display pdf in wpf c# : Save pdf rotate pages application SDK tool html winforms azure online 40501_catalog%202009-2010%20bookmarks4-part489

44
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Cultural Awareness
All students will take the American Foundations course to obtain 
a fi rm understanding of those things that defi ne America and the 
American experience.  Following that, students will be able to choose 
from 2 different options.  
The fi rst option includes taking a 3 credit Humanities course and a 2 
credit International Foundations course.  The second option includes 
2 integrated, multi-disciplinary courses that focus on the history of 
the world by focusing on different civilizations and societies.
The following courses will meet the Cultural Awareness Foundation 
requirements:
All students will take the American Foundations Course:
FDAMF  101 American Foundations  
(3.0:3:0)
Fullfi lls Foundation requirement. 
Fundamental principles of the American constitution, the strengths of the free-market 
economy, and historical events that have shaped America’s political and economic 
heritage.
(Every semester)
Students will choose from the following Humanities 
Courses:
FDHUM 101 The Heroic Journey 
(3.0:3:0)
Fullfi lls Foundation requirement. 
The individual’s heroic journey through creation, fall and redemption, as represented in 
art, literature, music, architecture, and drama.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDHUM 102 Transitions in Art and Culture 
(3.0:3:0)
Fullfi lls Foundation requirement. 
By looking at the relationship between the world of nature and the world of human 
creations, this course explores humanistic values in visual and literary art in a cultural/
political context. Explores themes of fall and redemption, classical and romantic, the 
machine and the garden. 
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDHUM 103 Art and Propaganda in the 20th Century 
(3.0:3:0)
Fullfi lls Foundation requirement. 
This course will focus on the use of propaganda and other forms of persuasive argument 
in the arts during the 20th Century. Students will experience this topic through the various 
cultural in uences including the visual, performing, and literary arts. Emphasizes the 
development of aesthetic judgment.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDHUM 104 Homer to Tolkein: Quests in the Arts 
(3.0:3:0)
Fullfi lls Foundation requirement. 
This course will focus on art works that imaginatively explore the “quest myth.” Students 
will learn about the archetypal structure of the quest and its heroic and spiritual dimen-
sions. Participants will encounter the quest myth through various cultural expressions 
including visual, performing, and literary arts. Emphasizes the development of educated 
aesthetic judgments.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
AND
Students will choose from the following International 
Foundations Courses:
FDINT 201 Global Hotspot: Pakistan at the Crossroads of Con ict  (2.0:2:0)
Fullfi lls Foundation requirement. 
Prerequisite: FDAMF 101
Few countries in the world are more strategically critical yet less understood than 
Pakistan.  This young country in an ancient land lies at the crossroads of history, religion, 
language, and culture.  On the front-line in the war against terror, this nuclear power is in 
the midst of political turmoil whose outcome will have great implications for the rest of 
the world.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDINT 202 The Developing World 
(2.0:2:0)
Fullfi lls Foundation requirement. 
Prerequisite: FDAMF 101
This two-credit interdisciplinary course will address the challenges to modernization faced 
by developing nations in an increasingly globalizing world.  Emphasis will be given to 
studyng and analyzing issues such as geography and natural resources, history, culture, 
economic policies, poverty, education, politics, government, environmental sustainability, 
and other issues related to a basic understanding of the complexities of the vast majority 
of the world’s population.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDINT 203 The Middle East 
(2.0:2:0)
Fullfi lls Foundation requirement. 
Prerequisite: FDAMF 101
Students will explore the con icts in the Middle East through the tools of geography, 
economics, political science, sociology, religion, and historical analysis.  Students will gain 
 more balanced view of the con ict by understanding it from multiple perspectives.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
OR
Students will take the following World Foundation Courses:
FDWLD 101 World Foundations I 
(2.0:2:0)
The fi rst half of a two-course sequence that examines great world civilizations through 
literature, art, music, philosophy, and history.
This course is part of a two-course sequence. Taking BOTH World Foundations 101 and 
World Foundations 102 completely satisfi es the Cultural Foundations requirement.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FDWLD 201 World Foundations II 
(3.0:3:0)
Prerequisite: FDWLD 101
The second half of a two-course sequence that examines great world civilizations through 
literature, art, music, philosophy, and history.
This course is part of a two-course sequence. Taking BOTH World Foundations 101 and 
World Foundations 102 completely satisfi es the Cultural Foundations requirement.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
Connections
The fi nal course of each students Foundations experience will be the 
Capstone course.  This course will pull together items from each of 
their Foundation courses in a culminating experience that will help 
students to exercise analytical thinking and moral judgements in case 
studies.  
All students will take the Connections Foundations Course:
FDCNC 250 Foundations Capstone: Analytical Thinking and Moral Judgment  
(3.0:3:0)
Fullfi lls Foundation requirement. 
In this course students will learn how to make diffi cult decisions well.  They will apply 
analytical thinking and moral judgment to problems with no easy solutions.  Students 
will learn to identify important factors to consider, understand and articulate opposing 
viewpoints, analyze factual claims for accuracy, spot logical weaknesses in arguments, 
anticipate consequences of possible solutions, and think strategically.  They will also 
discover how writing and preparing to present substantive positions can further sharpen 
their analytical skills.
(Fall, Winter, Spring)
FOUNDATIONS
Save pdf rotate pages - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf rotate just one page; how to rotate all pages in pdf
Save pdf rotate pages - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pdf page by page; rotate pdf pages and save
45
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
First Semester
Take these courses:
FDENG 101  Writing and Reasoning Foundations 
3
FDSCI 101 
Science Foundations 
2
Take 1 course:
FDREL 121 
Book of Mormon 
2
FDREL 122 
Book of Mormon 
2
Take 1 of the Quantitative Reasoning courses: 
(please refer to the test out information for courses other than FDMAT 108):
FDMAT 108*  Mathematical Tools for the Real World 
3
FDMAT 109  Precalculus 
5
FDMAT 110  College Algebra 
3
FDMAT 112  Calculus I 
4
FDMAT 221  Business Statistics 
3
FDMAT 222  Biostatistics 
3
FDMAT 223  Social Science Statistics 
3
FDMAT 224  Intermediate Statistics 
3
Total Foundation Credits for your First Semester 
10
Second Semester
Take 1 courses:
FDAMF 101  American Foundations 
3
Take 1 courses:
FDREL 121 
Book of Mormon 
2
FDREL 122 
Book of Mormon 
2
Take 1 course: 
(students must take a total of  5 credits of Issues in the Sciences):
FDSCI 200 
Energy Issues and Alternatives 
3
FDSCI 201 
Natural Disasters: Man and the Dynamic Earth 
3
FDSCI 202 
Issues in Global Climate Change 
2
FDSCI 203 
Environmental Stewardship 
2
FDSCI 204 
The American Epidemic: Diabetes and 
Cardio-vascular Disease 
3
FDSCI 205 
Understanding DNA and Related Health Issues 
and Technologies 
3
FDSCI 206 
Light & sound: The Science of Vision 
and Hearing 
3
FDSCI 207 
Origins of the Universe, Earth and Life 
3
Total Foundation Credits for your Second Semester  7-8
Recommended Sequence for Foundation Courses:
As new students prepare to register for their fi rst semester at BYU–Idaho, it is helpful for them to consider the following recommended sequence 
for their schedule.  If students will follow this sequence they will be able to get the most out of their time and make sure that all of the required 
courses are completed in a timely manner. Please note, this sequence may vary depending on students declared major.  Please see the applicable 
Satellite Advising Center for class planning details.
Third Semester
Take these courses:
FDREL 200 
Family Foundations 
2
FDCOM 101  Professional Communication 
2
Take 1 course:
FDHUM 101  The Herioc Journey 
3
FDHUM 102  Transitions in Art and Culture 
3
FDHUM 103  Art and Propaganda in the 20th Century 
3
FDHUM 104  Homer to Tolkein: Quests in the Arts 
3
OR
FDWLD 101  World Foundations I 
2
Take 1 course: 
(students must take a total of  5 credits of Issues in the Sciences):
FDSCI 200 
Energy Issues and Alternatives 
3
FDSCI 201 
Natural Disasters: Man and the Dynamic Earth 
3
FDSCI 202 
Issues in Global Climate Change 
2
FDSCI 203 
Environmental Stewardship 
2
FDSCI 204 
The American Epidemic: Diabetes and 
Cardio-vascular Disease 
3
FDSCI 205 
Understanding DNA and Related Health Issues 
and Technologies 
3
FDSCI 206 
Light & sound: The Science of Vision and Hearing  3
FDSCI 207 
Origins of the Universe, Earth and Life 
3
Total Foundation Credits for your Third Semester 
9-10
Fourth Semester
Take 1 course:
FDINT 201 
Global Hotspot: Pakistan at the Crossroads
of Confl ict 
2
FDINT 202 
The Developing World 
2
FDINT 203 
World Ideaologies in Confl ict 
2
OR
FDWLD 201  World Foundations II 
3
Take 1 course:
FDREL 211 
New Testament 
3
FDREL 301 
Old Testament 
3
FDREL 301H  Old Testament - Biblical Hebrew 1 
3
FDREL 302 
Old Testament 
3
FDREL 302H  Old Testament - Biblical Hebrew 2 
3
FDREL 324 
Doctrine and Covenants 
3
Total Foundation Credits for your Fourth Semester  5-6
Connections
Take this course:
FDCNC 250  Foundations Capstone: Analytical 
Thinking and Moral Judgment 
3
Associate Degree Students should complete this course their 4th semester.
Bachelor Degree Students should complete this course their 5th semester.
Other Semesters
Take a minimum of 5 additional Eternal Truths credits, 3 of which must 
be scripture based.
FOUNDATIONS
It is recommended that the following sequence of courses be fol-
lowed to ensure that Foundations requirements are fulfi lled in a 
timely manner.  
Please be aware that this is only a “recommended” sequence.  Stu-
dents should plan their schedule in a manner that best suits their de-
clared major and individual needs, however the student is ultimately 
responsible to make sure that all requirements are completed.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a range of pages from a PDF document.
rotate individual pages in pdf; how to rotate all pages in pdf
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.DeletePage(2); // Save the file. doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. How
pdf rotate page and save; rotate pdf page few degrees
46
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
FOUNDATIONS
14 Credits
ts
8 Credits
7 Credits
8 Credits
Family Foundations
Reading & Writing
Scientific Foundations
American Foundations
Take this course
e
:
Take this course
e
:
Take this course
e
:
Take this course
e
:
FDREL 200
2
FDENG 101
3
FDSCI 101
2
FDAMF 101
3
Take 2 Credit
t
s
Book of Mormon
FDREL 100
2
Quantitative Reasoning
Issues in the Sciences
Take these courses
s
:
FDREL 130
2
Take one course
e
:
Take five credits
s
:
FDREL 121
2
FDREL 215
2
FDMAT 108
3
FDSCI 200
3
Option 1: 
Option 2: 
FDREL 122
2
FDREL 234
2
FDMAT 109
5
FDSCI 201
3
FDREL 235
2
FDMAT 110
3
FDSCI 202
2
Humanities
World Foundations
s
OR
FDREL 261
2
FDMAT 112
4
FDSCI 203
2
Take one course
e
:
Take these courses
s
:
Take this course
e
:
FDREL 264
2
FDMAT 221
3
FDSCI 204
3
FDHUM 101
3
FDWLD 101
2
Foundations Requirements - Bachelors Degree
AND
(Other Religion Courses)
Choose 1 option
:
Eternal Truths
Academic Fundamentals
Science
Cultural Awareness
FDREL 221
4
FDREL 333
2
FDMAT 222
3
FDSCI 205
3
FDHUM 102
3
FDWLD 201
3
FDREL 341
2
FDMAT 223
3
FDSCI 206
3
FDHUM 103
3
FDREL 342
3
FDMAT 224
3
FDSCI 207
3
FDHUM 104
3
FDREL 351
2
Take two courses
s
:
FDREL 352
2
Take one course
e
:
FDREL 211
3
FDREL 360
4
FDINT 100
2
FDREL 301
3
FDREL 370
2
Take one course
e
:
FDINT 101
2
FDREL 301H
3
FDREL 431
2
FDCOM 201
2
FDINT 102
2
FDREL 302
3
FDREL 471
3
FDREL 302H
3
FDREL 475
2
FDREL 324
3
3 Credits
FDCNC 250
3
40 credits
(Scripture Based Courses)
AND
Professional Communication
Connections
Analytical Thinking and 
Moral Judgment in…
AND
8 Credits
ts
8 Credits
7 Credits
8 Credits
Family Foundations
Reading & Writing
Scientific Foundations
American Foundations
Take this course
e
:
Take this course
e
:
Take this course
e
:
Take this course
e
:
FDREL 200
2
FDENG 101
3
FDSCI 101
2
FDAMF 101
3
Take 2 Credit
t
s
Book of Mormon
FDREL 100
2
Quantitative Reasoning
Issues in the Sciences
Take these courses
s
:
FDREL 130
2
Take one course
e
:
Take five credits
s
:
FDREL 121
2
FDREL 211
3
FDMAT 108
3
FDSCI 200
3
Option 1: 
Option 2: 
FDREL 122
2
FDREL 215
2
FDMAT 109
5
FDSCI 201
3
FDREL 234
2
FDMAT 110
3
FDSCI 202
2
Humanities
World Foundations
s
OR
FDREL 235
2
FDMAT 112
4
FDSCI 203
2
Take one course
e
:
Take these courses
s
:
Take this course
e
:
FDREL 261
2
FDMAT 221
3
FDSCI 204
3
FDHUM 101
3
FDWLD 101
2
FDREL 221
4
FDREL 264
2
FDMAT 222
3
FDSCI 205
3
FDHUM 102
3
FDWLD 201
3
Foundations Requirements - Associate's Degree
AND
Eternal Truths
Academic Fundamentals
Science
Cultural Awareness
(Other Religion Courses)
Choose 1 option
:
FDREL 221
4
FDREL 264
2
FDMAT 222
3
FDSCI 205
3
FDHUM 102
3
FDWLD 201
3
FDREL 301
3
FDMAT 223
3
FDSCI 206
3
FDHUM 103
3
FDREL 301H
3
FDMAT 224
3
FDSCI 207
3
FDHUM 104
3
FDREL 302
3
FDREL 302H
3
Take one course
e
:
FDREL 324
3
FDINT 100
2
FDREL 333
2
Take one course
e
:
FDINT 101
2
FDREL 341
2
FDCOM 201
2
FDINT 102
2
FDREL 342
3
FDREL 351
2
FDREL 352
2
3 Credits
FDREL 360
4
FDREL 370
2
FDREL 431
2
FDREL 471
3
FDCNC 250
3
FDREL 475
2
AND
Professional Communication
Analytical Thinking and 
Moral Judgment in…
34 credits
Connections
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page doc2.Save(outPutFilePath Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using
pdf page order reverse; pdf rotate one page
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract PDF pages and save changes to original PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET.
rotate all pages in pdf file; rotate all pages in pdf and save
47
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
8 Credits
ts
8 Credits
3 Credits
Family Foundations
Take one course
e
:
Reading & Writing
Take this course
e
:
FDREL 100
2
Take this course
e
:
FDREL 200
2
FDREL 130
2
FDENG
3
FDCNC 250
3
FDREL 211
3
3
Book of Mormon
FDREL 215
2
Quantitative Reasoning
Take these courses
s
:
FDREL 234
2
Take one course
e
:
FDREL 121
2
FDREL 235
2
FDMAT 108
3
FDREL 122
2
FDREL 261
2
FDMAT 109
5
FDREL 264
2
FDMAT 110
3
OR
FDREL 301
3
FDMAT 112
4
Take this course
e
:
FDREL 301H
3
FDMAT 121
3
Foundations Requirements - AAS Requirements
AND
Analytical Thinking and 
Moral Judgment in…
Eternal Truths
Academic Fundamentals
Connections
FDREL 221
4
FDREL 302
3
FDREL 302H
3
FDREL 324
3
FDREL 333
2
Take one course
e
:
FDREL 341
2
FDCOM 201
2
FDREL 342
3
FDREL 351
2
FDREL 352
2
FDREL 360
4
FDREL 370
2
FDREL 431
2
FDREL 471
3
FDREL 475
2
19 credits
Professional Communication
FOUNDATIONS
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
outPutFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document doc2.Save(outPutFilePath
how to rotate a pdf page in reader; permanently rotate pdf pages
How to C#: Rotate Image according to Specified angle
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB Steps to Rotate image. Save the rotated image to an image file on the disk
how to rotate one pdf page; rotate all pages in pdf preview
48
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Religion Requirements
The Religion requirements for students beginning their education at Brigham Young–University  Idaho are as follows:
•Beginning Fall 2001–required to meet the Book of Mormon requirement;
•Beginning Fall 2003–required to meet the scripture-based requirement listed below;
•Beginning Fall 2008–required to take the Family Foundations course, FDREL 200, as well as the above requirements.
There is no degree, major, minor, or cluster offered in Religious Education.  To earn any degree offered by the University, the Religion Course 
requirements listed below must be completed.
BACHELOR DEGREE: Fourteen (14) credit hours of religion at BYU–Idaho must include:
4 credits of Book of Mormon (121 and 122) OR 4 credits of Missionary Book of Mormon (221);
2 credits Family Foundations (200);
6 scripture-based credits which inlcude the following 3-credit options: New Testament (211), Old Testament (301 or 302), Doctrine and Cov-
enants (324).  (Pearl of Great Price is incorporated into other scripture courses);
2 credits of your choice from any courses offered for religion credit.
TotalTransfer
ofCredits
Religionhours
totakeatBYU
Idaho
RequiredSubjectMatter:*IfthesubjectmatterhasbeentakenatanInstituteorotherChurchschoolyoumay
completethecreditrequirementbysubstitutingothercoursesofferedinReligiousEducationatBYUIdahountil14
creditsareearned.
014.9
14
4creditsFDREL121&122(or221);2creditsFDREL200;6creditsfromNT,OT,D&C,and2religioncreditsofyour
choice
1529.9
12
4creditsFDREL121&122(or221);2creditsFDREL200;6creditsfromNT,OT,D&C
3044.9
10
4creditsFDREL121&122(or221);2creditsFDREL200;4religioncreditsofyourchoice
4559.9
8
4creditsFDREL121&122(or221);2creditsFDREL200;2religioncreditsofyourchoice
6074.9
6
4creditsFDREL121&122(or221);2creditsFDREL200
7589.9
4
4creditsFDREL121&122(or221)and2creditsFDREL200.IfBookofMormonsubjectrequirementiscompleted,
takeFDREL200and2religioncreditsofyourchoice
90ormore
24
4creditsFDREL121&122(or221)and2creditsFDREL200.IfBookofMormonsubjectrequirementiscompleted,
takeFDREL200and2religioncreditsofyourchoice
ASSOCIATE DEGREE: Eight (8) credit hours or four courses of religion are required, which must include:
4 credits Book of Mormon (121 and 122 OR 4 credits of Missionary Book of Mormon (221);
2 credits Family Foundation (200)
2 or more credits of your choice from any courses offered for religion credit.
Religion Requirements
TotalTransfer
ofCredits
Religionhours
totakeatBYU
Idaho
RequiredSubjectMatter:*IfthesubjectmatterhasbeentakenatanInstituteorotherChurchschoolyoumay
completethecreditrequirementbysubstitutingothercoursesofferedinReligiousEducationatBYUIdahountil14
creditsareearned.
014.9
8
4creditsFDREL121&122(or221);2creditsFDREL200;2ormorereligioncreditsofyourchoice
1529.9
6
4creditsFDREL121&122(or221);2creditsFDREL200;2ormorereligioncreditsofyourchoice
3044.9
4
4creditsFDREL121&122(or221)and2creditsFDREL200.IfBookofMormonsubjectrequirementiscompleted,
takeFDREL200and2religioncreditsofyourchoice
4559.9
2
4creditsFDREL121&122(or221)and2creditsFDREL200.IfBookofMormonsubjectrequirementiscompleted,
takeFDREL200and2religioncreditsofyourchoice
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
example, you may easily create, load, combine, and split PDF file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s
how to rotate a single page in a pdf document; pdf rotate single page reader
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
rotate pdf page and save; pdf expert rotate page
49
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Transfer of Credit from other Universities and Institutes of Religion:  Religion credit earned at C.E.S. Institutes of Religion or other 
Church schools will transfer* as elective credit when the following conditinons are met: (1) a letter grade is given; (2) the earned letter grade 
appears on the BYU–Idaho transcript.
Students completing courses at the BYU Jerusalem Center or Nauvoo may receive up to 6 earned credits in religion which will count toward the 
BYU–Idaho religion requirement.  
*Be aware that too many transferred elective credits could jeopardize the total credits allowed for registration (140 maximum).
Second Religion Class:  A student who wishes to take two religion classes in a given term may attempt to do so after the fi rst day of the class IF 
there is available seating and they have obtained clearance to do so from the Religion Department Chairman.  A student should then meet with 
the instructor of that class and complete their registration.
Attendance: Each instructor may establish criteria for giving credit, but generally, lack of attendance would affect a student’s grade detrimentally 
and could result in no credit for the class, thus requiring the student to retake the class.
Waivers:  Should a student be denied a graduation diploma from BYU–Idaho because the religion credit was not completed and reasons for the 
non-completion were beyond the control of the student, an appeal may be submitted for review.
For clarifi cion and/or application for a waiver, see the Chair of the Department of Religious Education.  Make the appointment with Gloria 
Bradshaw, Offi ce Manager, at (208) 496-1430.
Religion Requirements
51
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Academic Policies
“Education is the power to think 
clearly, to act well in the world’s 
work and the power to appreci-
ate life.”
Brigham Young
52
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
ACADEMIC POLICIES 
Student Records and Registration Offi ce
The Student Records and Registration Offi ce processes all student re-
cords after the Admissions Offi ce has admitted the student.  Registra-
tion, graduation, transcript requests, and the handling and dispersing 
of all forms that affect student academic records are processed by the 
Student Records and Registration Offi ce. 
Full-Time Student Status 
Students must be registered for 12 credit hours per semester to be 
considered full-time.  However, some benefi ts may require more than 
12 credits.  The full-time equivalency for Block registration is 6 credit 
hours.
Credit Requirements for Benefi ts and Activities
To be eligible for various benefi ts and activities, students must be 
enrolled in the hours indicated.
•  14 semester credits (and a 3.7 GPA): BYU–Idaho scholar-
ships
•   12 semester credits: full Veterans’ benefi ts, full Pell Grants, 
selected loans and grants, campus employment, athletic 
competition, Social Security benefi ts, running for student 
government offi ces or fulfi lling major appointive offi ces in 
student government, health insurance coverage, interna-
tional students, Stafford Student Loans, and PLUS loans
•   9.5 semester credits: student activity privileges and student  
voting
Attendance and Absence from Class
Students are responsible for class attendance. No absences, whether 
approved by the University for participation in University-sponsored 
activities or necessitated by sickness or other personal emergencies, 
are “excused” in the sense that the student is relieved from class work 
assigned during the absence. To ensure continuity, students must 
make up missed work. In most cases, repeated absences will result in 
a lower grade or failure.
Exceptions to University Policy
Students wishing to appeal any BYU–Idaho academic policy must 
submit a petition to the Academic Exceptions Committee through 
the Student Records and Registration Offi ce. These situations may 
include dropping classes or withdrawing from school after pub-
lished deadlines. Only BYU–Idaho policies can be appealed; federal 
guidelines and/or requirements cannot be appealed through this 
committee.
GPA Requirements for Extracurricular Activities
Students must be making satisfactory academic progress (2.0 GPA) to 
represent the school in extracurricular activities.
Credits Earned
Credits may be earned and recorded at BYU–Idaho in accordance 
with the following provisions:
1.  In residence - Consists of attendance in regular school 
classes or extension classes in established residence centers 
for which a passing grade is received.
2.  In non-residence - Consists of correspondence or extension 
work in non-residence centers. Total residence and non-
residence hours may not exceed a normal level.
Electronic Devices in the Classroom
The BYU–Idaho Learning Model envisions students who have come 
to class prepared to share ideas, rather than merely receive them.  
Learning occurs through discussion in which each student listens 
carefully to the comments of others and seeks the opportunity to add, 
as inspired, to what is being said.  Participating in such a discussion 
requires careful attention–as though one were with a friend, one-on-
one.  
In order to promote such a learning environment, the University re-
quires, as general policy, that electronic devices be turned off during 
class time.  These devices include laptop computers, cell phones and 
all other electronic devices.
Instructors may, for the sake of achieving special learning objectives 
or to meet individual student needs, authorize the use of specifi c elec-
tronic devices in their classrooms.  However, it is recommended that 
the use of laptops for note-taking not be allowed except for occa-
sional lectures.  In the Learning Model environment, thinking about 
what is being said in the classroom and seeking the opportunity to 
add a comment is more important that transcribing the discussion.  
Impressions that come in class can be noted by hand.  When class 
is over, students will fi nd that their handwritten notes, along with 
ideas brought to remembrance by the Spirit, will allow them to write 
detailed refl ections.  Those refl ections will be richer because of the 
student’s active participation in the class discussion.
Academic Honesty
BYU–Idaho students should seek to be totally honest in all their 
dealings. They should complete their own work and be evaluated for 
that work. They should avoid academic dishonesty and misconduct 
in all its forms, including but not limited to plagiarism, fabrication or 
falsifi cation, cheating, and other academic misconduct.
Academic Dishonesty
Intentional plagiarism is the deliberate act of representing the words, 
ideas, or data of another as one’s own without providing proper 
attribution to the original author through quotation, reference, or 
footnote.
Inadvertent plagiarism involves the inappropriate, but nondeliberate, 
use of another’s words, ideas, or data without proper attribution. 
Although not a violation of the Honor Code, it is a form of academic 
misconduct for which an instructor can impose appropriate academic 
sanctions. Students who are in doubt as to whether they are provid-
ing proper attribution have the responsibility to consult with their 
instructor and obtain guidance.
Plagiarism may occur with respect to unpublished as well as published 
material. Examples include:
•  Direct Plagiarism. The verbatim copying of an original 
source without acknowledging the source.
•  Paraphrased Plagiarism. The paraphrasing of ideas, without  
attribution, from another, causing a reader to mistake these 
ideas for the writer’s own.
•  Plagiarism Mosaic. The borrowing of words, ideas, or data 
from an original source and blending this original mate-
rial with one’s own writing, without acknowledging the 
source.
•  Insuffi cient Acknowledgment. The partial or incomplete 
attribution of words, ideas, or data from an original source.
Academic Policies
53
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
Fabrication or falsifi cation is a form of dishonesty where a student 
invents or distorts the origin or content of information used as au-
thority. Examples include:
•  Citing a source that does not exist.
•  Citing information from a source that is not included in 
the source for which credit is given.
•  Citing a source for a secondary proposition that it does not 
support.
•  Citing a bibliography source when it was neither consulted 
nor cited in the body of the paper.
•  Intentionally distorting the meaning or applicability of 
data.
•  Inventing data or statistical results to support conclusions.
Cheating is a form of dishonesty where a student attempts to give 
the appearance of a level of knowledge or skill that has not been 
obtained. Examples include:
•  Copying from another person’s work during an examina-
tion or while completing an assignment.
•  Allowing someone to copy from your work during an 
examination or while completing an assignment.
•  Using unauthorized materials during an examination or 
while completing an assignment.
•  Collaborating on an examination or assignment without 
authorization.
•  Taking an examination or completing an assignment for 
another, or permitting another to take an examination or 
to complete an assignment for you.
Other academic misconduct includes other academically dishonest, 
deceitful, or inappropriate acts which are intentionally committed. 
Examples include but are not limited to:
•  Inappropriately providing or receiving information or 
academic work so as to gain unfair advantage over others.
•  Planning with another to commit any act of academic 
dishonesty.
•   Attempting to gain an unfair academic advantage for one-
self or another by bribery or by any act of offering, giving, 
receiving, or soliciting anything of value to another for 
such purpose.
•  Changing or altering grades or other offi cial educational 
records.
•  Obtaining or providing to another a test or answers to a 
test that has not been administered.
•  Breaking and entering into a building or offi ce for the 
purpose of obtaining unauthorized materials.
•  Continuing work on an examination or assignment after 
the allocated time has elapsed.
•  Submitting the same work for more than one class without 
disclosure and approval.
•  Getting equal credit on group assignments when equal 
work was not done.
Procedures for Handling Academic Dishonesty
Instructors are responsible to establish and communicate to students 
their expectations of behavior with respect to academic honesty and 
the student’s conduct in the course. The instructor will be responsi-
ble to investigate any incident of academic dishonesty or misconduct, 
determine the circumstances, and take appropriate action. Examples 
include but are not limited to the following:
•  Reprimanding the student orally or in writing.
•  Requiring work affected by the academic dishonesty to be 
redone.
•  Administering a lower or failing grade on the affected as-
signment, test, or course.
•  Working with the Student Honor Offi ce to remove the 
student from the course.
•  Recommending to the Student Honor Offi ce that the 
student be put on probation or dismissed.
If the incident involves the violation of a public law, e.g., breaking 
and entering into an offi ce or stealing an examination, the act should 
be reported to Campus Police.
For the purpose of tracking, suspected or proven violations of the 
Academic Honesty Policy should be reported to the Student Honor 
Offi ce, detailing the name, incident, and action taken. If the oc-
currence is suffi ciently egregious, or if a pattern of dishonesty or 
misconduct is discovered, additional action may be taken on behalf of 
the University based upon the nature of the infraction. (See Student 
Handbook in Section VII.)
If an affected student disagrees with the determination or action 
and is unable to resolve the matter to the mutual satisfaction of the 
student and the instructor, he or she may have it reviewed through 
the University’s grievance process. (See Student Academic Grievance 
Policy.)
Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment is defi ned as any unwelcome conduct of a sexual 
nature. Sexual harassment may include unwelcome sexual advances, 
requests for sexual favors and other verbal, non-verbal, or physical 
conduct of a sexual nature. Sexual harassment of a student may deny 
or limit, on the basis of gender, the student’s ability to participate in 
or receive benefi ts, services, or opportunities in University programs. 
BYU–Idaho’s policy against sexual harassment extends not only to 
employees of the University but to students as well. If you encounter 
sexual harassment or gender-based discrimination, or if you need 
assistance or information related to allegations of sexual harass-
ment, contact the Student Honor Offi ce, Kimball 270, or call (208) 
496-1120.
Academic Policies
54
Brigham Young University–Idaho 2009-2010
CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT RECORDS
Notifi cation of Rights under FERPA
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords 
students certain rights with respect to their education records. These 
rights include:
1.  The right to inspect and review the student’s education 
records within forty-fi ve days after the University receives a 
request for access. Students should submit to the registrar, 
dean, head of the academic department, or other appropri-
ate offi cial, written requests that identify the record(s) they 
wish to inspect. The University offi cial will make arrange-
ments for access and notify the student of the time and 
place where the records may be inspected. If the records 
are not maintained by the University offi cial to whom the 
request was submitted, that offi cial shall advise the student 
of the correct offi cial to whom the request should be ad-
dressed.
2.  The right to request amending those education records 
that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading.  Stu-
dents may ask the University to amend a record that they 
believe is inaccurate or misleading. (This does not apply to 
grade changes.) They should write the University offi cial 
responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the 
record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate 
or misleading. If the University decides not to amend the 
record as requested by the student, the University will 
notify the student of the decision and advise the student 
of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for 
amendment.  Additional information regarding the hearing 
procedures will be provided to the student when notifi ed 
of the right to a hearing.
3.  The right to consent to disclosure of personally identifi -
able information contained in the student’s education 
records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes 
disclosure without consent.  One exception which permits 
disclosure without consent is disclosure to school offi cials 
with legitimate educational interests.  A school offi cial is a 
person employed by the University in an  administrative, 
supervisory, academic, research, or support staff  position 
(including law enforcement unit personnel and health 
staff); a person or company with whom the University 
has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection 
agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a stu-
dent serving on an offi cial committee, such as a disciplinary 
or grievance committee, or assisting another school offi cial 
in performing his or her tasks. A school offi cial has a legiti-
mate educational interest if the offi cial needs to review an 
education record in order to fulfi ll his or her professional 
responsibility.
4.  The right to fi le a complaint with the U.S. Department of 
Education concerning alleged failures by State University 
to comply with the requirements of FERPA. To fi le a com-
plaint, write to:
Family Policy Compliance Offi ce
U.S. Department of Education
600 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20202-4605
5.  The following information is considered directory informa-
tion and may be made public:
* Student name
* Home and local address
* Telephone numbers
* E-mail addresses
* Dates of attendance (current and past)
* Major fi eld of study
* Degrees and awards received
* Participation in offi cially recognized activities and  
sports, including height and weight
* Previous educational institutions attended
* Religious affi liation to local church or congregation
* Current class schedule
* Photograph
* Number of months/semesters enrolled
* Class standing (freshman, sophomore, etc.)
* Total hours earned
* Enrollment status (full-time, part-time, less than  
half time)
* Anticipated future enrollments
* Course registrations prior to the beginning of a  
semester/term
* Expected date of graduation
* Deferred registration eligibility
6.  Students have the right to block the release of their public 
directory information by completing a “Request to With-
hold Directory Information” form at the Student Records 
and Registration Offi ce. For complete confi dentiality, this 
form must be completed within the fi rst ten days of each 
semester or term. Students may also modify the display of 
the public directory information.
7.  Parents or guardians of students claimed as dependents 
on the most recently submitted Federal Income Tax form 
may have grade reports forwarded to them pursuant to 
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. 
Parents of dependent children under the above-described 
defi nition must submit a Certifi cate of Dependence Form 
in order to receive grade reports. No grade report will be 
sent to a parent or guardian without proper submission of 
this form. The Student Records and Registration Offi ce 
will be responsible for informing all parents (of dependent 
children) of the option to have grade reports sent to them. 
The Student Records and Registration Offi ce will record 
Certifi cate of Dependence forms and send grade reports as 
requested.
Married students or students 21 years of age or older are considered 
as independent by the Student Records and Registration Offi ce.  Un-
married students or those under the age of 21, who are not claimed 
as dependents by their parents or guardians on the most recent 
Federal Income Tax form, must submit an Affi davit of Independent 
Status to be considered independent. These forms are available at the 
Student Records and Registration Offi ce or online at www.byui.edu/
srr/forms.
Students may also waive the Certifi cate of Dependence Form by 
completing the Waiver of Independence Form. Completion of this 
form authorizes parental access to student grades regardless of the 
dependency status of a student.
Academic Policies
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested