display pdf in wpf c# : Reverse pdf page order online software application dll winforms windows web page web forms 0234461096-Excel%20Hacks%20Tips%20and%20Tools%20for%20Streamlining%20Your%20Spreadsheets%2020075-part55

28 | Chapter1, Reducing Workbook and Worksheet Frustration
#8
Limit the Scrolling Range of Your Worksheet
HACK
Although you will not see a visible clue, such as the moat of the first
method, you won’t be able to scroll or select anything outside the specified
area.
Figure 1-12. Project Explorer Properties window
Reverse pdf page order online - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate one pdf page; change orientation of pdf page
Reverse pdf page order online - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pages in pdf; rotate pdf pages in reader
Limit the Scrolling Range of Your Worksheet #8
Chapter 1, Reducing Workbook and Worksheet Frustration | 29
HACK
Any macro that tries to select a range outside this scroll area
(including selections of entire rows and columns) will no
longer be able to do so. This is true particularly for recorded
macros, as they often use selections.
If your macros do select a range outside the scrollable area, you can easily
modify any existing macros so that they are not limited to a specific scroll
area while operating. Simply select View
Macros under Macro options, or
Developer
Macros under Code options, or Alt/Option-F8 (pre-2007,
Tools
Macro
Macros…), then locate your macro name, select it, and
click Edit.
Place the following line of code as the very first line of code:
ActiveSheet.ScrollArea = ""
As the very last line of code in your macro, place the following:
ActiveSheet.ScrollArea = "$A$1:$G$50"
So, your code should look something like this:
Sub MyMacro()
'
' MyMacro Macro
' Macro recorded 19/9/2007 by OzGrid.com
'
'
ActiveSheet.ScrollArea = ""
Range("Z100").Select
Selection.Font.Bold = True
ActiveSheet.ScrollArea = "$A$1:$G$50"
Sheets("Daily Budget").Select
ActiveSheet.ScrollArea = ""
Range ("T500").Select
Selection.Font.Bold = False
ActiveSheet.ScrollArea = "$A$1:$H$25"
End Sub
Our recorded macro selects cell Z100 and formats it to boldface. It then
selects the worksheet named Daily Budget, selects cell T500 on that sheet,
and un-bolds it. We added
ActiveSheet.ScrollArea = ""
so that any cell on
the worksheet can be selected and then the scroll area can be set back to our
desired range. When we select another worksheet (
Daily Budget
), we again
allowthe code to select any cell on this worksheet and set the scroll area for
this worksheet back to the desired range.
C# PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
online C# code solutions for sorting PDF page order in multiple to move, sort and reorder all PDF page in preview. Support to reverse page order in PDF document.
rotate pdf page; pdf reverse page order online
VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Support to reverse page order in adobe PDF document in both .NET Enable move, sort and reorder PDF page in preview. Provide online Visual Basic .NET source code.
how to rotate all pages in pdf; rotate pages in pdf expert
30 | Chapter1, Reducing Workbook and Worksheet Frustration
#9
Lock and Protect Cells Containing Formulas
HACK
Activating Only the Used Range
Athird method, the most flexible, automatically limits the scroll area to the
used range on the worksheet within which you place the code. To use this
method, right-click the Sheet Name tab on which you want the scroll area
limited, select View Code, and enter the following code:
Private Sub Worksheet_Activate()
Me.ScrollArea = Range(Me.UsedRange, Me.UsedRange(2,2)).Address
End Sub
Nowpress Alt/
c
-Q or click the X in the top righthand corner to get back to
Excel and save your workbook.
The preceding macro will run automatically each time you activate the
worksheet in which you placed it. However, you might encounter a prob-
lem with this macro when you need to actually enter data outside the exist-
ing used range. To avoid this problem, simply use a standard macro that will
reset your scroll area back to the full sheet. Select Developer
Visual Basic
under Code options (pre-2007, Tools
Macro
Visual Basic Editor), then
select Insert
Module, and enter the following code:
Sub ResetScrollArea()
ActiveSheet.ScrollArea = ""
End Sub
Nowpress Alt/
c
-Q or click the X in the top-righthand corner to get back to
Excel and save your workbook.
If you want to, you can make your macro easier to run by assigning it to a
shortcut key. Select the viewtab, then Macros, or press Alt/Option-F8 (pre-
2007, Tools
Macro
Macros…). Select
ResetScrollArea
(the name of
your macro), click Options, and assign a shortcut key.
Each time you need to add data outside the established bounds of your
worksheet, run the
ResetScrollArea
macro to readjust the borders. After you
run the macro, make any changes you were unable to make while the scroll
area was limited. When you’re finished, activate any other worksheet and
then activate the worksheet you just modified. Activation of the worksheet
will cause the code to run and limit the scroll area to the desired range.
H A C K
#9
Lock and Protect Cells Containing Formulas
Hack #9
You may want to let users change cells that contain data without providing
them access to change formulas. You can keep cells containing formulas
under lock and key without having to protect your entire sheet or workbook.
When we create a spreadsheet, most of us need to use formulas of some
sort. Sometimes, however, you might not want other users to tamper/delete/
overtype any formulas you included on your spreadsheet. The easiest and
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
document pages in original or reverse order within entire C# Class Code to Print Certain Page(s) of powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf rotate single page and save; rotate individual pages in pdf
Lock and Protect Cells Containing Formulas #9
Chapter 1, Reducing Workbook and Worksheet Frustration | 31
HACK
most common way of barring people from playing with your formulas is to
protect your worksheet. However, protecting your worksheet doesn’t just
prevent users from tampering with your formulas; it also stops users from
entering anything at all. Sometimes you do not want to go this far. Three
solutions are: locking the formula cells, using data-validation on the for-
mula cells, and auto-toggling worksheet protection, although none of these
solutions is bulletproof.
Locking Formula Cells
By default, all cells on a worksheet are locked; however, this has no effect
unless worksheet protection has been applied. Here is a very easy way to
apply worksheet protection so that only formula cells are locked and
protected.
Select all cells on your worksheet, either by pressing Ctrl/
c
-A or by clicking
the square at the intersecting point of column A and row1. Then select
Home
Format
Lock Cell (under Cells options, toggles to Lock/unlock
cells), or if you prefer you can right-click and select Format Cells and on the
Protection tab, uncheck the Locked checkbox to remove the tick (pre-2007,
select Format
Cells
Protection and uncheck the Locked checkbox to
remove the tick). Click OK.
Nowselect any single cell, select Home
Find & Select
Go To Special or
Ctrl-G, or F5 and click Special (pre-2007, Edit
Go To…
Special). You’ll
see a dialog box such as that inFigure1-13.
Figure 1-13. The Go To Special dialog
32 | Chapter1, Reducing Workbook and Worksheet Frustration
#9
Lock and Protect Cells Containing Formulas
HACK
Select Formulas from the Go To Special dialog and, if needed, limit the for-
mulas to the subtypes underneath. Click OK. With only the formula cells
selected, under Cells options choose Format
Lock Cell (pre-2007, select
Format
Cells
Protection, check the Locked checkbox to insert a tick),
and click OK.
Nowyou need to protect your sheet. Select Format
Protect sheet under
the Cells options (pre-2007, Tools
Protection
Protect Worksheet).
Apply a password if required and click OK.
The preceding method certainly saves a lot of time and eliminates possible
errors locating formulas so that you can protect them. Unfortunately, it can
also prevent users from using certain features, such as sorting, formatting
changes, aligning text, and many others you might not be concerned with,
even when in an unlocked cell.
Data Validation
Using data validation doesn’t rely on worksheet protection at all, and
instead simply prevents accidental overtyping of formula cells.
Data validation is far from bulletproof when it comes to pre-
venting users from entering nonvalidated data into cells.
Users can still paste into a validated cell any data they want
and, in doing so, remove the validation from that cell unless
the copied cell also contains data validation, in which case
this validation would override the original validation.
To see what we mean, select any single cell, press Ctrl-G or select Home
Find & Select
Go to Special, or press F5 and click Special (pre-2007, Edit
Go To…
Special). Nowselect Formulas from the Go To Special dialog
and, if needed, limit the formulas to the subtypes underneath. Click OK.
With only the Formula cells selected, select Data
Data Validation, under
Data Tools options (pre-2007, Data
Validation). Then, select the Settings
page tab, choose Custom from the Allow: box, and in the Formula box,
enter
=""
, as shown inFigure1-14. Click OK.
This method will prevent a user from accidentally overtyping into any for-
mula cells, although, as stressed in the earlier warning, it is not a fully secure
method and should be used only for accidental overtyping, etc. However,
the big advantage to using this method is that all of Excel’s features are still
usable on the worksheet.
Lock and Protect Cells Containing Formulas #9
Chapter 1, Reducing Workbook and Worksheet Frustration | 33
HACK
Auto-Toggle Worksheet Protection
This method dynamically turns worksheet protection on and off, but will
also enable you to use all of Excel’s features when you are in a cell that is not
locked. To start, ensure that only the cells you want protected are locked
and that all other cells are unlocked. Right-click the Sheet Name tab, select
View Code from the pop-up menu, and enter the following code:
Private Sub Worksheet_SelectionChange(ByVal Target As Range)
If Target.Locked = True Then
Me.Protect Password:="Secret"
Else
Me.Unprotect Password:="Secret"
End If
End Sub
If no password is used, omit
Password:="Secret"
. If a password is used,
change the word
Secret
to your password. Press Alt/
c
-Q or click the X in
the top-righthand corner to get back to Excel and save your workbook.
If you’re worried about your users getting into the macro
and disabling it, you can password-protect your macro by
selecting Tools
VBAProject Properties, going to the Pro-
tection tab, selecting “Lock Project for Viewing”, and enter-
ing a password.
Now, each time you select a cell that is locked, your worksheet will auto-
matically protect itself. The moment you select any cell that is not locked,
your worksheet will unprotect itself.
Figure 1-14. Validation formulas
34 | Chapter1, Reducing Workbook and Worksheet Frustration
#10
Find Duplicate Data Using Conditional Formatting
HACK
This hack doesn’t work perfectly, though it usually works
well enough. The keyword used in the code,
Target
, will
refer only to the cell that is active at the time of selection. For
this reason, it is important to note that if a user selects a
range of cells (with the active cell being an unlocked cell), it
is possible for him to delete the entire selection because the
target cell is unlocked and, therefore, the worksheet will
automatically unprotect itself.
H A C K
#10
Find Duplicate Data Using Conditional Formatting
Hack #10
Excel’s conditional formatting is generally used to identifyvalues in particular
ranges, but we can hack it to identify duplicated data within a list or table.
The improved functionality in Conditional Formatting in Excel 2007 makes
this hack suitable for prior versions only.
People frequently have to identify duplicated data within a list or table, and
doing this manually can be very time-consuming and error-prone. To make
this job much easier, you can hack one of Excel’s standard features, Condi-
tional Formatting.
Take, for example, a table of data with a range of $A$1:$H$100. Select the
top-left cell, A1, and drag it over and down to H100. It is important that A1
be the active cell in your selection, so don’t drag from H100 to A1. Select
Format
Conditional Formatting... and, in the Conditional Formatting dia-
log box, select Formula Is from the top-left pop-up menu. In the field to its
right, enter the following code:
=COUNTIF($A$1:$H$100,A1)>1
Click the Format tab (that’s the Format button under Mac OS X), followed
by the Patterns tab, and select a color you want applied to visually identify
duplicate data. Click OK to return to the Conditional Formatting dialog box
and click OK again to apply the formatting.
All those cells containing duplicate data should be lit up like a Christmas
tree in the color you chose, making it much easier to eyeball duplicate data
and delete, move, or alter it as appropriate.
It is vital to note that as A1 was the active cell in your selection, the cell
address is a relative reference and is not absolute (unlike your table of data,
$A$1:$H$100). By using conditional formatting in this way, Excel automati-
cally knows to use the correct cell as the
COUNTIF
criterion. By this we mean
that the conditional formatting formula in cell A1 will read as follows:
=COUNTIF($A$1:$H$100,A1)>1
Find Data That Appears Two or More Times Using Conditional Formatting
#11
Chapter 1, Reducing Workbook and Worksheet Frustration | 35
HACK
while in cell A2, it will read:
=COUNTIF($A$1:$H$100,A2)>1
in cell A3, it will read:
=COUNTIF($A$1:$H$100,A3)>1
and so forth.
H A C K
#11
Find Data That Appears Two or More Times Using
Conditional Formatting
Hack #11
While Excel’s Conditional Formatting is vastly improved in Excel 2007 and
can easily take care of duplicated data, it still does not offer the facility to
identify data that appears two or more times.
If you need to identify data that appears two or more times, you can use
Conditional Formatting with as many conditions/rules as your system mem-
ory will allow (note that you can use up to three different conditions only in
versions pre-2007) and color-code each condition for visual identification.
To do this, select cell A1 (the cell in the top-left corner) and drag it down to
H100. Again, it is important that A1 is the active cell in your selection.
Now, select Home
Conditional Formatting
NewRule under Styles
options. For Select Rule Type, choose “Use a Formula to determine which
cells to format” and then click in the white strip under “Format values
where this formula is true.”
Pre-2007, select Format
Conditional Formatting… and,
from the box containing the text Cell Value Is, select For-
mula Is. Click in the white box to the right of Formula Is.
Enter the following formula:
=COUNTIF($A$1:$H$100,A1)>3
Click the Format button, select a color you want to apply to identify data
that appears more than three times, and click OK; or for pre-2007 versions,
go to the Patterns page tab, select a color, and click OK.
Click NewRule (on the Mac, click Add>>) and repeat the previous steps,
entering the following formula (pre-2007, use the Condition 2 box and
select Formula Is) and selecting a different color this time:
=COUNTIF($A$1:$H$100,A1)=3
36 | Chapter1, Reducing Workbook and Worksheet Frustration
#12
Tie Custom Toolbars to a Particular Workbook
HACK
Instead of retyping the formula, highlight it after you have
entered it, then press Ctrl/
c
-C to copy, then paste where
necessary by pressing Ctrl/
c
-V to paste, and then change
>3
to
=3
.
Click NewRule, repeat the steps a third time (pre-2007, from the Condition
3 box, select Formula Is), and add the following formula:
=COUNTIF($A$1:$H$100,A1)=2
Again, select a different color from those previously chosen. You will have
different cell colors depending on the number of times your data appears
within your table of data.
Again, it is vital to note that as A1 was the active cell in your selection, the
cell address is a relative reference and is not absolute (unlike your table of
data, $A$1:$H$100). By using conditional formatting in this way, Excel
automatically knows to use the correct cell as the
COUNTIF
criterion.
In Excel 2007, your Conditions are limited only by your sys-
tem memory, whereas in pre-Excel 2007 versions, the limit is
3 Conditions.
H A C K
#12
Tie Custom Toolbars to a Particular Workbook
Hack #12
Although most toolbars you build apply to just about any work you do,
sometimes the functionalityof a custom toolbar applies to only one workbook
in particular. With this hack, you can tie custom toolbars to their respective
workbooks. The Quick Access Toolbar options in Excel 2007 make this hack
suitable for prior versions only.
If you’ve ever created a custom toolbar, you have no doubt noticed that the
toolbar is loaded and visible regardless of which workbook you have open.
What if your custom toolbar contains recorded macros meant only for a spe-
cific workbook? It’s probably best to tie special-purpose custom toolbars to
the appropriate workbooks to reduce both clutter and possible confusion.
You can do this by inserting some very simple code into the private module
of the workbook.
To get to this private module, right-click the Excel icon, which you’ll find at
the top left of your screen, next to File, and select View Code.
Tie Custom Toolbars to a Particular Workbook
#12
Chapter 1, Reducing Workbook and Worksheet Frustration | 37
HACK
This shortcut isn’t available on the Mac. You’ll have to open
the Visual Basic Editor (VBE) by pressing Option-F11 or by
selecting Tools
Macro
Visual Basic Editor. Once you’re
there, Ctrl-click or right-click This Workbook in the Projects
window.
Then, enter this code:
Private Sub Workbook_Activate()
On Error Resume Next
With Application.CommandBars("MyCustomToolbar")
.Enabled = True
.Visible = True
End With
On Error GoTo 0
End Sub
Private Sub Workbook_Deactivate()
On Error Resume Next
Application.CommandBars("MyCustomToolbar").Enabled = False
On Error GoTo 0
End Sub
Change the text
MyCustomToolbar
to the name of your own custom toolbar. To
get back to the Excel interface, close the module window or press Alt/
c
-Q,
then save your workbook. Whenever you open or activate another work-
book, your custom toolbar disappears and isn’t accessible. Reactivate the
appropriate workbook, and poof! The toolbar’s back.
You even can take this down a level, making the custom toolbar available
only to a specific worksheet within the workbook. Right-click the Sheet
Name tab of the sheet on which you want the toolbar to be accessible and
select View Code. Enter this code:
Private Sub Worksheet_Deactivate()
On Error Resume Next
Application.CommandBars("MyCustomToolbar").Enabled = False
On Error GoTo 0
End Sub
Private Sub Worksheet_Activate()
On Error Resume Next
With Application.CommandBars("MyCustomToolbar")
.Enabled = True
.Visible = True
End With
On Error GoTo 0
End Sub
Now press Alt/
c
-Q or close the window to get back to Excel.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested