display pdf winform c# : How to rotate one pdf page control Library utility azure asp.net winforms visual studio 810712-part745

Creating Adobe PDF files using Acrobat Distiller
Acrobat Distiller provides easy and repeatable Adobe PDF creation according to your 
specifications. By defining customized settings, you create PDF files that are specifically 
tailored to meet your needs.
In the Acrobat Distiller window, you select the Adobe PDF settings to use when 
converting documents to PDF files. You can customize the default settings supplied by 
Adobe by selecting the settings that most closely resemble your desired output, modifying 
the settings to fit your needs, and then saving those settings with a unique file name. This 
default settings file can then be distributed to other computers and users to ensure 
consistent PDF creation.
From the Acrobat Distiller window, you can open PostScript files for conversion to PDF 
files, set security for the PDF files, choose font locations and watched folders for Distiller, 
and get help on how to use Distiller. From the Acrobat Distiller window, you can also 
control basic processing of jobs, such as pausing, resuming, and canceling, and get 
feedback on jobs in the queue.
Acrobat Distiller main window (Windows) A. Menus B. Adobe PDF settings files C. Files in job 
queue D. Failed job E. Context menu F. Status window
Note: In Mac OS, there is no context menu. Instead, a Clear List button clears all distilled 
jobs from the list.
For your convenience, you can use one of the predefined Adobe PDF settings files 
included with Distiller to create PDF files optimized for a specific medium. Once you 
become familiar with PDF options, you can customize the settings to change the quality or 
size of your PDF files.
To start Acrobat Distiller:
In Acrobat, choose Advanced > Acrobat Distiller. (In Windows, you can also choose Start 
> Programs > Acrobat Distiller 7.0.)
To create an Adobe PDF file using Acrobat Distiller:
1.  In Distiller, select an Adobe PDF settings file from the Default Settings pop-up menu. For 
details, see 
Using default Adobe PDF settings files.
2.  In your authoring application, convert your file to PostScript. (See 
Creating PostScript 
files.)
3.  Convert the PostScript file using one of the following methods: 
l
Choose File > Open, and open the PostScript file.
l
Drag the PostScript file to the Acrobat Distiller window. (You can also drag multiple 
PostScript files to the Acrobat Distiller window to convert them.) 
To control job processing:
Use any of the following methods:
l
To temporarily stop processing the current job, click Pause. Or right-click the job queue 
(Windows only) and choose Pause. The Pause button changes to Resume.
l
To resume processing the current job, click Resume. Or right-click the job queue and 
choose Resume (Windows only).
l
To stop processing the files, click Cancel Jobs. Or right-click the job queue and choose 
Cancel Job(s) (Windows only). Cancel Jobs cancels all selected files waiting to be 
distilled or failed jobs in the queue.
l
(Windows only) To open the folder where the selected files are, right-click the job queue 
and choose Explore.
l
(Windows only) To open the selected PDF file in Acrobat, a browser, or Adobe Reader, 
right-click the job queue and choose View.
To clear files in the job queue:
Do one of the following:
l
(Windows) Right-click the job queue, and choose Clear History. 
l
(Mac OS) Click the Clear List button above the queue. 
All successfully converted files are removed from the list.
To save a history of the job queue (Windows only):
Right-click the job queue, and choose Save History. The list saves as a PDF file.
To add security to Adobe PDF files:
1.  In Acrobat Distiller, choose Settings > Security.
2.  In the Security dialog box, specify desired security options. For descriptions of security 
options, see 
Password security options. Not all options in this list are available in Distiller.
Related Subtopics:
Setting Distiller preferences
How to rotate one pdf page - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf page order reverse; rotate a pdf page
How to rotate one pdf page - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pdf page; pdf reverse page order online
Setting Distiller preferences
The Distiller preferences control global Distiller settings.
To set Distiller preferences:
1.  In Acrobat Distiller, choose File > Preferences (Windows), or choose Distiller > 
Preferences (Mac OS).
2.  Specify any of the following preferences:
l
To be notified if a watched folder becomes unavailable or can't be found, select Notify 
When Watched Folders Are Unavailable.
l
(Windows) To be warned if less than 1 MB of space is available on the hard disk where 
Distiller is installed, select Notify When Windows TEMP Folder Is Nearly Full. (The hard 
disk space you need to convert to PDF is often double the size of the PostScript file being 
processed.) 
l
To specify the name and location for files when using drag-and-drop or the Print 
command, select Ask For PDF File Destination.
l
To be warned if you are about to overwrite an existing PDF file, select Ask To Replace 
Existing PDF File.
l
To automatically open the converted PDF file, select View PDF When Using Distiller.
l
To automatically delete the log files used to track messages generated during a distilling 
session, unless the job failed, select Delete Log Files For Successful Jobs.
Note: Distiller tracks the status of all files during a distilling session. The information that 
appears in the Distiller window saves to a file called messages.log. The messages.log file 
is located at \Documents and Settings\[current user]\Application Data\Adobe\Acrobat
\Distiller 7 (Windows) or Users/[current user]/Library/Application Support/Adobe/
Acrobat/Distiller 7 (Mac OS). To view the messages.log file, open it in a text editor. 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program. Free PDF document processing SDK supports PDF page extraction, copying
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; save pdf after rotating pages
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
C# developers can easily merge and append one PDF document to document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
rotate one page in pdf reader; rotate pdf pages in reader
Creating PostScript files
In some cases, you might first want to create a PostScript file and then convert this file to 
Adobe PDF. For example, advanced users might want to use this method to fine-tune the 
creation of the PDF document by inserting Distiller parameters or pdfmark operators into 
the PostScript file. For details, see the Acrobat Distiller Parameters manual and pdfmark 
Reference Manual at http://partners.adobe.com/links/acrobat (English only) on the Adobe 
website. For information on combining PostScript files, see the Acrobat Distiller 
Parameters manual.
In authoring applications such as Adobe InDesign, use the Print command with the Adobe 
PDF printer to convert your file to PostScript. Print dialog boxes can vary from 
application to application. For instructions for creating a PostScript file from your specific 
application, see the application's documentation. 
Keep the following guidelines in mind when creating PostScript files:
l
Use PostScript LanguageLevel 3 whenever possible to take advantage of the most 
advanced features of PostScript.
l
Use the Adobe PDF printer as your PostScript printer.
l
(Windows) When you create a PostScript file, you have to send the fonts used in the 
document. To send the fonts, click the Adobe PDF Settings tab in the Adobe PDF Printing 
Preferences dialog box, and deselect Do Not Send Fonts To "Adobe PDF". (See 
Using the 
Adobe PDF printer.)
l
Give a PostScript file the same name as the original document, but with the extension .ps. 
When Distiller creates the Adobe PDF document, it replaces the .ps extension with .pdf. 
This makes it easy to keep track of the original, PostScript, and PDF versions. Some 
applications use a .prn extension instead of the .ps extension. Distiller recognizes both .ps 
and .prn extensions.
l
Color and custom page sizes are available if you use the PPD file that comes with Acrobat 
Distiller 7.0. Choosing a PPD file from some other printer may cause PDF documents 
without appropriate color, font, or page-size information. 
l
When using FTP to transfer PostScript files between computers, especially if the 
platforms are different, send the files as 8-bit binary data to avoid converting line feeds to 
carriage returns or vice versa.
Related Subtopics:
Using watched folders to convert PostScript files automatically
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Able to rotate one PDF page or whole PDF while in viewing. Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page. Support to select PDF document scaling.
how to rotate pdf pages and save; how to permanently rotate pdf pages
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
A powerful .NET WPF component able to rotate one PDF page or whole PDF while in viewing in C#.NET. Abilities to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
how to rotate one page in a pdf file; how to rotate page in pdf and save
Using watched folders to convert PostScript files 
automatically
You can configure Distiller to look for PostScript files in certain folders called watched 
folders. Distiller can monitor up to 100 watched folders. When Distiller finds a PostScript 
file in the In folder of a watched folder, it converts the file to Adobe PDF and moves the 
PDF document (and usually the PostScript file and any associated log file) to the Out 
folder. A watched folder can have its own Adobe PDF settings and security settings that 
apply to all files processed from that folder. Security settings for a watched folder take 
priority over the security settings for Distiller. For example, Distiller does not convert a 
PostScript file in a watched folder if the file is marked with read-only permission. 
However, if security is set for Distiller but not for the watched folder, Distiller applies its 
security settings to files in the folder when converting them.
In Windows, the settings and preferences are unique to each user, with the exception of 
the Adobe PDF settings files, which are shared and stored in \Document Settings\All Users
\Documents\Adobe PDF\Settings. On a non-NTFS system, custom settings files stored in 
this settings folder are read- and write-accessible by every user on the system. On an 
NTFS system, only files created by respective users are read- and write-accessible. 
Settings files created by other users are read-only.
Note: The default settings files installed with Distiller (Windows) are Read Only and 
Hidden.
In Mac OS, each user's settings and preferences for Distiller are not normally accessible to 
any other user. To share a watched folder with other users, the folder's creator must set the 
appropriate permissions on the In and Out folders. This enables other users to copy files to 
the In folder and get files from the Out folder. The creator must be logged into the system 
and have Distiller running. The other users must log in remotely to access the live 
watched folder and have their files processed.
Important: You can't set up watched folders as a network service for other users. Every 
user who creates Adobe PDF documents must have an Acrobat license.
To set up watched folders:
1.  In Acrobat Distiller, choose Settings > Watched Folders.
2.  Click Add Folder, and select the target folder. Distiller automatically puts an In folder and 
an Out folder in the target folder. You can place In and Out folders at any level of a disk 
drive.
3.  If you want to remove a folder, select the folder and click Remove Folder. Make sure that 
Distiller has finished processing all the files in the folder before you remove it. 
Note: When you remove a watched folder, Distiller does not delete the In and Out folders, 
their contents, or the folder.joboptions file. You can delete these manually when 
appropriate.
4.  To define security options for a folder, select the folder and click Edit Security. Set the 
options as described in 
Password security options. Click OK to return to the Watched 
Folders dialog box.
A security icon is prepended to any folder name for which security is set. To return a 
folder to the original options selected in the Distiller window, select the folder, and click 
Clear Security.
5.  To set Adobe PDF conversion settings for the folders, do one of the following, and then 
click OK:
l
To edit the Adobe PDF settings to be applied to a folder, select the folder, click Edit 
Settings, and edit the Adobe PDF settings. (See 
Creating custom Adobe PDF settings.) 
This file is saved to the watched folder as folder.joboptions. 
l
To use a different set of Adobe PDF settings, select the folder and click Load Settings. 
You can use any settings that you have defined, named, and saved. (See 
Creating custom 
Adobe PDF settings.)
6.  Set options to manage the processing of files:
l
Enter a number of seconds to specify how often to check the folders. You can enter up to 
9999. (For example, 120 equals 2 minutes and 9999 equals about 2 and 3/4 hours.)
l
Choose what to do with a PostScript file after it has been processed. The file can be 
moved to the Out folder along with the PDF file or deleted. Any log file is also 
automatically copied to the Out folder.
l
To delete PDF files after a certain period of time, enter a number of days, up to 999. This 
option also deletes PostScript and log files, if you have chosen to delete them.
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
rotate pdf page permanently; how to rotate all pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
to display it. Thus, PDFPage, derived from REPage, is a programming abstraction for representing one PDF page. Annotating Process.
rotate pdf pages by degrees; rotate pages in pdf
Creating Adobe PDF files from various file types
You can convert different types of files to Adobe PDF by opening the files using the 
Create PDF From File command. Supported file types are listed in the Open dialog box, in 
the Files Of Type (Windows) or Show (Mac OS) menu. You can use the default 
conversion settings or customize the conversion settings.
In Windows, you can also right-click a file in Windows Explorer and choose a Convert To 
Adobe PDF command from the context menu. In Mac OS, you can Control-click a file 
and choose an Open command to convert files. The last-used Adobe PDF settings file is 
used to create the PDF file. The Convert To Adobe PDF command is not available for file 
types that cannot be converted. 
You can convert multiple source files of different types and consolidate them into 
one PDF file using the Create PDF From Multiple Files command. (See 
Creating Adobe 
PDF files from multiple files.)
To create an Adobe PDF file using the Create PDF From File command:
1.  In Acrobat, choose File > Create PDF > From File, or click the Create PDF button 
on 
the toolbar and choose From File. 
2.  Select your file type from the Files Of Type menu (Windows) or the Show menu (Mac 
OS), and locate the file you want to convert to an Adobe PDF file. 
3.  If you want to customize the conversion settings, click the Settings button to change the 
conversion options. For image file formats, you can set conversion options for 
compression and color management. (See 
Setting conversion options for image files.) For 
other file formats, you can set Adobe PDF settings and security settings. (See 
Setting 
conversion options for nonimage files.)
Note: The Settings button is unavailable if no conversion settings can be set for the 
selected file type or if you choose All Files for the file type.
4.  Click OK to apply the settings.
5.  Click Open to convert the file to an Adobe PDF file.
Depending on the type of file being converted, the authoring application may open 
automatically or a progress dialog box may appear. 
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
for developers on how to rotate PDF page in different two different PDF documents into one large PDF C# PDF Page Processing: Split PDF Document - C#.NET PDF
rotate individual pages in pdf reader; rotate pdf pages and save
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Using RasterEdge Visual C# .NET PDF page deletion component, developers can easily select one or more PDF pages and delete it/them in both .NET web and Windows
pdf reverse page order; how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview
Creating Adobe PDF files by dragging and dropping
You can convert a variety of image, HTML, and plain-text file types to Adobe PDF files 
by dragging the files into the document pane of the Acrobat window or onto the Acrobat 
icon. 
To create an Adobe PDF file by dragging and dropping:
Do one of the following:
l
(Windows) Drag the file into the open Acrobat window or onto the Acrobat icon.
Note: If you have a file open in the Acrobat window and you drag a file into the document 
pane, the converted file opens as a new PDF file.
l
(Mac OS) Drag the file onto the Acrobat icon.
Creating Adobe PDF files from multiple files 
You can convert different types of files and combine them into one Adobe PDF file by 
using the Create PDF From Multiple Files command in Acrobat. You can also use this 
command to combine PDF files. This command uses the conversion settings specified in 
the Convert To PDF preferences.
Adobe PDF documents created from multiple files have structured bookmarks that enable 
you to print, delete, or extract individual documents from the combined PDF document. 
(See 
Extracting, moving, and copying pages and 
Deleting and replacing pages.)
After you have created a composite PDF file, you can add headers and footers, including 
page numbers, and a background or watermark to improve the document's appearance. 
(See 
Adding headers and footers and 
Adding watermarks and backgrounds.) 
To convert multiple files:
1.  Do one of the following:
l
Choose File > Create PDF > From Multiple Files, or click the Create PDF button 
on 
the toolbar and choose From Multiple Files.
l
In the Organizer window, select files and then click Create PDF From Multiple files.
2.  In the Create PDF From Multiple Documents dialog box, do any of the following to select 
files to be converted:
l
Click Browse (Windows) or Choose (Mac OS) to locate the first file to be converted. 
Double-click the file, or Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) to add 
multiple files from the same folder.
l
Select Include All Open PDF Documents to automatically add all open PDF files to the 
list of files to combine.
l
In the Include Recently Combined Files menu, select from the last 10 combined files.
l
Select a PDF file and click Preview to view it. Click OK to close the viewing window.
You can add the same file more than once if, for example, you need to add blank 
pages or transition pages between other files.
3.  Rearrange files in the list as needed (files are converted and consolidated in the order 
shown in this list):
l
To move a file up or down in the file list, select the file name and click Move Up or Move 
Down. 
l
Drag files within the list. 
l
To remove a file from the list, select the file name and click Remove.
4.  Click OK. Acrobat converts and consolidates the files into one Adobe PDF file. 
Depending on the method used to create the source files, a progress dialog box may show 
the conversion of the files. Some source applications may start and close automatically. 
When the conversion is complete, the consolidated PDF file opens, and you are prompted 
to save the file.
To specify conversion settings for different file types:
1.  In the Preferences dialog box, click Convert To PDF on the left.
2.  Select a file type from the list.
3.  Click Edit Settings, and specify options as desired. 
Note: Not all file types have settings that can be edited. For those file types, the Edit 
Settings button is unavailable.
Creating Adobe PDF files from paper documents
You can create an Adobe PDF file directly from a paper document using a scanner. 
During scanning, you can specify whether to create a searchable Adobe PDF file by 
applying optical character recognition (OCR) while scanning, or create an image-only 
PDF file--that is, a bitmap picture of the pages that can be viewed but not searched.
If you create an image-only PDF file and later want to search, correct, or copy text in the 
file, or make the file accessible to vision and motion impaired users, you can use the 
Recognize Text Using OCR command to run OCR and find the characters. (See 
Converting image-only scanned pages to searchable text.)
Note: If you need to convert large volumes of legacy paper documents into searchable 
PDF archives, consider purchasing the Adobe Acrobat® Capture® software.
Related Subtopics:
Converting scanned pages to Adobe PDF
Using Image Settings options
Scanning tips
Converting image-only scanned pages to searchable text
Correcting words on converted pages
Converting scanned pages to Adobe PDF
You can use the Create PDF From Scanner command to run your scanner. Before you 
begin scanning, make sure that your scanner is installed and working correctly. Follow the 
scanner instructions and test procedures to ensure proper setup. (See 
Scanning tips.)
TWAIN scanner drivers, which are industry-standard drivers compatible with almost all 
desktop scanners, are supported, together with Windows Image Acquisition (WIA) drivers 
on Windows XP.
Note: Adobe PDF documents created from scanned pages are compatible with Acrobat 
5.0 and later. For compatibility with Acrobat 4.0, use a compression method other than 
JBIG2. 
To create Adobe PDF files from scanned pages:
1.  In Acrobat, choose File > Create PDF > From Scanner, or choose From Scanner from the 
Create Adobe PDF menu 
on the toolbar. 
You can apply OCR and add tags for accessibility while scanning paper documents.
2.  In the Create PDF From Scanner dialog box, select your scanning device.
3.  Choose Front Sides or Both Sides format. (The scanner's settings might overwrite these 
settings in Acrobat. For example, if you select Both Sides in Acrobat and Single Side in 
the scanner, only one side scans.)
4.  Specify whether to create a new PDF document or append the converted scan to the 
currently open PDF document. If no PDF document is open, the Destination menu is 
unavailable, and the converted scan becomes a new document.
5.  Select Recognize Text Using OCR if you want to apply OCR and font and page 
recognition to the text images and convert them to normal text. Click Settings, and specify 
options.
l
Primary OCR Language specifies the language for the OCR engine to use to identify the 
characters. In the Japanese version of Acrobat, the roman languages are available only if 
you perform a Custom installation and select Roman Language Support. In non-Japanese 
versions of Acrobat, the Japanese language is available only if you perform a Custom 
installation and select Asian Language Support.
l
PDF Output Style allows you to specify either Searchable Image or Formatted Text & 
Graphics. Choose Searchable Image to have a bitmap image of the pages in the 
foreground and the scanned text on an invisible layer beneath. The appearance of the page 
does not change, but the text becomes selectable and readable. Choose Formatted Text & 
Graphics to reconstruct the original page using recognized text, fonts, pictures, and other 
graphic elements.
l
Downsample Images decreases the number of pixels in color, grayscale, and monochrome 
images. Downsampling of scanned images is performed after OCR is complete.
6.  Select Add Tags To Document (Improves Accessibility For Disabled Users) if you want 
Acrobat to analyze how the page is laid out, which defines the reading order. This option 
is available only if you select Recognize Text Using OCR. To correct reading order 
problems, see 
Correcting tags.
7.  Click Image Settings to set compression and filtering options. (See 
Using Image Settings 
options.)
8.  Click Scan.
9.  Set additional scanning options for your scanner, and finish scanning. Click Next if you 
are scanning multiple pages; click Done when you finish. (The scanning operation and 
options available vary with the type of scanner.) 
Note: If you try to select text in a scanned PDF file that does not have OCR applied, 
Acrobat asks if you want to run OCR. If you click OK, the Recognize Text dialog box 
opens. (See 
Converting image-only scanned pages to searchable text.)
Using Image Settings options
The Image Settings options control how scanned images are filtered and compressed in 
the Adobe PDF document. Default settings are suitable for a wide range of document 
pages, but you may want to change settings for higher quality images, smaller file sizes, or 
scanning issues.
Two controls determine how each scanned page is represented in the PDF document:
l
For Color/Grayscale, select either Adaptive or JPEG.
l
For Monochrome, select JBIG2, Adaptive, or CCITT Group 4.
Only one of these two controls is applied to each scanned page. After you click the 
Acrobat Scan control, you can choose the scanned page size, resolution, number of colors, 
and bits per pixel in the scanner's TWAIN interface. When you press Scan in the TWAIN 
interface, the scanner starts, and Acrobat receives and processes the scanned page, 
applying the Monochrome control to 1-bit per pixel black-and-white input, or the Color/
Grayscale control.
Adaptive
Divides each page into black-and-white, grayscale, and color regions and chooses a 
representation that preserves appearance while highly compressing each kind of content. 
Adaptive compression works on grayscale and RGB input greater than 150 ppi or on 
black-and-white input greater than 400 ppi. At lower resolution, only one kind of image is 
used in the adaptively compressed output. The recommended scanning resolutions are 300 
ppi for grayscale and RGB input, or 600 ppi for black-and-white input.
JPEG
Applies JPEG compression to the entire grayscale or RGB input page. (See 
Methods of 
compression.)
JBIG2
Applies the JBIG2 compression method to black-and-white input pages. At high quality 
settings (with the slide bar set far to the right, at 0.95 or higher), the page is compressed 
using the lossless method. At lower quality settings, text is highly compressed. JBIG2 
compressed text pages typically are 60% smaller than CCITT Group 4 compressed pages, 
but processing is slow. JBIG2 compression is compatible with Acrobat 5.0 (PDF 1.4).
CCITT Group 4
Applies CCITT Group 4 compression to black-and-white input page images. This fast, 
lossless compression method is compatible with Acrobat 3.0 (PDF 1.2). (See 
Methods of 
compression.)
Slide Bar
Use the slide bar to set the balance between smallest file size and maximum image 
quality. The slide bar does not affect black-and-white output for CCITT Group 4. If the 
slide bar covers a numerical range between 0.0 and 1.0, with 0.0 being the lowest quality 
and 1.0 being the highest, then at the position 0.95, the JBIG2 implementation switches to 
lossless compression. For JPEG output, the default setting gives compact pages of good 
quality; higher settings result in more accurately compressed, less compact pages; lower 
settings increase compression and reduce quality. For Adaptive compressed output, the 
slide bar determines both the JPEG quality of gray and color output images and the use of 
low-resolution images to represent some page content.
Deskew
Rotates the skewed page so that it appears vertical and not at an angle.
Background Removal
Affects gray and color input but has no effect on black-and-white input. This filter makes 
nearly-white page areas white. If the background is not white, Adaptive applies JPEG 
compression, resulting in poor compression. Low, Medium, and High settings increase the 
darkness of the not-quite-white clutter, which the filter makes white. For good results, 
calibrate your scanner using its contrast and brightness or other controls so that a scan of a 
normal black-and-white laser printer page has dark gray or black text and a white 
background. With this calibration, the Background Removal filter should produce good 
results for its Off or Low settings. However, if something printed on the backside of a 
page shows through, or if off-white paper or newsprint is scanned, the Medium or High 
setting may be preferred to clean up the page.
Edge Shadow Removal
Removes dark streaks that occur at the edges of scanned pages, where the scanner light is 
shadowed by the paper edge.
Despeckle
Removes isolated black marks in black-and-white page content. Low uses a basic 
peephole filter. Medium and High use both a peephole filter and a large area filter that 
removes larger spots farther from nearby features.
Descreen
Removes halftone dot structure. Most printing technologies represent a continuous range 
of color by controlling the size of tiny dots (yellow, cyan, magenta, and black) on a page. 
Higher resolution scans typically preserve some of this unwanted dot structure. If it is not 
removed, the dot structure reduces JPEG compression significantly, and it may cause 
Moire patterns when viewing or reprinting a PDF.
The Descreen filter typically works best on 200 to 400 ppi grayscale or RGB input or, for 
Adaptive compression, on 400 to 600 ppi black-and-white input. The Auto setting 
(recommended) allows Acrobat to choose when to descreen; it applies the filter for 300 
ppi or higher grayscale and RGB input, and disables it for 200 ppi or lower input. The Off 
setting disables the filter. Consider choosing the Off setting when scanning a page with no 
pictures or filled areas, or when scanning at a resolution higher than the range at which the 
filter is effective.
Halo Removal
On (recommended) removes excess color at high-contrast edges, which may have been 
introduced during either printing or scanning. This filter is used only on color input pages.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested