display pdf in wpf c# : Rotate pdf page Library application class asp.net windows wpf ajax 40501_catalog%202009-2010%20bookmarks17-part465

183
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Department of
Computer Science & 
Engineering
Eric Karl, Department Chair
Scott Ercanbrack, Rex Fisher, James Helfrich, Ron Jones, Eric Karl, 
Rick Neff, Kevin Smith, Kevin Twitchell
Merlynn Price, Secretary (208) 496-1880
http://www.byui.edu/CSE/
Department of Computer Science and Engineering
The curricula in the Department of Computer Science and Engi-
neering are designed to provide a broad background in the theory 
and practice of computer hardware and software.  Students learn 
how to combine scientifi c knowledge and engineering methods with 
practical technical skills to help prepare them for life-long learning 
and rewarding employment.  Three degree programs are offered:
1) B.S. in Computer Science (CS)
2) B.S. in Computer Engineering (CompE)
3) B.S. in Electrical Engineering (EE)
The graduates of the Department of Computer Science and Engi-
neering will 
• have a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles and 
practices of their respective programs
• have learned how to learn
• be prepared for a successful career
• be ethical and responsible employees who make a difference
The Department of Computer Science and Engineering continu-
ally strives to evaluate, improve, and modernize its curricula to keep 
pace with today’s technological innovations.  Advisors can help 
students determine the best sequence of courses to meet all gradua-
tion requirements within eight semesters. To qualify for graduation, 
students must achieve at least a C- grade in all major required classes.
Computer Science
The Computer Science major offers a solid background in Com-
puter Science by providing experience in algorithm development, 
procedural and object-oriented design and programming, software 
engineering practices, computer security, web engineering, technical 
communication, and theoretical foundations. Graduates are prepared 
for employment as software engineers or to continue their education 
at graduate school.
Computer Engineering
The Computer Engineering major focuses on preparing students 
to enter industry as computer engineers as well as continuing their 
education at graduate schools.  The program balances scientifi c and 
engineering theory with technical laboratory experiences in order to 
develop practical skills that working engineers must possess.
The Computer Engineering program at Brigham Young University–
Idaho has been accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Com-
mission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 
(EAC/ABET) since October 1, 2004. Visit www.abet.org for more 
information about this accreditation.
Electrical Engineering
The Electrical Engineering major is a new program at Brigham 
Young University-Idaho.  Students who desire to major in Electrical 
Engineering should contact the department for more information.
Electronics Engineering Technology
The Electronics Engineering Technology (A.A.S.) program has been 
discontinued at Brigham Young University-Idaho.  
Computer Science & Engineering
Rotate pdf page - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; how to rotate a page in pdf and save it
Rotate pdf page - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate all pages in pdf; reverse page order pdf online
184
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Computer Science & Engineering
BS in Computer Engineering (450)
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
This major is available on the following tracks:
Total Major Credits=76
Take these courses:
CHEM 105 
4
COMPE 150 
3
COMPE 224 
3
COMPE 250 
4
COMPE 324 
3
COMPE 340 
3
COMPE 350 
3
COMPE 360 
3
COMPE 398 
1-7
COMPE 499 
3
CS 124 
3
CS 165 
3
CS 235 
3
CS 237 
3
CS 308 
2
FDMAT 224 
3
MATH 215 
4
MATH 316 
4
PH 121 
3
PH 220 
3
61
Take 5 courses:
COMPE 440 
3
COMPE 450 
3
COMPE 460 
3
COMPE 470 
3
COMPE 480 
3
COMPE 490 
3
15
OR
Take 4 courses:
COMPE 440 
3
COMPE 450 
3
COMPE 460 
3
COMPE 470 
3
COMPE 480 
3
COMPE 490 
3
12
AND 
Take 1 course:
CS 306 
3
CS 345 
3
CS 460 
3
CS 490 
3
3
Program Notes: 
Major Requirements
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
permanently rotate pdf pages; rotate individual pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Professional .NET PDF control for inserting PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class application.
pdf rotate page and save; pdf rotate one page
185
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Computer Science & Engineering
BS in Computer Science (440)
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
This major is available on the following tracks:
Total Major Credits=80
Take these courses:
CS 124 
3
CS 165 
3
CS 213 
3
CS 235 
3
CS 237 
3
CS 238 
3
CS 246 
3
CS 306 
3
CS 308 
2
CS 345 
3
CS 364 
4
CS 416 
2
CS 432 
3
CS 470 
3
CS 499 
3
COMPE 224 
3
COMPE 324 
3
FDMAT 224 
3
53
Take 15 credits:
COMPE 360 
3
CS 313 
3
CS 356 
1
CS 371 
3
CS 460 
3
CS 480 
3
CS 490 
3
CS 499S 
1-2
15
Take 1 course:
CS 398 
1-4
CS 498R 
1-4
1
Program Notes: 
Major Requirements
Take 1 course:
MATH 113 
3
MATH 341 
3
3
Take these courses:
CHEM 105 
4
CHEM 106 
4
8
OR
Take these courses:
GEOL 111 
3
GEOL 111L 
1
GEOL 112 
3
GEOL 112L 
1
8
OR
Take these courses:
PH 121 
3
PH 150 
1
PH 220 
3
PH 250 
1
8
Minor in Computer Science (147)
Program Notes: 
Total Minor Credits=24
This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
Take these courses:
CS 124 
3
CS 165 
3
CS 235 
3
CS 246 
3
12
Take 12 credits:
COMPE 224 
3
COMPE 324 
3
CS 213 
3
CS 237 
3
CS 238 
3
CS 306 
3
CS 313 
3
CS 345 
3
CS 356 
1
CS 364 
4
CS 371 
3
CS 416 
2
CS 432 
3
CS 460 
3
CS 470 
3
CS 480 
3
CS 490 
3
12
Minor Requirements
Take required Foundations courses
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
rotate one page in pdf reader; rotate pdf pages and save
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How
how to rotate a page in pdf and save it; rotate single page in pdf
186
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Computer Science
Take these courses: 
CS 124 
Introduction to Software Development 
3
CS 165 
Object-oriented Software Development 
3
Take 2 courses:
COMPE 224  Fundamentals of Digital Systems 
3
COMPE 324  Computer Architecture 
3
CS 213 
Web Engineering I 
3
CS 235 
Data Structures 
3
CS 237 
Discrete Mathematics I 
3
CS 238 
Discrete Mathematics II 
3
CS 246 
Software Design and Development 
3
CS 371 
Human-Computer Interaction 
3
CS 460 
Computer Communication & Networks 
3
Total Credits 
12
Computer Science and Engineering Pre-approved Clusters
Computer Engineering
Take these courses: 
COMPE 150  Electric Circuit Analysis I 
3
COMPE 224  Fundamentals of Digital Systems 
3
CS 124 
Introduction to Software Development 
3
CS 165 
Object-Oriented Software Development 
3
Total Credits 
12
Computer Science & Engineering
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
Convert Tiff to Jpeg Images. Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PDF to Tiff. Move Tiff Page Position. Rotate a Tiff Page. Extract Tiff Pages.
how to rotate one page in a pdf file; pdf reverse page order
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C#.NET Sample Code: Clone a PDF Page Using C#.NET. Load the PDF file that provides the page object.
rotate pdf pages on ipad; rotate all pages in pdf and save
187
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
Course Descriptions  
Credits*
COMPE 150 Electric Circuit Analysis I  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite:  Profi ciency in algebra, exposure to trigonometry
Introduction to engineering. Analysis and design of DC and AC circuits. Resistors, capaci-
tors, inductors, transformers, and batteries. Ohms Law, power and network theorems. 
Steady state and frequency domain analysis. Laboratory exercises are included.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
COMPE 224 Fundamentals of Digital Systems  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: CS 124
Theory, design, and implementation of combinational and sequential logic. Students must 
design and build a project that uses sequential logic and a programmable logic device. A 
student presentation is required. Laboratory exercises are included.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
COMPE 250 Electric Circuit Analysis II  
(4.0:3:2)
Prerequisite: COMPE 150, Co-req: Math 316
Analysis and design of DC and AC circuits. Transient analysis using differential equations. 
Laboratory exercises are included.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
COMPE 305 Principles of Electrical Engineering  
(3.0:3:1)
Prerequisite: PH 220
Introduction to DC and AC circuits, motors, semiconductor devices and circuits, and 
digital logic circuits. Lab experiments are included. Intended for mechanical engineering 
majors.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
COMPE 324 Computer Architecture  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: CompE 224 and CS 235
Instruction sets, control unit and data path design, memory hierarchy, pipelining, and I/O. 
A student presentation is required. Laboratory exercises are included.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
COMPE 340 Digital Systems Design  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: CompE 224
Advanced topics in combinational logic, state machine design, and control structures. 
VHDL and FPGAs. A student presentation is required. Laboratory exercises are included.
(Fall, Spring)
COMPE 350 Electronic Devices and Circuits  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: CompE 250
Theory, design and implementation of circuits using diodes, bipolar junction transistors, 
and fi eld effect transistors. A student presentation is required. Laboratory exercises are 
included.
(Fall, Winter)
COMPE 360 Computer Input/Output  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: CompE 324
Applications, architecture, programming and interfacing of commercial microprocessors 
and microcontrollers. Laboratory exercises are included.
(Fall, Winter)
COMPE 398 Internship  
(1.0-7.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: Instructor Permission; completion of fi rst four semesters of computer engineer-
ing curriculum; must have completed at least three junior-level COMPE courses.
Full-time employment as a computer engineering intern for one semester or more.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
COMPE 440 Data and Computer Communications  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: CompE 250, CompE 324
Fundamentals of data and computer communications focusing on the physical and data 
link layers of the OSI architecture. Laboratory exercises are included.
(Fall, Spring)
COMPE 450 Advanced Digital Design and VLSI  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: CompE 340 and CompE 350
Advanced digital design concepts including multi-clock domain designs, meta-stability, 
signal integrity and functional verifi cation of HDL models. VLSI concepts including the 
translation of HDL to gates to transistors and then to functional silicon. CMOS transistor 
concepts with special attention to the digital CMOS silicon manufacturing process. Formal 
validation of silicon components.
(Fall, Winter)
COMPE 460 Real-Time and Embedded Systems  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: COMPE 360
Hardware/software interface, real-time kernel internals, implementation of high-level 
language constructs, issues in real-time application software development.
(Fall, Spring)
COMPE 470 Feedback Control of Dynamic Systems  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: MATH 316
Dynamic modeling, dynamic response, analysis and design of feedback control.
(Fall, Winter)
COMPE 480 Digital Signal Processing  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: CompE 324, Math 316
Time and frequency domain analysis of discrete time systems subjected to periodic or 
non-periodic input signals. Digital signal processing, fast Fourier transforms, digital fi lter 
design, spectrum analysis and applications. Laboratory exercises are included.
(Winter, Spring)
COMPE 490 Special Topics  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: Instructor Permission
In-depth study of a topic in computer engineering that interests students and faculty. 
Laboratory exercises are included where appropriate.
(Offered as Needed)
COMPE 499 Senior Project  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: Instructor Permission and at least two of: COMPE 440, COMPE 450, COMPE 
460, COMPE 470, COMPE 480, COMPE 490
Culminating design experience based on skills learned in advanced technical courses. 
Students work in teams to plan, design, test and demonstrate a major project.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
CS 124 Introduction to Software Development  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: High School Algebra
CS 124, Introduction to Programming, is the fi rst step in the computer science major 
tract. The goal of this class is that each student will be able to solve problems in C++ and 
have a solid foundation in software development methodology.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
CS 165 Object-Oriented Software Development  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: CS 124
Software design and development using the object-oriented paradigm. Algorithm formula-
tion and object-oriented programming.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
CS 202 Ethics  
(1.0:1:0)
Prerequisite: (ENG 111 or ENG 111C or FDENG 101 or FDENG 101C) and CS 165
Survey of issues regarding ethics in Computer Science. Overview of intellectual property 
rights relative to computing including copyright, patents, trademarks, and piracy. Discus-
sion of current social issues related to computing.
(Fall, Winter)
CS 213 Web Engineering I  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: CS 165
Internet and Web basics. Web fundamentals - web terminology, web browsers and web 
servers. This course teaches the concepts behind the fundamental tools used for building 
client-side web applications. It emphasizes client side programming standards and 
programming tools used to create dynamic web applications.
(Fall, Spring)
CS 235 Data Structures  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: CS 165
Builds on the foundation of CS 124 and CS 165 to introduce the fundamental concepts of 
data structures and the algorithms that proceed from them.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
CS 237 Discrete Mathematics I  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: CS 165 and Math 112
Introduces the mathematical topics needed to provide a solid theoretical foundation for 
computer science and computer engineering.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
Computer Science & Engineering
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text
how to reverse page order in pdf; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text
how to permanently rotate pdf pages; pdf rotate just one page
188
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
CS 238 Discrete Mathematics II  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: CS 237
Continues the mathematical topics needed to provide a solid theoretical foundation for 
computer science.
(Fall, Winter)
CS 246 Software Design and Development  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: CS 235
Advanced object-oriented design and software development.
(Fall, Winter)
CS 290 Special Topics  
(1.0-3.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
Faculty/Student consultation will determine an area of study/research that will give an 
advanced student greater appreciation and experience in this fi eld. Terms of enrollment, 
credit, etc., will be determined by the instructor.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
CS 306 Algorithms and Complexity  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: CS 235 and CS 238
Introduces formal techniques to support the design and analysis of algorithms, focusing 
on both the underlying mathematical theory and practical considerations of effi ciency. 
Topics include asymptotic complexity bounds, techniques of analysis, and algorithmic 
strategies.
(Fall, Spring)
CS 308 Technical Communication  
(2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: (ENG 316 or ENG 316C or FDCOM 201) and CS 235
Technical research. Technical writing and presentation to technical audiences.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
CS 313 Web Engineering II  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: CS 213, CS 246
This course builds upon Web Engineering I allowing students to create more advanced 
web applications and services. The emphasis of this course will be on server-side 
technologies and n-tier applications using relational database technology. Different 
server-side technologies will be used for creating dynamic n-tier web applications. Client-
side technologies will be enhanced and combined with server-side technologies to create 
rich web applications.
(Winter, Spring)
CS 345 Operating Systems  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: COMPE 324
Analysis of methods used by operating systems to perform typical system services, 
including: process control, memory management, scheduling, I/O, fi le management, and 
concurrency.
(Winter, Spring)
CS 356 Database Theory  
(1.0:1:0)
Prerequisite: CS 238
Introduces the mathematical topics needed to provide a solid theoretical foundation 
for database system analysis, design and optimization. The following topics will be 
covered: Database Structure Types; Relational; Object; Hierarchical; Network; Relational 
Database Theory; Sets and Relations; n-ary Relations and the Relational Algebra; The Tuple 
Relational Calculus; The Domain Relational Calculus; Normalization and Normal Forms; 
Object Database Theory; Object-Oriented versus Object-Relational; The Object-Relational 
Impedance Mismatch; Hierarchical Database Theory; Aggregates and Associations; Part-
Whole Relationships; Network Database Theory; Graph Theory; Graph Traversal and Search.
(Winter, Spring)
CS 364 Software Engineering I  
(4.0:4:1)
Prerequisite: CS 246 and CS 308
Software engineering overview. Software requirements engineering including elicitation 
and specifi cation. Software design.
(Fall, Spring)
CS 371 Human-Computer Interaction  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: CS 246
This class will follow the development lifecycle of a single user interface (UI) intensive 
project building a new UI for the windows media player. During this process, we will: 
1. Identify a target user 
2. Build a scenario in which this user will interact with the product. 
3. Create a paper prototype of the UI 
4. Develop a functional specifi cation 
5. Build the project into a workable media player skin
6. Conduct a usability study with people matching the target user 
(and a few not. . .) 
7. Redesign and rebuild the project to account for fi ndings of the study.
(Fall, Spring)
CS 398 Internship  
(1.0-4.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: CS 246 and consent of Department Internship Coordinator.
Planned and supervised practical experience in vocational or educational settings. Interns 
acquire practical skills while applying classroom theory and principles.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
CS 416 Software Engineering II  
(2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: CS 364
Software quality engineering including testing and verifi cation and validation. Software 
metrics. Software cost estimation.
(Fall, Winter)
CS 432 Software Engineering III  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: CS 364
Software process and project management.
(Winter, Spring)
CS 460 Computer Communication & Networks 
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: CS 246 or non-CS major and CS 235 and consent of instructor
Introduction to computer networking with an Internet focus, including: applications, 
protocols, transport services, IP, routing, LANs, and security.
(Winter, Spring)
CS 470 Computer Security  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: CS 237, CS 308
CS 470, Computer Security, is essentially a research class. The purpose of this class is to 
help each student develop the skills necessary to become a security expert in whatever 
domain of computer security that is important to their job when they enter the work force.
(Winter, Spring)
CS 480 Computational Theory  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: CS 306
Finite automata, regular expressions, grammars, languages, Turing machines, comput-
ability, complexity, P and NP problems.
(Winter, Spring)
CS 490 Special Topics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
Current topics in Computer Science.
(Taught as needed)
CS 498R Internship  
(1.0-4.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: CS 246 and consent of Department Internship Coordinator.
Planned and supervised practical experience in vocational or educational settings. Interns 
acquire practical skills while applying classroom theory and principles.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
CS 499 Senior Project  
(3.0:1:0)
Prerequisite: CS 364
Directed individual or group research and study of a topic in computer science not 
covered by the curriculum. The topic shall be such that the student shall apply material 
covered by the curriculum to understand a new topic.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
CS 499S Senior Project Supplemental  
(1.0-2.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: Instructor consent; co-registered in CS 499
An extension of CS 499, Senior Project. Allows the Senior Project student to engage in a 
more signifi cant project by registering for an extra one or two credits.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
Computer Science & Engineering
189
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
Department of
Dance
Jennifer Wadsworth, Department Chair 
Wendy Bone, Shawn Fisher, Gary Larsen, Jennifer Wadsworth
Sue Hexem, Secretary (208) 496-2073 http://www.byui.edu/
Dance/ 
The Department of Dance offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Dance.  
This  degree is designed to prepare students to fi nd successful career 
opportunities as a dance professional.  During their studies students 
will acquire the knowledge and experience necessary to become a highly 
qualifi ed and sound dance educator.  The Dance Department also of-
fers a minor degree in dance.  
Central Aims
1.  Provide opportunities for the student to develop spiritually, artis-
tically, intellectually and physically.  This is accomplished through 
our desire to emphasize gospel principles, personal integrity, 
individual enrichment and sensitivity to multiple perspectives.
2.  Graduates in dance will have a versatile, but quality foundational 
experience to begin a career in dance as a dance educator.
3.  Students will learn through dance that they can become bet-
ter individuals by living the restored gospel of Jesus Christ, 
enhancing their roles as creative and artistic individuals, church 
members, citizens and parents.
4.  Our goal is to challenge students to become individual thinkers, 
serve the community and make artistic efforts that refl ect a richly 
complex and diverse global perspective.
Objectives
•This four year degree in dance guides students in fi nding success 
and happiness in contributing to the dance fi eld.
•BYU-Idaho’s integrated degree program in dance offers a unique 
learning experience as students major in dance and minor in a sug-
gested fi eld of study such as business, health science, communica-
tion, music, etc.  This enables them to become prime candidates for 
desirable jobs in the dance fi eld that would be fulfi lling, meet their 
fi nancial needs, and allow them to contribute to their family and 
community.  
•The Dance Department is committed to helping students seek 
career opportunities in the dance fi eld through a four year degree 
program that demands both versatility and depth.
•The degree encourages students to reevaluate the purpose of beauty 
and how it can be expressed using dance as a medium of artistic com-
munication to reach people of varied backgrounds.
•Throughout their studies students will experience the value in bless-
ing others’ lives through a teaching and/or performance setting. 
•Through our performance tours, students have the opportunity to 
reach out to communities within our region, across the nation, and 
even the world. 
•We recognize the value and necessity to prepare students to become 
knowledgeable and skilled dance educators with the ability to col-
laborate across disciplines within the dance fi eld. 
Requirements:
The integrated Baccalaureate degree in dance at BYU-Idaho allows 
a student to choose a minor or two clusters in a suggested fi eld of 
study.  The suggested fi elds of study are:  Accounting, Business, 
Communications, Health Science, Music, or Recreational Leadership.
Dance Major Status:
The Department of Dance has an open enrollment for freshmen and 
transfer students interested in pursuing a degree in dance.  These 
students are considered “Prospective Dance Majors”.
Admission as a Dance Major and clearance for subsequent dance 
courses is contingent upon review of the students’ abilities and grades 
in the following areas: 
•Dance 103 (Orientation to Dance)
•Dance 240 (Dance Tech I) or Dance 340 (Dance Tech 2)
•Dance 290 (Ballet Tech I) or Dance 390 (Ballet Tech 2)
•Dance 284 (Ballroom Tech I) or Dance 271 (Clog Tech I)
Auditions
An audition is required to participate in Dance Alliance or Collegiate 
Dancers.
All audition dates and times will be posted online at www.byui.edu/
dance.
Dance
190
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
Dance
Minor in Dance (183)
No Grade Less Than C- for Minor Courses
Program Notes: 
Total Minor Credits=20
This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   NO
Take these courses:
DANCE 240 
2
DANCE 242 
2
DANCE 290R 
2
DANCE 402 
3
9
Take 2 credits:
DANCE 135 
1
DANCE 271 
2
DANCE 280M 
1
DANCE 280W 
1
DANCE 281M 
1
DANCE 281W 
1
DANCE 290R 
2
DANCE 340R 
2
DANCE 371 
2
2
Take 4 credits:
(Choose 4 credits from either 
Performance and/or Teach-
ing)
Performance Group:
DANCE 478R 
1-3
DANCE 488R 
1-3
Teaching Techniques:
DANCE 299R 
1-3
DANCE 356 
4
DANCE 358 
3
4
Minor Requirements
Take 5 credits:
DANCE 131 
1
DANCE 140 
1
DANCE 170 
1
DANCE 171 
1
DANCE 172 
1
DANCE 180M 
1
DANCE 180W 
1
DANCE 181M 
1
DANCE 181W 
1
DANCE 184M 
1
DANCE 184W 
1
DANCE 185M 
1
DANCE 185W 
1
Cont next column
Cont from previous column
DANCE 190 
1
DANCE 231 
2
DANCE 270 
2
DANCE 271 
2
DANCE 284R 
2
DANCE 331 
2
DANCE 371 
2
DANCE 384R 
2
DANCE 390R 
2
DANCE 458R 
2
DANCE 498R 
1-3
5
BA in Dance (655)
No Grade Less Than C-  in Major Courses
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   No
This major is available on the following tracks:
Total Major Credits=55
Take these courses:
DANCE 103 
1
DANCE 242 
2
DANCE 295 
3
DANCE 350 
1
DANCE 355 
2
DANCE 356 
4
DANCE 402 
3
DANCE 403 
1
DANCE 442 
3
DANCE 495 
3
DANCE 496 
2
25
Technique Courses
Take 4 credits:
DANCE 290R 
2
DANCE 390R 
2
4
AND
Take 4 credits:
DANCE 340R 
2
DANCE 440R 
2
4
AND
Take 4 credits:
DANCE 284R 
2
DANCE 384R 
2
4
Column Total 
12
Program Notes: 
Major Requirements
Take Required Foundation Courses
Elective Technique Courses
Take 16 credits:
DANCE 231 
2
DANCE 240 
2
DANCE 270 
2
DANCE 271 
2
DANCE 284R 
2
DANCE 290R 
2
DANCE 331 
2
DANCE 340R 
2
DANCE 371 
2
DANCE 384R 
2
DANCE 390R 
2
DANCE 440R 
2
DANCE 484R 
2
16
Performance Courses
Take 2 credits:
DANCE 478R 
1-3
DANCE 488R 
1-3
2
191
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
Dance
Take 8-10 credits:
DANCE 231  Jazz Dance, Intermediate 
2
DANCE 240  Modern Dance  Technique I 
2
DANCE 241  Modern Dance Technique II 
2
DANCE 271  Clog Dance Technique 1 
2
DANCE 284R  Ballroom Technique 1 
2
DANCE 290R  Ballet Technique I 
2
DANCE 331  Jazz Dance, Advanced 
2
DANCE 340R  Modern Dance Technique II 
2
DANCE 371  Clog Technique 2 
2
DANCE 384R  Ballroom Technique 2 
2
DANCE 390R  Ballet Technique II 
2
DANCE 440R  Modern Dance Technique III 
2
Take 2-4 credits:
DANCE 242  Improvisation and Choreography 
2
DANCE 295  Dance Kinesiology I 
3
DANCE 356  Techniques of Teaching Dance 
4
DANCE 402  History of Dance 
3
DANCE 442  Choreographic Explorations 
3
Take 3 credits:
DANCE 131  Jazz Dance, Beginning 
1
DANCE 135  Tap Dance  
1
DANCE 140  Modern Dance, Beginning 
1
DANCE 170  World Dance, Beginning 
1
DANCE 171  Clog Dance, Beginning 
1
DANCE 180  Social Dance, Beginning 
1
DANCE 181  Country Western Social Dance, Beginning 
1
DANCE 184  International Standard Beginning 
1
DANCE 185  International Latin Beginning 
1
DANCE 190  Ballet Beginning 
1
Total Credits 
15 
Dance Pre-approved Cluster
Dance
192
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
Course Descriptions  
Credits*
DANCE 103 Orientation to Dance  
(1.0:1:1)
This course is designed to help potential dance majors or minors explore career opportu-
nites in dance during their freshman year. Students will be guided in determing a career 
path, selecting a complimentary minor or clusters and outlining a four year plan. These 
objectives will be accomplished through class discussion, guest lectures, library research 
tools, readings, as well as gospel insights.
(Fall, Spring)
DANCE 131 Jazz Dance, Beginning  
(1.0:0:2)
A movement class where rhythms, style, and technique of jazz dancing are introduced to 
the student, including basic jazz terminology.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 135 Tap Dance  
(1.0:0:2)
A movement class where the rhythms, styles, and techniques of beginning tap dancing are 
introduced to the student, including basic tap terminology.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 140 Modern Dance, Beginning  
(1.0:0:2)
This course is designed to give the student experience in movement emphasizing locomo-
tor skills, movement progressions, and creativity through modern basic dance techniques.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 170 World Dance, Beginning  
(1.0:0:2)
Various dances from around the world. This is a movement class where basic rhythms, 
styles, and techniques are introduced.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 171 Clog Dance, Beginning  
(1.0:0:2)
This is a movement class where basic rhythms, styles, and techniques of clog dance are 
introduced to the student; including basic clog and buck terminology, style and steps. Set 
routines are taught as well as basic skills.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 172 Country Western and Square Dance, Beginning  
(1.0:0:2)
This course is designed to teach country western line dance and the twenty-fi ve basics of 
square dance.
DANCE 180M Social Dance, Beginning  
(1.0:0:2)
For beginners with an emphasis on partner dances in a social setting. The following fi ve 
dances will be taught: waltz, foxtrot, cha cha, swing (various styles) and polka.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 180W Social Dance, Beginning  
(1.0:0:2)
For beginners with an emphasis on partner dances in a social setting. The following fi ve 
dances will be taught: waltz, foxtrot, cha cha, swing (various styles) and polka.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 181M Country Western Social Dance, Beginning  
(1.0:0:2)
A course designed to develop skills of country western social dancing.
DANCE 181W Country Western Social Dance, Beginning  
(1.0:0:2)
A course designed to develop skills of country western social dancing.
DANCE 184M International Standard, Beginning 
(1.0:0:2)
Fee: $15.00
Prerequisite: Social DA 180 or consent of instructor
A course designed to develop skills of social dancing. Two of the following dances will be 
taught each semester: waltz, foxtrot, tango, quickstep.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 184W International Standard, Beginning 
(1.0:0:2)
Fee: $15.00
Prerequisite: Social DA 180 or consent of instructor
A course designed to develop skills of social dancing. Two of the following dances will be 
taught each semester: waltz, foxtrot, tango, quickstep.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 185M International Latin Beginning 
(1.0:0:2)
Fee: $15.00
Prerequisite: Social Dance 180, or consent of instructor
A course designed to develop skills of social dancing. Two of the following dances will be 
taught each semester: cha cha, rumba, paso doble, samba.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 185W International Latin Beginning 
(1.0:0:2)
Fee: $15.00
Prerequisite: Social Dance 180, or consent of instructor
A course designed to develop skills of social dancing. Two of the following dances will be 
taught each semester: cha cha, rumba, paso doble, samba.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 190 Ballet Beginning  
(1.0:0:2)
This course provides introductory background knowledge and experience in ballet 
technique, including alignment, kinesthetic movement principles, terminology and ballet 
history.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 231 Jazz Dance Intermediate  
(2.0:0:5)
A movement class where intermediate levels of rhythms, style, and technique of jazz 
dance are explored, including jazz terminololgy.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 240 Dance Technique I  
(2.0:0:5)
Prerequisite: Dance 140 or consent of instructor.
Fundamental dance techniques in ballet and modern dance emphasizing development in 
body, motion, space, time and energy awareness.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 242 Improvisition and Choreography  
(2.0:0:4)
Fee: $25.00
Prerequisite: DANCE 240
A practical course providing students with fundamentals of improvisation and choreogra-
phy. Improvisaiton and composition are an integral part of a dancer’s education. A study 
of the basic elements of dance, improvisation and composition will lead to the creation of 
a movement product. These practices will develop the ability to communicate ideas using 
the body as the instrument of expression.
(Fall, Spring)
DANCE 270 World Dance Intermediate 
(2.0:0:3)
Prerequisite: Dance 170 or Consent of Instructor
This course will give students a intimate and detailed understanding of selected World 
Dance forms.  It will incorporate a dual approach to include both a theoretical and body 
based focus.
DANCE 271 Clog Dance Technique I  
(2.0:0:3)
Prerequisite: Dance 171 or consent of Instructor.
This is a movement class where intermediate level rhythms, styles, and techniques of clog 
dance are experienced.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 272 Country Western and Square Dance, Intermediate   (1.0:0:2)
Prerequisite: DA 172 or consent of Instructor.
Mainstream 26-50 square dance basics above the “Basic Plateau.”
DANCE 280M Social Dance Intermediate 1  
(1.0:0:2)
Prerequisite: Dance 180
A course designed to develop skills of social dancing. Five of the following dances will be 
taught each semester: Waltz, Cha Cha, Tango, Rumba and Merengue.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 280W Social Dance Intermediate 1 
(1.0:0:2)
Prerequisite: Dance 180
A course designed to develop skills of social dancing. Five of the following dances will be 
taught each semester: Waltz, Cha Cha, Tango, Rumba and Merengue.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 281M Social Dance Intermediate 2 Men  
(1.0:0:2)
Prerequisite: Dance 180
A course designed to develop skills of social dancing. Five of the following dances will be 
taught each semester: Foxtrot, Swing, Mambo, West Coast Swing and Night Club Two-Step.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
Dance
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested