embed pdf in mvc view : How to reverse pages in pdf Library software class asp.net wpf winforms ajax 9783319135267-c20-part835

21
Chapter 2
Land-use and Landscape Changes:  
A Methodological Proposal for the Creation 
of Sustainable Cultural Tourism Itineraries
Luca Simone Rizzo, Raffaela Gabriella Rizzo and Filippo Smerghetto
© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015 
M. Luc et al. (eds.), Landscape Analysis and Planning, Springer Geography,  
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-13527-4_2
Abstract  The debate on the role of itineraries as instruments of territorial valori-
sation is now ‘mature’  (Trono  and Oliva 2013; Candela et al. 2005). More  and  
more  ‘territories’  are  organizing  activities to  design  and  create  new  itineraries, 
convinced  that  they  can act  as a  driving  force  for local  development.  By  link-
ing places,  atmospheres  or  assets,  they provide the keys, for  understanding  the 
‘places’, and their evolution, to a growing number of ‘new tourists’. It becomes, 
however, a  priority to carry out  an  evaluation of  the  territorialization  processes 
that characterize the areas that they ‘touch’ (in particular land use); this is in order 
to determine their impact on the state of health of the territory being ‘crossed’. 
Current technological evolution has allowed us to go beyond the classical statis-
tical analyses based on the calculation of indicators, integrating  them with geo-
spatial analyses capable of including what is mentioned above. Here, we propose 
the illustration of a case study conducted on this subject, which is presented as a 
working model. In 2013–2014, the research team carried out a diachronic (visual 
and overlay) GIS analysis. Our aim was to represent the changes taking place in 
the territory to the east of Verona, quantify them and evaluate the feasibility of the 
proposal for an itinerary in the conceptual stage, partly in the light of urban devel-
opment planning. The case study has the value of substantiating the need to reflect 
L.S. Rizzo (*) 
Università di Padova—Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca e Servizi Giorgio Lago,  
Padua, Italy
e-mail: lucasimone.rizzo@unipd.it
R.G. Rizzo 
Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Brescia, Milano, Italy
e-mail: RaffaelaGabriella.Rizzo@unicatt.it
F. Smerghetto 
Centro de Compensación Automatizado S.A., Santiago, Chile
e-mail: filippo.smerghetto@gmail.com
How to reverse pages in pdf - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate all pages in pdf preview; how to rotate one page in pdf document
How to reverse pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
pdf rotate single page reader; how to save a pdf after rotating pages
22
L.S. Rizzo et al.
on  the  often absent relationship  between  environmental  and territorial research, 
and the development strategy related to it.
Keywords  GIS analysis  ·  Landscape  ·  Land-use and land-cover change  ·  Tourist  
routes  ·  Planning
Conceptual References
Tourism  and cultural  routes—Tourism  by  both international  and domestic visi-
tors has grown considerably in many countries over the last few decades (Rocca 
2013; WTO 2014). Mass tourism is giving way to ‘slow tourism’ and ‘slow travel’, 
which are in line with conceptions linked to:
•  a respect for the places being visited and an appreciation of the cultures (Corna 
Pellegrini 2004; Stephenson 2008; Nistoreanu et al. 2011; Timms and Conway 
2011; Yurtseven and Kaya  2011; Fullagar  2012) and of the typical products 
of  the  host  countries  (Petrini 2005;  Bryant  and  Grillotti  Di  Giacomo 2007; 
Heitmann et al. 2011);
•  the selection of smaller destinations (Radstrom 2011; Grzelak-Kostulska et al. 
2011);
•  the abandonment of haste;
•  a propensity to savour landscapes and atmospheres;
•  as well as to the use of unhurried modes of transport (Dickinson et al. 2011; 
Calzati et al. 2012; Calzati 2012; Georgicaˇ et al. 2013; Mogollón et al. 2012
1
De Salvo et al. 2013).
At  the  same  time—notwithstanding  the  occurrence  of  massive  landscape 
changes—awareness has grown as to the extent to which natural assets as well as 
those due to the work of man are widespread. A pervasive process of valorisation 
of areas or individual sites has thus been set in motion: destinations that stand out 
as tourist resources of many different kinds.
As a consequence, there has been a boom in the creation of brand new itinerar-
ies (e.g. Schmude and Trono 2003) and the rehabilitation of historic ones like the 
network  of  the Via Francigena  from  Canterbury  to  Rome  with  a flourishing  of 
websites and a related journey literature. Interest in the planning of long-distance 
tourist/cultural itineraries is very much in line with the concept of slowness and 
has been adopted by the European Council which, since 1987, has recognised and 
sustained  29 cultural routes  and landscapes that are deemed to  form  part of the 
1
Here, the authors highlight the principal elements of demand and supply as regards slow tour-
ism—a relaxed pace, an experience and environmental and social ethics—with references to the 
works of Calzati, Matos, Lumsdom, McGrath, Petrini, Dickinson and others.
C# PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Support to reverse page order in PDF document. SDK (XDoc.PDF) is a thread-safe .NET library that can be used to adjust the PDF document pages order.
permanently rotate pdf pages; rotate all pages in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Support to reverse page order in adobe PDF document in both .NET WinForms application and ASP.NET webpage. So a PDF document pages sorting control is
pdf rotate pages separately; rotate pages in pdf expert
23
 Land-use and Landscape Changes …
common heritage of Europe
2
(Berti 2013). All of these routes, which have already 
been fully designed, are smart in one way or another.
3
Moreover, the  planning  of prototypes  for  smart  itineraries in both urban  and 
extra-urban  environments—and  therefore  more  limited  in  scope  than  the  ones 
just  mentioned—has  greatly  involved  researchers  and  practitioners  since  2000, 
that is  to say since ICT has become pervasive, and  mobile tourism and mobile 
guides have established themselves in the marketplace (Smart Environments 2005; 
Edwards et al. 2006; Rizzo 2008; Kenteris et al. 2009; Chu et al. 2011; Fu and Yu 
2013; Arnaboldi et al. 2014; Dickinson et al. 2014). Indeed, geo-technologies have 
become  increasingly  important  not only  because  they  are  essential  for  creating 
routes and trails (Rizzo 2014) or their customization (Garcia et al. 2010), but also:
•  to deliver or gather—during the trip—information based on the location of tour-
ists (Nie et al. 2009) and/or to analyse tourist behaviours (Girardin et al. 2007; 
Asakura and Iryo 2007; Asakura and Hato 2009; Zheng et al. 2012);
•  to bring tourism information to users in a more immersive manner than tradi-
tional text or maps (granting access to/providing augmented reality information 
at distance) (El Choubassi et al. 2010);
•  as  tools  and settings in which to  integrate,  aggregate  and diffuse information 
(and,  therefore,  enhance  the  communication  of  the  route,  e.g.  via  web-GIS) 
(Cataldo and Rinaldi 2003).
In creating itineraries, various problems have been faced up to, depending on the 
academic background of the researchers involved (engineering, computer sciences, 
geography, etc.).
Routes and regional development—The itineraries have also always been recog-
nized as embodying a cultural value and have been attributed the ability to have an 
effect  on  local  development (Rizzo  et  al. 2013;  Dallari 2013).  Examples in  this 
regard are the numerous routes drawn up by local action groups (LAGs) throughout 
Europe; their design is in fact one of the operations that was financed by LEADER 
and—now not only for LAGs but more broadly—may be financed under the ad hoc 
measures of the EU rural development programmes, partly within the scope of the 
growth of forms of rural tourism. Today, these local or/and circumscribed itinerar-
ies may present themselves as already available and ready for use on the Web
4
or 
the user himself may fine-tune them as needed (D’Amico et al. 2014). Given the 
massive land use that exists, with often widespread sprawl phenomena (Freire et al. 
2
http://www.culture-routes.lu/php/fo_index.php?lng=fr&dest=ac_00_000&lng=en Accessed 
23 September 2014.
3
On  this  subject,  we  refer  the  reader  to  the  material  produced  under  the  CERTESS  project 
(Capp 2012).
4
An example is constituted by the 7 multimedial itineraries for alternative tourism from north-
ern to southern Italy—from Trieste to Salerno—drawn up by various authors (2014) in Bollettino 
dell’Associazione Italiana  di  Cartografia (A.I.C.),  Laboratorio GIS dell’Università  di  Trieste—
Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici, A.I.C./Associazione Geografi Italiani (http://www.openstarts.
units.it/dspace/handle/10077/9911). This work was produced by a Research Group of Italian uni-
versity geographers coordinated by A. Favretto.
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
document pages in original or reverse order within demonstrates how to print defined pages of Word powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to rotate pdf pages and save; save pdf after rotating pages
24
L.S. Rizzo et al.
2009; Rizzo et al. 2014), it is worthwhile understanding whether itineraries that are 
currently set up or that may in future include further significant points of interest—
even in areas rendered complex by past intervention—may persist or whether they 
will be spoiled by future interventions in the territory. This gives rise to a need for 
pervasive applications that take into account medium-to-long-term scenarios (Güell 
2013) which consider routes—including tourist choices and scenic POIs—and the 
territorial planning of government institutions.
Build-up and landscape—The need for a similar reflection becomes even more 
compelling  when  considering  the  spread  of  architectural  and  building  forms that 
clearly  reflect  the paths of  the  territories,  which  are  often  problematic:  examples 
which,  documented  by  widespread  ‘crane  landscapes’  and  omnipresent  ‘for  sale’ 
billboards (Bonora 2009: 23), in any case constitute a narrative of places and pro-
cesses  of  ‘reification’ that characterize  them. In  Italy, the inability  to regulate the 
growth (especially of built-up areas) has given a result of pervasive expressive pov-
erty. Building modules—sometimes bizarre—often have an impact on the landscape, 
resulting in disharmony and deterritorialization. Landscape-related urban and  rural 
relationships are being challenged by development models, rendering the territories 
being examined as incoherent realities and amalgams of fragments. Often artificializa
tion/anthropization projects become ‘unbalancing events’, acting as obstacles to local 
development (when adopting a medium-to-long-term viewpoint). Despite becoming 
part of the fabric of places and their local economy, they in fact leave behind material 
evidence incoherent with the true long-term (environmental) needs of the area as well 
as symbolic evidence that has little to do with the identity of the territory.
Structure of the Paper
This paper seeks to illustrate the results of a study carried out in 2013–2014. In sec-
tion ‘Research design’, we shall clarify what are its objectives and the methodology 
used to obtain  them. In section ‘Discussion of the Results’, we shall discuss the 
results, initially presenting the route we created and on which we tested our work 
model  (section  ‘Conceptual References’).  Subsequently, we  shall illustrate what 
emerged from our analysis of changes in land usage (section ‘Land Use in the Area 
Covered by the Study. For a Quantitative Level 1 Evaluation of the Regional Data’) 
and on the impact that these may have had on the possibility of enjoying the coun-
tryside,
5
the principal tourist resource that the itinerary aims to promote (section 
Land Use, Landscape and Visibility: Possible Negative Interactions? POI 
Classifications by Impact Assessment of LUCC’). Some concluding notes will fol-
low (section ‘Conclusions and Cues for Reflections’), in which we shall reflect on 
the subject of ‘tourist itineraries, landscape and territorial planning’, partly in view 
of renewed interest in studying the link between these aspects and the use of inno-
vative tools and methods for building a tourist attraction.
5
Landscapes, in particular.
25
 Land-use and Landscape Changes …
Research Design
Objectives
As tourism and  landscape  are interrelated concepts,  as we have seen,  work has 
been carried out on developing tools for the design of tourism planning and man-
agement  strategies  with  landscape  (conservation)  as  a  reference  (de Aranzabal 
et al. 2009). Our work intends to contribute to the topic by adding results which 
look at things in  a different  perspective: one  that also reflects  on  cultural  land-
scape  routes  (potentially) acting as a  tool  allowing the tourist to gain access  to 
sites that are linked  thematically  with each  other as well as  with  the landscape 
‘systems’ of which they form part (Rizzo and Trono 2012: 4). The implementation 
of marketing actions for cultural routes begins—we believe—with the identifica-
tion of appropriate  methods aimed at the creation of a specific tourism product. 
Traditionally, this is achieved in primis by analysing the demands of the market 
and of the users themselves. It must, though, also depend on the use of innovative 
tools capable of revealing the structural patterns of territorial processes and deter-
mine if, ultimately, they facilitate or hinder its success. The itinerary, as said, acts 
to coalesce and systematically reorder the available supply, in our case landscapes. 
As a result, it is necessary to combine the moment of its creation with careful veri-
fication of how the territorial fabric to which it refers has evolved, so as to find 
connotations that, over time, invest the planning of the route with coherence. To be 
economically viable as an engine for development, in fact, the (territorial) valori-
zation project—aiming at helping tourists to read the signs of history in the land-
scape  and  to decompile/interpret associated  collective meanings  (Laurens 2007; 
Berti 2013)—should  be  long  lasting.  With that  in mind,  the  identified  research 
problem may be formulated as follows: How can innovative geospatial technolo-
gies, tools and methods enhance the capacity of territorial actors to design more 
sustainable routes, taking under due consideration land-use-related territorializa-
tion processes that are capable of affecting cultural landscapes and impacting on 
the  experience  a  tourist can enjoy (and on his perception  of it)? Therefore,  the 
general aim is to evaluate the impact that land-use/cover changes (LUCCs) have 
on  landscape  visibility  (and,  thus,  on  ‘fruition’/perception  by  tourists)  given  a 
planned tourist route.
The aforementioned statement of the research problem determined the follow-
ing operational objectives:
1.  LUCC evaluation in the area crossed by the route;
2.  Assessment per point of interest (POI) of the impact that LUCCs have had on 
landscape fruition (visibility) within a given buffer zone;
3.  Assessment of the global impact that LUCCs have had on landscape visibility 
within a given buffer zone considering a particular factor: the overlapping of 
possible effects;
4.  Same as (3), but focussing only  on municipalities whose territory is entirely 
included in a given buffer zone.
26
L.S. Rizzo et al.
The Case Study Area: An Overview
The case study area is located in the province of Verona (Veneto Region—Italy) and 
in particular a hilly zone in the north-east of the province itself. It involves eight 
municipalities (San Martino Buon Albergo, Verona, Mezzane di Sotto, Tregnago, 
Illasi,  Cazzano  di  Tramigna,  Soave  and Monteforte  d’Alpone),  whose limits  are 
close to the regional park of Lessinia  and in the cultural region that goes by the 
same name (Sauro 2010). The territorial setting is characterized by parallel ranges 
downgrading into the underlying plain. It offers different kinds of landscapes:
•  an agricultural environment of intensive grapevine cultivation (sometimes frag-
mented by olive trees);
•  small sections of rural landscape (in particular that dedicated to pastures);
•  the urban context of a small walled town (e.g. the town of Soave with its medi-
eval castle);
•  the  precious  (heritage)  landscape  generated  by  the  presence  of  historical 
Venetian Villas (e.g. the Municipality of Illasi);
•  a  ‘sacred’  landscape  consisting  of  ‘minor’  religious  heritage  (sanctuaries, 
abbeys, parish churches, shrines, etc.).
The area is easily accessible by means of the provincial roads that cross transver-
sally the five valleys of Squaranto, Mezzane, Illasi, Tramigna and Alpone. Driving 
along  these roads  allows  one  to appreciate  the  above  landscapes  in  the  typical 
manner  of so-called slow  travel (Mogollón  et  al. 2012)
6
passing  through  Wine 
Routes  (Soave  and Valpolicella), Wine  Towns  (Illasi,  Monteforte  d’Alpone  and 
Mezzane di Sotto), Olive Oil Towns (Illasi and Mezzane di Sotto) and areas boast-
ing the Bandiera Arancione of the Touring Club Italiano (Soave). All of these ele-
ments are part of RES TIPICA (Calzati et al. 2012) (Fig. 2.1).
Methodology
Data sets Used
To fulfil the objectives set, we availed ourselves of a set of data made up of the 
following:
1.  Limits of the spatial units examined in .shp format (downloaded from the geo-
portal of the Veneto Region): NUT3 (province of Verona) and LAU2 (munici-
palities studied);
2.  The POIs that identify the points of interest in .shp punctual format. Each point 
was located using Google Earth. Subsequently, we generated the corresponding 
shape file to be imported into the GIS.
6
See table no. 1, which summarizes the main headings of the slow philosophy: slowness, expe-
rience and environmental/social ethics.
27
 Land-use and Landscape Changes …
3.  The route of the itinerary—created ad hoc—in .shp polyline format.
4.  The technical maps  of  the Veneto Region [scale:  1:5000,  in  raster  (.tif) for-
mat and relating to our case study area] used to generate the digital elevation 
model, on which our analysis was based.
5.  Data sets referring to land use and land cover:
a.  Corine Land  Cover  (CLC)  for Italy (1990,  2000, 2006)  [database down-
loaded from SINAnet in .shp format; scale: 1:100,000];
b.  data in .shp format on land use/cover (scale: 1:10,000) relative to the years 
1983, 1996 and 2006 made available by Veneto Region and relative to the 
province and the municipalities studied.7
These data sets (5a. and 5b.) represented the starting point for all our overlay cal-
culations and the extraction of the values of class changes, below described.
7
‘The genealogy of the data produced  by the Veneto Region is the following. With regard to 
the production process, the table associated with the data derives from the geometric processing 
of the database of the land use and land cover of the Veneto Region. This database, which for 
the urban coverage refers to the archives produced in the project GSE-Land, was implemented 
using the photo-interpretation of AIMA orthophotos, for the 1994 period and of the CTR, in the 
original 1983 edition. The sources are therefore varied: CTR from 1983 and subsequent editions; 
digital AIMA orthophotos from 1994; AGEA orthophotos 2006–2007; GSE-Land archives of the 
land use and land cover’ (Rizzo et al. 2014: 23).
Fig. 2.1   Italy, Veneto and the Province studied. Source Map created by the R.G. Rizzo (2014)
28
L.S. Rizzo et al.
Procedures Carried Out
Once we had  obtained or produced the  data,  we made  them  converge  in a  GIS 
(specially  created  using  ArcGIS  10.2).  From  the  inputs  above–mentioned,  we 
implemented the following phases (Figs. 2.2 and 2.3):
1.  The first step was that of creating the area of analysis of the CLC and of the 
data in .shp format on land use/cover of the Veneto Region (for both data sets, 
we carried out a clip operation using the boundaries of the province of Verona 
and of the municipalities studied as the clip theme);
2.  Secondly,  we  reclassified  such  data  sets8  at  level  1  [the  CLC,  one  should 
remember, uses a hierarchical three-level classification that includes 44 subsec-
tions (Bossard et al. 2000; Gardi et al. 2010: 29). The Region’s data set is in 
line with this. For the purposes of this study, we deemed it sufficient to concen-
trate our attention on the macro-classes of land use. This led to the necessity to 
group together elements on the basis of the ‘(macro) function performed’];
3.  Using topological  overlay  (intersect), we proceeded to extract the past poly-
gons from class 2 (agricultural areas) to class 1 (artificial areas) (respectively, 
from 1990 to 2000 and 2006 for the CLC and from 1983 to 1996 and 2006 for 
8
Corine Land Cover and BDCS (Banca Dati sulla Copertura del Suolo) of the Veneto Region, that is.
Fig. 2.2   Outline of the methodology used in Step 1–3 (polygons extraction, data reclassification, 
topological  overlay  analysis,  indices  calculation;  datasets:  CLC  and  Regione Veneto).  Source 
Charts by R.G. Rizzo
29
 Land-use and Landscape Changes …
the regional figures). Furthermore, with regard to agricultural and viticultural 
practices—such  as  for  example  the  new vineyard  plantings  on  high-altitude 
hillsides—we  used  the  same  approach,  transferring  the  past  polygons  from 
classes 1 and 3 (woodland territories and semi-natural environments) to class 2. 
This allows us to quantify the changes in the landscape. Our procedure high-
lights the accentuation of artificial modelling of the land or—on the contrary—
its  return  to  a  natural  state;  moreover,  it  permits  us  to  calculate  indices  of 
synthesis: the percentual rate of change (not on an annual basis but by period/
interval) and its actual effects in terms of hectares.9 Using the same approach, 
we analysed the changes to the third  degree of detail, to which we refer the 
reader elsewhere for reasons of space (Rizzo et al. 2014). In order to validate 
the  work  carried  out, we  decided  to  convert  into  KML format the layers  in 
shape format deriving from the overlay procedure we implemented. As is well 
9
The data sets (Corine Land Cover and BDCS of the Veneto Region) were, of course, treated 
separately.
Fig.  2.3   Outline  of the  methodology used in Step  4–6 (viewshed  and  distance analysis). The 
example  given refers  to the  analysis of  CLC data. When analysing the  dataset of  the  Veneto 
Region, the team followed the same steps. Source Charts by L.S. Rizzo (2014)
30
L.S. Rizzo et al.
known, Google Earth is capable of opening KML and KMZ files. We visual-
ized the results of the  study  in 3D. Superimposing the files produced on the 
orthophotos uploaded in Google Earth  allowed us to  verify  that the polygon 
does indeed correspond with the new registered land use.
4.  Subsequently,  the  DEM—on  which  in  particular  our  visual  analysis  was 
based—was generated using the technical maps of the Veneto Region. These, 
dated 2005, are distributed on a scale of 1:5000, presenting an error of meas-
urement of around 1–2 m in the x-y plane and about 2–5 m in the z plane. The 
elements that  make  up  these  maps  are  for  the  most  part  three-dimensional. 
Two-dimensional elements, such as contour lines, triangulation points, roads, 
waterways, and anthropic elements, such as supporting walls and discontinu-
ity, have  information  regarding their elevation that is also useful for creating 
the model. Consequently, these were also transformed into three-dimensional 
elements. This process is called for two stages: (a) construction of a triangu-
late irregular network (TIN) model and (b) transformation from the TIN for the 
generation of a raster with 5 × 5 resolution/a 5 × 5 grid.
5.  Remaining within the ambit of the methodology applied to the research being 
carried out here, we went on to make a visibility analysis
10
of the case study 
area  in  two  stages: of the  individual  points  of interest and  of the  route  as a 
whole. Initially, we created a zone visible from a given position (the individual 
POI):  the  so-called  viewshed.  To  do  so,  we  used  a  DEM  to  calculate—by 
means of an algorithm—the difference in elevation of a cell (optical cell) com-
pared to one nearby (target cell). In order to establish the visibility of the latter, 
one examines (for each cell) the line of sight between the observation point cell 
and that of the destination. At the moment when the highest value cells coin-
cide with the target ones, one’s line of sight is blocked. With regard to the des-
tination  cell,  this  is part  of the viewshed  as  long  as  the  line of  sight is  not 
blocked. If the contrary is the case, this cell is not included in the viewshed. In 
the study described here, this analysis was carried out with the aim of identify-
ing which areas that have undergone land-use change form part of the visible 
output raster.
11
As mentioned above,  two different  scenarios were  generated: 
(a) viewshed analysis referring to each individual POI; (b) analysis referring to 
all  of  the  individual  POIs.  Masks  were  obtained  as  outputs  which,  in  a 
10
For the visibility study, we referred to the viewshed techniques utilized over the last few dec-
ades  (Fisher 1996;  Llobera 2003; Štefunková and Cebecauer 2006;  Qiu  et  al. 2011;  La Rosa 
2011).
11
We should like to specify that, in this phase of our  work, we decided to apply visual anal-
ysis  and distance analysis only to the results of the overlay analysis carried out  on the Veneto 
Region’s data  set  on  land  use and coverage. We decided  to make  reference  to  other  data sets 
apart from that of the CLC in order to ‘correct’ the lack of precision due to its low resolution. 
Though highlighting a growing and pervasive distribution of artificial areas, Corine does not reg-
ister small changes which, however, when added together, have a definite influence on the maps 
produced. This finds confirmation in a reading of the metadatum: though the Regional data use 
the same nomenclature as Corine, the two data sets are not homogeneous.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested