193
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
DANCE 281W Social Dance Intermediate 2 Women  
(1.0:0:2)
Prerequisite: Dance 180
A course designed to develop skills of social dancing. Five of the following dances will be 
taught each semester: Foxtrot, Swing, Mambo, West Coast Swing and Night Club Two-Step.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 284R Ballroom Technique 1  
(2.0:0:0)
Fee: $20.00
Prerequisite: Dance 184,185, 280 or consent of Instructor
A course designed to develop skills of ballroom dancing. Four dances will be covered 
each semester.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 290R Ballet Technique I  
(2.0:0:4)
Prerequisite: Dance 190 or consent of Instructor.
This course will explore ballet through an understanding of kinesthetic awareness. De-
veloping this concious attention to the body will allow the dancer to learn the difference 
between effi cient movement and ineffi cient movement, a principle that can be used not 
only in dance but also in everyday life.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 295 Dance Kinesology I  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: DANCE 240
Introduction to human anatomy and kinesiology consisting of the study of human 
movement specifi c to dance, with emphasis on the anatomical principles and the laws of 
physics as they apply to dance technique and performance from the foot to the hip. Struc-
tural and neuromuscular analysis including individual analysis of alignment, muscular 
imbalances, body types, conditioning needs, injury prevention, nutrition, somatics and 
movement behavior.
(Winter)
DANCE 299R Practicum  
(1.0-3.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of supervising faculty member.
Practical experience in teaching and choreography in a campus setting.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 331 Jazz Dance, Advanced  
(2.0:0:3)
Prerequisite: DA 231 or consent of instructor
A movement class where advanced rhythm, styles, techniques and choreography of jazz 
are explored.
(Fall, Spring)
DANCE 340R Dance Technique 2  
(2.0:0:5)
Prerequisite: Dance 240 or consent of instructor.
This course will explore modern dance using a variety of methods of movement awareness 
in order to promote optimal movement effi ciency and potential. Simple and complex 
movement patterns and rhythms will be explored through movement combinations, 
choreography and some improvisation. Alignment and conditioning of the body will be 
emphasized. Methods of dance/body therapies will be incorporated. Trends and current 
events of modern dance will be covered in the form of a group project.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 350 Dance Seminar  
(1.0:1:0)
Prerequisite: 60 credits or consent of instructor
A seminar exposing students to a variety of dance related topics. Four to six guest instruc-
tors will be invited. This course should assist the student in fi nalizing the outline of their 
capstone project.
(Winter)
DANCE 355 Dance Production  
(2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: DANCE 240 or DANCE 281 or DANCE 290 or DANCE 340 or consent of instruc-
tor.
A practical course of organizing and developing a dance production. The elements of 
Music, Costuming, Staging, Choreography, Advertising, and Event Procedures will be 
discussed. Dance Production will take advantage of online learning as well as classroom 
discussion.
(Winter)
DANCE 356 Techniques of Teaching Dance  
(4.0:3:2)
Prerequisite: Technique class 200 level or higher
A course designed to teach the skills necessary to be a successful dance teacher in all 
genres and for all ages.
(Winter)
DANCE 358 Teaching Techniques of Social Dance  
(3.0:3:0)
Fee: $35.00
Prerequisite: Dance 180 or consent of instructor.
A course designed to train a person to teach all forms of social dance including ballroom 
and world, with an emphasis on recreational dancing. Social or Recreation emphasis.
(Winter)
DANCE 371 Clog Dance Techniques 2  
(2.0:0:3)
Prerequisite: DA 271 or Instructor consent
This is a movement class where rhythms, styles and techniques of clog dance on an 
intermediate-advanced level will be introduced to the student.
(Fall, Winter)
DANCE 384R Ballroom Technique 2  
(2.0:0:5)
Fee: $20.00
Prerequisite: Dance 185 or consent of Instructor
A course designed to develop skills of technical and social dancing. Three of the folow-
wing dances will be taught each semester: Cha Cha, Rumba, Paso Doble, Samba, and Jive.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 390R Ballet Technique II  
(2.0:0:4)
Prerequisite: DANCE 290
This course explores ballet through an understanding of kinesthetic movement principles.
(Fall, Winter)
DANCE 402 Dance History  
(3.0:3:0)
This course is a survey of dance history derived from western civilation from the Renais-
sance to contemporary periods. Students examine the role of movement, dance and the 
arts in a philosophical and historical context.
(Winter)
DANCE 403 Senior Capstone Project  
(1.0:1:0)
An in depth, original research project that integrates dance and related fi eld of interest 
such as teaching, choreography, production, or performance. This will require a written 
document, oral presentation, and visual production. Preparation for this course will begin 
in the Orientation to Dance and Dance Seminar classes in order to help them determine 
a topic of research.
DANCE 440R Dance Technique 3  
(2.0:0:5)
Prerequisite: DANCE 240 or consent of instructor
This course will explore modern dance using a variety of methods of movement awareness 
in order to promote optimal movement effi ciency and potential. Simple and complex 
movement patterns and rhythms will be explored through movement combinations, 
choreography and some improvisation. Alignment and conditioning of the body will be 
emphasized. Methods of dance/body therapies will be incorporated. Trends and current 
events of modern dance will be covered in the form of a group project.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 442 Choreographic Explorations  
(3.0:0:4)
Prerequisite: DANCE 242
This course encompasses the study, exploration, implementation and examination of 
the dance making process at an advanced level of inquiry, creative thinking and critical 
analysis in order to more articulately develop an understanding of movement as an 
expressive art form. It is also an opportunity for students to produce a fi nal choreographic 
project that will incorporate the skills, knowledge and experience acquired throughout 
their studies which will be presented in a live performance setting.
(Fall, Spring)
DANCE 458R Teaching Techniques of Social Dance, Advanced  
(2.0:2:0)
Fee: $95.00
Prerequisite: DA 358
A course designed to develop skills of teaching social dance. Pro DVIDA syllabus is used 
or followed.
(Winter, Spring)
Dance
Pdf rotate pages and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to change page orientation in pdf document; how to rotate all pages in pdf
Pdf rotate pages and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf rotate single page and save; rotate pages in pdf online
194
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
DANCE 478R Dance Alliance  
(1.0-3.0:0:6)
Fee: $25.00
Prerequisite: Audition Required. Concurrent in one of the following courses: Dance 240, 241, 
271, 284, 290.
Dance Alliance is a distinctive dance company representing BYU-Idaho dedicated to 
sharing the gospel through dance, using individual technical strength, while engaging in 
a variety of dance genrés. As we create dance for performances we will be bound by the 
13th Article of Faith in music, costumes, and choreography which will be ‘virtuous, lovely 
or of good report or praiseworthy.’ Our purpose as dancers and artists should be to lift 
and inspire and change the hearts of those who experience the performance. It is this 
alternative in dance that Dance Alliance will seek out.  Check the Dance Department 
website for audition and tour dates at www.byui.edu/Dance
DANCE 484R Ballroom Technique 3  
(2.0:0:5)
Fee: $20.00
Prerequisite: Dance 384R
A course designed to develop skills of ballroom dancing. One dance will be covered from 
the 4 styles each semester.
(Fall, Spring)
DANCE 488R Collegiate Dancers  
(1.0-3.0:0:6)
Fee: $25.00
Prerequisite: Audition
Collegiate Dancers’ promotes recreational dancing, teaching, and performance. This 
outreach group will consist of 40 dancers dedicated to sharing several styles of dance. 
Representing BYU-Idaho the group will perform for community schools and local 
organizations in addition to campus events. Our hope is that the students will receive a 
quality experience that will allow them to share dance in their communities as well as 
prepare for other performing opportunities. These students will be invited to strengthen 
their testimonies of the restored gospel in addition to developing their skill, performance, 
teaching, and team work abilities.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
DANCE 495 Dance Kinesiology 2  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Dance 295
Introduction to human anatomy and kinesiology consisting of the study of human 
movement specifi c to dance, with emphasis on the anatomical principles and the laws 
of physics as they apply to dance technique and performance from the hip to the head. 
Structural and neuromuscular analysis including individual analysis of alignment, muscu-
lar imbalances, body types, conditioning needs, injury prevention, nutrition, somatics and 
movement behavior.
(Winter)
DANCE 496 Somatics  
(2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: DANCE 240 & DANCE 295
A course that provides the opportunity to learn about neuromuscular reeducation of the 
body as it pertains to dance education. To promote optimal, healthy movement habits.
(Winter)
DANCE 498R Internship  
(1.0-3.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
The purpose of the internship is to provide & ”real world” experience linked with informa-
tion and learning from courses taken at the university. The internship should aid the 
student in decisions about future careers in the dance world.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
Dance
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a range of pages from a PDF document.
how to save a pdf after rotating pages; rotate pdf page
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.DeletePage(2); // Save the file. doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. How
rotate a pdf page; rotate one page in pdf
195
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Department of
Economics
Rick Hirschi, Department Chair
Fenton Broadhead, Kirk Gifford, Rick Hirschi, Will Jenson, Ryan 
Johnson, Ronald Nate, Allan Walburger, Kerry Webb, Denise 
Rydalch, Secretary (208) 496-2048
http://www.byui.edu/Economics/
Why Study Economics?
“What’s your major? Around the world, college undergraduates’ 
time-honored question is increasingly drawing the same answer: 
economics,” said Wall Street Journalist, Jessica Vascellaro, who 
points out that “in a global economy fi lled with uncertainty, many 
students see economics as the best vehicle for a job promising good 
pay and security” (The Hot Major for Undergrads Seeking High Pay 
is Economics, Wall Street Journal, June 5, 2005).  
Majoring in economics helps students develop strong analyti-
cal and quantitative reasoning skills that enable them to not only 
solve problems but also identify the appropriate questions to ask in 
evaluating the alternatives that exist.  This economic way of thinking 
helps individuals on a daily basis with the decisions they face and 
allows them to address issues in a wide variety of areas including 
fi nance, business, public policy (e.g., health care, environment), and 
international trade. Former Harvard president and secretary of the 
Treasury, Larry Summers points out that “people are fascinated with 
applying the economic mode of reasoning to a wide variety of issues, 
and these forces are causing them to study economics more and 
more” (ibid).
To better meet the demands of a changing market place, students 
may pursue a bachelor of science in either economics or fi nancial 
economics.  As an integrated degree, students also choose a minor 
or two clusters that allow them to complement the major with ad-
ditional training in other areas.  
Bachelor of Science in Economics
In addition to the core courses, students majoring in economics have 
the fl exibility to choose from several economic elective courses based 
on their career plans.  This fl exibility allows students to prepare for 
either employment or graduate school. 
Bachelor of Science in Financial Economics
This degree is designed for students wanting to combine economics 
with the tools of fi nance to prepare for a career in fi nancial institu-
tions, capital markets, and the treasury/investment functions of a 
business.  
Graduation Requirements
Graduates in economics and fi nancial economics will need to com-
plete the prescribed course of study with a minimum GPA of 2.5 and 
no more than three credits of D or less. Major courses must have a 
minimum grade of C-. 
Career Opportunities
Job Ready
Economics students are prepared to work in a variety of fi nance, 
banking, business, or government areas. Graduates are equipped with 
the tools necessary for the application of economic theory to specifi c 
business and government issues.
Graduate Study
Economics prepares students for further graduate studies, which 
are required for careers in research, teaching, and consulting. It is 
strongly recommended that students preparing for graduate studies 
in economics take additional upper-division mathematics and statistic 
courses.
Pre-MBA
Students planning to pursue a Masters of Business Administration 
degree benefi t by studying economics. Students are introduced to 
business and management courses while developing the quantitative 
and analytical skills necessary for success in MBA programs. Accord-
ing to Richard A. Silverman, director of admissions at Yale School of 
Management, “Economics is viewed as the ticket to the nation’s top 
business schools. It shows the students have the intellectual fi re in 
the belly to perform well in an MBA program.” (Wall Street Journal, 
November 30, 1998)
Pre-Law
Economics consistently ranks as one of the top majors for students 
who are accepted to law school. The study of economics establishes a 
strong foundation for both the logical reasoning and analytical skills 
that are critical to legal studies.
International
Economics students receive a strong background in economic theory 
plus a solid base for analytical reasoning. In addition, they receive 
training in international trade, fi nance, and economic development. 
Complementary course work may include international studies, inter-
national business, and international politics.
Economics
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; PDFDocument doc1 doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex); // Output the new
saving rotated pdf pages; pdf page order reverse
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract PDF pages and save changes to original PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET.
rotate all pages in pdf; rotate pdf page permanently
196
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Economics
BS in Financial Economics (715)
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
This major is available on the following tracks:
Total Major Credits=55
Take these courses:
ACCTG 201 
3
ACCTG 202 
3
B 301 
3
B 401 
3
B 410 
3
B 411 
3
ECON 111 
3
ECON 112 
3
ECON 358 
3
ECON 388 
3
ECON 398 
3
ECON 453 
3
ECON 455 
3
ECON 499 
3
FDMAT 224 
3
MATH 324 
3
48
Take 1 course:
FDMAT 112 
4
MATH 119 
4
4
Take 1 course:
ECON 300 
3
ECON 380 
3
3
Program Notes: 
Major Requirements
This major also requires a minor or 2 clusters
BS in Economics (720)
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No Grade Less Than C- in Major Courses
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
This major is available on the following tracks:
Total Major Credits=52
Take these courses:
ACCTG 201 
3
ECON 111 
3
ECON 112 
3
ECON 358 
3
ECON 381 
3
ECON 388 
3
ECON 398 
3
ECON 430 
3
ECON 499 
3
FDMAT 224 
3
MATH 324 
3
33
Take 1 course:
FDMAT 112 
4
MATH 119 
4
4
Take 1 course:
ECON 300 
3
ECON 380 
3
3
Program Notes: 
Major Requirements
Take 12 credits:
B 361 
3
ECON 315 
3
ECON 357 
3
ECON 390R 
1-3
ECON 440 
3
ECON 444 
3
ECON 450 
3
ECON 453 
3
ECON 455 
3
ECON 463 
3
ECON 475 
3
ECON 476 
3
12
This major also requires a minor or 2 clusters
Take required Foundations courses
Take required Foundations courses
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
outPutFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document doc2.Save(outPutFilePath
how to rotate just one page in pdf; rotate pdf pages
How to C#: Rotate Image according to Specified angle
pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB Steps to Rotate image.
pdf reverse page order online; rotate pdf page few degrees
197
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Economics
Economics Minor (149)
No Double Counting of Minor Courses
Program Notes: 
Total Minor Credits=21
This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
Take these courses:
ECON 111 
3
ECON 112 
3
6
Take 15 credits:
ECON 300 
3
ECON 315 
3
ECON 357 
3
ECON 358 
3
ECON 380 
3
ECON 381 
3
ECON 388 
3
ECON 390R 
1-3
ECON 398 
3
ECON 430 
3
ECON 440 
3
ECON 444 
3
ECON 450 
3
ECON 453 
3
ECON 455 
3
ECON 463 
3
ECON 475 
3
ECON 476 
3
15
Minor Requirements
Minor in Economic Education (165)
No Double Counting of Minor Courses
Program Notes: 
Total Minor Credits=21
This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
Take these courses:
ECON 111 
3
ECON 112 
3
6
Take 1 course:
B 201 
3
HFED 340 
3
3
Take these courses:
(Econ 390R must be taken for 
3 credits)
ECON 358 
3
ECON 390R 
1-3
6
Take 6 credits:
ECON 300 
3
ECON 315 
3
ECON 357 
3
ECON 380 
3
ECON 381 
3
ECON 388 
3
ECON 398 
3
ECON 430 
3
ECON 440 
3
ECON 444 
3
ECON 450 
3
ECON 453 
3
ECON 455 
3
ECON 463 
3
ECON 475 
3
ECON 476 
3
6
Minor Requirements
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Similarly, Tiff image with single page or multiple pages is supported. Description: Convert to PDF and save it on the disk. Parameters:
rotate individual pdf pages reader; rotate pages in pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it on the disk.
how to rotate one pdf page; pdf rotate single page reader
198
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Economics Pre-approved Clusters
(No Double Counting between Major, Minor and Cluster courses)
General Economics
Take these courses: 
ECON 111 
Economic Principles and Problems - Macro 
3
ECON 112 
Economic Principles and Problems - Micro 
3
Take 2 courses: 
ECON 300 
Mangerial Economics 
3
ECON 358 
International Economics 
3
ECON 381 
Intermediate Macroeconomics 
3
ECON 430 
Economic History and Thought 
3
Total Credits 
12
Economics and Finance
Take these courses: 
ECON 300 
Mangerial Economics 
3
ECON 358 
International Economics 
3
ECON 421 
Introduction to Econometrics 
3
ECON 453 
Money, Banking and Financial Markets 
3
Total Credits 
12
Law and Economics
Take these courses: 
ECON 111 
Economic Principles and Problems - Macro  3
ECON 112 
Economic Principles and Problems - Micro 
3
ECON 440 
Law and Economics 
3
Take 1 course: 
ECON 430 
Economic Thought and History 
3
ECON 444 
Regional Economics 
3
ECON 475 
Public Economics 
3
FDMAT 221  Business Statistics 
3
Total Credits 
12
Public Administration
Take these courses: 
ECON 111 
Economic Principles and Problems - Macro  3
ECON 112 
Economic Principles and Problems - Micro 
3
Take 2 courses: 
ECON 300 
Mangerial Economics 
3
ECON 444 
Regional Economics 
3
ECON 475 
Public Economics 
3
Total Credits 
12
Economics
199
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
Course Descriptions  
Credits*
ECON 111 Economic Principles and Problems - Macro  
(3.0:3:0)
An elementary course emphasizing the workings of the U.S. macro economy.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ECON 112 Economic Principles and Problems - Micro  
(3.0:3:0)
An elementary course emphasizing the functioning of the price system and its effect on 
households and businesses.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ECON 300 Managerial Economics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Economics 111, 112
This course is designed to enhance the student’s understanding of how micro-economic 
analysis can be applied to modern business decision making.
(Fall 09, Spring 10, Winter 11)
ECON 315 Quantitative Methods  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Economics 111, 112; and Math 112 or 119
This course develops the mathematical tools used in the construction and manipulation 
of economic models. The fact that the fi eld of economics strives to explain how and why 
people buy, sell, produce, trade, pollute, give to charities, etc., means that we can quantify 
most of the actions we are interested in. This means that mathematics plays a central role 
in economics. To be sure, economists can be thought of as, in part, applied mathemati-
cians. Thus, it is essential that economic students develop a facility with the standard 
mathematical tools of the economist to prepare students for graduate-level economics 
studies (should they choose that path).
(Fall 09, Spring 10)
ECON 357 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Econ 112
Economic analysis applied to various natural resource and environmental issues, 
including usage of renewable and non-renewable resources; sustainable development; 
quality of life; environmental impacts of specifi c industrial and consumption activities 
(for example, solid waste disposal and air and water pollution); introduction to measuring 
natural resource and environmental values and cost-benefi t analysis; the design and 
implementation of government policies; and global environmental effects of human 
economic activity.
(Fall 10, Winter 12)
ECON 358 International Economics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Economics 111, 112
An introduction to international trade and fi nance. It examines international institutions, 
policies, and issues.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ECON 380 Intermediate Microeconomics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Economics 111, 112, Math 119 or Math 112
Intermediate micro-economic theory emphasizing theories of the fi rm and consumer 
behavior.
(Winter 10, Fall 10)
ECON 381 Intermediate Macroeconomics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Economics 111,112, Math 119
This course analyzes basic models of income determination which attempt to explain how 
the price level, the interest rate, and the level of output and employment are determined. 
Monetary and fi scal policies are discussed within the framework of these models and 
competing theories are compared.
(Win 10, Fall 10)
ECON 388 Introduction to Econometrics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: ECON 111, ECON 112, FDMAT 324
Econometrics is the branch of economics that formulates statistical methodology to esti-
mate, predict and test economic relationships. This course helps prepare students to criti-
cally evaluate econometric models and to conduct basic empirical economic research.
(Fall 09, Spring 10, Winter 11)
ECON 390R Special Projects  
(1.0-3.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: Economics 111, 112
This arranged course allows students to undertake a special project or further research in 
the fi eld of economics. Economic Education students study teaching methodologies and 
prepare course material for teaching economics.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ECON 398 Professional Internship  
(3.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: Prior completion of seven of the nine 100-300 level courses in the Economics 
Core Requirments.
Students will fi nd an economics-related internship/job and have it approved prior to reg-
istering in the course. Students will complete at least 270 hours of work over a minimum 
of eight weeks. They will apply the principles and skills learned in the classroom to on-the-
job practices and procedures for economists. Through on the job experience, students will 
gain a greater vision of what it means to be an economics professional. Students will es-
tablish professional career habits and hone their economic analytical skills. Students will 
report regularly to the instructor and will receive timely consultation from their internship 
provider in order to help direct learning progress in various job responsibilities. Students 
may also receive compensation and recognition by receiving wages from the employer 
and letters of recommendation from both the employer and BYU-Idaho. Students will be 
required to submit a fi nal report and evaluation as directed by the instructor.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ECON 430 Economic Thought and History  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Economics 111, 112, MATH 221
This course explores the development and application of major economic doctrines from 
classical through contemporary economics. Contributions of selected writers and schools 
of thought are analyzed, with emphasis on how these theories are used in our day.
(Fall 09, Spring 10, Winter 11)
ECON 440 Law and Economics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Economics 111, 112
This course uses economic analysis to analyze the basic common law areas of torts, 
contracts, property, and criminal law. Economic tools are used both to understand the 
basic structure of the law (positive analysis), and to suggest how the law might be made 
more effi cient (normative analysis). The course assesses whether individuals or collective 
action (courts) are better for addressing market failures. Transaction costs and litigation 
costs (among other things) are crucial to the assessment. This course is recommended for 
economics majors who are planning to go to law school or who intend to pursue a career 
in the legal fi eld. “For the rational study of the law...the man of the future is the man of 
statistics and economics” (Oliver Wendell Holmes, The Path of Law, 1897).
(Fall 10, Winter 12)
ECON 444 Regional Economics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Econ 111, Econ 112
This course presents an economic approach to the study of regions and communities.
(Fall 09, Win 11)
ECON 450 Development Economics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Economics 111, 112, 358
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the history, concepts 
and stimulus for economic development and growth.
(Spring 10, Fall 11)
ECON 453 Money, Banking, & Financial Markets  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Economics 111, 112, Math 221
This course examines money and banking issues from an economics perspective. This 
course is composed of three general sections. First, it considers interest rate theory and 
how investors make decisions in order to maximize fi nancial returns. Second, the course 
examines the nature and behavior of fi nancial institutions relating to risk management, 
performance measures, and government regulations. Finally, the course analyzes various 
theories of monetary policy and their implications for fi nancial markets, and the economy.
(Winter 10, Fall 10, Spring 11, Winter 12)
ECON 455 Financial Economics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Econ 453, Bus 410
The central concern of this course is the impact of risk and uncertainty on the allocation 
of monetary resources over time.
(Fall 09, Spring 10, Winter 11, Fall 11)
ECON 463 Labor Economics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Econ 111, Econ 112
This course provides an introduction to the fi eld of contemporary labor economics as we 
explore the interactions between fi rms and workers in the macro-economy.
(Winter 10, Spring 11)
Economics
200
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
ECON 475 Public Economics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Economics 111, 112
This course develops economic tools to analyze the role of the public sector in a market 
economy. Students examine how goverment intervenes when markets “fail” as a result 
of externalities, public goods, or monopoly situations; to restore effi cient outcomes. 
The process of collective decision making is an important topic in the course. The class 
observes the ways that government generates revenue (mainly taxes) from the perspective 
of their impacts on the behavior of economic agents. Students will try to determine what 
types of taxes are most effi cient and those that are less effi cient. Finally, the course looks 
at the relationships between the various levels of government (national, state, and local). 
Thereby students can develop an economic theory of a federal system of government.
(Winter 10, Spring 11)
ECON 476 Industrial Organization  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: ECON 112, MATH 108 or 110, and ECON 300 or 315 or 380 or approval of 
instructor.
The course introduces students to the economics of imperfect competition. Topics covered 
include the theory of the fi rm, market structure, and various aspects of fi rm strategy such 
as pricing, advertising, product differentiation, and innovation. Related questions of public 
policy will also be addressed.
(Win 09, Sp 10)
ECON 499 Senior Capstone  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Completion of Majors Core.
The revised three-credit capstone is designed to be a culminating experience as seniors 
explore topics of interest and apply analysis tools developed in their course of study. 
Students will create a senior research paper and take the major fi elds test in economics 
as a part of this course.
(Winter 10, Fall 10, Spring 11)
Economics
201
Brigham Young University-Idaho 2009-2010
Department of
English
Karen C. Holt, Department Chair 
Josh Allen, Matthew Babcock, Mark Bennion, Robert Bird,         
William Brugger, Scott Cameron, Zan Cammack, Julie Clark, Eric 
d’Evegnee, Suzette Gee, Emily Gilliland, Terry Gorton, Kendall 
Grant, Don Hammar, Darin Hammond, Kip Hartvigsen, Elaine 
Hawker, Nancy Hayes, Murray Hunt, Rod Keller, Darin Merrill, 
Joelle Moen, Phil Murdock, Anne Papworth, Jim Papworth, Dan 
Pearce, James Richards, Scott Samuelson, Rhonda Seamons, Paula 
Soper, Judy Steiner, Steven Stewart, Vaun Waddell, David Ward, 
Zeb Weeks, Jason Williams, Bob Worrell 
Delaina Scholes, Secretary (208) 496-1470
http://www.byui.edu/English/ 
For English Advising 
Jill Evans, College Career and Academic Advisor 
(208) 496-3017 
evansj@byui.edu 
http://www.byui.edu/Advising/landl/default.htm
Introduction 
The English Department offers a BA degree in English (with em-
phases in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Professional Writ-
ing) and BA degrees in English Education and English Education 
Only Field. Minors are available in English and English Education. 
The student organization, the English Academic Society (EAS), 
sponsors various activities, including a Pre-Professional Conference, 
monthly lectures and workshops, regular excursions to undergradu-
ate conferences, and frequent socials. The department supports 
the annual Children’s and Young Adult Literature Conference and 
sponsors Outlet, a publication of student writing. English majors are 
encouraged to participate in these opportunities and to complete an 
internship in the fi eld (English 398R, 1-6 credits). 
Literary Studies Emphasis 
Literary Studies focuses on the interpretation and appreciation of 
literature from the perspective of several critical theories. Course 
work includes British and American literary history, genre and 
author studies, ethnic and world literature, and rhetorical and literary 
theory. Literary Studies prepares students for further graduate study 
in English or other professional programs. Students who are con-
sidering graduate school in English should complete eight to eleven 
credits in one foreign language.
Professional Writing Emphasis 
Professional Writing focuses on writing, editing, formatting, and 
producing documents. Course work includes computer applications, 
publication design, and editing, with special attention to genres 
specifi c to technical communication. Professional Writing students 
gain hands-on experience writing, editing, and preparing texts for 
publication. Professional Writing prepares students to work as writers 
for business and industry or as freelance writers. 
Creative Writing Emphasis 
Creative Writing focuses on writing original works of poetry, fi ction, 
drama, and nonfi ction. Course work includes the study of literary 
genre and creative writing within a workshop setting. This emphasis 
culminates with English 418R Creative Writing and Publishing, a 
course which provides students an opportunity to submit works for 
publication and prepare issues of Outlet for publication. More often 
an avocational pursuit, creative writing can contribute to careers in 
education, editing, publishing, and professional and freelance writing. 
English Education and English Education Only Field Degrees 
English Education focuses on educational theories and methods 
for teaching literature and composition. Course work includes the 
English major and Teacher Education cores. These degrees culminate 
with English 430 Teaching English in Secondary Schools and student 
teaching. English Education prepares students to teach in grades 
6-12 in Idaho (and 42 other states). The English Education First 
Field requires an education minor; the English Education Only Field 
does not. However, extra endorsements are encouraged. 
Outlet: The BYU-Idaho Literary and Art Journal
Outlet is an annual literary journal published in conjunction with 
the Art Department. It features creative works written by students.  
Submissions are reviewed and selected by a senior-level editorial 
board. Those intereseted in submitting their poetry, fi ction, creative 
non-fi ction, or drama can fi nd submission forms at http://www.byui.
edu/english/outlet/default.htm.
Graduation Requirement 
For major and minor courses a letter grade of C- is required as a 
minimum grade.
Writing Center 
Free Service. Qualifi ed peer Writing Assistants, under the supervision 
of the Writing Center Director, work individually with students in 
free, confi dential writing sessions (for more information see http://
www.byui.edu/writingcenter). English majors who complete English 
325 are welcome to apply as Writing Assistants.
English
202
Brigham Young University-Idaho 2009-2010
English
BA in English
Literary Studies Emphasis (630-11)
No Double Counting of Major Courses
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
This major is available on the following tracks:
Total Major Credits=55
Take these courses:
ENG 110 
1
ENG 251 
3
ENG 252 
3
ENG 314 
3
ENG 325 
3
ENG 350R 
ENG 370R 
3
ENG 373 
ENG 440 
3
ENG 450 
3
ENG 495 
3
31
Choose 4 courses:
ENG 331 
3
ENG 332 
3
ENG 333 
3
ENG 334 
3
ENG 335 
3
ENG 336 
3
12
Choose 1 course:
ENG 351 
3
ENG 352 
3
ENG 353 
3
ENG 354 
3
ENG 355 
3
ENG 356 
3
3
Program Notes: 
For major and minor 
courses a letter grade of C- 
is required as a minimum 
grade.
Major Requirements
Choose 1 course:
CHIN 347 
3
ENG 350R 
3
FR 202 
3
GER 202 
3
RUSS 340 
3
SPAN 202 
3
SPAN 302 
3
3
Choose 2 courses:
CHIN 101 
4
CHIN 102 
4
CHIN 201 
4
CHIN 202 
3
CHIN 347 
3
ENG 327 
3
FR 102 
4
FR 201 
4
FR 202 
3
GER 102 
4
GER 201 
4
GER 202 
LATIN 101 
3
LATIN 102 
3
RUSS 101 
4
RUSS 102 
4
RUSS 340 
3
SPAN 102 
4
SPAN 201 
4
SPAN 202 
4
SPAN 302 
3
6
This major also requires a minor or 2 clusters
BA in English
Professional Writing Emphasis (630-12)
No Double Counting of Major Courses
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
This major is available on the following tracks:
Total Major Credits=55
Take these courses:
ENG 110 
1
ENG 251 
3
ENG 252 
3
ENG 314 
3
ENG 321 
3
ENG 325 
3
ENG 326 
3
ENG 390 
3
ENG 398R 
1-6
ENG 400R 
2
ENG 450 
3
ENG 452 
3
ENG 495 
3
34
Choose 3 courses:
ENG 331 
3
ENG 332 
3
ENG 333 
3
ENG 334 
3
ENG 335 
3
ENG 336 
3
9
Choose 1 course:
ENG 351 
3
ENG 352 
3
ENG 353 
3
ENG 354 
3
ENG 355 
3
ENG 356 
3
3
Program Notes: 
For major and minor 
courses a letter grade of C- 
is required as a minimum 
grade.
Major Requirements
Choose 1 course:
ENG 370R 
3
ENG 373 
3
3
Choose 2 courses:
CHIN 101 
4
CHIN 347 
3
CIT 140 
3
CIT 230 
3
COMM 130 
3
ENG 327 
3
FR 102 
4
FR 202 
3
GER 102 
4
GER 202 
3
RUSS 101 
4
RUSS 340 
3
SPAN 102 
4
SPAN 202 
3
SPAN 302 
3
6
This major also requires a minor or 2 clusters
Take required Foundations courses
Take required Foundations courses
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested