embed pdf in mvc view : Rotate pdf page software SDK dll windows wpf html web forms 97807356240238-part821

mySheet.Protect "Password", True, True, True
Next mySheet
End Sub
The For Each statement acts just like Set: It assigns an object reference to a variable. 
But instead of assigning a single object to the variable, it assigns each item from a 
collection to the variable. Then, for each (get it?) object in the collection, Visual Basic 
executes all the statements down to the Next statement. (Technically, you don’t 
need to put the variable name after Next. If you do use it, Visual Basic requires that 
it match the variable name after For Each. Always use the loop variable after Next 
so that Visual Basic can help you avoid creating bugs in your macros.)  Statements 
beginning with For Each and ending with Next are called For Each blocks or For 
Each loops. 
5. 
Press F8 repeatedly to step through the macro, watching as it works on each 
worksheet in turn. 
6. 
Switch to Excel, and try typing a value into a cell on any worksheet. Afterwards, 
close the error message box that opens. 
7. 
Create a new macro named UnprotectSheets that unprotects all the worksheets. 
Try to write the macro without looking at the fi nished code that follows. Hint: You’ll 
need to use the Unprotect method of the worksheet object, with a single argument 
that gives the password.
Tip 
A For Each loop is a handy way of browsing collections in the Immediate window. 
However, in the Immediate window, everything you type must be on a single line. You 
can put multiple statements on a single line by separating the statements with colons. 
For example, here’s what you’d type in the Immediate window to see the names of all 
the worksheets in the active workbook: For Each x In Worksheets: ?x.Name: Next x. (In 
the Immediate window, it’s all right to use short, meaningless names for variables.) 
Here’s what the UnprotectSheets macro should look like: 
Sub UnprotectSheets()
Dim mySheet As Worksheet
For Each mySheet In Worksheets
mySheet.Select ' This statement is optional.
mySheet.Unprotect "Password"
Next mySheet
End Sub
Creating Loops   
221
Rotate pdf page - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
reverse page order pdf; rotate single page in pdf
Rotate pdf page - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate pages in pdf; rotate pdf pages individually
222 
Chapter 7  Control Visual Basic
8. 
Save the workbook, press F5 to run the UnprotectSheets macro, and then test it by 
changing a value on a worksheet. 
Looping through a collection is almost as easy as assigning a single object to a variable. 
The only differences are that you use For Each instead of Set, you specify a collection to 
loop through, and you add a Next statement to end the loop. 
Loop with a Counter by Using a For Loop
Sometimes you want to perform actions repeatedly but can’t use a For Each loop. For 
example, a For Each loop can work through only a single collection. If you want to com-
pare two parallel collections—such as two ranges—you can’t use a For Each loop. In that 
situation, Visual Basic has another, more generalized way to loop: a For loop. 
The Compare worksheet in the Chapter07 workbook contains two named ranges. The 
one on the left is named Old, and the one on the right is named New. You can think 
of these as being an original forecast and a revised forecast. The cells in the Old range 
contain values. The cells in the New range contain a formula that will calculate a random 
number each time you press F9 to recalculate the workbook. (The formula in those cells 
is =ROUND(RAND()*50+100,0), which tells Excel to calculate a random number between 
0 and 1, multiply it by 50, add 100, and round to the nearest whole number. Because the 
numbers in the New range are randomly generated, the ones you see will differ from the 
ones in this graphic.) 
The Flow text fi le contains a macro named CompareCells, which looks like this: 
Sub CompareCells()
Dim i As Integer
Calculate
If Range("New").Cells(i) > Range("Old").Cells(i) Then
Range("New").Cells(i).Interior.Color = rgbLightGreen
Else
Range("New").Cells(i).Interior.Color = rgbLightSteelBlue
End If
End Sub
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
how to rotate all pages in pdf at once; rotate pages in pdf expert
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Professional .NET PDF control for inserting PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class application.
how to save a pdf after rotating pages; how to rotate page in pdf and save
The macro fi rst executes the Calculate method, which calculates new values for all the 
cells in the New range. Then the macro compares only the last cell in the New range with 
the last cell in the Old range. If the New value for that one cell is greater than the Old 
value, the cell turns light green; otherwise, it turns light steel blue. The macro assigns the 
Count of cells in the range to the variable i, which is a simple integer. 
See Also If you’re not comfortable with If blocks, review the fi rst half of this chapter. For 
more information about cell color, see the section titled “Format the Interior of a Range” in 
Chapter 4, “Explore Range Objects.”
Now see how you can convert this macro to use a loop to compare and color all the cells 
in the New range. 
1. 
Copy the CompareCells macro from the text fi le, and paste it into a VBA module in 
the Chapter07 workbook. 
2. 
Click in the CompareCells macro, and press F8 repeatedly to step through the 
macro. Make sure you understand everything the original macro does. 
3. 
In the statement that assigns the Count to the variable, insert the word For in front 
of the variable, and then insert 1 To after the equal sign. 
4. 
Type Next i before the End Sub statement, and indent all the statements between 
For and Next. 
The fi nished macro should look like this: 
Sub CompareCells()
Dim i As Integer
Calculate
For i = 1 To Range("New").Cells.Count
If Range("New").Cells(i) > Range("Old").Cells(i) Then
Range("New").Cells(i).Interior.Color = rgbLightGreen
Else
Range("New").Cells(i).Interior.Color = rgbLightSteelBlue
End If
Next i
End Sub
Creating Loops   
223
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
how to rotate all pages in pdf; rotate pages in pdf permanently
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How
pdf rotate page and save; rotate pdf pages by degrees
224 
Chapter 7  Control Visual Basic
The keyword For works just like a simple assignment statement. It assigns a number 
to the variable. (The For statement assigns a number to an integer variable, while 
the For Each statement assigns a reference to an object variable.) The variable that 
holds the number is called a loop counter. You specify the start value for the loop 
counter (in this case, 1) and the stop value (in this case, the total number of cells in 
the range). 
The For loop assigns the start value to the loop counter, executes all the statements 
down to the Next statement, adds 1 to the loop counter, and checks the loop 
counter against the stop value. If the loop counter is greater than the stop value, 
the For loop jumps to just past the Next statement. If the loop counter is less than 
or equal to the stop value, the For loop does it all again. 
5. 
Press F8 repeatedly to watch the macro work. Step through at least two or three 
loops, and then press F5 to fi nish the macro. 
In many cases, using a For Each loop is more convenient than using a For loop. However, a 
For loop is a more general tool: you can always use a For loop to reproduce the behavior 
of a For Each loop. For example, here’s how you could write the ProtectSheets macro with-
out using For Each: 
Sub ForProtectSheets()
Dim mySheet As Worksheet
Dim i As Integer
For i = 1 to Worksheets.Count
Set mySheet = Worksheets(i)
mySheet.Select
mySheet.Protect "Password", True, True, True
Next i
End Sub
Troubleshooting 
If you run a macro that contains an infi nite loop, stop the macro by 
pressing Ctrl+Break. 
The For loop is a little more dangerous than a For Each loop because you have to be 
sure to get the start and stop values correct. If you have a stop value that is smaller than 
the start value, the loop will run forever—a condition known as an infi nite loop. With a 
For Each loop, it is impossible to create an infi nite loop. 
Troubleshooting 
If you run a macro that contains an infi nite loop, stop the macro by 
If you run a macro that contains an infi nite loop, stop the macro by 
pressing Ctrl+Break.
.
pressing Ctrl+Break.
.
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
Convert Tiff to Jpeg Images. Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PDF to Tiff. Move Tiff Page Position. Rotate a Tiff Page. Extract Tiff Pages.
reverse page order pdf online; how to reverse pages in pdf
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C#.NET Sample Code: Clone a PDF Page Using C#.NET. Load the PDF file that provides the page object.
pdf reverse page order preview; rotate pages in pdf and save
Loop Indefi nitely by Using a Do Loop
A For Each loop works through a collection. A For loop cycles through numbers from a 
starting point to an ending point. In some situations, however, neither of these options 
works. 
For example, suppose that you want to retrieve the names of all the Excel workbooks in 
the current folder. Visual Basic has a function that tells you the names of fi les in a folder 
(or directory). The function is named Dir, after the old MS-DOS operating system com-
mand of the same name. The fi rst time you use Dir, you give it an argument that tells 
which kind of fi les you want to look at. To retrieve the name of the fi rst Excel workbook 
in the current directory, you use the statement myFile = Dir("*.xlsx"). To get the next fi le 
that matches the same pattern, you use Dir again, but without an argument. You must 
run Dir repeatedly because it returns only one fi le name at a time. When Visual Basic 
can’t fi nd another matching fi le, the Dir function returns an empty string. 
So how do you create a macro that retrieves the names of all the Excel fi les in the current 
folder? The list of fi les in the directory isn’t a collection, so you can’t use a For Each loop. 
You can’t use a For loop either because you don’t know how many fi les you’ll get until 
you’re fi nished. Fortunately, Visual Basic has one more way of controlling a loop: a Do loop. 
The ListFiles macro in the Flow text fi le retrieves the fi rst two Excel fi les from the current 
directory and puts their names into the fi rst two cells of the fi rst column of the active 
worksheet. Here’s the original macro: 
Sub ListFiles()
Dim myRow As Integer
Dim myFile As String
myRow = 1
myFile = Dir("*.xls")
Cells(myRow, 1) = myFile
myRow = myRow + 1
myFile = Dir
Cells(myRow, 1) = myFile
End Sub
Aside from the variable declaration statements, this macro consists of two groups of three 
statements each. In each group, the macro assigns a row number to myRow, retrieves a 
fi le name using the Dir function, and then puts the fi le name into the appropriate cell. The 
fi rst time the macro uses Dir, it specifi es the pattern to match. The next time, the macro 
uses Dir without an argument so that it will retrieve the next matching fi le. 
Now see how you can convert this macro to loop until it has found all the fi les in the folder. 
Creating Loops   
225
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text
permanently rotate pdf pages; rotate individual pdf pages reader
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text
pdf rotate single page; rotate pdf pages
226 
Chapter 7  Control Visual Basic
1. 
Copy the ListFiles macro from the text fi le, and paste it into a VBA module in the 
Chapter07 workbook. 
2. 
In the Chapter07 workbook, activate the Files worksheet. 
3. 
Make sure the current folder is the one containing the practice fi les for this book. 
(Click the Microsoft Offi ce Button, click Open, change to the correct folder, and 
then click Cancel.) 
4. 
In the Visual Basic editor, click in the ListFiles macro, and press F8 repeatedly to 
step through the macro. (The names of the fi les your macro retrieves might differ 
from those in the graphics.) Make sure you understand the original macro. 
Tip 
As you step through the macro, move the mouse pointer over a variable name to 
see the current value stored in that variable. 
5. 
At the end of the fi rst statement that contains a Dir function, insert a new line, and 
type Do Until myFile = "" (There is no space between the quotation marks.) 
This statement begins the loop. You begin the loop after the fi rst Dir function be-
cause you use Dir with an argument only once. 
6. 
At the end of the second statement that contains a Dir function, insert a new line, 
and type Loop
This statement ends the loop and sends Visual Basic back to the start of the loop to 
check if it’s time to quit. 
7. 
Delete the second Cells(myRow, 1) = myFile statement. 
You don’t need this statement because the loop repeats the assignment statement 
as many times as needed. 
8. 
Just before the myRow = 1 statement, insert a line, and then enter the statement 
Cells.Clear
This ensures that the worksheet is empty in case you run the macro multiple times 
and some lists are shorter than others. 
Tip 
When you use a macro to write a list onto a worksheet, make sure there are no 
old lists left in the worksheet. You can use Cells.Clear to erase the worksheet, or use 
Worksheets.Add to create a new one. 
9. 
Indent the three statements between the Do and Loop statements. 
The revised macro should look like this: 
Sub ListFiles()
Dim myRow As Integer
Dim myFile As String
Cells.Clear
myRow = 1
myFile = Dir("*.xlsx")
Do Until myFile = ""
Cells(myRow, 1) = myFile
myRow = myRow + 1
myFile = Dir
Loop
End Sub
The myFile = "" expression at the end of the Do Until statement is a conditional ex-
pression, precisely like one you’d use with an If statement. The conditional expres-
sion must be something that Visual Basic can interpret as either True or False. Visual 
Basic simply repeats the loop over and over until the conditional expression is True. 
Note that the condition may never be true, in which case the loop will never exe-
cute. For example, if there were no .xlsx fi les in the folder, the stop condition would 
be true the very fi rst time it executes. 
If you want to increment a number during the loop, you must enter a statement to 
do so. You must always be careful to cause something to happen during the loop 
that will allow the loop to end. In this case, you retrieve a new fi le name from the 
Dir function. 
10. 
Press F8 repeatedly to watch the macro work. Step through at least two or three 
loops, and then press F5 to fi nish the macro. 
Troubleshooting 
If you run a macro that contains an infi nite loop, stop the macro 
by pressing Ctrl+Break. 
Troubleshooting
If you run a macro that contains an infi nite loop, stop the macro 
If you run a macro that contains an infi nite loop, stop the macro 
by pressing Ctrl+Break.
k.
by pressing Ctrl+Break.
.
Creating Loops   
227
228 
Chapter 7  Control Visual Basic
A Do loop is the most fl exible of all the looping structures. Anything that you can do with 
a For loop or a For Each loop, you can do with a Do loop. If you had to be stranded on a 
desert island with only one loop structure, the Do loop would be the best one to have. 
For example, here is how you could write the ProtectSheets macro by using a Do loop. 
Sub ProtectSheets()
Dim mySheet As Worksheet
Dim i As Integer
i = 1
Do Until i > Worksheets.Count
Set mySheet = Worksheets(i)
mySheet.Select
mySheet.Protect "Password", True, True, True
i = i + 1
Loop
End Sub
The fl exibility makes the Do loop a little more complicated than the others because you 
have to create and increment your own loop variable and provide your own condition 
for ending the loop. This makes a Do loop particularly vulnerable to becoming an infi nite 
loop. For example, if you forgot to add the statement to retrieve a new fi le name, or if 
you had included the argument to the Dir function inside the loop (so that Dir would 
keep returning the fi rst fi le name over and over), you’d have an infi nite loop. 
Tip 
Do loops have several useful variations. You can loop until the conditional expression is 
True or while the expression is True. You can put the conditional expression at the top of the 
loop (in the Do statement) or at the bottom of the loop (in the Loop statement). To fi nd out 
more about Do loop structures, select the word Do in the macro, and then press F1. 
Managing Large Loops
A loop that executes only two or three times isn’t much different from a program with-
out a loop. It runs fast, and it’s easy to step through to watch how each statement works. 
Once you start repeating a loop hundreds or thousands of times, however, you need 
some additional techniques to make sure the macro works the way you want it to. 
Set a Breakpoint
The Flow text fi le includes a macro named PrintOrders. You can think of this macro as 
one that your predecessor wrote just before leaving the company. Or you can think of it 
as one that you almost fi nished three months ago. In either event, you have a macro that 
you don’t completely understand and that doesn’t work quite right. 
The PrintOrders macro is supposed to print a copy of the entire Orders workbook, specifi -
cally one that is sorted by product Category. You give each Category manager the section 
of the report that shows orders only for that one category, so you need a new page every 
time the Category changes. Unfortunately, the macro doesn’t do what it’s supposed to. 
You need to fi nd and fi x the problem. Here’s the macro as you fi rst receive it: 
Sub PrintOrders()
Dim myRow As Long
Dim myStop As Long
Workbooks.Open FileName:="orders.xls"
Columns("E:E").Cut
Columns("A:A").Insert Shift:=xlToRight
Range("A1").CurrentRegion.Sort Key1:="Category", _
Order1:=xlAscending, Header:=xlYes
myStop = Range("A1").CurrentRegion.Rows.Count
For myRow = 3 To myStop
If Cells(myRow, 1) <> Cells(myRow + 1, 1) Then
Cells(myRow, 1).Select
ActiveCell.PageBreak = xlPageBreakManual
End If
Next myRow
Cells(myRow, 1).Select
ActiveSheet.PageSetup.PrintTitleRows = "$1:$1"
ActiveSheet.PrintPreview
ActiveWorkbook.Close SaveChanges:=False
End Sub
The best approach is probably to start stepping through the macro. 
1. 
Copy the PrintOrders macro from the text fi le, and paste it into a VBA module in 
the Chapter07 workbook. 
2. 
Make sure the current folder is the one containing the practice fi les for this book. 
(Click the Offi ce Button, click Open, change to the correct folder, and then click 
Cancel.) 
Managing Large Loops   
229
230 
Chapter 7  Control Visual Basic
3. 
In the Visual Basic editor, click in the PrintOrders macro, and then press F8 three 
times to jump over the variable declarations and open the Orders workbook. 
4. 
Press F8 three more times. 
These statements move the Category fi eld over to column A and then sort the list 
by Category. 
5. 
Press F8 twice to assign a number to myStop and to start the loop. Hold the mouse 
pointer over myStop and then over myRow to see the values that were assigned. 
The value of myStop is 3266, and the value of myRow is 3. Those values appear to 
be correct. The loop will execute from row 3 to row 3266. 
6. 
Press F8 several times. 
Visual Basic keeps checking whether the cell in the current row matches the cell 
below it. How many rows are in the Art category? Pressing F8 repeatedly until the 
macro fi nds the last row in the category could take a long time. But if you just press 
F5 to run the rest of the macro, you can’t watch what happens when the condition 
in the If statement is True. If only there were a way to skip over all the statements 
until the macro moves into the If block. 
7. 
Click in the gray area to the left of the statement starting with ActiveCell. 
A dark red circle appears in the margin, and the background of the statement 
changes to dark red. This is a breakpoint. When you set a breakpoint, the macro 
stops when it reaches the breakpoint statement. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested