371
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
FDREL 431 Doctrines of the Gospel 
(2.0:2:0)
A study of the basic doctrines of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as taught 
in the scriptures and by Latter-day prophets.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDREL 471 Methods of Teaching Seminary  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Rel 370 and Instructors consent. For prospective Seminary teachers only.
This course helps trainees become more effective teachers. It prepares trainees to teach 
the scriptures and involves them in a brief seminary teaching experience.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDREL 475 Seminary Teaching Seminar  
(2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: Rel 471 and Instructors consent. For prospective Seminary teachers only.
This course deals with current teaching issues and needs. Trainees are also employed 
part-time and may teach from one to three classes of seminary each day. Trainees are 
evaluated to determine whether they should be considered for a full-time seminary 
teaching position.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
Religious Education
Pdf page order reverse - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pdf page and save; rotate pages in pdf and save
Pdf page order reverse - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
how to change page orientation in pdf document; rotate single page in pdf reader
372
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Religious Studies 
14 Religion Credits required 
4 Credits from the Book of Mormon
Course #  Credit
121            2             I Nephi 1 – Alma 29 
122            2             Alma 30 – Moroni 10 
OR 
221            4             Nephi 1 – Moroni 10 
Missionary Preparation 
Plus 2 Credits from the Family Foundations 200 course
Plus a minimum of 6 credits from the following courses:
Course #  Credit
211 NT  3 
Matthew – Revelation; JS Matthew 
301 OT  3 
Moses; Abraham; Genesis – Deuteronomy 
302 OT  3 
Joshua – Malachi 
324 D/C  3 
D/C Sections 1-138; Official Declarations 
Pearl of Great Price is incorporated into other scripture courses 
Plus 2 additional Credits of your choice
Additional Doctrine
Course #  Credit
333  
  Teachings of the 
Living Prophets 
431  
  Doctrines of the Gospel 
Seminary – Pre Service
Course #  Credit
370           2   Intro. To Teaching Seminary 
471           3   Methods of Teaching Seminary 
475           2   Seminary Teaching Seminar 
Preparation Courses
Course #  Credit
100 
  Introduction to Mormonism 
130 
  Missionary Preparation 
150 
  Provident Living 
215 
  Scripture Study Skills 
234 
  Preparation for Eternal Marriage 
235 
  Building an Eternal Marriage 
261 
  Family History 
264 
  Family History Research 
Historical/Comparitive
Course #  Credit
341 
  Church History 1805-1844 
342 
  Church History 1844-Present 
351 
  World Religions 
352 
  Christian History 
360 
  History of Western Religion 
Religious Education
C# PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
page. Enable C# users to move, sort and reorder all PDF page in preview. Support to reverse page order in PDF document. RasterEdge
pdf rotate page and save; how to rotate just one page in pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Support to reverse page order in adobe PDF document in both .NET WinForms application and ASP.NET webpage. Enable move, sort and reorder PDF page in preview.
pdf expert rotate page; rotate pages in pdf permanently
373
Brignam Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
Department of
Sociology /Social Work
Grover Wray, Department Chair 
Michael Abel, Steven Hay, Martin McDonell, Nathan Meeker, Paul 
Roberts, Stephen Smith, Steve Stokes, Mike Tatum, Richard Whit-
ing, Grover Wray 
Karri Tingey, Secretary (208) 496-1363 
http://www.byui.edu/Sociology/ 
Introduction
Sociology and Social Work studies are concerned with the social 
causes and consequences of human behavior. Subject matter ranges 
from the immediate family to the hostile mob, from crime to 
religion, and from the divisions of race and social class to the shared 
beliefs of a common culture. 
The mission of the Sociology and Social Work Department is to: 
•Prepare majors to incorporate Christian service into their careers 
and personal lives. 
•Help students gain an appreciation for the social and cultural infl u-
ence affecting them, their families and society. 
•Prepare majors for advanced study and careers in the fi elds of soci-
ology and social work, criminology, and anthropology. 
•Develop knowledge and skills related to successful human interac-
tion and function pertaining to society, culture, the social envi-
ronment, and social justice. 
Career Opportunities 
A degree in Sociology prepares students for higher education with 
eventual careers in teaching, organizational development or research. 
Opportunities also exist in military and in private security. A Social 
Work degree will prepare students planning for careers as case 
workers for juvenile delinquents, mental health clients or children’s 
services. The department also offers a limited number of courses in 
anthropology, the study of humankind. These courses are designed to 
expand the students’ understanding of themselves in relation to other 
cultures and ideas. 
Criminology 
Criminology is an area of study within Sociology; no degree is of-
fered. However, students who choose to take Soc 330 and four other 
courses related to Criminology will receive a certifi cate from the 
department. Applications are available online. 
Pre-Law 
Sociology or Criminology are choices for students desiring to take 
the LSAT (Law School Aptitude Test) and apply for law school. Stu-
dents may choose other majors such as English, History, Accounting, 
Business, etc. 
Bachelor’s Social Work Program Mission 
The mission of the BYU–Idaho Social Work Program is to support 
the overall mission of BYU–Idaho and The Church of Jesus Christ 
of Latter–Day Saints and to help students develop knowledge to be-
come competent and effective communicators and professional social 
workers for generalist social work practice and Christian service with 
individuals, groups, families, communities and society. 
To help students of diverse interest and abilities to use and integrate 
social work historically grounded purposes, philosophy, knowledge, 
values, supervision, consultation and skills for leadership in the evalu-
ation and development of social policy, social service delivery systems, 
professional employment and for their roles as citizens and parents. 
To promote economic and social justice and prepare graduates to 
work within the context of their clients’ specifi c cultures. 
Social Work Accreditation 
The Baccalaureate Social Work program at BYU–Idaho is accredited 
by the Council on Social Work Education.  
Social Work Application Process 
Only students accepted into the Social Work Program are Social Work 
majors. 
Freshman and Sophomore students choose a major of their choice 
(e.g. typically Sociology, or some other social science discipline). 
Students fulfi ll Foundations and Social Work prerequisite course work 
during their Freshman and Sophomore years and make application to 
the program during the second semester of their Sophomore year. 
Application will be required for admission to the BSW Program. The 
following will be required: 
Second semester Sophomore standing, completion of most Founda-
tions requirements, cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher, 
a statement of psychological well-being, three letters of reference and 
a personal autobiography (two pages or less). In addition the follow-
ing prerequisite course work: Social Work 260, Sociology 111 or 112 
with grades of B range or better.
Human Biology 230 or 264, Statistics 223, Psychology 111 with 
grades of C range or better. 
Please access the application online at www.byui.edu/socialwork. 
Sociology/Social Work
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
document pages in original or reverse order within entire C# Class Code to Print Certain Page(s) of powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
save pdf rotate pages; pdf rotate single page and save
374
Brignam Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
Sociology/Social Work
BS in Social Work (500)
No Double Counting of Major Courses  - No Grade Less Than C-
This major is available on the following tracks:
Total Major Credits=77
Take these courses:
FDMAT 223 
3
PSYCH 111 
3
PSYCH 342 
3
SW 260 
3
SW 311 
3
SW 340 
3
SW 362 
3
SW 364 
3
SW 365 
3
SW 367 
3
SW 400 
3
SW 463 
3
SW 464 
3
SW 465 
3
SW 466 
3
SW 470 
3
48
Take 1 course:
HS 460 
3
SOC 420 
3
3
Take 1 course:
CHILD 320 
3
SOC 383 
3
3
Repeat 2 times:
SW 497R 
2
4
Repeat 2 times:
SW 498R 
3
6
Take 1 course:
BIO 230 
4
BIO 264 
4
4
Program Notes: 
Major Requirements
Take required Foundations courses
Take 9 credits:
ARAB 101 
4
ARAB 102 
4
CHILD 210 
3
CHILD 330 
2
CHILD 440 
3
CHIN 101 
4
CHIN 102 
4
CIT 140 
3
COMM 150 
3
COMM 350 
3
FAML 360 
3
FAML 460 
2
FR 101 
4
FR 102 
4
GER 101 
4
GER 102 
4
HS 280 
2
HS 351 
2
PSYCH 201 
3
PSYCH 235 
2
RM 320 
3
RM 370 
3
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
RUSS 101 
4
RUSS 102 
4
SIGN 101 
3
SIGN 102 
3
SOC 111 
3
SOC 112 
3
SOC 323 
3
SOC 330 
3
SOC 357 
3
SOC 360 
3
SOC 420 
3
SOC 460 
3
SPAN 101 
4
SPAN 102 
4
SW 490R 
1-3
9
BS in Sociology (780)
No Double Counting of Major Courses  - No Grade Less Than C-
This major is available on the following tracks:
Total Major Credits=46
Take these courses in 
sequence:
Take 1 course:
SOC 111 
3
SOC 112 
3
AND Take these courses:
SOC 230 
3
SOC 300 
3
SOC 340 
3
SOC 400 
3
15
Take 2 courses:
SOC 323 
3
SOC 370 
3
SOC 450 
3
SOC 462 
3
6
Take this course:
FDMAT 223 
3
3
Take 1 course:
SOC 495 
2
SOC 498 
1-4
1
Take 2 courses:
SOC 311 
3
SOC 330 
3
SOC 355 
3
SOC 360 
3
6
Program Notes: 
Major Requirements
This major also requires a minor or 2 clusters
Take required Foundations courses
Take 15 credits:
(Soc 311 & SW 311 are the 
same course)
ANTH 101 
3
CHILD 210 
3
POLSC 280 
3
PSYCH 350 
3
SOC 111 
3
SOC 112 
3
SOC 120 
3
SOC 204 
4
SOC 205 
3
SOC 206 
3
SOC 311 
3
SOC 323 
3
SOC 330 
3
SOC 355 
3
SOC 357 
3
SOC 360 
3
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
SOC 370 
3
SOC 383 
3
SOC 420 
3
SOC 440 
3
SOC 450 
3
SOC 451 
3
SOC 460 
3
SOC 462 
3
SOC 490R 
1-3
SW 260 
3
15
375
Brignam Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
Sociology/Social Work
Minor in Sociology (129)
No double counting of minor courses
Program Notes: 
Total Minor Credits=21
This minor is available on the following tracks:
Fall-Winter----   YES    
Winter-Spring----   YES    
Spring-Fall----   YES
Take 1 course:
SOC 111 
3
SOC 112 
3
3
Minor Requirements
Take 18 credits:
ANTH 101 
3
PSYCH 350 
3
SOC 111 
3
SOC 112 
3
SOC 120 
3
SOC 204 
4
SOC 205 
3
SOC 206 
3
SOC 230 
3
SOC 300 
3
SOC 311 
3
SOC 323 
3
SOC 330 
3
SOC 340 
3
SOC 355 
3
SOC 357 
3
SOC 360 
3
SOC 370 
3
SOC 383 
3
SOC 400 
3
SOC 420 
3
SOC 440 
3
SOC 450 
3
SOC 451 
3
SOC 460 
3
SOC 462 
3
SOC 490R 
1-3
SW 260 
3
18
Criminology
Take these courses: 
SOC 330 
Criminology 
3
Take 12 credits:
BIO 307 
Wildlife Law and Enforcement 
3
SOC 120 
Introduction to Criminal Justice 
3
SOC 203 
Campus Offi cer Training 
2
SOC 204 
Reserve Offi cer Training 
4
SOC 205 
Criminal Investigations 
3
SOC 206 
Police in America 
3
SOC 298 
Internship in Criminal Justice 
1-4
SOC 355 
Law and Society 
3
SOC 383 
Juvenile Delinquency 
3
SOC 395R 
Direct Study (criminology related) 
1-3
SOC 420 
Drugs and Society 
3
SOC 440 
Corrections 
3
Total Credits 
15
Department of Sociology
Sociology
Take these courses: 
SOC 111 
Introduction to Sociology 
3
SOC 112 
Social Problems 
3
Take 6 credits:
SOC 311 
Family Interaction 
SOC 323 
Race and Ethnic Relations 
3
SOC 360 
Religions Impact on Society 
3
SOC 383 
Juvenile Delinquency 
3
SOC 420 
Drugs and Society 
3
Total Credits 
12
376
Brignam Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
Course Descriptions  
Credits*
ANTH 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology  
(3.0:3:0)
Anthropological approaches and perspectives on humans, their culture and their society; 
early and prehistoric humans. Basic concepts for analyzing cultural behavior. Comparison 
on non-Western with Western societies.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology  
(3.0:3:0)
This course focuses on the social and cultural foundations of human life. Its basic 
concepts enable the students to appreciate the degree to which they and others are 
molded and shaped by society and to understand the complexity of the social forces in 
their environment.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 112 Social Problems  
(3.0:3:0)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with current social problems and suggests 
possible means of prevention and/or solution.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 120 Introduction to Criminal Justice  
(3.0:3:0)
The philosophy and history of criminal justice, the overview of criminal justice system, 
organization and functions of law enforcement, courts, probation, pardon and parole, and 
analysis of causes of crime. Survey of professional career opportunities and qualifi cations 
required.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 203 Campus Offi cer Training  
(2.0:2:0)
This course provides students with a basic understanding of essential job duties and func-
tions of campus offi cers. The course is outlined by the International Association of Campus 
Law Enforcement Administrators. A certifi cate of completion is issued.
(Winter
SOC 204 Reserve Offi cer Training 
(4.0:3:2)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into Reserve Acadamy
This course is to give credit to students taking the Reserve Academy as a requirement for 
employment with Campus Police.
(Winter, Spring)
SOC 205 Criminal Investigations  
(3.0:3:0)
Techniques and practices of criminal investigation, scientifi c crime detection, interview 
and interrogation techniques, laws of arrest, search and seizure, crime scene search and 
evidence collection and preservations.
(Fall, Winter, Spring odd years)
SOC 206 Police in American Society  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Intro to Criminology is suggested.
Role of Law Enforcement in our society. Analysis of police organizations procedures, 
practices and legal mandates.
(Fall, Winter,Spring even years)
SOC 230 Foundations of Sociology  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Soc 111 or Soc 112
This course is designed to introduce students to the sociology major and provide them 
professional preparation for continuing scholarship and careers. Research, career 
opportunities, graduate school, vitas, senior research seminar and internships will be 
addressed.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 298 Internship in Criminal Justice  
(1.0-4.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
To provide students with exposure to the world of work in an active justice agency.
(On demand)
SOC 300 Sociological Theory  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Soc 230
Survey and appraisal of major schools of sociological thought at present, with an exami-
nation of areas of change and controversy emphasizing recent signifi cant sociological 
contributions.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 311 Family Interaction  
(3.0:3:0)
In this course we will seek to better understand the different ideologies about family 
and how they shape and are shaped by historical, cultural, and societal contexts. We will 
discuss the diverstiy of family arrangements in American society, the stresses faced by 
families and the social policies that shape family life.
SOC 323 Race and Ethnic Relations  
(3.0:3:0)
This course considers historic as well as present-day relationships of racial and ethnic 
groups. The students analyze prejudices and discriminatory practices, their causes and 
in uences.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 330 Criminology  
(3.0:3:0)
A study of crime and its causation with an overview of the crime problem from a theoreti-
cal approach.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 340 Research Methods  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor, Math 221, Soc 340
This class will provide you with the methodological tools used by sociologists to under-
stand individuals, groups and societies. We will start by reviewing the process of social 
scientifi c inquiry and the role of theory. Then we will focus on how social scientists design 
studies and collect data. Finally, we will begin to explore some ways in which data can be 
analyzed. Each student will have the opportunity to apply what you learn as you create a 
research plan and collect some data of your own as part of your research project assign-
ment. This experience should confi rm the usefulness of the principles covered throughout 
the course and will allow you to see fi rst-hand how the scientifi c method can be used to 
learn about your own sociological questions of interest.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 355 LAW AND SOCIETY  
(3.0:3:0)
This course explores the relationship between the government and citizens, and the role 
of law and civil rights.
(Fall, Winter, Spring even years)
SOC 357 Human Relations and Leadership  
(3.0:3:0)
The basic knowledge and skills necessary to lead and participate effectively in organi-
zational and social settings. Leadership skills are enhanced through understanding self, 
interpersonal relations, families, various levels of social strata and organizations. Students 
are expected to participate in various classroom experiences.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 360 Religion’s Impact on Society  
(3.0:3:0)
A mounting body of research showing that religion is playing a signifi cant role in society 
has forced researchers to more seriously consider the impact of religion on politics, eco-
nomics, family life and deviance, among other things. Contemporary events, such as 9/11, 
the Israeli-Arab con ict and the culture wars, are all helping to drive the re-emerging 
sociology of religion fi eld. In this class we will read and discuss different sociological 
perspectives related to the sociology of religion. We will explore the validity of seculariza-
tion theory and examine why people believe in religious things. We will also consider what 
impact religion has on individual and social life and the dynamics of religious groups and 
markets.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 370 Social Stratifi cation  
(3.0:3:0)
A sociological approach to the dilemma of power, economic and status differentiations in 
American society.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 383 Juvenile Delinquency 
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Soc 111 or Soc 112 recommended
The nature, extent, causes, treatment and prevention of delinquency as well as the adjudi-
cation process will be considered. Social causes and solutions are emphasized.
(Winter, Fall, Spring)
SOC 395R Direct Study  
(1.0-3.0:0:0)
Develop further understanding of special interest topics in sociology. Sociological topic 
chosen by student and approved by instructor.
(Upon request)
Sociology/Social Work
377
Brignam Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
SOC 400 Sociological Analysis  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: FDMat 223 and Soc 340.
Sociologists are interested in identifying and understanding patterns in society. Unfor-
tunately, most of the patterns of interest to sociologists are impossible to verify through 
simplistic personal observations. Consequently, in order to better understand society, 
sociologists use various methods of data collection, which often involve large samples 
of certain populations. Once collected, these datasets can be analyzed in a number of 
different ways which tell us useful things about the populations we are curious about. The 
primary focus of this course will be to help you understand and apply certain quantitative 
tools that sociologists regularly use to identify, verify and interpret specifi c patterns 
among individuals, groups and societies. You will also have the opportunity to see 
fi rst-hand how the statistical analysis can be used to learn about your own sociological 
questions of interest.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 420 Drugs and Society  
(3.0:3:0)
This course explores the place drugs have in American Society. It includes society’s use 
of and attitude toward drugs as it explores the history of drugs. The power and in uence 
of drugs, the acceptance and rejection of drugs, an understanding of the classifi cation of 
drugs, legal responses and treatment programs for drug abuse are also addressed.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 440 Corrections  
(3.0:3:0)
An overview of the role of corrections in our justice system and critical analysis of con-
temporary correctional theory and practice. Historical, traditional, innovative, and future 
aspects of corrections, as well as critical issues such as prisoners’ rights, death penalty, 
unions, and institutions and correctional careers will be discussed.
(Fall, Winter, Spring odd years)
SOC 450 Social Inequalities  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Soc 300
An examination of social inequality in the United States and comparisons to other 
countries. Focus on the sources of consequences of inequality for both individuals and 
social institutions.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 451 Self and Society  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Soc 111
This course is designed to explore the social bases of self-concept and defi nition. The 
social nature of the SELF is key to self-understanding and adoption to the social world of 
which we are all ultimately a part. The imprint of socialization, e.g. the process whereby 
individuals learn and internalize their attitudes, values, and behaviors to function as 
social beings and responsive participating members of society, ensures that the individual 
will develop an identity, or self.
(Fall, Winter, Spring even years)
SOC 460 Community Studies  
(3.0:3:0)
The changing nature of social life as it has moved from predominantly rural to urban 
patterns. Signifi cant events that have led to urbanization.
(Spring)
SOC 462 Sociology of Death and Dying  
(3.0:3:0)
Examine phenomena related to death and dying, utilizing the sociological perspective.
(Fall & Winter Odd years, Spring even years)
SOC 490R Special Topics in Sociology  
(1.0-3.0:3:0)
The department will determine special areas of study that will benefi t the Sociology stu-
dents in giving them additional preparation related to the fi eld. Term of enrollment, credit 
and other details will be arranged by the department and the instructor.
(Upon request)
Soc 495 Senior Thesis 
(2.0:1:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. Should be a fi rst or second semester senior majoring in 
Sociology
Soc 497 Sociology Senior Internship Seminar 
(2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: Soc 300, Soc 340
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SOC 498R Senior Internship in Sociology  
(1.0-4.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Should be a fi rst or second semester senior majoring in 
Sociology.
This course will give students work experience in areas of sociology and criminology.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SW 260 Introduction to Social Work  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: none
Social welfare as a social institution and the emergence of social work as a profession. 
An overview of historical underpinnings to develop social work knowledge, historically 
grounded purposes, and fundamental values and ethics for generalist practice.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SW 311 Family Interaction  
(3.0:3:0)
This course explores the dynamics of family life with the use of multiple theoretical 
perspectives. It also investigates the impact that environmental and developmental 
factors have on families over time. Assessment of family functioning as well as social work 
intervention strategies are covered.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SW 340 Social Work Research Methods  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor, Math 221
Qualitative and quantitative research designs. Problems formulation, data collection, 
statistical analysis, writing and presenting results. Knowledge is used to assess and apply 
qualitative, empirical-related research and technology to social work generalist practice. 
Practical uses for research to inform policy, promote social change, improve clinical work, 
and enhance program delivery.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SW 362 Social Work Practice 1-Individuals  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Admission to Social Work program
To introduce, explore and blend knowledge, values, ethics and skills used by social work-
ers. Social work practice using the generalist method i.e. relationship identifying issues, 
problems, resources, assessment, intervention, evaluation and termination with a diverse 
client population.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SW 364 Social Work Practice II Group  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Admission to program
The basic knowledge and skills necessary to lead and participate effectively in small 
groups. Students will participate in small group experiences.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SW 365 Social Work Practice III-Community/Macro  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Admission to program
This class prepares students with knowledge, values, skills, and ethics for macro level 
generalist social work practice. Topics include community, bureaucracy, social planning, 
social action and locality organization development.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SW 367 Human Behavior in Social Environment  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Admission to Social Work program
This course introduces social work’s perspective on human behavior and the social 
environment. A social system’s approach is used to focus on the bio-psycho-social context 
of human development. Relationships between life-span issues and the understanding of 
person/environment transactions and use of the generalist social work method with indi-
viduals, families, groups, organizations, communities, culture and society are all areas of 
study. Discussion of empirical theories and knowledge about the interaction between and 
among systems. The ways in which social systems promote or deter people in maintaining 
or achieving health and well-being is explored.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SW 400 Social Work Values & Ethics  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Admission to Social Work program
An overview of values and principles of ethical decision making for social workers using 
the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics as a backdrop. Students will 
have the opportunity to become aware of personal values, the values of the social work 
profession and to discuss various ethical dilemmas and their effect on agencies, clients 
and social work practice. Students will learn that social work values and ethics are woven 
into the fabric of generalist social work pratice with all populations.
(Fall, Winter)
Sociology/Social Work
378
Brignam Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
* Credit Description (Credit Hours : Lecture Hours per week : Lab Hours per week)
SW 463 Child Welfare Services 
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Admission to Social Work program
This course is planned and organized to acquaint students with the role of the generalist 
social work practitioner in the fi eld of child welfare. An overview of public and private 
programs that provide services to children is provided. These services include counseling, 
adoptions, foster care, residential care, school-based services, home-based services, 
court services and daycare services. Also addressed are social problems that impact 
children, particularly those who are disadvantaged because of disability, racism, sexism 
and poverty.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SW 464 Intervention Diverse Clients  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Admission to Social Work program
This class is to develop competency for generalist social work practice with diverse 
clients. This includes improving self-awareness, gaining knowledge of racial/ethnic groups, 
and conducting multi-level social work practice based on client cultural reality.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SW 465 Social Work in Community Mental Health  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Admission to Social Work program, Psych 342 recommended
This course studies the bio-psycho-social aspects of emotional maladjustments. The his-
tory of community mental health will be studied as well as various aspects of assessment, 
social causations, treatments and preventions of mental illness. Using the generalist 
social work method the role of the baccalaureate social worker in community and behav-
ioral mental health is explored.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SW 466 Social Welfare Policy  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Admission to Social Work program
Develop an understanding of the history of social work and social welfare services and 
the role of policy delivery in social work practice. The student will understand the role of 
policy in service delivery and practice and attainment of individual and social well-being. 
Develop knowledge and skills to understand and analyze organizational, local, state, na-
tional and international issues in social welfare policy and social service delivery. Develop 
skills to use policy practice to in uence, formulate and advocate for policy consistent with 
social work values.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SW 470 Populations at Risk  
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: Admission to Social Work program
This course is an overview of special populations at risk. Distributive justice, global inter-
connections to oppression and human civil rights will be explored. The role of the social 
worker in risk assessments, obtaining resources, interventions and evaluations of these 
special populations will be defi ned. Populations include, but are not limited to, children, 
single parent families, developmental disabilities, mental illness, poverty, minority groups, 
gender, juvenile delinquency, the homeless, sexual orientation and the elderly.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SW 490R Special Topics  
(1.0-3.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
The Department will determine special areas of study that will benefi t social work stu-
dents in giving them additional preparation related to the fi eld. Term of enrollment, credit 
and other details will be arranged by the Department and the Instructor.
(On demand)
SW 497R Social Work Senior Internship Seminar  
(2.0:2:0)
Prerequisite: SW 362, SW 364, SW 365, SW 367, SW 400
The goal is to integrate academic knowledge with actual experience (empirical and prac-
tice based knowledge). This experience will help the student to reinforce identifi cation 
with the purposes, values and ethics of the social work profession, promote professional 
competence and focus on generalist social work education. Students will be evaluated on 
the basis of consistency with program objectives.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
SW 498R Senior Internship SW  
(3.0:0:0)
Prerequisite: SW 362, SW 364, SW 365, SW 367, SW 400
Supervised fi eld experience in a social service agency. Supervision by a social worker. 
Experience and intervention to apply knowledge, values and practice skills in actual social 
work settings. 
Sociology/Social Work
373
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
Department of
Teacher Education
Van Christman, Department Chair 
David Allen, Joyce Anderson, Barbara Baiamonte, Dean Cloward, 
Jillisa Cranmer, Lary Duque, Lynda Hawkes, Deanna Hovey, 
Dana Johnson, Jo Anne Kay, Ralph Kern, David Magleby, Marcia 
McManus, Thomas Morley, Lorie Rawlings, Matt Sellers, Kevin 
Stanger, Chris Wilson 
Jolynn Reed, Secretary (208) 496-1348 
For Education Advising Contact: 
Education Advising Center 
http://www.byui.edu/teachered/Advising
Phone 208-496-2926 
edadvising@byui.edu 
Introduction 
Infl uencing people’s lives for the better is one of the satisfactions 
of teaching. Education, above all other professions, allows you to 
share yourself with others as you help them grow, learn, mature, and 
identify that which will have a lasting impact for good throughout 
their lives. As President McKay taught “No greater responsibility can 
rest upon any man [or woman], than to be a teacher of God’s children” 
(in Conference Report, Oct. 1916, 57). The department believes in 
programs that integrate theory and best practice. They are rigor-
ous academic programs with a strong theoretical knowledge base 
and extensive practical experience in public schools. The Teacher 
Education Department offers degrees in Early Childhood/Special 
Education and Elementary Education. Core classes are also offered 
in secondary education, but the majors are housed in content areas 
across campus. See http://www.byui.edu/teachered for recom-
mended sequence of courses in each area. 
Early Childhood/Special Education
Early Childhood/Special Education prepares students to work with 
typically developing and/or children with special needs from birth 
through age eight. Students who successfully complete this program 
will be eligible to apply for the Blended Early Childhood Education/
Early Childhood Special Education Idaho Teaching License, which 
allows them to teach general or special education classes in kinder-
garten through third grade. Students may also choose to work with 
young children and their families in home, agency, and preschool 
settings. Applied coursework and fi eldwork involving children in a va-
riety of settings will prepare students for successful career experiences. 
Students will demonstrate knowledge, understanding and applica-
tion of skills during three different supervised intervention/teaching 
experiences: (1) infants and toddlers in home or agency settings, (2) 
preschoolers in private or public preschools, and (3) kindergarten 
through third grade children in public schools. 
ECSE Major Requirements 
• Students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA in major courses for 
program continuation. 
•Students must earn a C- or better in all major courses. 
•Students must take the following exams: 
1. 
Idaho Comprehensive Literacy Exams (there are 3) 
2.  
Praxis II Exams (0021 and 0690) 
• Students must complete a Professional Portfolio which will include 
entries from all course areas included in major requirements. 
Elementary Education
Elementary Education prepares students for teaching children 
through a series of classes designed to give students the practical 
knowledge they need to be successful in their careers. Students suc-
cessfully completing the program will be eligible to apply for a K-8 
Idaho Education Teaching License. 
Elementary Education Major Requirements 
• Students must maintain a 2.75 cumulative GPA in major courses 
for continuation in the program 
•Students must earn a C- or better in all major courses. 
•Students must take the following exams: 
1. 
Idaho Comprehensive Literacy Exams (there are 3) 
2. 
Praxis II Exams (0014 and 0522) 
Secondary Education
Secondary Education serves many other campus departments that 
offer secondary teaching majors and minors, by offering a series of 
classes designed to prepare students to be successful in the secondary 
public school setting. Secondary education is not a major. Students 
interested in pursuing secondary certifi cation will select a teaching 
major and teaching minor or enroll in one of the available composite 
programs. Students successfully completing a secondary education 
program will be eligible to apply for the grade 6-12 Idaho Education 
Teaching License. 
Secondary Education Core Requirements 
• Students must earn a C- or better in all secondary education core 
courses. 
• Students must take the following exams: 
1. 
Praxis II Content Area Exams for major and minor areas of  
study. 
Teacher Education
374
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2008-2009
SECONDARY EDUCATION MAJORS 
Agriculture Education Composite: See the Agronomy & Ag Busi-
ness section of this catalog 
Art Education: See the Art section of this catalog 
Art Education Composite: See the Art section of this catalog 
Biology Education: See the Biology section of this catalog 
Biology Education Composite: See the Biology section of this 
catalog 
Chemistry Education: See the Chemistry section of this catalog 
Earth Science Education: See the Geology section of this catalog 
English Education: See the English section of this catalog 
English Education Composite: See the English section of this 
catalog 
Family & Consumer Sci. Ed. Composite: See the Home & Family 
Ed. section of this catalog 
History Education: See the History section of this catalog 
Mathematics Education: See the Mathematics section of this catalog 
Music Education Composite: See the Music section of this catalog
Physics Education: See the Physics section of this catalog 
Social Studies Education Composite: See the History section of 
this catalog 
Spanish Education: See the Foreign Language section of this 
catalog 
Theatre & Speech Education: See the Theatre section of this 
catalog 
SECONDARY EDUCATION MINORS 
American Government Education: See the Political Science section 
of this catalog 
Art Education: See the Art section of this catalog 
Biology Education: See the Biology section of this catalog 
Chemistry Education: See the Chemistry section of this catalog 
Chinese Education: See the Foreign Language section of this 
catalog 
Earth Science Education: See the Geology section of this catalog
Economics Education: See the Economics section of this catalog 
English Education: See the English section of this catalog 
French Education: See the Foreign Language section of this catalog 
Geography Education: See the Geography section of this catalog 
German Education: See the Foreign Language section of this 
catalog 
Health Education: See the Health Science section of this catalog
History Education: See the History section of this catalog 
Journalism Education: See the Communication section of this 
catalog 
Mathematics Education: See the Mathematics section of this catalog 
Music Education-Band: See the Music section of this catalog 
Music Education-Choral: See the Music section of this catalog 
Music Education-Orchestra: See the Music section of this catalog 
Natural Science Education: See the Geology section of this catalog 
Physical Science Education: See the Physics section of this catalog 
Physics Education: See the Physics section of this catalog 
Russian Education: See the Foreign Language section of this 
catalog 
Spanish Education: See the Foreign Language section of this 
catalog 
TESOL Education: See the Foreign Language section of this 
catalog
Theatre and Speech Education: See the Theatre section of this 
catalog 
Teacher Education
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested