31
 Land-use and Landscape Changes …
subsequent phase, were superimposed on the elements of land-use change and 
on the distance from each individual POI.
6.  Once we had  performed out  the visibility analysis, we carried out  Euclidean 
distance analysis using Euclid’s theorem that allows one to calculate adjacent 
cells with respect to a given observation cell (starting point for the process of 
analysis). This allowed us to identify at what distance the various land-use ele-
ments
12
were located with respect to the individual POIs. We then proceeded to 
carry out a reclassification based on putative impact on the field of vision. This 
reclassification  refers to distances.  Considering  a  buffer zone  of  5  km,
13
we 
identified the classes of impact as a descending hyperbolic function, as shown 
in the figure.
All of the analyses—reclassification of the data associated with topological over-
lay, as well as visibility and distance analyses—were carried out using the Model 
Builder tool, the use of which is briefly described hereafter (Fig. 2.4). By means 
of an iterative process for each POI, we obtained an initial visibility analysis from 
which  to  generate  the  mask  of the visible areas.  It was  necessary to transform 
12
Such as those on which the changes in land use we registered are based.
13
The decision to have a 5-km buffer zone derived from the ‘combination’ of the concepts of 
visibility  and slow  tourism.  The  analysis  of intervisibility, often  used  to determine  the impact 
that  major  works/buildings  have  on  the  territory,  considers  both  short-  and  long-range  visual 
perception. The field of vision of the human eye varies according to the physical, chemical and 
environmental conditions  prevailing in  a given moment. This—usually  depending on distance, 
on the altitude of the observer and on clarity (often influenced by the humidity of the particles 
suspended in the air)—may vary from a minimum of 3000 m to a maximum of 250,000 m. Slow 
tourism,  on the  other  hand,  has as its objective to move  around the  territory in  a relaxed  and 
attentive manner (Babou and Callot 2009). Priority is given to observing perceptible details in the 
vicinity rather than to allowing one’s gaze to ‘wander’ into the deeper recesses of the landscape 
and of what is visible on the horizon. Our choice therefore fell on a (relatively short) distance to 
which we could rigorously apply a visibility analysis that allowed us to give greater emphasis to 
perceptible details. Also,  we should like to remind  the  reader that we are dealing with entities 
which, in the municipalities being studied, are not particularly high. Therefore, if one is think-
ing in terms of taking advantage of the countryside, one’s ‘view’ is affected more by a change in 
colour than by the obstruction of one’s field of vision by elements of considerable size (e.g. wind 
farms).
Point Input: 
POI 5 Valli 
Iterate Feature 
Selection 
Value: 
Name
POI Selected 
- Name  
Viewshed 
Analysis 
Visibility 
Raster %n% 
Euclidean 
Distance 
Analysis 
Distance 
Raster %n% 
Buffer 
Analysis 
Buffer Area 
%n%
DTM Input: 
DTM 5x5m 
Extent 
Maxim 
Distan 
Output 
Cell Size 
Distance 
Extract by
Mask  
Visibility 
Buffered 
%n%
Clip 
LLC_Buffere
d_%n
Visibility 
Featured 
%n%
Dataset: 
LLC_80-00
Select 
Feature 
Visibility 
Selected
%n% 
Add Field 
Output 
Feature 
Visibility 
%n%
TableTo Excel  
LLC_Table 
%n%.xls 
Expression 
Field Name 
Field Type 
Clip 2 
LLC Clipped 
on Visibility 
%n%
Clip 3 
LLC Clipped 
on Visibility 
%n%
Reclassify 
D-Raster 
Reclassified 
%n%
Reclassifica
tion
Raster To 
Polygon 
Raster To 
Polygon 
D-Polygon-
Raster 
Reclassified 
%n%
Spatial Join 
LLC-Di 
Jointed %n% 
Match 
Option 
TableTo Excel  
LLC-Di-Vi
Table %n% 
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
Field 
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
Output 
Above 
Output 
Above 
Fig. 2.4   Model builder. Example of the model created for the analysis for and from individual 
POIs. Source Chart created (in ArcGIS 10.2) by F. Smerghetto (2014)
Pdf rotate just one page - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to rotate just one page in pdf; how to rotate a page in pdf and save it
Pdf rotate just one page - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
how to rotate a pdf page in reader; rotate pages in pdf permanently
32
L.S. Rizzo et al.
the  above-mentioned  area  into  a  polygon  and  extract  just  the  visible  areas. 
Subsequently, we created the distance with a buffer limit of 5 km, reclassified that 
raster according to the classes of impact we had established and converted it into 
a polygon. By means of clipping operations, we thus extracted those areas where 
visibility was significant with regard to land-use change. Finally, by means of a 
spatial join, we attributed impact values related to the distances and the elements 
of land-use change. An analogous procedure was performed for the analysis car-
ried out on the various municipalities included in the area under examination.
The implementation of the steps mentioned allowed us to produce appropriate 
thematic cartographies.
Discussion of the Results
The ‘Chosen’ Route: Five Valleys in the Eastern Hills  
of the Province of Verona.
14
A Short Description
Once  the  area had been chosen—and  after  having finalised the evaluation  pro-
cess of its resources—it was decided to use the route just traced by R.G. Rizzo 
and available in the Internet. It is important to specify that it runs mostly through 
hilly  areas. Their  surface  is  characterized  by  little  villages and isolated  houses 
in a rural landscape. The route crosses the five ranges of the Lessinia region and 
also reaches flat territories such as the plains of the valleys at Mezzane di Sotto, 
Tregnago and Soave. The scenic driving or walking route starts from San Martino 
Buon Albergo  and  ends  in  the  walled  town  of  Soave.  It  passes  through  seven 
municipalities and the sites of (1) San Martino B.A., (2) Ferrazze, (3) Montorio 
(Verona), (4) Pian di Castagnè, (5) Postuman, (6) Mezzane di Sotto, (7) Mezzane 
di  Sopra,  (8)  Tregnago,  (9)  Marcemigo,  (10)  Illasi,  (11)  Costeggiola,  (12) 
Castelcerino, (13) Fittà, (14) Monteforte d’Alpone and (15) Soave. It covers about 
100 km in the Squaranto, Mezzane, Illasi, Tramigna and Alpone valleys. With 29 
multi-thematic POIs, it crosses a landscape of vineyards and olive groves, but also 
of heritage villages, Venetian Villas, castles and ancient churches. The whole ter-
ritory is quiet and dotted with wineries and small restaurants serving typical local 
food, and it is well served by winding bike trails and footpaths (Fig. 2.5).
14
Route no. 3 stretching for 100 km by R.G. Rizzo Le 5 valli nelle colline orientali veronesi in 
http://www.openstarts.units.it/dspace/handle/10077/9911. The route with 29 POIs (see the pho-
tographs of the buildings and landscapes) can be seen in the maps using: Google Streets, Google 
Maps, Bing Maps or Bing Satellite.
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
Able to separate one PDF file into two PDF PDF page processing functions by just following attached C# PDF Page Processing: Rotate PDF Page - detailed guidance
rotate single page in pdf reader; how to change page orientation in pdf document
C# PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PDF document pages, or just change the position of certain one PDF page in an
pdf reverse page order preview; change orientation of pdf page
33
 Land-use and Landscape Changes …
Land Use in the Area Covered by the Study. For a 
Quantitative Level 1 Evaluation of the Regional Data
The results obtained will be discussed, first focusing on the province of Verona, 
then on the municipalities listed above and—lastly—on the buffer area at 5000 m. 
The provincial data will ‘function’ as a benchmark against which the performance 
of the municipalities will be ‘weighed’ and to determine the virtuosity of the tra-
jectory made by the territories or, conversely, the regressive character of the same.
The  province of Verona—The  landscape  profile and the  land use  appears  to 
be  affected  by a  significant change. The  analysis has therefore aimed to do  the 
following: (a) verify how much of the surface has changed its intended use; (b) 
understand which classes have favoured from this and which have been disadvan-
taged. It was then decided to further analyse both the period 1983–2006 and the 
two intervals 1983–1996 and  1996–2006. This was  done at  level 1 and at  level 
3 of the classification, both for the CLC and for the data produced by the Veneto 
Region. Only the latter, however, is reported here.
Fig.  2.5   Tourist  route  traced  in  2013–2014  by  R.G.  Rizzo  and  available  in  Internet 
(http://www.openstarts.units.it/dspace/handle/10077/9915). Source  Map  created  by  R.G.  Rizzo 
(2014)
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Easy to rotate the current picture or file page through just a button click; Commonly used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page TIFF and
how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview; reverse page order pdf online
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
be easily integrated into many MS Visual Studio .NET applications to create PDF with just a few VB.NET: Create a New PDF Document with One Blank Page.
rotate pages in pdf and save; how to rotate one page in a pdf file
34
L.S. Rizzo et al.
The implementation of  the  topological overlay procedures on  the  total  years 
covered  by  the  database  reveals  that  the  change  which  took  place  particularly 
favoured the macro-class 1. A total of 8016 ha changed their intended use between 
1983 and 2006 and have been classified as ‘artificially modelled territories’. The 
class that has been replaced, however, has been class 2 (99 % of the total changed 
hectares).  Conversely,  a small  number of  hectares (48)  were ‘lost’ in favour  of 
classes 2, 3
15
and 5.
16
A study that takes into account the two sub-intervals (1983–
1996 and 1996–2006) highlights that the most pronounced change regards the first 
period (57 % of the total, when considering the hectares that switch to class 1). 
However, the phenomenon is also evident (43 % of the total) in the second period. 
For literature on the modes of dissemination of the urbanization from Verona—the 
capital city of the province—to the municipalities of the first belt and then of the 
second urban belt, especially along the radial lines of communication that come 
out of it, and with phenomena of building growth within the same ranges in recent 
years (see Robiglio and Rizzo 2009). Over the years, industrialization has been 
established, especially with the phenomenon of industrial clusters, a commercial 
tertiary and of various services—even quaternary—and logistics for the transport 
and exhibition nodal role of Verona at the national and European level (Robiglio 
1996 2009). Added to this is the tourism function of Verona city, UNESCO. 
Built-up areas are also taken into account, due to expanding tourism in the Verona 
side of the internationally acclaimed Lake Garda (over 11 million overnight visi-
tors in 2013), with a lakeside tourism, along with theme parks, and tourism based 
on culture, wellness, food and wine.
The level 1 analysis only gives a small indication of the changes in the land 
use and cover that occurred between 1983 and 2006. It was then made a more in-
depth  analysis. By disaggregating  the data at level  3, details have emerged that 
we believe are noteworthy. For example, when there is a change in intended use 
in favour of the ‘artificially modelled territories’ class, it was found that the sub-
classes  involved  are  1.1.2  (discontinuous  urban  fabric)  and  1.2.1  (industrial  or 
commercial units) at 30 and 40 % of the hectares, respectively. It was also noted 
that this  occurs  mainly at the  expense  of the  sub-classes 2.1 (Arable) and, in a 
much less pronounced manner, 2.2 (permanent crops).
Focus  on  the  seven  municipalities  in  the  itinerary  and  on  the  buffer  at 
5000  m—Focusing  on  the  territory  of  the  seven  municipalities  crossed  by  the  
tourist itinerary has allowed the clear illustration of how the changes are often not 
contained and mainly affect the following areas: the municipalities of Verona, San 
Martino Buon Albergo and Soave. The analysis of the three thresholds at level 1 
enables the outlining of the following profile: approximately 1400 ha switch from 
class 2 to class 1 (non-negligible figure, given that it represents 20 % of the total 
change  detected  at  the  provincial
17
level  and  represents  almost  the  totality  of  
15
Forested territories and arable land.
16
Water bodies.
17
It should be noted that the Province of Verona comprises 98 municipalities.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
functions, including extracting one or more page(s) from PDF document. To utilize the PDF page(s) extraction function in VB.NET application, you just need to
pdf reverse page order online; rotate pdf pages in reader
VB Imaging - VB MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
Resolution = 96 'set rotation barcode.Rotate = Rotate.Rotate0 barcode 100F, 100F)) docx.Save("C:\\Sample_Barcode.pdf"). Below is just an example of generating an
rotate pdf pages individually; reverse pdf page order online
35
 Land-use and Landscape Changes …
hectares that become artificial areas). When other changes are revealed, towards 
class 3 and/or 5, for example, the values considered, in hectares, are negligible. 
Overall, the growth rate of the built-up areas stands at +20 %, with peaks of 50 % 
in the case of Soave, and 33 and 28 % when considering the dynamics expressed 
by the Municipality of Mezzane di Sotto and of Monteforte d’Alpone (Table 2.1).
 study  that  considers  the  two  sub-intervals  (1983–1996  and  1996–2006) 
reveals that the processes that have transformed the territory were mainly deployed 
in the first period: it refers to 70 % of the hectares that have changed intended use. 
The figure—of which the Municipality of Mezzane stands out (85 %), although in 
line with the provincial trend—occurs in a more pronounced manner with respect 
to this. The drive to land consumption—despite still being considerable—seems, 
however, to be slowing down (probably due also, and above all, to the economic 
crisis). Where there are changes of intended use that artificially shape the land and 
change the landscape, this is still  to the benefit of the sub-classes 1.2.1—which 
on average stands at 40 % of the total (except for Mezzane)—and 1.1.2 (‘discon-
tinuous urban fabric’), to the detriment of ‘agricultural’ sub-classes (as expected). 
Switching to class  1.1.2—on average 24 % of the hectares that are  transformed 
into built-up areas—is equal to almost 50 % of the hectares affected by the change 
in the municipalities of Monteforte d’Alpone and Soave.
The area covered by the buffer at 5000 m, last but not least, stood at 39,500 ha. 
Within  this,  1220 ha have been  lost,  which have changed their  intended use  to 
favour class 1. A quantity that represents 86 % of the total shown above refers to 
the municipalities crossed by the route. A quick examination shows that the phe-
nomenon was particularly evident in the period 1983–2006 and that it is character-
ised in line with what has already been described (Fig. 2.6).
Table  2.1   Province of Verona  and the 7 municipalities: sealed  area and LUCCs (1983–2006). 
Source Data processed by L.S. Rizzo (2014)
Admin. unit
Indices
Sealed area:  
% on tot. (ha)
Var % 
2006–1983 
(CL. 1)
Class change (1983–2006)
2006
1983
% on tot. (ha) of 
the admin. unit 
ha
Prov. of Verona
13.6
11.0
23.4
2.6
8063.5
Municipality
All together
23.4
19.5
20.0
4.0
1417.0
San Martino 
B.A.
20.2
16.7
21.0
3.5
122.1
Mezzane di 
Sotto
7.9
5.9
33.1
2.0
38.5
Tregnago
6.6
6.0
10.7
0.6
23.9
Illasi
11.0
9.2
19.9
1.8
45.4
Soave
16.1
10.7
50.9
5.4
123.2
Monteforte 
d’Alpone
14.0
10.9
28.1
3.1
62.7
VERONA
32.1
27.1
18.3
5.0
1001.0
VB.NET TIFF: Rotate TIFF Page by Using RaterEdge .NET TIFF
specific formats are: JPEG, PNG, GIF, BMP, PDF, Word (Docx the target TIFF page(s) accurately and quickly; Rotate single or TIFF page(s) at one time just as you
pdf rotate page and save; rotate single page in pdf
C# Imaging - C# MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
96;// set resolution barcode.Rotate = Rotate.Rotate0;// set 100F, 100F)); docx.Save(outputDirectory + "Sample_Barcode.pdf"); }. Below is just an example of
rotate individual pdf pages reader; pdf rotate pages and save
36
L.S. Rizzo et al.
Land Use, Landscape and Visibility: Possible Negative 
Interactions? POI Classifications by Impact Assessment  
of LUCC
The  analysis  from  and  for  individual  POIs  has  provided  intervisibility  evaluation 
and the classification of the visual impact as a function of the changes in land use. 
It allows one to rank all POIs in terms of how problematic their (individual) relation 
with LUCCs is in terms of landscape fruition. For space reasons, though, it is not pos-
sible to analyse the full impact on each POI (Fig. 2.7). For a fuller account, we refer 
the interested reader to the authors’ work. This short article is confined, for space rea-
sons, to some essential points emerging from the remaining two levels of analysis.
Global effect (POIs)—The extension of the analysis area was—as said—a total 
of 39,435.5 ha. Within this, the area affected by the changes in land use consists of 
1220 ha, equal to 3 % of the total analysis. If considering the area affected by the 
visual impact that falls within the 5-km buffer, it is 6,140 ha (about 16 % of the 
total area). What remains is the extraction of the areas of the land-use field falling 
within the visible areas. These amount to 178.5 ha: 3 % compared to the visible 
area and  0.45 % with respect to  the buffer area. Now, examining the classifica-
tion carried out, the predominant class observed is 5 (the class with the greatest 
impact). In fact, it occupies a surface of 83 ha within the area of visual impact, 
equivalent to 1.5 %. The other classes, from 4 to 1, respectively, occupy 55, 24, 13 
and 2.7 ha or rather 0.8, 0.3, 0.2 and 0.04 %. These percentages do suggest that the 
zones are affected by the change to the territory that is taking place.
Fig. 2.6   5000 m buffer area: LUCCs 1983–1996 and 1996–2006. Source Map created by R.G. 
Rizzo (2014)
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
How to Rotate, Merge Word Documents Within VB.NET of the web page, here we just describe each Word powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to reverse page order in pdf; how to reverse pages in pdf
C# Image Convert: How to Convert MS PowerPoint to Jpeg, Png, Bmp
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. The last one is for rendering PowerPoint file to raster image Gif. This demo code just converts PowerPoint first page to Gif image.
reverse page order pdf online; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
37
 Land-use and Landscape Changes …
A study of the  data according to sub-interval (1983–1996; 1996–2006) reveals 
a trend consistent  with what was  discussed  in the previous paragraph. In the first 
interval, at 109 ha, the model attributes a notable impact on the perception that the 
tourist may have of the landscape (52 ha fall within class 5; 43 in class 4; and 14 in 
class 3). In terms of total hectares, the phenomenon is less pronounced in the sub-
sequent period. Comparing the two intervals, it can be seen that there is an increase 
in the weight of the POIs that fall within class 5, in relative terms: that is, which is 
associated with the maximum impact (which switches from 44 to 52 %). Conversely, 
the distribution of the remaining classes is more homogeneous (class 2 increases—
which  expresses  a  moderate  impact—of  three  percentage  points  and  class  3—
medium impact—of five). Furthermore, class 4 drops by 17 % points (Fig. 2.8).
Analysis per municipality totally  included within the buffer  area examined—
The analysis developed in the municipal territory was carried out on those com-
munes  that  are  totally  included  within  the  5-km  analysis  buffer  zone.  This 
decision was dictated by the desire to avoid any error that might be linked to the 
proportional analysis defining the relationship between the area of impact within 
the commune and the total area of the municipality. The changes we found fall 
within impact  level 5,  which comprises  a total area of  46.47 ha; we also regis-
tered 6.49 ha with an impact of 4, 0.68 ha with an impact level of 3 and 0.63 ha 
with class 2 impact. Such a scenario goes to show that the changes have influenced 
areas in the vicinity of landscape resources or points with panoramic views. One 
Fig. 2.7   Impact of LUCCs in the (blue) area visible from the POI “Palazzo vescovile” in Monte-
forte d’Alpone, within the 5 km buffer zone (all LUCCs refer to a switch to class 1 of the CLC clas-
sification adopted in the dataset of the Veneto Region). Source Map created by L.S. Rizzo (2014)
38
L.S. Rizzo et al.
finds, moreover, that these impacts are to be noted mainly in flat areas.  Passing 
on to the relationship defined earlier, we note that class 5 considers a rapport of 
0.4 %, while the others are considered as practically of zero value. Considering the 
details with regard to the municipalities, one can carry out two evaluations: (1) by 
area and (2) by level of impact. With regard to the area devoted to change in land 
use, the most  virtuous  municipalities  are Monteforte  d’Alpone  and Soave, with 
1.03 and 2.23 ha, respectively. The commune with the greatest variation in its ter-
ritory is Lavagno with 19.65 ha, followed by Illasi with 14.06 ha. Taking the level 
of  impact  in  examination,  Soave  is  the  most  virtuous,  followed  by  Monteforte 
d’Alpone. Lavagno and Illasi remain unchanged with alterations in land use falling 
in impact class 5 virtually throughout their territories (Figs. 2.9 and 2.10).
Conclusions and Cues for Reflections
The work has aimed to test methods and identify tools that can be used synergisti-
cally and immediately by collective players, interested in operationally reasoning 
on the link between land use, landscape and tourism planning.
Recent  advances  at  the  level  of  representation  systems  and  spatial  analysis, 
together with the development of theoretical approaches that reflect on the concept 
of  territory,  have  enabled  the  development  of  a  synthesis.  The  outcome  is  the 
Fig.  2.8   LUCCs  1983–1996  and  1996–2006:  hectares  (in  percentage)  associated  with  the 
classes of impact. Source Data processed by F. Smerghetto (2014)
39
 Land-use and Landscape Changes …
Fig. 2.9   Total change (ha) within the municipalities wholly comprised in the 5 km buffer zone. 
Source Data processed by F. Smerghetto (2014)
Fig. 2.10   Visible LUCCs (in blue) within the municipalities totally comprised in the 5 km buffer 
zone: classes of impact (all LUCCs refer to a switch to class 1 of the CLC classification adopted 
in the dataset of the Veneto Region). Source Map created by L.S. Rizzo (2014)
40
L.S. Rizzo et al.
proposal of a model through which the reflective contribution of the cartography 
can primarily emerge, to promote a more sustainable exploitation of the landscape 
assets  in  complex  territories,  and  long-term  management  of their enhancement. 
This model helps us to identify spatial relationships between the route under con-
struction  and  land-use-related  processes.  A  by-product  is  the  identification  of 
weaknesses  in  the  valorisation  strategy (i.e.  the  proposed POI),  on  which local 
communities are able to intervene. The methodology is certainly innovative when 
applied to the field of tourism. It could instead be partly reinforced when consider-
ing the uses that could be made of it—especially at the level of visual analysis—to 
evaluate the impact that large buildings have on the landscape.
18
The identification of a more appropriate scale of impact will be the subject of 
subsequent reflections by the research team. The work presented here aims to act 
as a first step. It requires refinement, in order to find solutions that solve the risk of 
an otherwise approximate assessment. In this study, the scale of impact was based 
on the distance factor, limited to the meaning expressed in Euclidean terms. The 
need that is perceived is that of refining the model in a way that takes into account 
the multiple factors that contribute to ‘defining’ the complexity of the impact of 
changes in land use, subject of the study. Potential ‘catalysts’ on which to reflect 
for designing a tool for comprehensive evaluation, in addition to the distance as 
defined  above,  are  identified  in  the  range of  geometric  and  topological factors, 
such as shape, layout and fragmentation.
No less important is the analysis of the territory, incorporating georeferred data 
into the model relative to the approved transformability (parts of the urban and ter-
ritorial planning, or created by ad hoc editing). For the present work, the planning 
information has not currently been made available by the institutions. Applying 
the  model  to  them—both  the  developed  one  and  its  more  elaborate  version—
would allow projection of the analysis into the future and to produce scenarios that 
can diachronically reflect, in greater depth, on the rate of transformation of the ter-
ritory and the direction that it expresses. It could have, in fact, positive or negative 
implications, where it is orientated towards greater naturalness or towards a grow-
ing artificialization that may not be adequately controlled in the results and that 
outlines the establishment of:
•  an increasing geometrization and homogenization of the landscape;
•  (conversely) a random territorial development;
•  a marked differentiation of the natural and landscaped components.
All of these are aspects which, when considered through an impact index that is 
capable of reading them, could generate evaluations  with diametrically opposite 
results in different analytical situations.
Beside top-down decisions (to which our model could contribute), the fruition 
of rural countryside landscapes could increasingly benefit also from the adoption 
of a bottom-up approach. The creation of participatory maps based on community 
18
For example, wind turbines for energy production.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested