display pdf in wpf c# : Rotate pages in pdf permanently SDK Library service wpf .net azure dnn 40501_catalog%202009-2010%20bookmarks28-part477

298
Brignam Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
Course Descriptions  
Credits*
Foundations Quantitative Reasoning Requirement
There are two ways to fulfi ll the Foundations Quantitative Reasoning graduation require-
ment:  1) Pass Math 108. or 2) Pass any math class which indicates that it “fulfi lls the 
Foundations math requirement” (FDMAT 109, FDMAT 110, FDMAT 112, FDMAT 221, 
FDMAT 222, FDMAT 223, FDMAT 224) and then complete the test-out procedure for 
Math 108. Detailed information on testing out of Math 108 is available online at http://
www.byui.edu/math/foundations/testout.htm or you may contact the Department of 
Mathematics. Please note that passing a math class other than Math 108 will not fulfi ll 
the Foundations graduation requirement. You must also test-out of Math 108.
FDMAT 108 Mathematical Tools for the Real World 
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Math 100B with a grade of “B” or higher or one year of high school algebra.
This class prepares students to understand, analyze, and solve real-life problems that 
require quantitative reasoning. Topics include the meaning of probabilities, how to 
read, critique, and apply statistical information found in news reports, public policy 
debates, consumer reports, and other daily life and professional situations; the use of 
mathematical models in describing, understanding, and making predictions about real 
world phenomena; and the mathematics of loans and investments. Other topics may be 
included as time permits. All topics will be illustrated by examples and applications from 
current events, daily life, business, and natural phenomena.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDMAT 109 Precalculus 
(5.0:5:0)
Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra or Math 101 with a grade of “B” or higher. You 
must also achieve a satisfactory score on the placement exam. The placement exam will 
cover topics from high school algebra II and will be offered during the fi rst week of class. A 
practice exam is available on the web.
Combination of College Algebra and Trigonometry. Intended to prepare students for 
Calculus or other math and science courses. Elementary analysis of functions having 
discrete or connected domains. Methods of solving equations. Systems of equations and 
matrices. Triangle relationships, graphs of periodic functions, trigonometric identities, 
inverse trigonometric functions, and applications of trigonometry.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDMAT 110 College Algebra 
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra or Math 101 with grade of B or higher.
Elementary analysis of functions having discrete or connected domains. Methods of 
solving equations. Systems of equations and matrices. Strong connections to real world 
applications of functions and matrices will be made. Students who will be going on to 
take Calculus are strongly encouraged to take Math 109 instead of Math 110.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDMAT 112 Calculus I  
(4.0:4:1)
Limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, and transcendental functions. Properties and 
applications of the above.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDMAT 221 Business Statistics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: At least 15 credits.
Graphical representations of data; measures of center and spread; elementary prob-
ability; sampling distributions; correlation and regression; statistical inference involving 
means, proportions, and contingency tables.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDMAT 222 Biostatistics  
(3.0:3:0)
Graphical representations of data; measures of center and spread; elementary prob-
ability; sampling distributions; correlation and regression; statistical inference involving 
means, proportions, and contingency tables; odds ratio and relative risk.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDMAT 223 Social Sciences Statistics  
(3.0:3:0)
Graphical representations of data; measures of center and spread; elementary prob-
ability; sampling distributions; correlation and regression; statistical inference involving 
means, proportions, and contingency tables.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDMAT 224 Intermediate Statistics 
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisites:  15 credits
Graphical representation of data, principles of experimental design, confi dence intervals, 
hypothesis testing, contingency tables, nonparametric tests, ANOVA, multiple compari-
sons, multiple regression, regression diagnostics, subset selection procedures, and some 
nonlinear regression models.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
MATH 100A Arithmetic  
(1.0:0:3)
A study of arithmetic and applications using arithmetic. This course is only for those 
needing a review of elementary school arithmetic including signed numbers, fractions, 
decimals, and percents.
MATH 100B Beginning Algebra  
(2.0:0:3)
The arithmetic of integers and rational numbers as well as an introduction to algebra. 
This course is recommended for those needing basic algebra before taking progressively 
higher math courses.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
MATH 111 Trigonometry 
(2.0:2:0)
Trigonometric functions, triangle relationships, graphs, identities, inverse trigonometric 
functions, complex numbers, and applications. Applications of trigonometry will be 
emphasized throughout the course.
MATH 113 Calculus II  
(3.0:3:1)
Prerequisite: Math 112 or the equivalent. Students entering Calculus II may be expected to 
know how to use those features of their graphing calculators that are typically used in fi rst 
semester calculus courses.
Techniques of integration, infi nite sequences and series, polar coordinates, and paramet-
ric curves.
(Fall, Winter)
MATH 114 Calculus II for Education Majors  
(4.0:4:0)
Prerequisite: FDMAT 112
Techniques of integration, infi nite sequences and series, polar coordinates, parametric 
curves, introduction to multi-variable and vector calculus.
(Fall, Spring)
MATH 119 Calculus for Business and Life Sciences  
(4.0:4:1)
Prerequisite: Math 110 or the equivalent
A one-semester terminal course of single and multi-variable calculus designed primarily 
for students in biology, agriculture, and business. Topics include derivatives, integrals, and 
applications.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
MATH 190 Tutoring Mathematics  
(1.0:1:0)
Prerequisite: FDMAT 112
Work as a math department tutor.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
MATH 205 Fundamentals of Number Theory 
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: FDMAT 108 or concurrent enrollment in a higher numbered math class.
This course is for Secondary Education Mathematics Majors and Minors and Elementary 
Education majors. Systems of numeration, operations on whole numbers, integers and 
rational numbers, the real number system, and other topics from number theory are 
included.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
MATH 206 Elementary Geometry  
(2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: FDMAT 108 or concurrent enrollment in a higher numbered math class.
This course is for Secondary Education Mathematics majors and minors and Elementary 
Education majors. Concepts of geometry in two and three dimensions.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
MATH 214 Multivariate Calculus  
(3.0:3:1)
Prerequisite: Math 113 or the equivalent.
Techniques of integration, infi nite sequences and series, polar coordinates, parametric 
curves, introduction to multi-variable and vector calculus.
(Fall, Winter)
Mathematics
Rotate pages in pdf permanently - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate a pdf page; how to rotate one pdf page
Rotate pages in pdf permanently - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pages in pdf and save; rotate pages in pdf permanently
299
Brignam Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
MATH 215 Engineering Mathematics I  
(4.0:4:1)
Prerequisite: Math 112 or the equivalent.
Polar coordinates, parametric curves, vectors, vector geometry, vector-valued functions, 
partial derivatives, gradient, optimization, multiple integration, vector fi elds, and opera-
tions on scalar and vector fi elds. Emphasis on methods and applications. Math 215 and 
Math 214 cannot both be taken for credit.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
MATH 225 Simulation 
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite:  FDMAT 221, 222, 223, or 224
This is an introductory course in simulation.  Topics include: elementary probability; ran-
dom variables; generating discrete and continuous random variables; statistical analysis 
of simulated data; variance reduction techniques; statistical validation techniques; 
MCMC methods.
(Winter)
MATH 240 Discrete Mathematics  
(2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: FDMAT 112
Topics from graph theory, combinatorics, logic, and mathematical induction. Training in 
how to communicate clearly and carefully about mathematical concepts.
(Fall, Winter)
MATH 241 Linear Algebra I  
(2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: FDMAT 112
Introduces and explores some of the major concepts of matrix analysis through solving 
signifi cant real world problems.
(Winter, Spring)
MATH 242 Linear Algebra II  
(2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: Math 241
Introduces and explores some of the major concepts of vector spaces and linear transfor-
mations through solving signifi cant real world problems.
(Winter, Spring)
MATH 271 Elementary Differential Equations  
(2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: FDMAT 112
Introduces and explores some of the major concepts of differential equations and 
dynamical systems through solving signifi cant real world problems.
(Fall, Winter)
MATH 281 Introduction to Applied Mathematics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Math 112 or Math 119
Mathematical modeling concepts applied to areas such as biology, physics, chemistry, 
game theory, and economics. May include guest lecture, fi eld trips, and interdisciplinary 
projects.
(Fall)
MATH 301 Foundations of Mathematics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Math 113
Achieving maturity in mathematical communication. Topics include introduction to math-
ematical proof, analysis of proof, set theory, mathematical induction, logical reasoning, 
elementary number theory, and properties of relations and functions.
(Winter)
MATH 302 Geometry  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Math 206 and Math 240
Axiomatic treatment of fi nite geometries, transformation geometry, Euclidean and 
non-Euclidean geometries with emphasis on the historical signifi cance of the Parallel 
Postulate.
(Winter, Spring)
MATH 316 Engineering Mathematics II  
(4.0:4:1)
Prerequisite: Math 214 or 215 or the equivalent.
Matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, fi rst and second order ordinary dif-
ferential equations, power series and Fourier series methods, Laplace transforms, systems 
of linear ordinary differential equations. Emphasis on methods and applications. Math 
316 and Math 371 cannot both be taken for credit.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
MATH 324 Probability and Statistics 
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite:  (FDMAT 221, 222, 223, or 224) and (Math 112 or 119)
This course is intended for mathematics majors, economics majors, and statistics minors. 
This is an introduction to probability and mathematical statistics.  Topics include: prob-
ability theory, random variables, multiple integration, discrete and continuous distribu-
tions, limit theorems, estimation, hypothesis testing, and power.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
MATH 341 Linear Algebra  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Math 112
Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, vec-
tors, vector spaces, linear transformations, and applications.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
MATH 371 Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations  
(3.0:3:1)
Prerequisite: Math 214 and Math 341.
Methods and theory of ordinary differential equations with applications. Differential 
operators, systems of linear ODEs, Laplace transforms and series methods. Math 371 and 
Math 316 cannot both be taken for credit.
(Fall)
MATH 411 Numerical Analysis  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: CS 144 and either Math 341 or Math 316. Math 301 preferred.
Basic error analysis, complexity of algorithms, roots, interpolation, least squares ap-
proximation, curve fi tting, numerical differentiation and integration, and systems of linear 
equations.
(Winter even years)
MATH 412 Scientifi c Computing  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Math 411 and either Math 214 or Math 316
Methods of solving complex problems using numerical analysis and computer simulation. 
A variety of computing tools will be employed to study signifi cant problems of current 
interest. Topics may include graph theory, cryptography, random number generation, 
queuing theory, discrete optimization, parameter fi tting, fi nite element analysis, numerical 
PDE methods, etc.
(Fall even years)
MATH 440 Modern Algebra 
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Math 205 and Math 240
This course is for secondary education majors and minors. Number theory, division algo-
rithm, primes, GCD, LCM, proofs, rings, integral domains, fi elds, polynomials, Fundamental 
Theorem of Algebra, groups, isomorphisms, and how these topics apply to the secondary 
school mathematics curriculum.
MATH 441 Abstract Algebra I  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Math 301 and Math 341
Introduction to groups, rings, fi elds, vector spaces, and applications.
(Fall on odd years)
MATH 442 Abstract Algebra II  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Math 441
Additional exposure to groups, rings, fi elds, vector spaces, and applications.
(Winter even years)
MATH 450 History of Mathematics 
(2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: Math 302 and Math 440
Intended for those students majoring in Mathematics Education. Presents an overview of 
the development of mathematics and its interaction with society.
(Fall, Spring)
MATH 461 Real Analysis I  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: (Math 214 or Math 215) and (Math 341 or Math 316)
Rigorous treatment of the calculus. Limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, and 
metric properties of Euclidean spaces.
(Fall even years)
MATH 462 Real Analysis II  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Math 461 and either Math 316 or Math 341
Analysis in the context of metric spaces. Applications involving such tools as approxima-
tion, Fourier analysis, and multivariate optimization.
(Winter odd years)
Mathematics
VB.NET PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in vb.net
file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Enable VB.NET Users to Redact PDF Pages to Protect PDF Document in
how to permanently rotate pdf pages; save pdf rotated pages
C# PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Redaction is the process of permanently removing visible our redact function API to redact entire PDF pages.
how to save a pdf after rotating pages; rotate single page in pdf
300
Brignam Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
MATH 463 Complex Analysis  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Math 214 or Math 215
Arithmetic, algebra and calculus operations and concepts applied to complex numbers 
and functions of a single complex variable.
(Winter odd years)
MATH 472 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Either Math 316 or Math 371
Solving linear homogeneous and nonhomogeneous second-order partial differential 
equations with homogeneous and nonhomogeneous boundary conditions by separation 
of variables. Sturm-Liouville theory. Applications of partial differential equations to diffu-
sion, wave, and other phenomena. Fourier series and their applications to solving partial 
differential equations. Solving fi rst-order partial differential equations using the method 
of characteristics. Introduction to the fi nite-element and fi nite-difference methods.
(Winter)
MATH 490 Secondary Education Mathematics Teaching Methods   (2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: Must student teach within two semesters after taking this course.
Math 490 must be taken the semester before student teaching. This course is designed 
to help preservice secondary mathematics teachers apply research-based teaching 
strategies that lead students to discover, create, appreciate, and utilize mathematics. 
Students will have many opportunities to teach, prepare lesson plans, learn how to orga-
nize and manage classrooms, and gain a knowledge of state and professional standards 
for secondary mathematics teachers.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
MATH 495R Topics in Mathematics 
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
The content of this class will be determined by the department and the instructor, based 
on student need and interest. Some possible subjects are: Number Theory, Topology, 
Stochastic Processes, and Actuarial Science.
(Fall, odd years)
MATH 498R Internship 
(1-3:0:0)
Prerequisite:  Consent of Instructor
Practical experience working in a math intensive industry.
(As needed)
MATH 499R Senior Project in Mathematics 
(1-3:0:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
Content tailored to individual needs and interests of the students.  Investigation and/or 
application of mathematical principles under the guidance of a faculty mentor.
(As needed)
Mathematics
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
VB.NET Image Rotator Add-on to Rotate Image, VB.NET Watermark Maker to VB.NET image editor control SDK, will the original image file be changed permanently?
change orientation of pdf page; how to rotate pdf pages and save
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
to change view orientation by clicking rotate button. users can convert Excel to PDF document, export Users can save Excel annotations permanently by clicking
saving rotated pdf pages; save pdf after rotating pages
301
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Department of
Mechanical Engineering
Garth Miller, Department Chair 
Adrian Baird, Bill Cooley, Adam Dean, Alan Dutson, Russell 
Daines; David Johson, David Saunders; Aaron Schellenberg; Greg 
Roach 
Kenna Carter, Secretary (208) 496-1862 
http://www.byui.edu/MechEngr / 
Department of Mechanical Engineering 
The Mechanical Engineering Department has two engineering pro-
grams from which to select a career path. These are: 
4-Year Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering, BSME (470) 
2-Year Associate of Applied Science in Engineering (351) 
These programs are available to students entering Brigham Young 
University–Idaho on any admission track. These engineering pro-
grams are designed to provide students with the competencies 
necessary to work in a variety of exciting fi elds within engineering. 
These majors offer excellent placement potential, professional job 
satisfaction, and substantial salaries. Students entering either of these 
two programs can expect a well designed and rigorous curriculum 
based on industry standards. The baccalaureate degree program is 
accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). The 
2-year associate program also allows students to continue their en-
gineering education at a 4-year university in engineering fi elds other 
than mechanical engineering. Areas of emphasis available in the 
associate program include chemical, civil, electrical and mechanical 
engineering. 
Students in the BSME program are encouraged to take the Fun-
damentals of Engineering (FE) exam before they graduate. This is 
an important milestone of achievement for each ME engineering 
student in preparing him/her for future licensing as a Professional 
Engineer.
Using techniques, skills, and modern engineering modeling tools, 
students must demonstrate their abilities to apply mathematics, engi-
neering science, and technology principles necessary for analyzing, 
modeling, and solving engineering problems. Students must com-
municate effectively in written and oral presentation. Each student 
must gain an understanding of professional and ethical behavior in 
the workplace. Finally, students should understand that learning is a 
life-long process and develop a desire to continue to enhance their 
abilities as a professional engineer. 
Mathematics and physical sciences are critical components of any 
engineering curriculum. The normal entry level mathematics class for 
engineering is Calculus I (FDMAT 112). Entering freshman students 
should consult with their advisor to ensure they are beginning with 
the mathematics course for which they are prepared. Students with 
weak mathematics skills are advised to enroll in a preparatory math-
ematics course to strengthen their skills. For engineering students 
the normal entry level chemistry course is General Chemistry (Chem 
105). 
These engineering programs are specialized degrees at Brigham 
Young University–Idaho. The BSME degree is designed for comple-
tion in the 120 credit hours, and the AASE degree in 60-62 credits 
hours. It is imperative that students develop and follow a plan of 
study that will allow them to complete all the required courses within 
these credit hour limits. Due to the credit hours limit, no minor 
programs are available within the Mechanical Engineering program. 
Courses in the ME curriculum have prerequisite courses that must be 
taken. Each student must consult with his/her advisor early to make 
sure his/her educational plan is correct. The Advising Center and 
each faculty advisor have a sample curriculum fl ow chart that can be 
used as an example plan. 
Program Educational Objectives 
The program objectives for the baccalaureate degree in mechanical 
engineering are to produce engineering graduates who: 
1. Demonstrate and maintain faith in God, and exhibit high stan-
dards of personal integrity and professional ethics through lifelong 
service to family, church, profession, and community. [Service] 
2. Provide leadership in their chosen fi eld of endeavor through the 
application of effective interpersonal, communication, and teamwork 
skills. [Leadership] 
3. Apply fundamental principles of design and analysis to develop in-
novative solutions in an industrial and societal context. [Design] 
4. Maintain currency in their fi eld through continued learning and 
education. [Lifelong Learning} 
Program Outcomes 
To achieve the program educational objectives, the following out-
comes will be measured during the course of study within the pro-
gram. Assesment methods consistent with accreditation recommen-
dations will be used to determine how each student meets these 
outcomes. Students will: 
1. Demonstrate their knowledge and application of engineering 
mechanical systems, thermal systems, and the laws of physical and 
natural science to engineering analysis and design problems. 
2. Demonstrate their ability to analyze and interpret the behavior of 
a physical system through experimentation. 
3. Use acquired math skills (calculus, linear algebra, ordinary differ-
ential equations, and statistical analysis) in solving engineering design 
and analysis problems. 
4. Use modern engineering computer software and hardware tools 
to create models of physical systems in order to predict behavior and 
develop solutions to engineering problems. 
5. Competently present their technical fi ndings to peers, supervisors, 
and the faculty in both oral and written format. 
6.Exhibit and maintain high ethical, moral and professional standards 
expected of members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter–Day 
Saints, and as graduates from Brigham Young University–Idaho. 
7. Design, model, and manufacture components, systems, or 
processes necessary to meet product specifi cations for a competitive 
market environment. 
8. Demonstrate an understanding of modern manufacturing proce-
dures and project management techniques as applied to the develop-
ment, manufacture, and delivery of customer products. 
9. Learn to function as a contributing team member in a multi-disci-
pline work environment. 
10. Develop an understanding of the impact engineering design has 
on the world. 
11. Continue their educational processes beyond baccalaureate 
degree in graduate studies and/or enhancement of skills within the 
work environment. 
Mechanical Engineering
VB.NET Image: How to Create a Customized VB.NET Web Viewer by
used document & image files (PDF, Word, TIFF btnRotate270: rotate image or document page in burnAnnotationToImages: permanently burn drawn annotation on page in
rotate individual pages in pdf reader; rotate pages in pdf expert
How to C#: Cleanup Images
By setting the BinarizeThreshold property whose value range is 0 to 255, it will permanently modify the image to 1bpp grayscale image of the Detect Blank Pages.
reverse page order pdf; pdf rotate all pages
302
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
AAS in Engineering (351)
No Double Counting of Major Courses - Students must maintain a minimum grade of C- in their major courses
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
This major is available on the following tracks:
Take these courses:
CHEM 105 
4
MATH 113 
3
MATH 214 
3
MATH 371 
3
PH 220 
3
16
Take 1 course:
MATH 321 
3
MATH 341 
3
3
Chemical Engineering 
Option
Take these courses:
CHEM 106 
4
CHEM 351 
4
CHEM 352 
4
ME 142 
2
PH 121 
3
*Technical Elective  
6
Elective 
2
25
*Choose any 200 level or 
higher course with Math, 
ME, Chem, CS, or Ph prefi x
Mechanical Engineering
Major Requirements
Total Major Credits=44
BS in Mechanical Engineering (470)
No Double Counting of Major Courses - Students must maintain a minimum grade of C- in their major courses
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
This major is available on the following tracks:
Take these courses:
CHEM 105 
4
COMPE 305 
3
MATH 215 
4
MATH 316 
4
ME 131 
2
ME 142 
2
ME 172 
3
ME 201 
2
ME 202 
3
ME 204 
3
ME 210 
1
ME 218 
1
Cont. next column
Take 7 credits:
COMPE 470 
3
ME 332 
3
ME 337 
3
ME 398 
1-3
ME 422 
3
ME 425 
3
ME 438 
3
ME 445 
3
ME 460 
3
ME 465 
3
ME 470 
3
ME 482 
3
ME 490 
1-3
ME 495R 
1-3
7
Program Notes: 
Major Requirements
Total Major Credits=80
Cont. from previous column
ME 250 
3
ME 280 
3
ME 322 
3
ME 330 
3
ME 342 
3
ME 360 
3
ME 370 
3
ME 380 
3
ME 410 
3
ME 423 
3
ME 480 
3
PH 123 
3
PH 220 
3
71
Civil Engineering Option
Take these courses:
CONST 340 
3
ME 142 
2
ME 172 
3
ME 201 
2
ME 202 
3
ME 204 
3
ME 218 
1
ME 250 
3
PH 123 
3
Elective 
2
25
Electrical Engineering 
Option
Take these courses:
CS 124 
3
CS 165 
3
CS 235 
3
CS 237 
3
COMPE 150 
3
COMPE 224 
3
COMPE 250 
4
PH 121 
3
25
Mechanical Engineering 
Option
Take these courses:
ME 131 
2
ME 142 
2
ME 172 
3
ME 201 
2
ME 202 
3
ME 204 
3
ME 218 
1
ME 250 
3
ME 280 
3
PH 123 
3
25
Take 1 course:
ME 132A 
2
ME 132B 
2
2
Select One Option
Take 1 course:
ME 132A 
2
ME 132B 
2
2
Take required Foundations courses
Take required Foundations courses
How to C#: Color and Lightness Effects
Geometry: Rotate. Image Bit Depth. Color and Contrast. Cleanup Images. NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET
pdf reverse page order online; rotate pdf pages
303
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Engineering Cluster
Take this course: 
ME 172 
Visualization in Engineering Design 
3
Take 4 credits:
ME 105 
Essentials of Welding 
4
ME 131 
Manufacturing Processes I 
2
ME 132A* 
Manufacturing Processes II 
2
ME 132B* 
Manufacturing Processes II 
2
*Only  1 of these 2 classes may be taken for credit
Take 8 credits:
FDMAT 112  Calculus I  
4
ME 142 
Engineering Computation I 
2
ME 201 
Engineering Mechanics: Statics 
2
ME 202 
Strength of Materials 
3
ME 204 
Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics 
3
ME 210 
Measurement & Instrumentation 
1
ME 218 
Materials Lab 
1
ME 250 
Materials Science 
3
ME 280 
ME Design I 
3
Total Credits 
15
Mechanical Engineering Pre-approved Cluster
Mechanical Engineering
Minor in Engineering (206)
No Double Counting of Major Courses - Students must maintain a minimum grade of C- in their major courses
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
This major is available on the following tracks:
Take these courses:
FDMAT 112 
4
ME 131 
2
ME 142 
2
ME 172 
3
ME 201 
2
ME 202 
3
ME 280 
3
19
Take 1 course:
ME 132A 
2
ME 132B 
2
2
Program Notes: 
Major Requirements
Total Minor Credits=25
Take 4 credits:
Chem 105 
4
Chem 106 
4
Math 113 
3
Math 214 
3
Math 215 
4
ME 204 
3
ME 210 
1
ME 218 
1
ME 250 
3
ME 3XX* 
3
ME 4XX* 
3
PH 123 
3
PH 220 
3
4
*Select from any ME 300 or 
400 level course.
Take required Foundations courses
304
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
Course Descriptions  
Credits*
ME 105 Essentials of Welding  
(4.0:2:4)
Fee: $30.00
A course in beginning welding designed to teach the fundamentals of arc welding includ-
ing: safety, power sources, electrodes, oxyfuel cutting, and oxyacetylene welding with an 
introduction to weld symbols, metallurgy, and metal identifi cation.
ME 115 Computerized Technical Illustration 
(2.0:2:0)
This course will explore the basic system of technical illustration, the use of construction
aids and grids, and special techniques in rendering an animation. Students will be
introduced to 3D Solids modeling and rendering using the computer software (3D Studio
VIZ R3) and animation techniques. This course is designed heavily around the use of 3D
drawings. Students will learn to accurately portray any given object three dimensionally
(both manually and using the computer).
(As needed)
ME 131 Manufacturing Processes I  
(2.0:2:1)
Integration of manufacturing processes. Emphasis on principles of mechanical mass 
reducing and surface fi nishing processes, machining parameters, measurement, and 
material selection.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 132A Manufacturing Processes II - CNC Lab Emphasis  
(2.0:2:1)
Prerequisite: ME 131, ME 172
Continuation of manufacturing processes with major focus on CNC, CAM, and GD&T.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 132B Manufacturing Processess II - Joining Processes Lab Emphasis    
(2.0:2:1)
Prerequisite: ME 131, ME 172
Continuation of manufacturing processes with major focus on joining processes.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 142 Engineering Computation I  
(2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: FDMAT 112
This course provides an introduction to computation in the context of engineering 
problem solving. Fundamental principles of computation, such as computer representa-
tion of numbers and round-off error, are presented. Basic numerical methods, including 
numerical integration, differentiation, and root fi nding, are covered. An introduction to 
computer programming, including  owcharts, loops, condition statements, and functions, 
is given. Emphasis is placed on using MS Excel to solve computational problems, and 
using VBA within Excel to create computer programs. A brief introduction to commerical 
math software packages is also given.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 172 Visualization in Engineering Design  
(3.0:3:0)
Fundamentals of 3D parametric modeling and engineering design concepts including: or-
thographic projection, auxiliary views, sectioning, dimensions, working drawings, assembly 
modeling, parametric modeling fundamentals, and standards (ANSI and ISO). Instruction 
in computer-aided design tools with application to Mechanical Engineering.
ME 201 Engineering Mechanics: Statics  
(2.0:2:1)
Prerequisite: FDMAT 112
Concepts of forces, moments and other vector quantities; free body diagrams; particle 
and rigid body statics; trusses, frames and machines; friction; centroids and moments of 
inertia. Vector analysis used.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 202 Strength of Materials  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: ME 201
Review of equations of static equilibrium; introduction to engineering stress and strain; 
thermal loading; stress distributions resulting from axial, torsional, and transverse (beam) 
loadings; combined loading problems; stress and strain transformation, Mohr’s circle; 
de ection of axial members, torsional members, and beams including statically indeter-
minate structures; column buckling.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 204 Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: ME 201
The study and application of the concepts of dynamics to particles, systems of particles, 
and rigid bodies. Scalar and vector analysis used.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 210 Measurement and Instrumentation  
(1.0:0:2)
Prerequisite: ME 142
This course provides an introduction to mechanical measurements and instrumentation 
techniques. Topics related to instrumentation, such as calibration, bias and precision 
error, and sample rates are covered. The basic operation of several types of sensors, 
including strain gages, thermocouples, accelerometers, load cells, LVDTs, and pressure 
transducers are discussed. Professional software (LabVIEW) is used to perform experi-
ments in data acquision.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 218 Materials Lab 
(1.0:0:2)
Prerequisite: ME 202
Laboratory investigations in materials science and strength of materials.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 250 Materials Science  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Chem 105; FDMAT 112
Atomic and microstructure of engineering materials, including metals, ceramics, polymers, 
and composites. Factors in uencing the farication, processing, and selection of materials 
in engineering analysis and design. Case studies of engineering material failures. Use of 
material selection software.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 280 ME Design I  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: ME 142, ME 132A or ME 132B, ME 202
This course focuses on the practical aspects of mechanical design and teaches concepts 
such as the integration of engineering analysis and design, the strategic use of CAD in 
making design decisions, the effective use of vendor off-the-shelf mechanical compo-
nents, and manufacturing process considerations in design. The concepts are taught in 
the context of small design projects where students design and build mechanical devices 
throughout the semester.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 322 Thermodynamics I 
(3.0:3:2)
Prerequisite: ME 204
Fundamentals of classical thermodynamics. Thermodynamic property relationships for 
ideal gasses, vapors, liquids and solids. First and second law analysis of open and closed 
systems. Energy and entropy concepts in power and refrigeration cycles. Laboratory 
experiences with thermodynamic devices.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 330 Engineering Statistics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Math 215
Introduction to statistical methods for science and engineering. Review of basic statisti-
cal concepts of central tendency, dispersion of data, probability laws, hypothesis testing, 
and confi dence intervals. Introduces statistical process control, design of experiments, 
statistical tolerance analysis, and concepts of six sigma quality.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 332 Advanced CNC  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: ME 132A or ME 132B
Automated machine control through Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) and Computer 
Numerical Control (CNC). Students gain practical laboratory experience on CAM, CNC, 
and manual programming on a variety of CNC equipment (machining center, lathe, wire 
EDM, and plasma cutter). Principles of machining variables, tooling, and setups will be 
reviewed.
(As Needed)
ME 337 Kinematics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: ME 204
Relative motion of links in mechanisms; velocities and accelerations of machine parts; 
rolling contact; cams; synthesis of mechanisms. Includes computer-aided engineering 
techniques.
(As needed)
ME 342 Engineering Computation II 
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: ME 142, ME 202, ME 204, Math 316 or Math 371
This course builds on the basics of engineering computation from ME 142. Additional 
numerical methods, including curve fi tting, optimization, and ordinary differential 
equations are covered. Additional topics in computer programming are also presented. 
Computational techniques are implemented in MS Excel, VBA within Excel, and a com-
mercial math software package.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
Mechanical Engineering
305
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
ME 360 Fluid Mechanics  
(3.0:3:2)
Prerequisite: ME 342
Introduction to  uid mechanics and incompressible  uid  ow,  uid statics,  uid dynam-
ics, control volume and differential analysis of  uid  ow, dimensional analysis and scale 
models, internal and external viscous  ow, turbomachinery. Flow measurement lab 
included.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 370 Mechanical Systems Design  
(3.0:3:2)
Prerequisite: ME 280
Analysis, modeling and design of mechanical components and sytems; materials, pro-
cesses and structural analysis; static and dynamic failure theories; analysis and design of 
machine elements. Use of computer-aided design tools emphasized.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 380 ME Design II: Product Design 
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: ME 370
This course introduces a structured design methodology for product development. The 
methodology includes such topics as product specifi cations, concept generation, concept 
selection, and prototying. Other topics that are associated with the design process, such 
as economic analysis and intellectual property, are also presented.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 398 Internship  
(1.0-3.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
Industrial work experience.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 410 System Dynamics 
(3.0:3:2)
Prerequisite: ME 204, ME 210, MATH 316 or MATH 371
This course provides an introduction to dynamic system modeling and analysis. Major 
topics covered in this course include lumped parameter models of dynamic systems, 
derivation of state equations, analytical and numerical solution of state equations, and 
frequency response analysis. Professional software is used in obtaining numerical solu-
tions of state equations.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 422 Thermodynamics II 
(3.0:3:2)
Prerequisite: ME 322
Application of principles of thermodynamics to air standard cycles (Otto, Diesel, Brayton, 
Sterling, and Ericsson), steam power cycles (Rankine), and refrigeration and heat pump 
cycles. Property calculations for gas mixtures. Processes involving air water mixtures, 
psychrometric charts, etc. with applications to air-conditioning and drying processes. 
Introduction to thermodynamic calculations for combustion chemical reactions. Labora-
tory experience analyzing thermodynamic systems.
(As needed)
ME 423 Heat Transfer 
(3.0:3:2)
Prerequisite: ME 322, ME 342
Fundamentals of conduction, convection, and radiant modes of heat transfer; fundamen-
tal equations for steady and unsteady conduction; heat exchanger analysis and design; 
design of systems involving multi-mode heat transfer. Heat transfer lab included.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 425 Fluid Mechanics II 
(3.0:3:2)
Prerequisite: ME 322, ME 360
This course is a follow-on course to the introductory  uid mechanics course. Some topics 
including integral momentum, modeling and similitude, and analysis of piping systems 
from the introductory course will be explored in greater depth and detail. New topics 
covered may include potential  ow, compressible  ow, computational  uid dynamics, and 
turbulence. This course will analyze more involved  uid systems.
(As needed)
ME 438 CAE Modeling and Digital Simulation 
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: ME 380
A study of advanced Computer-Aided Design and engineering applications in design, 
modeling, simulation and customization. The use of CAD and engineering software tools 
is stressed. Topics include engineering design process, project management, advanced 
solids modeling techniques, kinematic analysis, digital simulation techniques, and 
customization techniques.
(As needed)
ME 445 Mechanics of Composite Materials  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: ME 342, ME 250
An introduction to laminated composite materials and structures. An investigation of the 
micromechanical and macromechanical behavior of anisotropic plies. Development of 
classical lamination theory for predicting the mechanical behavior of laminated compos-
ite plates. Laboratory work involving fabrication and testing of composite laminates.
(As needed)
ME 460 Fundamentals of Finite Element Analysis  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: ME 342, ME 370
This course provides an introduction to the fi nite element method. Characteristics and 
limitations of several basic fi nite elements are evaluated. The fi nite element method 
is applied to both structural and thermal problems. Applications of the fi nite element 
method are carried out with commercial software.
(As needed)
ME 465 Fluid Power Fundamentals  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: ME 360
This course is a technical elective in Mechanical Engineering and teaches fundamentals 
of  uid power. Students will explore hydraulic and pneumatic systems including hydraulic 
 uids, air preparation components, pumps, compressors, cylinders, motors, valves, 
circuits, controls, and commercial applications.
(As Needed)
ME 470 Mechatronics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: ME 410, CompE 305
This course provides an introduction to systems that contain both electrical and 
mechanical elements. Methods for modeling and controlling the behavior of such systems 
are discussed. Several computer-based methods and tools are presented, including the 
use of programmable logic controllers and data acquisition software.
(As needed)
ME 480 ME Design III: Capstone Design  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: Senior Standing, ME 322, ME 360, ME 380
Comprehensive one-semester integrated design experience using the engineering design 
process and skills gained in engineering science classes. Product conception, develop-
ment, design, and manufacture.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 482 Capstone Project II  
(3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: Senior Standing, ME 480
Second semester of an integrated design experience using the engineering design pro-
cess and skills gained in engineering science classes. Product conception, development, 
design, and manufacture.
(As needed)
ME 490 Special Problems in Mechanical Engineering  
(1.0-3.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
Students complete individual major projects or research in engineering, under the 
supervision of a faculty member.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
ME 495R Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering (3.0:2:2)
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
Automated machine control through Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) and Computer 
Numerical Control (CNC). Students gain practical laboratory experience on CAM, CNC, and 
manual programming on a variety of CNC equipment (machining center, lathe, and EDM). 
Principles of machining variables, tooling, and setups will be reviewed.
(As needed)
Mechanical Engineering
307
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Department of
Military Science 
Harmon Esplin, Director 
Sean Cannon, Harmon Esplin, Jason Hartley 
Janine Clifford, Administrative Assistant (208) 496-2153 
The Army ROTC program is an extension of Idaho State University 
Army ROTC. The traditional Army ROTC program encompasses 
a four-year period tailored to the normal progression of a student 
through four years of college. A student can take all four years of 
ROTC at Brigham Young University-Idaho. Entry into the ROTC 
advanced course requires U.S. citizenship and the student must 
have a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Anyone can take the fi rst two years of 
ROTC. 
Arrangements can be made for entry into the program anytime prior 
to the junior year of college. For specifi c circumstances, students 
may also take two years of academic work at once. Such actions 
should have the approval, in advance of the professor of Military 
Science. 
The Army ROTC Program is designed to produce highly qualifi ed 
commissioned offi cers in the U.S. Regular Army, Army Reserve and 
the U.S. Army National Guard. The Military Science student will in-
cur no military obligation while in the program at BYU–Idaho. Mili-
tary Science students have the option to contract with the United 
States Army if they choose to pursue a military career. Students will 
typically contract at the beginning of their junior year. A monthly 
subsistence allowance is paid to contracted students. 
The instruction program compliments the academic schedule of the 
university and is taught by professional career offi cers and non-
com-missioned offi cers from the Regular Army, Army Reserve or 
National Guard. Students specialize in the major fi eld of their choice 
and graduate with the ability to function as a junior executive. The 
Army ROTC studies are designed to teach principles and techniques 
of leadership and management in preparation for service as an army 
offi cer and civic leader. 
Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP) 
A program allowing for simultaneous membership in the National 
Guard or Army Reserve during the junior and senior year that pro-
vides additional pay (up to $500 per month) as an offi cer trainee. 
Uniforms and Training Materials 
Uniforms and training materials are furnished by the U.S. Army. 
Army ROTC Scholarship Program 
Full tuition assistance is available on a competitive basis. College 
students enrolled in Army ROTC may qualify for a two, three, or 
four year scholarship. The scholarship provides for full tuition, fees, a 
textbook allowance, and a monthly stipend. 
Extracurricular Activities 
Army ROTC cadets extend academic and laboratory associations into 
a variety of extracurricular activities. Among these are the Ranger 
Club, Army Color Guard, and an annual Military Ball, rafting, rap-
pelling and more. 
Military Science
308
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Minor in Military Science (179)
No Double Counting of Major Courses - No GradeLess Than B- in Major Courses
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
This major is available on the following tracks:
Total Minor Credits=25
Take 1 Option:
Option A
Take these courses:
MS 101 
1
MS 102 
1
MS 201 
2
MS 202 
2
OR
Option B
MS 290 
6
OR
Option C
Complete:
Basic Training 
0-6
6
Take these courses:
MS 301 
3
MS 302 
3
MS 401 
3
MS 402 
3
12
Repeat this course 4 times:
MS 315R 
1
4
Take this course:
MS 350 
3
3
Program Notes: 
Military Science
Minor Requirements
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested