If you know that Sheet1 is the active sheet, you can simplify the reference even
more:
Range(“”A1””)
Objects have properties.
A property can be thought of as a setting for an object. For example, a Range
object has properties such as Value and Name. A Chart object has properties such
as HasTitle and ChartType. You can use VBA to determine object properties and
also to change them.
You refer to properties by combining the object with the property, separated by
a period.
For example, you can refer to the value in cell A1 on Sheet1 as
Worksheets(“”Sheet1”).Range(“”A1”).Value
You can assign values to VBA variables.
Think of a variable as a name that you can use to store a particular value.
To assign the value in cell A1 on Sheet1 to a variable called Interest, use the fol-
lowing VBA statement:
Interest = Worksheets(“Sheet1”).Range(“A1”).Value
You can also assign a variable’s value to a cell.
To assign a variable called Interest to cell A1 on Sheet1, use the following VBA
statement:
Worksheets(“Sheet1”).Range(“A1”).Value = Interest
Objects have methods.
A method is an action that is performed with the object. For example, one of the
methods for a Range object is ClearContents. This method clears the contents of
the range.
You specify methods by combining the object with the method, separated by a
period.
For example, to clear the contents of cell A1 on the active worksheet, use this:
Range(“A1”).ClearContents
VBA also includes all the constructs of modern programming languages,
including arrays, looping, and so on.
Believe it or not, this summary pretty much describes VBA. Now it’s just a matter
of learning some details.
Chapter 13: Introducing VBA
379
Pdf save rotated pages - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf rotate pages separately; how to reverse pages in pdf
Pdf save rotated pages - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate single page in pdf file; how to rotate one page in a pdf file
Introducing the Visual Basic Editor
Before you can begin working with VBA, you need to become familiar with the
Visual Basic Editor, or VB Editor for short. The VB Editor enables you to work with
VBA modules, which are containers for your VBA code.
380
Part III: Using VBA with Charts
What You Can Do with VBA
VBA is an extremely rich programming language with thousands of uses. The following
are just a few things that you can do with VBA macros:
 Insert a text string or formula.If you frequently need to enter your com-
pany name into worksheets, you can create a macro to do the typing for you.
The AutoCorrect feature can also do this.
 Automate a procedure that you perform frequently.For example, you may
need to create a series of charts to prepare a month-end summary. If the
task is straightforward, you can develop a macro to do it for you.
 Automate repetitive operations.If you need to perform the same action
in 12 different charts, you can record a macro while you perform the task
once—and then let the macro repeat your action on the other charts.
 Create a custom command.For example, you can combine several of Excel’s
menu commands so that they are executed from a single keystroke or from a
single mouse click.
 Create a custom toolbar button.You can customize Excel’s toolbars with
your own buttons to execute macros that you write.
 Create a simplified “front end” for users who don’t know much about
Excel.For example, you can set up a foolproof data entry template.
 Develop a new worksheet function.Although Excel includes a wide assortment
of built-in functions, you can create custom functions that greatly simplify your
formulas.
 Create complete, turnkey, macro-driven applications.Excel macros can 
display custom dialog boxes and add new commands to the menu bar.
 Create custom add-ins for Excel. The JWalk Chart Tools add-in (available
on the companion CD-ROM) is an example of an add-in created with VBA.
VB.NET TIFF: Rotate TIFF Page by Using RaterEdge .NET TIFF
specific formats are: JPEG, PNG, GIF, BMP, PDF, Word (Docx Save the rotated page(s) to new a TIFF Multiple image formats support for saving rotated TIFF page(
how to rotate pdf pages and save; reverse page order pdf
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
VB.NET image rotator control SDK allows developers to save rotated image as are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to rotate all pages in pdf; how to reverse page order in pdf
This chapter assumes that you use Excel 97 or a later version.Previous ver-
sions don’t have a separate VB Editor.
Activating the VB Editor
When you work in Excel, you can switch to the VB Editor by using any of the fol-
lowing techniques:
 Press Alt+F11.
 Select ToolsMacroVisual Basic Editor.
 Click the Visual Basic Editor button, located on the Visual Basic toolbar
(not visible by default).
Figure 13-1 shows the VB Editor. Chances are that your VB Editor window won’t
look exactly like the window shown in the figure. This window is highly customizable.
You can hide windows, change their sizes, “dock” them, rearrange them, and so on.
Figure 13-1: The Visual Basic Editor window
Chapter 13: Introducing VBA
381
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB Tiff page, like sorting and saving the rotated Tiff page 0); page.Rotate(RotateOder.Clockwise90); doc.Save(@"C:\rotate
rotate pdf pages by degrees; rotate one page in pdf reader
How to C#: Rotate Image according to Specified angle
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB.NET OCR, VB.NET Twain, VB Save the rotated image to
save pdf after rotating pages; rotate pages in pdf
The VB Editor components
The VB Editor consists of a number of components. I briefly describe some of the key
components in the following sections. Refer to Figure 13-1 to get your bearings.
MENU BAR
The VB Editor menu bar works like every other menu bar that you’ve encountered.
It contains commands that you use to work with the various components in the VB
Editor. The VB Editor also features shortcut menus. Right-click virtually anything
in a VB Editor window, and you get a shortcut menu of common commands.
TOOLBARS
The standard toolbar, directly under the menu bar by default, is one of six VB
Editor toolbars that are available. VB Editor toolbars work just like those in Excel:
You  can  customize toolbars,  move them around, display other toolbars,  and  so
forth.
PROJECT WINDOW
The Project window displays an expandable list that consists of every workbook
that’s currently open in Excel (including add-ins and hidden workbooks). In the VB
Editor, each workbook is known as a project. I discuss the Project window in more
detail in the section “Using the Project Window.” If the Project window is not visi-
ble, press Ctrl+R.
CODE WINDOW
A code window contains VBA code. Every item in a project has an associated code
window. To view a code window for an object, double-click the object in the Project
window.  Or, select  the item and  click the  View  Code  button  at the  top of the
Explorer window.
For example, to view the code window for the Sheet1 object for a particular
workbook, double-click Sheet1 in the Project window. Unless you’ve added some
VBA code, the code window will be empty. I discuss code windows later in this
chapter (see “Using Code Windows”).
PROPERTIES WINDOW
The Properties window contains a list of all properties for the selected object. Use
this window to examine and change properties. You can use the F4 shortcut key to
display the Properties window. The Properties window is not shown in Figure 13-1.
IMMEDIATE WINDOW
The Immediate window is most useful for executing VBA statements directly, test-
ing statements, and debugging your code. This window may or may not be visible.
If the Immediate window isn’t visible, press Ctrl+G. To close the Immediate window,
click the Close button on its title bar.
382
Part III: Using VBA with Charts
VB.NET Imaging - Data Matrix Plug-in SDK Control
Generated Data Matrix barcode image can be freely rotated, resized and code page.AddImage(image, New PointF(100F, 100F)) docx.Save("C:\\Sample_Barcode.pdf").
pdf rotate page; rotate pages in pdf permanently
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
documents, CSV file and Text file are allowed to be rotated. PowerPoint (.ppt, .pptx) on webpage, Convert CSV to PDF file online Users can save annotations to
how to rotate one page in pdf document; how to rotate a pdf page in reader
Using the Project window
When you work in the VB Editor, each Excel workbook and add-in that’s currently
open is considered a project. You can think of a project as a collection of objects
arranged as an outline. You can expand a project by clicking the plus sign (+) at the
left of the project’s name in the Project window. You contract a project by clicking
the minus sign (–) to the left of a project’s name. Figure 13-2 shows the Project
window with three projects listed (one add-in and two workbooks).
Figure 13-2: A Project window with three projects listed
If  you  try  to  expand  a  project  that  is  protected  with  a  password,  you  are
prompted to enter the password.
Every  project  expands  to  show  at  least  one  “node”  called  “Microsoft  Excel
Objects.” This node expands to show an item for each worksheet and chart sheet in
the  workbook  (each  sheet  is  considered  an  object)  and  another  object  called
ThisWorkbook (which represents the Workbook object). If the project has any VBA
modules, the project listing also shows a Modules node with the modules listed there.
A project may also contain a node called Forms (which contains UserForm objects)
and a node called Class Modules (which contain Class Module objects). This book
doesn’t cover the objects contained in the UserForms node or Class Modules node.
RENAMING A PROJECT
By default, all projects are named VBAProject. In the Project window, the workbook
name appears (in parentheses) next to the project name. For example, a project may
appear as
VBAProject (budget.xls)
You may prefer to change the name of your project to a more descriptive name.
To do so, select the project in the Project window. Make sure that the Properties
window is displayed (press F4 if it’s not displayed) and change the name  from
Chapter 13: Introducing VBA
383
VB.NET Word: VB.NET Code to Rotate Word Page Within .NET Imaging
Here, we can recommend you VB.NET PDF page rotating tutorial and multi any original quality during or after the Word page rotating; Save the rotated Word page
pdf reverse page order online; rotate all pages in pdf and save
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
permanently? A 2: This VB.NET image editor control SDK allows developers process target image file and save edited image as new file.
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; rotate pages in pdf expert
VBAProject to something else. After you make the change, the Project window dis-
plays the new name.
ADDING A NEW VBA MODULE
A new Excel workbook has no VBA modules. To add a VBA module to a project,
select the project’s name in the Project window and choose InsertModule.
RENAMING A MODULE
VBA  modules  have  default  names,  such  as Module1,  Module2,  and  so  on.  To
rename a VBA module, select it in the Project window and then change the Name
property by using the Properties window (a VBA module has only one property—
Name). If the Properties window is not visible, press F4 to display it. Figure 13-3
shows a VBA module that is being renamed ChartMacros.
Figure 13-3: Use the Properties window to change the name of a VBA module.
REMOVING A VBA MODULE
If you want to remove a VBA module from a project, select the module’s name in
the Project window and choose FileRemove xxx, (where xxx is the name of the
module). You are asked whether you want to export the module before removing it.
Exporting a module makes a backup file of the module’s contents. You can import
an exported module into any other project.
Using code windows
Each object in a project has an associated code module, displayed in a code win-
dow. For example, the workbook itself has a code module named ThisWorkbook.
Every worksheet and chart sheet also has a corresponding code module (for exam-
ple, Sheet1 or Chart1). Each code module has its own code window.
384
Part III: Using VBA with Charts
MINIMIZING AND MAXIMIZING WINDOWS
At any given time, the VB Editor may have lots of code windows. Code windows
are much like worksheet windows in Excel. You can minimize  them, maximize
them, hide them, rearrange them, and so on. Most people find that it’s much easier
to maximize the code window that they’re working on. Sometimes, however, you
may want to have two or more code windows visible. For example, you may want
to compare the code in two modules, or copy code from one module to another.
Minimizing a code window gets it out of the way. You also can click the Close
button in a code window’s title bar to close the window completely. To open it
again, just double-click the appropriate object in the Project window.
You can’t close a workbook from the VB Editor. You must reactivate Excel and
close it from there.
STORING VBA CODE
In general, a module can hold three types of code:
Sub procedures: A procedure is a set of instructions that performs some
action. For example, you may have a Sub procedure that combines vari-
ous parts of a workbook into a concise report.
Function procedures: A function is a set of instructions that returns a
single value or an array. You can use Function procedures in worksheet
formulas.
Declarations: A declaration is information about a variable that you pro-
vide to VBA. For example, you can declare the data type for variables that
you plan to use.
A single VBA module can store any number of procedures and declarations.
Entering VBA code
This section describes the various ways of entering VBA code in a code window. For
Function procedures, the code window will always be a VBA module. You can add
code to a VBA module in three ways:
 Use your keyboard to type it.
 Use Excel’s macro-recorder feature to record your actions and convert
them into VBA code.
 Copy the code from another module and paste it into the module that you
are working on.
Chapter 13: Introducing VBA
385
ENTERING CODE MANUALLY
Sometimes the most direct route is the best one. Type the code by using your key-
board. Entering and editing text in a VBA module works just as you expect. You
can select text and copy it, or cut and paste it to another location.
Use the Tab key to indent the lines that logically belong together—for example,
the conditional statements between an If and an End If statement. Indentation isn’t
necessary but makes the code easier to read.
A single instruction in VBA can be as long as you want. For the sake of read-
ability, however, you may want to break a lengthy instruction into two or more
lines. To do so, end the line with a space followed by an underscore character, and
then press Enter and continue the instruction on the following line. The following
code, for example, is a single statement split over three lines.
If IsNumeric(MyCell) Then _
Result = “Number” Else _
Result = “Non-Number”
Notice that I indented the last two lines of this statement. Doing this is optional,
but it helps to clarify the fact that these three lines comprise a single statement.
After you enter an instruction, the VB Editor performs the following actions to
improve readability:
It inserts spaces between operators. If you enter Ans=1+2 (without any
spaces), for example, VBA converts it to
Ans = 1 + 2
The VB Editor adjusts the case of the letters for keywords, properties, and
methods. If you enter the following text:
user=application.username
VBA converts it to
user = Application.UserName
Automatic case adjustment is a handy debugging tool. Get into the habit
of entering VBA code in lowercase. Then, if the VB Editor does not capi-
talize the keywords, it means you have entered something incorrectly.
Because variable names are not case sensitive, the VB Editor adjusts the
names of all variables with the same letters so that their case matches the
case of letters that you most recently typed. For example, if you first spec-
ify a variable as myvalue (all lowercase) and then enter the variable as
MyValue (mixed case), VBA changes all other occurrences of the variable
to MyValue. An exception to this occurs if you declare the variable with
Dim or a similar statement; in this case, the variable name always appears
as it was declared.
386
Part III: Using VBA with Charts
The VB Editor scans the instruction for syntax errors. If it finds an error, it
changes the color of the line and may display a message describing the
problem. You can set various options for the VB Editor in the Options dia-
log box (accessible by selecting ToolsOptions).
As does Excel,the VB Editor has multiple levels of Undo and Redo.Therefore,
if you find that you mistakenly deleted an instruction,you can click the Undo
button (or press Ctrl+Z) repeatedly until the instruction returns.After undo-
ing the action, you can select EditReDo Delete (or click the ReDo Delete
toolbar button) to redo previously undone changes.
USING THE MACRO RECORDER
Another way to get code into a VBA module is to record your actions by using
Excel’s macro recorder. In many cases, you can use the recorded macro as is. More
often, however, you’ll want to edit the recorded macro to make it more useful.
For more information about recording macros,refer to Chapter 15.
COPYING VBA CODE
This section has covered entering code directly and recording your actions to gen-
erate VBA code. The final method of getting code into a VBA module is to copy it
from another module. For example, you may have written a macro for one project
that would also be useful in your current project. Rather than reenter the code, you
can open the workbook, activate the module, and use the normal Clipboard copy-
and-paste procedures to copy it into your current VBA module.
You also can copy VBA code from other sources. For example, you may find a
listing on a Web page or in a newsgroup. In such a case, you can select the text in
your browser (or newsreader), copy it to the Clipboard, and then paste it into a
module.
Saving your project
As with any application, you should save your work frequently while working in
the VB Editor. To do so, use the FileSave command, press Ctrl+S, or click the Save
button on the standard toolbar.
Chapter 13: Introducing VBA
387
When you save your project,you actually save your Excel workbook.By the
same token,if you save your workbook in Excel,you also save the changes
made in the workbook’s VB project.
The VB Editor doesn’t have a FileSave As command. To save your project with
a different name, activate Excel and use Excel’s FileSave As command.
388
Part III: Using VBA with Charts
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested