display pdf in wpf c# : Permanently rotate pdf pages software application dll winforms html azure web forms 68843-part561

Dim MyArray(1 To 10, 1 To 10) As Integer
You can think of the preceding array as occupying a 10 x 10 matrix. To refer to
a specific element in a 2-D array, you need to specify two index numbers. For
example, here’s how you can assign a value to an element in the preceding array:
MyArray(3, 4) = 125
Arrays crop up later in this chapter in the sections that discuss looping.
Using VBA’s Built-In Functions
VBA has a variety of built-in functions that simplify calculations and operations.
Many of VBA’s functions are similar (or identical) to Excel’s worksheet functions.
For example, the VBA function 
UCase
, which converts a string argument to upper-
case, is equivalent to the Excel worksheet function UPPER.
To display a list of VBA functions while writing your code,type VBA followed
by a period (.).The VB Editor displays a drop-down list of all functions.In
addition to functions,the displayed list also includes built-in constants.The
VBA functions are all described in the online help.To view help,just move
the cursor over a function name and press F1.
Here’s a statement that calculates the square root of a variable by using VBA’s
Sqr
function, and then assigns the result to a variable named 
x
.
x = Sqr(MyValue)
You can use many (but not all) of Excel’s worksheet functions in your VBA code.
To use a worksheet function in a VBA statement, just precede the function name
with 
WorksheetFunction
and a dot. The following code demonstrates how to use
Excel’s MEDIAN worksheet function in a VBA statement. 
x = WorksheetFunction.Median(Range(“A1:A10”))
It’s important to understand that you can’t use worksheet functions that have an
equivalent VBA function. For example, VBA can’t access Excel’s SQRT worksheet
function because VBA has its own version of that function: 
Sqr
. Therefore, the fol-
lowing statement generates an error:
x = Application.Sqrt(123) 
Chapter 14: VBA Programming Concepts
399
Permanently rotate pdf pages - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pages in pdf permanently; rotate pdf page by page
Permanently rotate pdf pages - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pdf pages and save; how to reverse pages in pdf
Controlling Execution
Some VBA procedures start at the top and progress line by line to the bottom.
Often, however, you need to control the flow of your routines by skipping over
some statements, executing some statements multiple times, and testing conditions
to determine what the routine does next.
This section discusses several ways of controlling the execution of your VBA
procedures:
If-Then
constructs
Select Case
constructs
For-Next
loops
On Error
statements
The If-Then construct
Perhaps the most commonly used instruction grouping in VBA is the 
If-Then
con-
struct. This instruction is one way to endow your applications with decision-mak-
ing  capability.  The 
If-Then
construct  executes  one  or  more  statements
conditionally. The 
Else
clause is optional. If included, it enables you to execute one
or more instructions when the condition that you test is not true.
The following procedure demonstrates an 
If-Then
structure without an 
Else
clause. The example deals with time. VBA uses the same date-and-time serial num-
ber system as Excel. The time of day is expressed as a fractional value—for exam-
ple, noon is represented as .5. VBA’s 
Time
function returns a value that represents
the time of day. The following example uses an 
If-Then
statement to check the
time of day. If the time is before noon, the Then part of the statement executes and
the procedure displays a 
Good Morning
message.
Sub GreetMe()
If Time < 0.5 Then MsgBox “Good Morning”
End Sub
The following procedure uses two 
If-Then
statements. It displays either 
Good
Morning
or 
Good Afternoon
:
Sub GreetMe()
If Time < 0.5 Then MsgBox “Good Morning”
If Time >= 0.5 Then MsgBox “Good Afternoon”
End Sub
Notice that the second 
If-Then
statement uses >= (greater than or equal to). This
covers the extremely remote chance that the time is precisely 12:00 noon when the
function is executed.
400
Part III: Using VBA with Charts
VB.NET PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in vb.net
extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET If you need to permanently removing visible text and our redact function API and redact entire PDF pages.
rotate pages in pdf online; pdf page order reverse
C# PDF Page Redact Library: redact whole PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Redaction is the process of permanently removing visible our redact function API to redact entire PDF pages.
how to permanently rotate pdf pages; pdf expert rotate page
Another approach is to use the 
Else
clause of the 
If-Then
construct. For example:
Sub GreetMe()
If Time < 0.5 Then MsgBox “Good Morning” Else _
MsgBox “Good Afternoon”
End Sub
Notice that the preceding example uses the line continuation sequence (a space
followed by an underscore); 
If-Then-Else
is actually a single statement.
The preceding examples all used a single statement for the Then clause of the
If-Then
construct. However, you often need to execute multiple statements if a
condition is True. You can still use the 
If-Then
construct, but you need to use an
End If
statement to signal the end of the statements that comprise the Then clause.
Here’s an example that executes two statements if the 
If
clause is True:
If x > 0 Then
y = 2
z = 3
End If
You can also use multiple statements for an 
If-Then-Else
construct. Here’s an
example that executes two statements if the 
If
clause is True, and two other state-
ments if the 
If
clause is not True.
If x > 0 Then
y = 2
z = 3
Else
y = -2
z = -3
End If
The Select Case construct
The 
Select Case
construct is useful for choosing among three or more options.
This construct also works with two options and is a good alternative to 
If-Then-
Else
. The following example of a 
Select Case
construct shows another way to
code the 
GreetMe
examples presented in the preceding section:
Sub GreetMe()
Select Case Time
Case Is < 0.5
MsgBox “Good Morning”
Case 0.5 To 0.75
Chapter 14: VBA Programming Concepts
401
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
VB.NET Image Rotator Add-on to Rotate Image, VB.NET Watermark Maker to VB.NET image editor control SDK, will the original image file be changed permanently?
how to rotate one page in a pdf file; save pdf rotate pages
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
to change view orientation by clicking rotate button. users can convert Excel to PDF document, export Users can save Excel annotations permanently by clicking
permanently rotate pdf pages; rotate pdf pages
MsgBox “Good Afternoon”
Case Else
MsgBox “Good Evening”
End Select
End Sub
Any number of instructions can be written below each 
Case
statement; they all
execute if that case evaluates to True.
Looping blocks of instructions
Loopingis the process of repeating a block of VBA instructions within a procedure.
You may know the number of times to loop, or it may be determined by the values
of variables in your program. VBA offers a number of looping constructs, but I
cover only two of them: 
For-Next
loops and 
For Each-Next
loops:
FOR-NEXT LOOPS
The following listing is an example of a 
For-Next
loop. This procedure displays the
sum of the first 100 integers:
Sub SumIntegers()
total = 0
For num = 1 To 100
total = total + num
Next num
MsgBox total
End Sub
In this example, num (the loop counter variable) starts out with 1 and increases by
1 each time the loop repeats. The loop ends when num is equal to 100. The 
total
vari-
able simply accumulates the various values of num as it changes during the looping.
You also can use a 
Step
value to skip some values in the loop. Here’s the same
procedure rewritten to sum every otherinteger between 1 and 100 (that is, 1, 3, 5,
and so on):
Sub SumOddIntegers()
total = 0
For num = 1 To 100 Step 2
total = total + num
Next num
MsgBox total
End Sub
The previous examples use relatively simple loops. But you can have any number
of statements in the loop, and you can even nest 
For-Next
loops inside other 
For-
Next
loops. The following is VBA code that uses nested 
For-Next
loops to initialize
402
Part III: Using VBA with Charts
VB.NET Image: How to Create a Customized VB.NET Web Viewer by
used document & image files (PDF, Word, TIFF btnRotate270: rotate image or document page in burnAnnotationToImages: permanently burn drawn annotation on page in
how to rotate all pages in pdf; save pdf after rotating pages
How to C#: Cleanup Images
By setting the BinarizeThreshold property whose value range is 0 to 255, it will permanently modify the image to 1bpp grayscale image of the Detect Blank Pages.
pdf rotate just one page; pdf rotate all pages
a 10 x 10 x 10 array with the value –1. When the three loops finish executing, each
of the 1,000 elements in 
MyArray
contains –1.
Dim MyArray(1 To 10, 1 To 10, 1 To 10)
For i = 1 To 10
For j = 1 To 10
For k = 1 To 10
MyArray(i, j, k) = -1
Next k
Next j
Next I
FOR EACH-NEXT LOOPS
Your procedures often need to loop various items in a collection. A collection is a
group of related objects. For example, the 
Workbooks
collection includes all the
workbooks currently open. The 
Charts
collection comprises all chart sheets in a
workbook. The 
Sheets
collection includes all worksheets and chart sheets. All
series in a chart are included in the 
SeriesCollection
collection.
The following example displays the names of all series in the active chart, each
in a separate message box:
Sub ShowSeriesNames()
Dim s As Series
For Each s In ActiveChart.SeriesCollection
MsgBox s.Name
Next s
End Sub
In the preceding example,sis a variable name.There’s nothing special
about this name;you can replace it with any valid variable name.
The following example loops through all cells in a range and displays the sum:
Sub AddCells()
Dim c As Range
Dim Total As Double
Total = 0
For Each c In Range(“A1:C100”)
Total = Total + c
Next c
MsgBox Total
End Sub
Chapter 14: VBA Programming Concepts
403
How to C#: Color and Lightness Effects
Geometry: Rotate. Image Bit Depth. Color and Contrast. Cleanup Images. Effect VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word range is 0 to 255, it will permanently modify
rotate single page in pdf file; pdf reverse page order
Basic Error Handling
When VBA code executes, a number of errors can occur. You can write code to
specify how these errors are handled. In some cases, you can safely ignore any
errors that occur within your procedures. To force VBA to ignore errors, use the fol-
lowing statement:
On Error Resume Next
The following procedure attempts to delete a chart named Old Chart. If that chart
doesn’t exist, an error will occur. Using the 
On Error
statement causes VBA to
ignore that inconsequential error and not display an error message.
Sub DeleteCharts()
On Error Resume Next
ActiveSheet.ChartObjects(“Old Chart”).Delete
End Sub
In other cases, you want your code to know whether errors occurred and then do
something about them. You can determine whether an error occurred by checking
the 
Number
property of the 
Err
object. If this property is equal to zero, an error did
not occur. If 
Err.Number
is equal to anything else, an error did occur.
The following procedure attempts to activate Chart 1. If Chart 1 does not exist,
Err.Number
will be something other than zero and a message will be displayed.
Sub ActivateTheChart()
On Error Resume Next
ActiveSheet.ChartObjects(“Chart 1”).Activate
If Err.Number <> 0 Then MsgBox “Chart does not exist”
End Sub
You can also specify that code execution continue at a different location when
an error occurs. The following procedure uses an 
On Error
statement that points to
a code label called 
BailOut
. If any error occurs in the procedure, execution stops
and the code after the 
BailOut
statement is executed.
Sub ActivateTheChart()
On Error GoTo BailOut
ActiveSheet.ChartObjects(“Chart 1”).Activate
‘Other code goes here
Exit Sub
BailOut:
MsgBox “Cannot continue”
End Sub
404
Part III: Using VBA with Charts
Using Ranges
Charts, of course, use data stored in ranges. Therefore, it’s important that you under-
stand how to work with ranges using VBA. The information in this section is intended
to be practical rather than comprehensive. If you want more details, consult Excel’s
help system.
Referencing a range
VBA code can reference a range in a number of different ways:
 The 
Range
property
 The 
Cells
property
 The 
Offset
property
THE RANGE PROPERTY
You can use the 
Range
property to refer to a range directly, by using a cell address
or name. The following example assigns the value in cell A1 to a variable named
Init
. In this case, the statement accesses the 
Range
object’s 
Value
property.
Init = Range(“A1”).Value
In addition to the 
Value
property, VBA enables you to access a number of other
properties of a 
Range
object. For example, the following statement counts the num-
ber of cells in a range and assigns the value to the 
Cnt
variable.
Cnt = Range(“A1:C300”).Count
THE CELLS PROPERTY
Another way to reference a range is to use the 
Cells
property. The 
Cells
property
accepts two arguments (a row number and a column number), and returns a single
cell. The following statement assigns the value in cell A1 to a variable named
FirstCell
:
FirstCell = Cells(1, 1).Value
THE OFFSET PROPERTY
The 
Offset
property (like the 
Range
and 
Cells
properties) also returns a 
Range
object.
The 
Offset
property is used in conjunction with a range. It takes two arguments that
correspond to the relative position from the upper-left cell of the specified 
Range
object. The arguments can be positive (down or right), negative (up or left), or zero.
Chapter 14: VBA Programming Concepts
405
The following example returns the value one cell below cell A1 (that is, cell A2) and
assigns it to a variable named 
NextCell
:
NextCell = Range(“A1”).Offset(1,0).Value
Some useful properties of ranges
Previous sections give examples that used the 
Value
property for a range. VBA
gives you access to many additional range properties. Some of the more useful
properties for function writers are briefly described in the following sections. For
complete information on a particular property, refer to Excel’s online help.
THE FORMULA PROPERTY
The 
Formula
property returns the formula (as a string) contained in a cell. If you try
to access the 
Formula
property for a range that consists of more than one cell, you
get an error. If the cell doesn’t have a formula, this property returns the cell’s value.
The following statement simply displays the formula for cell A1 on the active
worksheet:
MsgBox Range(“A1”).Formula
You can use the 
HasFormula
property (which returns True or False) to determine
whether a cell has a formula.
THE ADDRESS PROPERTY
The 
Address
property returns the address of a range as a string. By default, it
returns the address as an absolute reference (for example, $A$1:$C$12). The fol-
lowing statement displays the address of the range selection.
MsgBox Selection.Address
THE COUNT PROPERTY
The 
Count
property returns the number of cells in a range. The following statement
displays the number of cells in range A1:M200:
MsgBox Range(“A1:M200”).Count
THE COLUMNS AND ROWS PROPERTIES
The 
Columns
and 
Rows
properties work with columns or rows in a range. For exam-
ple, the following statement displays the number of columns in a range by access-
ing the 
Count
property:
MsgBox Range(“B5:K32”).Columns.Count
406
Part III: Using VBA with Charts
Chapter 15
Understanding Objects,
Collections, Properties, 
and Methods
IN THIS CHAPTER
 An overview of objects, collections, properties, and methods
 An introduction to the 
Chart
objects
 Understanding the benefits and limitations of Excel’s macro recorder
 Various ways to execute macros
VBA 
ESSENTIALLYIS APROGRAMMING
language that manipulates objects contained
in a host application such as Excel or PowerPoint. Excel provides a bewildering
array of objects, and they can all be modified by using VBA macros.
This chapter focuses on one particular object: the 
Chart
object. As you’ll see,
this object can contain many additional objects, which can also contain other
objects. In other words, they comprise an object hierarchy.
Objects and Collections
This section presents a broad overview of Excel’s objects and collections.
The object hierarchy
The 
Application
object (that is, Excel) contains other objects. Here are a few
examples of objects that may be contained in the 
Application
object:
Workbook
object
Window
object
An 
AddIn
object
407
A group of similar objects is known as a collection. For example, the Workbooks
collection consists of all the open workbooks. Each Workbook object in that collec-
tion can contain other objects, a few of which follow:
Worksheet
object
Chart
object (a Chart sheet, not an embedded chart)
Name
object
As you might expect, these objects also form collections. All the 
Worksheet
objects in a particular workbook make up the 
Worksheets
collection. And these
objects, in turn, can contain other objects. A 
Worksheet
object, for example, can
contain many other objects, which include the following:
ChartObject
object (the container for an embedded chart)
Range
object
PageSetup
object
PivotTable
object
If this seems confusing, trust me, it will make sense, and you’ll eventually real-
ize that this whole object hierarchy thing is quite logical and well structured. By the
way, the complete Excel object model is diagrammed in the VBA help system.
Figure 15-1 shows an example.
Figure 15-1: Using the help system to find out about objects
408
Part III: Using VBA with Charts
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested