Pdf rotate pages and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf page order reverse; rotate pdf pages individually
Pdf rotate pages and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
reverse page order pdf online; rotate pages in pdf
On the Cover
The background image consists of an aerial photo of Port Alberni, Vancouver
Island overlaid by cadastral, BC Terrain Resource Information Mapping (TRIM)
streams, and Sensitive Habitat Inventory Mapping (SHIM) GPS stream course.
Photographs reflect aspects of the SHIM process, including GPS and fish surveys
and mapping watercourse features.
Citation
Mason,  B.,  and  R.  Knight.  2001.  Sensitive  Habitat  Inventory  and  Mapping.
Community  Mapping  Network,  Vancouver,  British  Columbia.    315pp  +  viii.
M. Johannes, Editor.
Canadian Cataloguing in Publication Data
ISBN 1-894630-24-6
Copyright © 2001, Community Mapping Network
Copies of this report may be
Ordered from (Cost $90.00)
Northwest Ecosystem Institute, PO Box 513, Lantzville, BC  V0R 2H0
Orders@ecosystems.bc.ca
Or downloaded from
www.shim.bc.ca
Comments and suggestions for SHIM methods improvement can be forwarded to
masonb@pac.dfo-mpo-gc.ca.
Cover photographs by M. Johannes, J. Cleland, and F. Mason.
Design by K. Owen, Klassen Design and production by J. Cleland and L. Hanslit,
Northwest Ecosystem Institute.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a range of pages from a PDF document.
how to rotate all pages in pdf; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.DeletePage(2); // Save the file. doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. How
rotate a pdf page; rotate individual pages in pdf
i
Foreword
The Sensitive Habitat Inventory Mapping (SHIM) method was developed with the
interest, cooperation and participation of many individuals and groups within
British Columbia. SHIM method development is ongoing and integrates at least
seven years of experience and consultation with specialists, local community
groups  and  agencies  within  the  Georgia  Basin  and  West  Coast  of  British
Columbia.  SHIM methods are intended for distribution and use as a watercourse
mapping standard.  The  manual  presented here  is  comprised  of a series  of
modules describing tools to inventory, precisely map and compile data for BC
urban and rural watercourses.
Many urban and smaller rural watercourses remain unknown, poorly understood,
and suffer from many impacts of human development. SHIM methods reflect a
novel set of tools to explore and promote awareness of these watercourses by
mapping their location and inventorying their attributes. The awareness and
commitment to  local  watercourses is  an important process created  through
cooperation of local communities, First Nations, municipalities, planners, and
managers. SHIM methods comprise a set of tools and methods which can be
used to help protect and contribute to sustainable development of fisheries,
wildlife and aquatic habitat resources around British Columbia. SHIM mapping
and data systems developed to date reflect the use and interests of many of
these agencies and community groups.
SHIM was initiated through the Fish Habitat Inventory and Information Program
(FHIIP) through cooperation between Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the British
Columbia  Ministry  of  Water,  Lands  and  Air  Protection  along  with  many
municipalities and non government groups as partners in fisheries inventory and
information systems in BC.  The use of SHIM or other standardised mapping
methods  to  locate,  map  and  inventory watercourses  will 
● 
greatly  improve
information about watercourses to strengthen rationale for better protection and
restoration  of  streams  and  riparian  habitats  in  the  face  of  continued  land
development; 
assist  managers,  planners  and  communities  alike  in  the
successful  resource  inventory,  land  use  planning,  freshwater  restoration,
enhancement and assessment of BC’s urban/rural watercourses; 
improve the
confidence of government agents in the information that nongovernment groups
collect and compile; and 
ultimately improve the health of British Columbia’s
salmonid stocks and habitats.
M. Johannes, editor
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; PDFDocument doc1 doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex); // Output the new
rotate pages in pdf online; how to rotate a single page in a pdf document
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract PDF pages and save changes to original PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET.
rotate pdf pages and save; rotate pdf pages in reader
ii
Acknowledgements
We  recognize contributions  from  many  local  government  planners  and engineers,  volunteers,
community groups, fishers, First Nations, fisheries and environmental biologists including: Don
Chamberlain, Project Watershed in the Comox Valley, Langley Environmental Partners (LEPS), Nanaimo
Community Fisheries Development Centre  (CFDC),  Alberni  Clayoquot  Regional  District  (ACRD),
Regional  Aquatic Management  Society (RAMS),  Regional District of  Nanaimo  (RDN),  Northwest
Ecosystem Institute (NEI) and many other groups (see below) that piloted methods and promoted use
of the SHIM method and information products.
♦  ARMS
♦  Bowen Forest & Water Mgt. Society
♦  BCCF – BC Conservation Foundation
♦  Burns Bog Society
♦  CORD – Central Okanagan Regional
District
♦  CRD – Capital Regional District
♦  City of Abbotsford
♦  City of Chilliwack
♦  City Maple Ridge
♦  City of Mission
♦  City of Port Alberni
♦  City of Port Moody
♦  City of Squamish
♦  City of Surrey
♦  Comox Strathcona Regional District
♦  Coquitlam
♦  Cowichan Tribes
♦  CVRD – Cowichan Valley Regional
District
♦  District of Saanich
♦  District of Ucluelet
♦  FVRD – Fraser Valley Regional
♦  FVRWC – Fraser Valley Regional Watershed
Coalition
♦  Gambier Island Conservancy
♦  GVRD – Greater Vancouver Regional District
♦  ICNRC – Inner Coast Natural Resource Center
♦  Langley Environmental Partners Society
♦  Mt. Currie First Nations
♦  Mt. Waddington Regional District
♦  Powell River Healthy Community
♦  Sto Lo First Nations
♦  SCRD – Sunshine Coast Regional District
♦  Township and City of Langley
♦  Veins of Life
♦  Many Landowners
♦  Many Local Streamkeepers
Direction for the development of this manual was provided by the Sensitive Habitat Inventory and
Mapping (SHIM) steering committee including Brad Mason of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Rob
Knight of the Urban Salmon Habitat Program, Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection; and
Kathleen Moore of the Canadian Wildlife Service. Further guidance and support was provided by Dave
Tredger, Fisheries Inventory Section in the Ministry of Sustainable Resources Management and Mark
Johannes, Northwest Ecosystem Institute.
Contributing authors and reviewers during the early development of this manual include: Coast River
Environmental Services Ltd. in association with Northwest Hydraulic Consultants Ltd. and Quadra
Planning Consultants Ltd., Louise Porto of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Paul McElligott, Triton
Environmental Consultants, and Julian Dunster. Early methods for riparian area  mapping were
developed by Annette DeHault and Maria Grau. Final riparian and photo-interpretive methods were
written by Larianna Brown, University of British Columbia. The imperviousness module was written by
Paul  Zandbergen, University of British Columbia.  The  Global Positioning  Systems  module  had
contributions from Steve Robertson with assistance from Laurie Smith. Hydraulic cross sections were
developed by Peter O’byrne of the District of Chilliwack engineering department and Murray Manson,
Marc Porter, Katrina Roger and Tanya Bettles. Geographic Information System tools were developed
by Johnny Y. Voong, Canadian Coast Guard. Review and editing, graphics and layout were undertaken
by Mark Johannes, Leila Hanslit, Josie Cleland and Kari-Lyn Owen of Northwest Ecosystem Institute.
Local user input was contributed through ongoing consultation, extensive field trials, user need
assessments, focus groups, working sessions and two workshops titled “Mapping a Course For Our
Watersheds,” held in Nanaimo and Abbotsford, 2000. The participation of numerous individuals from
the municipal, provincial and federal governments, as well as stewardship groups and First Nations is
appreciated. The diversity of groups participating in SHIM is essential for the creation of management
strategies for protecting watercourses and planning sustainable communities.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
outPutFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document doc2.Save(outPutFilePath
rotate one page in pdf reader; how to rotate just one page in pdf
How to C#: Rotate Image according to Specified angle
pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB Steps to Rotate image.
saving rotated pdf pages; pdf reverse page order
iii
Table of Contents
Foreword
i
Acknowledgements
ii
Table of Contents
iii
List of Tables
vii
Introduction
Introduction
1
SHIM Method Schematic
4
Limitations of SHIM Methods
5
Who can or should use this manual?
5
Terms and Definitions
5
Relationship of this Manual to Other Inventory Methods
7
References Cited
8
Module 1: Existing Information Review
1.1 Purpose
9
1.2 Final Products
9
1.3 Introduction
10
1.4 Inventory Review Procedure
10
1.5 Sources of Information
12
1.5.1 Fish and Fish Habitat Information from Federal and Provincial
Agency Sources
12
1.5.2 Fisheries Information from Municipal and Regional Governments
14
1.5.3 Fisheries Information from Stewardship Groups
14
1.5.4 Fisheries Information from First Nations
15
1.5.5 Red and Blue Listed Species
15
1.5.6 Maps and Aerial Photographs
15
1.6 Required Inventory Data
16
1.7 Reporting
17
1.8 References Cited
17
Module 2: Watershed Overview
2.1 Purpose
19
2.2 Final Products
20
2.3 Introduction
21
2.4 Obtain a Base Map
21
2.5 Develop a Base Map
23
2.6 Delineating the Watershed and its Stream Network
23
2.6.1 Preliminary Identification of the Stream Network on the Base Map
24
2.6.2 Assessing Field Mapping Requirements
24
2.6.3 Watershed Boundaries
25
2.7 Watershed and Waterbody Referencing
25
2.7.1 Map Reference
26
2.7.2 Gazetted Name
26
2.7.3 Alias (Local Name)
26
2.7.4 Watershed/Waterbody Identifier System
26
2.7.5 Interim Locational Points (ILPs)
27
2.7.6 Geo-Referenced Co-ordinate
27
2.7.7 Final Watershed/Waterbody Code
28
2.8 Designating Preliminary Reach Breaks
28
2.8.1 The Longitudinal (Long) Elevation Profile
29
2.8.2 Identification of Stream Reaches
29
2.8.3 Stream Reach Numbering
31
2.8.4 Reach Classification
31
2.8.5 Reach Description
32
2.9 Reporting
33
2.9.1 Required Inventory Data
33
2.9.2 Required Map Products
34
2.10 References Cited
34
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Similarly, Tiff image with single page or multiple pages is supported. Description: Convert to PDF and save it on the disk. Parameters:
how to rotate pdf pages and save; rotate pages in pdf expert
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it on the disk.
pdf reverse page order online; rotate single page in pdf
iv
Module 3: Watercourse Centreline and
Habitat Feature Mapping
3.1 Purpose
35
3.2 Introduction
36
3.3 Using the SHIM Data Dictionary for Data Collection
37
3.3.1 The Data Dictionary
37
3.3.2 Points, Lines and Polygons
38
3.3.3 Use of GPS for All or Part of the Survey
40
3.4 Criteria for Defining Stream Segments
40
3.4.1 Fish Habitat Inventories
42
3.4.2 Impact Assessment and Monitoring
42
3.4.3 Habitat Suitability and Productive Capacity
43
3.4.4 Land Use Planning
44
3.4.5 Stock Assessment
44
3.5 Survey Logistics
45
3.5.1 Survey Timing
45
3.5.2 Equipment
45
3.5.3 Legal Permission: Land Owners, Statutory Agencies
46
3.5.4 Note-keeping
47
3.6 Mapping the Watercourse Centreline
47
3.7 Survey Reference Information
48
3.7.1 Watercourse Name
48
3.7.2 Watershed Code and Tributary Code
49
3.7.3 Other Information
50
3.8 Recording Stream Segment Characteristics
50
3.8.1 Primary Class
51
3.8.2 Secondary Class
55
3.8.3 Hydraulic Type
58
3.8.4 Crown Closure
59
3.8.5 Gradient
60
3.8.6 Spawning Habitat
61
3.8.7 Livestock Access
61
3.8.8 Bars
61
3.8.9 Substrate Composition
62
3.8.10 Substrate Compaction
63
3.8.11 Channel Dimensions
63
3.9 Points of Reference
68
3.10 Habitat Feature Mapping
69
3.10.1 Watercourse Features
73
3.10.2 Artificial Features
78
3.10.3 Obstructions
85
3.10.4 Discharges
90
3.10.5 Restoration/Enhancement Features
94
3.10.6 Other Watercourse Features
95
3.13 References Cited
111
Module 4: Riparian Area Classification
And Detailed Cross-Sections
4.1 Purpose
113
4.2 Introduction
114
4.3 Required Skills
116
4.4 Equipment
116
4.5 Project Planning
116
4.6 Compiling Existing Data
117
4.6.1 Scale
117
4.6.2 Vector Data
117
4.6.3 Photograph and Photointerpretation Tools
118
4.7 Photo Pre-typing and Preliminary Field Reconnaissance
119
4.7.1 Photo Pre-typing
119
4.7.2 Field Reconnaissance
119
4.8 Secondary Photo Pre-typing
120
4.8.1 Delineating the Watercourse and Project Area
120
4.8.2 Delineating Land Cover Polygons
120
4.9 Field Sampling
121
4.9.1 Designing a Sampling Plan
121
4.9.2 Sampling Methods
122
4.10 Field Data Integration and Final Photo-typing
123
v
4.10.1 Adding Field Data to the GIS
123
4.10.2 Final Photo-typing
123
4.10.3 Interpretive Mapping
124
4.11 Detailed Stream Channel Cross-sections
125
4.11.1 Cross-sectional Measurement Points
125
4.11.2 General Field Protocol for Detailed Cross-sectional Measurements
127
4.11.3 Measurement Methods
128
4.11.4 Channel Measurements
130
4.11.5 Riparian Measurements
131
4.11.6 Definition of Terms
132
4.12 ArcView Cross-sectional Diagram Tool Extension
133
4.12.1 Loading the Extension in ArcView
134
4.12.2 Displaying Stream Cross-sections
134
4.12.3 Displaying Cross-sectional Attribute Tables
137
4.12.4 Spatial Display of Cross-sectional Features
139
4.13 References Cited
141
Module 5: GPS Surveying Procedures
5.1 Purpose
155
5.2 Introduction
155
5.3 Urban Stream Mapping Program
156
5.3.1 Stream Information Requirements
156
5.3.2 Accuracy Requirements
158
5.4 Using GPS for Urban Stream Mapping
160
5.4.1 Advantages of GPS
160
5.4.2 Limitations of GPS
161
5.4.3 Practical and Logistical Considerations
161
5.4.4 Stream Mapping Scenarios
162
5.5 General Project Requirements
163
5.5.1 Personnel Requirements
164
5.5.2 Training and Experience Requirements
165
5.5.3 GPS Equipment and Software
167
5.6 Field Methods for Stream Mapping
169
5.6.1 Methods for Point Features
170
5.6.2 Methods for Line Features
173
5.6.3 Practical Receiver Operations
181
5.6.4 Field Work under Forest Cover
183
5.7 Planning and GPS Processing
187
5.7.1 GPS Mission Planning
188
5.7.2 GPS Reference Stations
189
5.7.3 GPS Data Processing
192
5.8 Mapping and Data Quality
197
5.8.1 Using GPS Data in Mapping and GIS Software
197
5.8.2 Quality Control in GPS Position Data
200
5.8.3 The Nature of Errors in GPS Positions
202
5.8.4 GPS Under Forest Canopy
207
5.8.5 Integrating Conventional Survey Data
214
5.9 GPS Data Processing
214
5.9.1 Handling GPS Data Using Pathfinder Office and ArcView
214
5.9.2 Editing GPS Data Using the GPS Data Dictionary Tool Extension
for ArcView
221
5.10 References Cited
232
Module 6: Fish Inventory
6.1 Purpose
233
6.2 Final Products
233
6.3 Introduction
234
6.4 Inventory Format
234
6.5 Pre-Field Inventory Procedure
235
Step 1 Review Existing Fisheries Information
235
Step 2 Select Sample Sites
235
Step 3 Determine Sampling Techniques and Select Sampling Gear
236
Step 4 Obtain Fish Collection Permits
236
6.6 Field Inventory Procedure
237
6.6.1 Access to Private Land
237
Step 5 Fish Sampling
237
6.6.2 Required Individual Fish Data
241
6.6.3 Discretionary Individual Fish Data
242
vi
Step 6 Photodocumentation
243
6.7 Reporting
243
6.7.1 Required Inventory Data
244
6.7.2 Required Map Products
245
6.8 References Cited
246
Module 7: Imperviousness
7.1 Purpose
247
7.2 Final Products
247
7.3 Introduction
248
7.3.1 Methodology
248
7.3.2 What is imperviousness and why is it important?
249
7.3.3 Total versus Effective Impervious Area
250
7.4 Summary of Methodologies
252
7.4.1 Direct Measure
252
7.4.2 Indirect Measures
253
7.4.3 Surrogate Measures
255
7.5 Recommended Methodology
256
7.6 Requirements
257
7.6.1 Imagery and Existing Watershed Information
257
7.6.2 Additional Information
257
7.7 Step-by-Step Description of Method
259
Step 1 Organize Your Project
259
Step 2 Delineate the Watershed Boundary
259
Step 3 Map Land Use and Cover
260
Step 4 Determine Imperviousness Factors
265
Step 5 Carry Out Calculations
268
7.8 Final Observations
271
7.9 Reporting
271
7.10 References Cited
272
Module 8: Photodocumentation
8.1 Purpose
273
8.2 Final Products
273
8.3 Introduction
273
8.4 Inventory Procedure
274
8.4.1 Site Photography
274
8.5 Reporting
275
8.5.1 Required Inventory Data
275
8.5.2 Required Map Products
276
8.6 References Cited
276
Module 9: SHIM Data Deliverables and
Data Management
9.1 Data Collection and Processing
277
9.2 Qualifications
278
9.3 Deliverables
278
9.3.1 Photo Subfolder
278
9.3.2 Raw GPS Data Subfolder
279
9.3.3 Corrected GPS Data Subfolder
279
9.3.4 Processed GPS Data Subfolder
279
9.3.5 Metadata Subfolder
283
9.3.6 SHIM Map Subfolder
284
9.4 Flowchart of SHIM Data Management Process
285
Appendum: Hotlinking JPG Images to ArcView Shapefiles
286
Appendicies
Appendix A: Using the SHIM Data Dictionary v. 23.0
291
Appendix B: SHIM Data Dictionary v. 23.0
295
Appendix C: Global Positioning System Procedures and Specifications
305
Appendix D: TSCI-Asset Surveyor Operator
309
vii
List of Tables
Table 2.1 SHIM Required Basin and Reach Classification Table
31
Table 3.1 Summary of Data Dictionary v23.0
38
Table 3.2 Stream Characteristics Used to Define Stream Segment Assignment
42
Table 3.3 Recommended SHIM Field Equipment
45
Table 3.4 BC Provincial Watershed Coding System
49
Table 3.5 Stream Characteristics Used to Define Individual Segments
50
Table 3.6 Bed Material Size Classes
62
Table 3.7 Watercourse Instream Cover Descriptions
67
Table 3.8 Watercourse Measurements
70
Table 3.9 Minimum Size Criteria Required for Including Deep Pools
in Features Mapping
101
Table 4.1 SHIM Land Cover Classification System
144
Table 4.2 SHIM Riparian Land Cover Signature Key
148
Table 7.1 General Land Use and Land Cover Categories
261
Table 7.2 Recommended Land Use and Land Cover Categories
262
Table 7.3 Recommended Imperviousness Factors
266
Table 7.4 Land Use and Cover for Hoy Creek
270
Table 7.5 Example of EIA Estimates
270
viii
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested