embed pdf in mvc view : Rotate pdf page and save SDK control service wpf web page windows dnn 10Apr02%20complete%20SHIM%20with%20all%20bookmarks11-part93

Module 3 - 101
ɷ  Moderately turbid (M) − muddy water with increased visibility
in shallow areas. General shapes on the surface of the stream
bed can be discerned, but deeper areas are not visible.
ɷ  Lightly turbid (L) − features can be distinguished in shallow
areas, and there is limited visibility in slightly deeper pools
(>1.5 m).
ɷ  Clear (C) - excellent visibility except in very deep areas.
Deep Pool (Other) 
Code: DP
Description: a deep pool meets the minimum size criteria outlined in
Table 3.9.
Residual pool depth is the depth that the pool would have if the stream
stopped  flowing.  It  is  calculated  by  subtracting  the  depth  at  the
downstream riffle crest (which defines the downstream end of the pool)
from the depth at the deepest point in the pool.
Table 3.9  Minimum size criteria required for including deep pools in features
mapping  (taken from Schuett-Hames 
et al. 
1994).
Channel Bankfull
Width (m)
Minimum Unit Size
(m
2
)
Min. Residual Pool Depth (m)
0 – 2.5
0.5
0.10
2.5 – 5
1.0
0.20
5 – 10
2.0
0.25
10 – 15
3.0
0.30
15 – 20
4.0
0.35
> 20
5.0
0.40
Large Woody Debris (Other) 
Code: LWD
Description:   Logs within the bankfull  channel that  are  ≥30  cm  in
diameter  and  ≥2  m  in  length.  LWD  provides  fish  with  cover  from
predators as well as adding complexity to in-stream habitat.
Rotate pdf page and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
how to save a pdf after rotating pages; change orientation of pdf page
Rotate pdf page and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
how to rotate pdf pages and save; how to rotate all pages in pdf at once
Module 3 - 102
Figure 3.37  An example of large woody debris in a stream channel (Top
downstream view; Bottom – upstream view).
Methods:
ɷ  Record each piece of large woody debris and its approximate
location.
Measurements required:
ɷ  Bank (L/R/I/B)
ɷ  Length
ɷ  Diameter (average)
ɷ  Height – from bottom of LWD to stream bed.
Comments:
ɷ  Type of wood, if known
ɷ  Potential to cause backwatering or blockage for spawners or
juveniles.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
this RasterEdge XDoc.PDF SDK, you can simply delete a single page from a PDF document using VB.NET or remove any page from a PDF document and save to local
how to rotate a pdf page in reader; how to rotate a single page in a pdf document
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
those page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File in
rotate all pages in pdf preview; how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview
Module 3 - 103
Small Woody Debris (Other) 
Code: SWD
Description:  (See Table 3.6.)  Branches and smaller logs within the
bankfull channel that are <30cm in diameter and/or <2m in length. Like
LWD, SWD provides fish with cover from predators as well as adding
complexity to in-stream habitat.
Methods:
ɷ  Record the presence of significant amounts of SWD, and
record the general location of SWD accumulations.
Boulder (Other) 
Code: B
Description:  (See Table 3.6.)  Boulders within the stream channel are
large rocks with their longest axis measuring >256mm. They provide
important cover for fish, provide areas of reduced flow, create scour
pools, and generally contribute to the structural diversity of instream
habitat.
Methods:
ɷ  Record the presence of significant boulders in the stream
channel.
Instream Vegetation (Other) 
Code: IV
Description:  (See Table 3.6.)  Vegetation growing within the wetted
channel provides cover for fish.
Methods:
ɷ  Record the presence of instream vegetation growing within the
stream channel.
Overstream Vegetation (Other) 
Code: OV
Description:  (See Table 3.6.)  Vegetation that projects over the stream
and is <1m above the water surface. Provides shade and cover.
Methods:
ɷ  Record the presence of vegetation overhanging the stream
channel.
Cutbank (Other) 
Code: CU
Description:  (See Table 3.6.)  Cover is provided by portions of the stream
banks where the current has cut away the bank material at or near the
waterline, resulting in an overhang.
Methods:
ɷ  Record the presence of undercut banks.
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Related APIs (PDFDocument.cs): public override void DeletePage(int pageId). Description: Delete specified page from the input PDF file
how to rotate all pages in pdf; how to change page orientation in pdf document
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
outPutFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 doc2.InsertPage(page, pageIndex) ' Output the new document. doc2.Save(outPutFilePath
how to rotate just one page in pdf; rotate single page in pdf file
Module 3 - 104
Spawning Habitat (Other) 
Code: HS
Description:  Salmonids spawn in gravel, cobble, or sandy substrates with
cool, clean, moderate water flows during the months required for egg
incubation and alevin refuge. Spawning habitats are generally found in
the middle reaches of stream systems. However, some species prefer the
lower reaches, where cobble and higher flows are prevalent. Still others
prefer the quieter, smaller tributaries in the upper reaches. Salmonids
generally require a water depth of at least 18cm, a consistent water flow
with a moderate velocity (0.3−1.0m/s), and a surface area at least 1.5m
2
for anadromous salmon, or at  least  0.1m
2
for  resident  trout. Note:
ditches can also be prime spawning areas.
Methods:
ɷ  As spawning areas may occur over long stretches of streams,
note the start and end points.
ɷ  Beware of disturbing sensitive spawning redds during
incubation periods between October and June.
Measurements required:
ɷ  Bank (I)
ɷ  Length – of potential spawning area.
ɷ  Depth – average, of water.
ɷ  Gradient (Slope) – of spawning area.
Comments:
ɷ  Note numbers of spawners and spawned-out carcasses, the
dominant substrate composition, the presence of redds (e.g.,
mounds of freshly turned gravel, spaced evenly in a criss-cross
pattern), and potential obstructions downstream.
Unidentified Fish Species 
Visual Observation (Other) 
Code: FSH
Description:  Since fish presence or absence is an important determinant
of the extent to which a stream is protected by law, locations of fish
observations should be recorded. Many of the smaller watercourses in
settled areas have been altered to the point where fish presence is no
longer likely. While conducting stream surveys, it is important to collect
information about potential barriers to fish passage, and to conduct fish
sampling on watercourses where no previous sampling data exists, but
which could potentially support fish populations.
Salmonid 
Visual Observation (Other) 
Code: SA
Description:  To the experienced observer such as a fly fisherman, it is
relatively easy to identify a trout or salmon as it swims in a stream. Key
features to look for are general body form and behaviour. For resident
trout, spotting along the back and tail fin are often diagnostic.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
int pageIndex = 2; doc.UpdatePage(page, pageIndex); // Save the PDFDocument. String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf"; doc.Save
rotate one page in pdf reader; rotate pdf page by page
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. Parameters: zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
pdf expert rotate page; pdf rotate single page reader
Module 3 - 105
Stickleback 
Visual Observation (Other) 
Code: SK
Description:  Sticklebacks seldom exceed 8cm in length and are usually
much smaller. All species have a series of isolated spines in front of the
dorsal fin. Sticklebacks are typically found in small clear streams, bogs,
beaver ponds and lakes. Threespine sticklebacks (
Gasterosteus aculeatus
)
are abundant in lakes and low-gradient streams, and are often found in
roadside ditches in coastal areas. Anadromous and resident forms exist.
Sucker 
Visual Observation (Other) 
Code: SU
Description:    Suckers  are  common,  widespread  fish  in  many  BC
drainages. Suckers are often found in fast-flowing water, like salmonids,
and appear similar to salmonids in many respects. However, generally
have larger scales, lack dorsal spotting, and a close look at the head will
reveal a sucker’s characteristic downward-pointing mouth with it large
fleshy lips. Suckers spawn during the spring, at which time most migrate
into small streams.
Sculpin 
Visual Observation (Other) 
Code: SC
Description:  Sculpins, also known as bullheads, are common in rocky
streams. However, they are not often seen by the casual observer, since
they are bottom-dwellers that usually hide during the day beneath rocks
and debris. Sculpins are generally small fish, <17cm in length. They
typically have large, flattened heads, and are scaleless.
Fish Collected 
Visual Observation (Other)
Description:  Record the locations of any fish collected during your
sampling efforts. Note that fish sampling generally requires a federal
and/or provincial permit, which should be acquired before you go into
the field.
Figure 3.38  Collected fish sample (juvenile cutthroat trout 
Oncorhynchus clarki
).
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Description: Convert to PDF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. DocumentType.PDF. zoomValue, The magnification of the original tiff page size.
rotate pages in pdf permanently; reverse page order pdf online
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. Parameters: zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
pdf reverse page order preview; rotate pages in pdf
Module 3 - 106
Methods:  For details on fish sampling procedures, refer to publication:
Fish Collection Methods and Standards 
(BC Fisheries, 1999),
Section 2:
Fish Inventory Methodologies.
ɷ  Review existing fish presence data before initiating sampling
in any system;
ɷ  Obtain fish sampling permits from MELP and DFO (allow one
month);
ɷ  Choose the method most suitable for the size of stream,
habitat type, target species and life stage, flow levels, and
available time and budget;
ɷ  Ensure that the crew is experienced in sampling techniques
and identification of fish species; and
ɷ  Ensure that fish are handled in such a way as to minimize
stress and mortality.
Website: http://www.for.gov.bc.ca/ric/pubs/aquatic/fishcol/fish-3.htm
Measurements required:
ɷ  Date of capture
ɷ  Water level (flood, high, moderate, low)
ɷ  Site locator and description
ɷ  Number of specimens captured, and fork lengths for
salmonids and red or blue listed species.
ɷ  Habitat type (e.g., pool, riffle).
ɷ  Method and total capture effort (e.g., the number of minnow
traps used and the amount of time they were in place).
ɷ  Key personnel
ɷ  Photos of representative specimens of each species, especially
for red or blue-listed species.
Wildlife Sighting (Other)
Description:  Signs of wildlife include tracks, scats, scratch markings,
nests, burrows, sounds, etc. Include additional notes in the comments
field and, if possible, take photos.
Methods:  Indicate the type of evidence witnessed, as described in the
following categories:
ɷ  call – or vocalization, most common for birds and amphibians.
ɷ  egg mass – sign of amphibian presence.
ɷ  nest
ɷ  sighted – specimen observed visually.
ɷ  scat/droppings – most common for mammals, but also
visible in the form of “guano” (whitewash) for birds.
ɷ  tracks – most common for mammals.
ɷ  other – e.g., indications of deer browse, or rubbing against
trees.
Module 3 - 107
Describe the general class of wildlife that the evidence indicates, and
assign to one of the following categories:
ɷ  amphibian – including frogs, newts, salamanders, etc.
ɷ  large mammal – including fox, coyote, deer, bear, etc.
ɷ  songbird – including wrens, sparrows, warblers, etc.
ɷ  raptor – including hawks, eagles, owls, etc.
ɷ  reptile – including snakes, turtles, etc.
ɷ  small mammal – including mice, bats, squirrels, weasels,
snowshoe hare, etc.
ɷ  waterbirds – including gulls, herons, sandpipers, plovers, etc.
ɷ  waterfowl – including ducks, geese, etc.
ɷ  other bird – including woodpeckers, grouse, pheasants, etc.
Note whether the evidence was observed on the right bank, left bank,
both banks or in-stream. If a specimen is seen flying overhead, indicate
whether it was observed over the stream (in-stream) or over one or both
of the banks. Then indicate in the comments that it was observed in
flight.
If possible, include the common or scientific name of the species as a
text entry.
Include in the comments any additional information about the evidence.
Examples of appropriate comments would be the size and description of
a scat, nest or egg mass, or the description and behaviour of observed
specimens.
Module 3 - 108
Figure 3.39  Top: Signs of beavers chewing willows (riparian). Bottom: Black bear
prints on gravel bar.
Wildlife Tree (Other)
Description:  A wildlife tree is a standing live or dead tree that provides
habitat for wildlife such as birds, salamanders and small  mammals.
Large decaying trees with loose bark, broken tops and large limbs are the
most valuable. Look for signs of nests, holes or cavities, scratch-marks or
fur on the bark and wood chips, or bat guano around the base of the
tree.
Methods:
ɷ  Note the type of tree as coniferous, deciduous or unknown. If
possible, indicate the tree species in the comments field.
ɷ  Indicate whether the wildlife tree is located on the right bank,
the left bank or in-stream.
ɷ  Indicate the nesting status of the tree. If a nest is present,
classify the nest as “large” (i.e., larger than a volleyball) or
“small” (i.e., smaller than a volleyball). If no nest is present,
but the tree appears suitable for nesting, classify the nest
status as “potential." If no nest is present, leave the category
blank.
Module 3 - 109
ɷ  Note the state of the tree as living or dead. The most basic
manner of assessing the state is by determining whether or
not the tree is supporting foliage. If unsure, use the
“unknown” category.
ɷ  Woodpecker use is apparent from the holes that are made as
the woodpecker is foraging for insects under the outer surface
of the wood. Hole size varies depending on the species of
woodpecker, from smaller holes created by downy
woodpeckers (
Picoides pubescens
) and northern flickers
(
Colaptes auratus
),
to large rectangular holes created by
pileated woodpeckers (
Dryocopus pileatus
). The existence of
small chips or shards of wood that have fallen to the ground
during the foraging process indicates recent use. If there is no
evidence of woodpecker use, ignore this category.
ɷ  The bases of trees are common locations for wildlife dens and
burrows that are used by mammal species for avoiding
predators, breeding and hibernating. The entrances of dens
and burrows can be quite small, and there may not be any
indication of recent use. However, if a hole near the base of a
tree appears to be a potential den or burrow, indicate “yes."
Otherwise, ignore this category.
ɷ  A mast tree is a fruit or nut-bearing shrub or tree that provides
a valuable food source for birds and mammals. For the
purposes of SHIM, it is only necessary to indicate those shrubs
and trees that show evidence of being actively used by wildlife
for food. For example, a dogwood tree may exhibit claw marks
from being scaled by a racoon or bear in order to access the
fruit. If there is no indication of recent use, leave this category
blank. However, if there are an abundance of mast-producing
trees and shrubs in a particular stream segment, indicate this
in the comments field for right and left bank riparian.
ɷ  Perches are sturdy branches on living or dead trees that are
used by raptors as viewpoints from which they can hunt for
prey. Although perches are most common in open areas with
little vegetation, they may also be observed in dense forests,
provided the view from the perch to the ground or shrub cover
is not obscured by foliage. Often, especially during the dry
season, the use of perches can be evaluated by the presence
of guano (whitewash) underneath the perch area.  Again, this
category should be ignored unless perches are evident.
ɷ  Cavities are nesting or denning holes located in a tree, usually
in the main trunk. They are used by various species of wildlife
for predator avoidance, resting, breeding and hibernating.
Common cavity-users include owls, swallows, bats, flying
squirrels. Indicate the number of cavities in the one of the
following categories: 1, 2, 3 or 4+. If possible, note the size of
the cavities in the comments field, along with any other
relevant information about description or evidence of use.
ɷ  Where possible, take photographs of wildlife trees.
ɷ  In the comments field, include information on the diameter
and height of the wildlife tree, as well as information on
species, stage of decomposition, etc.
Module 3 - 110
Photo Location (Other)
Description:  Record the location where a photograph is taken.
Methods:
ɷ  For regular cameras, include the roll and frame number of the
photograph as a comment.
ɷ  For digital cameras, record the image number.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested