; and National 
Renewable Energy Laboratory. Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations. 
NREL/TP-620/34783. November 2003. 
49
50
Advanced Hydropower 
Technology Description 
Advanced hydropower is new 
technology for producing 
hydroelectricity more efficiently, with 
improved environmental performance. 
Current technology often has adverse 
environmental effects, such as fish 
mortality and changes to downstream 
water quality and quantity. The goal of 
advanced hydropower technology is to 
maximize the use of water for 
hydroelectric generation while 
eliminating these adverse side 
effects
in many cases both increased 
energy and improved environmental 
conditions can be achieved. 
System Concepts 
•  Conventional hydropower projects use either impulse or reaction turbines to convert kinetic energy 
in flowing or falling water into turbine torque and power. Source water may be from free-flowing 
rivers/streams/canals or released from upstream storage reservoirs. 
•  Improvements and efficiency measures can be made in dam structures, turbines, generators, 
substations, transmission lines, and systems operation that will help sustain hydropower’s role as a 
clean, renewable energy source. 
Representative Technologies 
•  Turbine designs that minimize entrainment mortality of fish during passage through the power 
plant. 
•  Autoventing turbines to increase dissolved oxygen in discharges downstream of dams. 
•  Reregulating and aerating weirs used to stabilize tailwater discharges and improve water quality. 
•  Adjustable-speed generators producing hydroelectricity over a wider range of heads and providing 
more uniform instream flow releases without sacrificing generation opportunities. 
•  New assessment methods to balance instream flow needs of fish with water for energy production. 
•  Advanced instrumentation and control systems that modify turbine operation to maximize 
environmental benefits and energy production. 
Technology Applications 
•  Advanced hydropower products can be applied at more than 80% of existing hydropower projects 
(installed conventional capacity is now 78 GW); the potential market also includes 15–20 GW at 
existing dams without hydropower facilities (i.e., no new dams required for development) and about 30 
GW at undeveloped sites that have been identified as suitable for new dams. 
•  The nation's largest hydropower plant is the 7,600 megawatt Grand Coulee power station on the 
Columbia River in Washington State. The plant is being upscaled to 10,080 megawatts, which will 
make it the third largest in the world. 
•  There would be significant environmental benefits from installing advanced hydropower 
technology, including enhancement of fish stocks, tailwater ecosystems, and recreational opportunities.  
These benefits would occur because the advanced technology reverses adverse effects of the past. 
•  Additional benefits would come from the protection of a wide range of ancillary benefits that are 
provided at hydropower projects but are at extreme risk of becoming lost in the new deregulated 
environment. 
51
Current Status 
•  Hydropower (also called hydroelectric power) facilities in the United States can generate enough 
power to supply 28 million households with electricity, the equivalent of nearly 500 million barrels of 
oil. The total U.S. hydropower capacity—including pumped storage facilities—is about 95,000 
megawatts. Researchers are working on advanced turbine technologies that will not only help 
maximize the use of hydropower but also minimize adverse environmental effects.  
•  According to EIA, hydropower provided 12.6% of the nation’s electricity generating capability in 
1999 and 80% of the electricity produced from renewable energy sources. 
•  DOE estimates current capital costs for large hydropower plants to be $1,700 to $2,300 per kW 
(although no new plants are currently being built in the United States and O&M is estimated at 
approximately 0.7 cents/kWh). 
•  Worldwide, hydropower plants have a combined capacity of 675,000 megawatts and annually 
produce more than 2.3 trillion kilowatt-hours of electricity, the energy equivalent of 3.6 billion barrels 
of oil. 
•  Existing hydropower generation is declining because of a combination of real and perceived 
environmental problems, regulatory pressures, and changes in energy economics (deregulation, etc.); 
potential hydropower resources are not being developed for similar reasons. 
•  The current trend is to replace hydropower with electricity from fossil fuels. 
•  Some new, environmentally friendly technologies are being implemented (e.g., National 
Hydropower Association’s awards for Outstanding Stewardship of America’s Rivers). 
•  DOE's Advanced Hydropower Turbine System (AHTS) program constructed a test facility to pilot 
test a new turbine design to evaluate hydraulic and biological performance; testing at this facility was 
completed in 2003. This program is demonstrating that new turbine designs are feasible, but additional 
support is needed to fully evaluate these new designs in full-scale applications.   
•  There is insufficient understanding of how fish respond to turbulent flows in draft tubes and 
tailraces to support biological design criteria for those zones of power plants. 
•  Fish resource management agencies do not recognize that the route through turbines is acceptable 
for fish—this perception could be overcome if field-testing continues to show mortality through 
turbines is not greater than other passage routes. 
•  TVA’s Lake Improvement Plan has demonstrated that improved turbine designs can be 
implemented with significant economic and environmental benefits.  This effort has shown increases in 
hydroelectric plants’ energy production by 12% with significantly improvements of downstream fish 
resources. 
•  Field-testing of the Minimum Gap Runner (MGR) designs for Kaplan turbines indicate that fish 
survival up to 98% is possible, if conventional turbines are modified. 
•  FERC instituted a short-term reduction in regulatory barriers on the West Coast in 2001—this 
resulted in more than 100,000 MWh of additional generation and a significant shift from nonpeak to 
peak production, without significant adverse environmental effects. 
•  Regulatory trends in relicensing are to shift operation from peaking to baseload, effectively 
reducing the energy value of hydroelectricity; higher instream flow requirements are also reducing total 
energy production to protect downstream ecosystems, but scientific justification is weak. 
•  Frequent calls for dam removal is making relicensing more costly to dam owners. 
•  Regional efforts by Army Corps of Engineers and Bonneville Power Administration are producing 
some site-specific new understanding, especially in the Columbia River basin; but commercial 
applications are unlikely because of pressures from industry deregulation and environmental regulation.
•  Voith-Siemans Hydro and TVA have established a limited partnership to market environmentally 
friendly technology at hydropower facilities. Their products were developed in part by funding 
provided by DOE and the Corps of Engineers, as well as private sources. 
•  Flash Technology is developing strobe lighting systems to force fish away from hydropower 
intakes and to avoid entrainment mortality in turbines. 
52
Technology History 
•  Since the time of ancient Egypt, people have used the energy in flowing water to operate machinery 
and grind grain and corn. However, hydropower had a greater influence on people's lives during the 
20th century than at any other time in history. Hydropower played a major role in making the wonders 
of electricity a part of everyday life and helped spur industrial development. Hydropower continues to 
produce 24% of the world's electricity and supply more than 1 billion people with power. 
•  The first hydroelectric power plant was built in 1882 in Appleton, Wisconsin, to provide 12.5 
kilowatts to light two paper mills and a home. Today's hydropower plants generally range in size from 
several hundred kilowatts to several hundred megawatts, but a few mammoth plants have capacities up 
to 10,000 megawatts and supply electricity to millions of people. 
•  By 1920, 25% of electrical generation in the United States was from hydropower; and, by 1940, 
was 40%. 
•  Most hydropower plants are built through federal or local agencies as part of a multipurpose 
project. In addition to generating electricity, dams and reservoirs provide flood control, water supply, 
irrigation, transportation, recreation, and refuges for fish and birds. Private utilities also build 
hydropower plants, although not as many as government agencies. 
Technology Future 
•  By 2003, a quantitative understanding of the responses of fish to multiple stresses inside a turbine 
should be developed. Biological performance criteria for use in advanced turbine design also should be 
available. 
•  By 2005, environmental mitigation studies should be available on topics such as in-stream flow 
needs to produce more efficient and less controversial regulatory compliance. In addition, pilot-scale 
testing of new runner designs, including field evaluation of environmental performance, will allow full-
scale prototype construction and testing to proceed. 
•  By 2010, full-scale prototype testing of AHTS designs should be completed, including verified 
biological performance of AHTS in the field. This will allow AHTS technology to be transferred to the 
market. 
Source: National Renewable Energy Laboratory. U.S. Climate Change Technology Program.  
Technology Options: For the Near and Long Term. DOE/PI-0002.  November 2003.
53
Hydroelectric Power 
Market Data 
U.S. Installed Capacity (MW)* 
Source: Renewable Energy Project Information System (REPiS), Version 7, NREL, 2003. 
1980
1985
1990
1995
1996
1997 
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
Annual 
1,391
3,237
862
1,054
19.9
64.0 
7.6
179.3
1.1
11
0.002
21.0
Cumulative 
80,491 87,839
90,955
94,052
94,072 94,136  94,143
94,323
94,324 94,335 94,335 94,356
* There are an additional 21 MW of hydroelectric capacity that are not accounted for here because they have no specific online date. 
2003 data not complete as REPiS database is updated through 2002. 
Cumulative Grid-
Connected Hydro 
Capacity (MW)
1
Source: U.S. data from EIA, AER 2003 Table 8.11a, World Total from EIA, International Energy Annual, 1996-2003, Table 6.4.  
International data from International Energy Agency, Electricity Information 2004. 
1980 
1985
1990
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
U.S. 
Conventional and 
other Hydro 
81,700  88,900
73,923
78,562
76,437
79,415
79,151
79,393
79,359
79,484
79,354
79,366
Pumped Storage
2
N/A 
N/A
19,462
21,387
21,110
19,310
19,518
19,565
19,522
19,096
20,373
20,373
U.S. Hydro Total 
81,700  88,900
93,385
99,948
97,548
98,725
98,669
98,958
98,881
98,580
99,727
99,739
OECD Europe
3
124,184  124,577 130,886 132,893 134,902 135,939 133,307 136,251 140,779 141,913
147,580
NA
IEA Europe
4
123,960  124,357 130,663 132,666 134,038 135,074 132,315 135,254 138,093 138,912
144,010
NA
Japan 
21,377  19,980
20,825
21,171
21,222
21,277
21,477
21,555
22,019
22,081
21,690
NA
OECD Total 
286,969  300,725 316,291 340,259 342,893 346,342 342,673 346,446 351,513 352,564
338,130
NA
IEA Total 
286,745  300,505 316,068 330,703 331,947 335,395 331,930 335,768 339,145 339,880
324,920
NA
World Total 
470,669  537,734 600,206 650,936 661,237 673,797 680,610 697,749 712,689 723,581
NA
NA
1. Excludes pumped storage, except for specific U.S. pumped storage capacity listed.  
2. Pumped storage values for 1980-1985 are included in "Conventional and other Hydro"  
3. OECD included 24 countries as of 1980. Mexico, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, South Korea, Slovak Republic joined after 1980. Countries' data 
are included only after the year they joined. 
5
4
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested