embed pdf in mvc view : Rotate single page in pdf reader software SDK cloud windows wpf winforms class 97807356240234-part817

This selects the second row of values in the list, even though they exist in row 3 
of the worksheet. A single row from the collection referenced by the global Rows 
property includes the entire row of the worksheet; the Rows property of a Range 
object includes only the cells within the range. 
10. 
Type myRange.Rows(myRange.Rows.Count).Select and press Enter. 
This selects the last row of the list. Because the Rows property returns a collection, 
you can use the Count property to fi nd the number of items in the collection. That 
count can then serve as an index into the same collection. 
When you use the Range, Cells, Columns, or Rows properties as members of a Range 
object, the resulting ranges are relative to the upper-left cell of that range. Contrast 
this to when you use the same functions from the global group—or as members of the 
Application object or of a Worksheet object. With anything other than a Range object, 
these functions return ranges that are relative to the upper-left cell of the worksheet. 
Refer to a Relative Range
Excel has other properties that can calculate a new range based on one or more existing 
ranges. Two of these properties do not exist in the list of global members; they exist only 
as members of a Range object: the Offset property references a range shifted down, up, 
left, or right from a starting range, and the Resize property references a range with a 
different number of rows or columns from a starting range. An additional property, the 
Intersect property, does appear in the list of global members. It is particularly valuable 
when you need to “trim away” part of a range, such as when you want to remove the 
header row from the current region. 
1. 
In the Object Browser, select Range in the Classes list. Then, in the Members list, 
select the Offset property. 
The description indicates that this property has two arguments—RowOffset and 
ColumnOffset, both of which are optional—and that it returns a Range object. 
Referring to a Range   
109
Rotate single page in pdf reader - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf reverse page order online; how to change page orientation in pdf document
Rotate single page in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf page order reverse; how to reverse pages in pdf
110 
Chapter 4  Explore Range Objects
2. 
In the Immediate window, type myRange.Offset(1).Select and press Enter. 
This selects a range identical in size and shape to the range stored in the variable, 
but shifted down by one cell. The fi rst argument to the Offset property indicates 
the number of rows down to shift the range; the second argument indicates how 
many columns to the right to shift the range. Omitting an argument is the same as 
using zero and does not shift the range in that direction. 
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Able to remove a single page from adobe PDF document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
how to rotate page in pdf and save; how to rotate pdf pages and save permanently
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
application. Able to remove a single page from PDF document. Ability Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How to
reverse pdf page order online; rotate all pages in pdf preview
Tip 
To understand the Offset property, think of yourself as standing on the upper-
left cell of the initial range. Face the bottom of the worksheet, and step forward the 
number of steps specifi ed in the fi rst argument. Zero steps means no movement. 
Negative steps are backwards. Then face the right side of the worksheet and do the 
same with the number of steps specifi ed in the second argument. The resulting range 
is the same size and shape as the original one, but it begins on the cell you end up 
standing on. 
3. 
In the Object Browser, select Range in the Classes list. Then, in the list of members, 
select the Resize property. 
The description indicates that this property has two arguments—RowSize and 
ColumnSize, both of which are optional—and that it returns a Range object. 
4. 
In the Immediate window, type myRange.Offset(1).Resize(5).Select and press Enter. 
This selects the fi rst fi ve rows of data. The Offset property shifts the range down to 
omit the heading row. The Resize function changes the size of the resulting range. 
The fi rst argument to the Resize property is the number of rows for the result 
range; the second is the number of columns for the result range. Omitting an 
argument is the same as keeping the size of the original range for that direction. 
5. 
Type myRange.Offset(1,5).Resize(1,2).Select and press Enter. 
This selects the range G3:H3, which happens to be the numeric values in the fi rst 
row of the body of the list. 
Referring to a Range   
111
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C# Single page. View PDF in single page display mode
rotate pdf page permanently; pdf rotate single page
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
rotate single page in pdf; pdf rotate pages and save
112 
Chapter 4  Explore Range Objects
Tip 
The combined functionality of the Offset and Resize properties is equivalent to 
that of the OFFSET function available on worksheets. 
6. 
In the Object Browser, with the <globals> object selected in the list of classes, 
select the Intersect method in the Members list. 
The description shows that this method returns a Range object, but it also shows 
that it can take up to 30 arguments! In practice, you usually use two arguments, 
and you can see that the fi rst two arguments are required. The Object Browser 
shows that the fi rst two arguments must be range objects, but if you use more than 
two arguments, they do all need to be ranges. You can use the Intersect method in 
conjunction with the Offset method to remove headings from the current region. 
7. 
In the Immediate window, type Intersect(myRange, myRange.Offset(1)).Select 
and press Enter. 
This selects the range B3:H14, which is the entire list except the heading row. You 
often need to manipulate the body of a list separately from the heading. By using 
a range as the fi rst argument of the Intersect method, and then an offset version 
of the range as the second argument, you can trim off portions of the range. 
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Both single page and multipage tiff image files can be created from PDF. Supports tiff compression selection. Supports for changing image size.
rotate pdf page; pdf reverse page order preview
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save or query data and save the PDF document. The PDFPage class presents a single page in a PDFDocument
pdf rotate single page and save; how to rotate one pdf page
8. 
Press F5 to end the macro. 
The Offset and Resize properties, along with the EntireRow, EntireColumn, and 
CurrentRegion properties and the Intersect method, provide you with fl exible tools for 
calculating new Range objects based on an original starting range. Often, the easiest 
way to work within a range is to fi rst use the CurrentRegion property to establish the 
base range, and then use the Offset property and the Intersect method to manipulate 
the range. 
Enhancing Recorded Selections
When you record a macro, the macro recorder dutifully follows all your actions, including 
selecting ranges before acting on them. You can make a macro do less work—and make 
it easier to read—by eliminating unnecessary selection changes. A powerful technique 
for eliminating unnecessary changes to the selection begins with watching for a state-
ment ending in Select followed by one or more statements beginning with Selection or 
ActiveCell. What you do next depends on whether a single Selection (or ActiveCell) state-
ment follows the Select statement or whether a group of statements follows. 
Simplify Select…Selection Pairs
When a single Selection statement follows a Select statement, you can collapse the two 
statements into one. Record and simplify a macro that puts the names of the months 
across the top of a worksheet. 
Enhancing Recorded Selections   
113
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
all. This guiding page will help you merge two or more PDF documents into a single one in a Visual Basic .NET imaging application.
permanently rotate pdf pages; save pdf after rotating pages
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
all those C#.NET PDF document page processing functions To be more specific, two or more input PDF documents can then saved and output as a single PDF with user
rotate individual pages in pdf reader; rotate pdf page few degrees
114 
Chapter 4  Explore Range Objects
1. 
In Excel, insert a blank worksheet and start recording a macro named 
LabelMonths. Type the labels JanuaryFebruary, and March in the cells B1, C1, 
and D1. 
2. 
Turn off the recorder, and then edit the macro. 
The macro should look similar to the following code. (Your macro might be slightly 
different, depending on the key you press to enter the values into the cells.) 
Sub LabelMonths()
Range("B1").Select
ActiveCell.FormulaR1C1 = "January"
Range("C1").Select
ActiveCell.FormulaR1C1 = "February"
Range("D1").Select
ActiveCell.FormulaR1C1 = "March"
Range("D2").Select
End Sub
For each cell, the word Select appears at the end of one statement followed by 
either the word Selection or ActiveCell at the beginning of the next statement. You 
can delete both words, leaving only a single period. If a Select statement is the last 
one in a macro, you can delete it entirely. 
3. 
Remove the unnecessary selections from the LabelMonths macro by deleting 
Select and ActiveCell each time they appear.  
The fi nal macro should look like this: 
Sub LabelMonths()
Range("B1").FormulaR1C1 = "January"
Range("C1").FormulaR1C1 = "February"
Range("D1").FormulaR1C1 = "March"
End Sub
4. 
Insert a new blank worksheet, and test the macro. 
The labels appear in the cells, and the original selection doesn’t change. 
Why should you get rid of Select…Selection pairs? One reason is that doing so does make 
the macro run faster. Another reason is that running a macro can seem less disruptive if 
it doesn’t end with different cells selected than when it started. But the most important 
reason is unquestionably that Select…Selection pairs in a macro are a dead giveaway that 
you’re a beginner who uses the macro recorder to create macros. It’s OK to use the macro 
recorder; you just want to cover your tracks. 
Simplify Select Groups
When you eliminate a Select…Selection pair, be sure that only a single statement uses 
the selection. If you have a single Select statement followed by two or more statements 
that use the selection, you can still avoid changing the selection, but you must do it in a 
different way. 
1. 
In Excel, select a sheet with labels in the fi rst row, and start recording a macro 
named MakeBoldItalic. 
2. 
Click cell B1, click the Bold button, click the Italic button, and then click the Stop 
Recording button. 
3. 
Edit the macro to look like this: 
Sub MakeBoldItalic()
Range("B1").Select
Selection.Font.Bold = True
Selection.Font.Italic = True
End Sub
Obviously, if you delete the fi rst Select…Selection pair, the macro won’t control 
which cells will become italicized. 
4. 
Edit the macro to assign the range to a variable named myRange. Then replace the 
Selection object with the myRange object. 
The fi nished macro should look like this: 
Sub MakeBoldItalic()
Dim myRange As Range
Set myRange = Range("B1")
myRange.Font.Bold = True
myRange.Font.Italic = True
End Sub
5. 
Change "B1" to "C1" in the macro, and then press F8 repeatedly to step through 
the macro. Watch how the format of the cell changes without changing which cell 
is originally selected. 
6. 
Save the Chapter04 workbook. 
Eliminating the selection when there’s a group might not seem like much of a simpli-
fi cation. And with only two statements, it probably isn’t. But when you have several 
statements that use the same selection, storing the range in a variable can make the 
macro much easier to read. 
Bold 
Italic
Stop Recording
Bold 
Italic
Stop Recording
Enhancing Recorded Selections   
115
116 
Chapter 4  Explore Range Objects
Tip 
You could also replace the Select group with a With structure, like this: 
With Range("B1") 
.Font.Bold = True
.Font.Italic = True
End With
Secretly in the background, the With structure really just creates a hidden variable, 
takes the object from the With statement, and assigns that object to the hidden vari-
able. It then puts the hidden variable in front of each “dangling” period. The End With 
statement discards the hidden variable. An advantage of using an explicit object vari-
able is that you can delare the variable with a specific object type—for example, Dim 
myRange as Range—and then VBA checks to make sure any methods or properties you 
use are appropriate. With an explicitly declared variable, VBA also offers Auto Lists to 
help you modify a macro. 
Entering Values and Formulas into a Range
You may have situations where you want to create a macro that dynamically enters 
formulas into cells. First you should understand how references work in formulas in 
Excel, and then you can see how to create formulas in a macro. 
See Also This section refers to standard Excel formula references. For information about using 
structured formulas in a table, see the section titled “Record a Macro to Manipulate a Table” in 
Chapter 5, “Explore Data Objects.”
Relative References
Most formulas perform arithmetic operations on values retrieved from other cells. Excel 
formulas use cell references to retrieve values from cells. Imagine, for example, a list of 
Retail prices and Wholesale costs. 
Suppose you want to add a column to the list that calculates the gross margin—the 
difference between the Retail price and the Wholesale cost—for each item. You would 
put the label Margin in cell D1 and then enter the fi rst formula into cell D2. The formula 
subtracts the fi rst Wholesale cost (cell C2) from the fi rst Retail price (cell B2). So you 
would enter =B2-C2 into cell D2. 
For each item in the High group, the gross margin is $2.75. Now you need to copy the 
formula to the other rows. The formula you typed into cell D2 refers explicitly to cells C2 
and B2. When you copy the formula to cell D3, you want the formula to automatically 
adjust to refer to C3 and B3. Fortunately, when you copy the formulas, Excel adjusts the 
references because, by default, references are relative to the cell that contains the for-
mula. (The Prices worksheet in the Chapter04 workbook contains these formulas.)
If the reference =C2 is found in cell D2, it really means “one cell to my left.” When you 
copy the formula to cell D3, it still means “one cell to my left,” but now that meaning is 
represented by the reference =C3. 
Absolute References
Sometimes you don’t want relative references. Imagine, for example, a worksheet that 
contains various quantities in column B and prices in row 3. (The Revenue worksheet in 
the Chapter04 workbook contains the prices and quantities.) 
Suppose you want to add formulas to calculate the revenue for each combination. To 
calculate the fi rst revenue value (cell C4), you need to multiply the fi rst quantity (cell 
B4) by the fi rst price (cell C3) . When you type = B4*C3 into cell C4, you get the correct 
answer: $50. 
Entering Values and Formulas into a Range   
117
118 
Chapter 4  Explore Range Objects
But if you copy that formula to cell C5, you get the ridiculous answer of $1000. That’s 
because the cell references are relative. In this version of the formula, you’re not really 
referring to cells B4 and C3; you’re referring to “one cell to my left” and “one cell above 
me.” When you put the formula into cell C5, “one cell above me” now refers to cell C4, 
not cell C3. 
In the Revenue table, you want the Quantity cell references to adjust from row to row , 
and you want the Price cell references to adjust from column to column, but you always 
want to reference the Quantity from column B and the Price from row 3. The solution in 
the user interface is to put a dollar sign ($) in front of the B in the fi rst Quantity reference 
($B4), andin front of the 3 in the fi rst Price reference (C$3). The formula that should go into 
cell C4 is =$B4*C$3. The dollar sign “anchors” that part of the formula, making it absolute. 
When you copy the formula to the rest of the range C4:E8, you get correct answers. (The 
RevenueFormulas worksheet in the Chapter04 workbook contains the correct formulas.) 
The relative portion of the formula changes with the row or column of the cell that 
contains the formula. The absolute portion remains fi xed. 
If you want to modify the formula so that it also takes into account the discount value 
from cell G3, you must make both the row and the column of the discount reference 
absolute. The correct formula would be =$B4*C$3*(1-$G$3). If you assign a name to a 
cell—for example, if you assign the name Discount to cell G3—then by default, using 
the name in the formula acts as a completely absolute reference. (The RevenueFormulas 
worksheet in the Chapter04 workbook contains these formulas.) Later in this chapter, you 
will create a macro that will fi ll the grid with the correct formula, regardless of where it is 
on the worksheet and how many rows or columns it has. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested