foxit pdf viewer c# : How to rotate pdf pages and save Library application class asp.net html azure ajax 10Apr02%20complete%20SHIM%20with%20all%20bookmarks15-part97

Module 4 - 141
4.13  References Cited
Brown 
et al
. Watershed Modelling Using a GIS/Hyper-media Framework: A Case
Study of Land Use-Water Quality Interactions in the Salmon River
Watershed in Langley, BC. 1996 pp. 229-233. Urban Salmon Habitat
Program – Towards Integration. In Watercourses: Getting on Stream with
Current Thinking. Conference proceedings. ed. Hicks, R. Canadian Water
Resources Association.
Budd, W.W., P.L. Cohen, and P.R. Saunders. 1987. Stream corridor management
in the Pacific
Coast River Environmental Services. 1998. Resource Inventory Committee Urban
Fish and Fish Habitat Inventory Standard. In conjunction with Northwest
Hydraulic Consultants Ltd., and Quadra Planning Consultants Ltd.
Colwell, R. N. 1997. History and Place of Photographic Interpretation.  Manual of
Photographic Interpretation. Second Edition. ed. W.R. Phillipson. American
Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. pp. 3-15.
Cousins, S.A., M. Ihse. 1998. A Methodological Study for Biotope and Landscape
Mapping Based on CIR Aerial Photographs. Landscape and Urban
Planning. 41:183-192.
Franklin, J.F. 1992. Scientific basis for new perspectives in forest and streams. 
In
Watershed
How to rotate pdf pages and save - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
rotate pages in pdf and save; how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview
How to rotate pdf pages and save - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate one page in pdf reader; change orientation of pdf page
Module 4 - 142
Greene, R.G., J.F. Cruise. 1995. Urban Watershed Modelling Using Geographic
Information Systems. Journal of Watershed Resources Planning and
Management. 13:318-325.
Green, R. and K. Klinka. 1994. A Field Guide to Site Identification and
Interpretation for the Vancouver Forest Region. Province of British
Columbia, Research Branch, Ministry of Forests.
Gregory, S.V., F.J. Swanson, W.A. McKee, and K.W. Cummins. 1991. An ecosystem
perspective of riparian zones. BioScience 41: 540-551
Impervious Surface Reduction Study. City of Olympia, Public Works Department.
Kadman, R., and R. Harari-Kremer. 1999. Studying Long-term Vegetation
Dynamics Using Digital Processing of Historical Aerial Photographs.
Remote Sensing and the Environment. 68:164-176.
Lund, H. G. 1997. Forestry Manual of Photographic Interpretation, Second
Edition. ed. W.R. Phillipson. American Society for Photogrammetry and
Remote Sensing. pp. 399-423.
MacKenzie, W. and A. Banner. 1998. Classification and Description of Wetlands
and Related Ecosystems in British Columbia. Ministry of Forests Research
Program FRBC Project #SB97170
Management.  R. J. Naiman, ed.  Springer Verlag.
Millar, J. N., N. Page., M. Farrell, B. Chilibeck, and M. Child. 1997. Establishing
Fisheries Management and Reserve Zones in Settlement Areas of Coastal
British Columbia. Canadian Manuscript Report of Fisheries and Aquatic
Sciences No. 2351.
Miller, D.R., C. Quine, and W. Hadley. 2000. An Investigation of the Potential of
Digital Photogrammetry to Provide Measurements of Forest
characteristics and Abiotic Damage. Forest Ecology and Management.
135:279-288.
Moring, J.R., G.C. Garman, and D.M. Mullen. 1985. The value of riparian zones
for protecting aquatic systems: General concerns and recent studies in
Maine. In Riparian Ecosystems and their Management: Reconciling
Conflicting Uses. USDA Forest Service General Technical Report RM-120.
p. 315-319.
Northwest: I. Determination of stream corridor widths. Environmental
Management Vol. 11(5): 587-597.
O’Laughlin, J. and G.H. Belt. 1995. Functional approaches to riparian buffer strip
design. Journal of Forestry 93(2): 29-32.
Resource Inventory Committee Website 2001. http://www.for.gov.bc.ca/RIC/
Schuett-Hames, D., A. Pleus, L. Bullchild, and S. Hall. 1994. Timber-Fish-Wildlife:
Ambient Monitoring Program Manual. Northwest Indian Fisheries
Commission.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
doc.Save(outPutFilePath). How to VB.NET: Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF. This is a VB .NET example for how to delete a range of pages from a PDF document.
how to permanently rotate pdf pages; rotate individual pages in pdf reader
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
doc.DeletePage(2); // Save the file. doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Demo Code: How to Delete Consecutive Pages from PDF in C#.NET. How
how to rotate all pages in pdf; pdf rotate page
Module 4 - 143
Standard for Terrestrial Ecosystems Mapping in British Columbia. 1998. Province
of British Columbia, Resources Inventory Committee.
Standard for Terrestrial Ecosystem Mapping in British Columbia.
http://www.for.gov.bc.ca/RIC/pubs/TEECOLO/tem/indextem.htm
Stanfield, L., M. Jones, M. Stoneman,, B. Kilgour, J. Parish, G. Wichert. 1997.
Stream Assessment Protocol for Ontario. Ontario Ministry of Natural
Resources.
Swanson, F.J., R.L. Fredriksen, and F.M. McCorison. 1992. Material transfer in a
western Oregon forested watershed. 
In
Analysis of Coniferous Forest
Ecosystems in the Western United States. R. Edmonds, ed. Hutchinson
Ross Publishing Company.
Vegetation Resources Inventory. The BC Land Cover Classification Scheme.
1999.  Province of British Columbia, Resources Inventory Committee.
Vegetation Resources Inventory BC Land Cover Classification Scheme.
http://www.for.gov.bc.ca/RIC/pubs/TEVEG/BCLand/index.htm
Vegetation Resources Inventory. Photo Interpretation Procedures. (1999).
Province of British Columbia, Resources Inventory Committee.
Vegetation Resources Inventory Photo Interpretation Standards.
http://www.for.gov.bc.ca/RIC/pubs/TEVEG/PhotoStandards/index.htm
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page doc2.Save(outPutFilePath Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using
rotate pdf pages; save pdf rotate pages
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Able to extract PDF pages and save changes to original PDF file in C#.NET. C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET.
rotate pages in pdf; pdf rotate one page
Module 4 - 144
Table 4.1   SHIM land cover classification system
Land Cover Classes Used for Photointerpretation and Field Sampling
Class
Code
Description
Coniferous forest VNF
This area has a natural tree crown cover of 20% or
more of the total polygon area, and at least 80% of the
he
trees are conifers
Broadleaf forest
VBF
This area has a natural tree crown cover of 20% or
more of the total polygon area, and at least 65% of the
he
trees are broadleaf.
Mixed forest
VMF
This area has a natural tree crown cover of 20% or
more of the total polygon area, but of the total trees
es
no more then 80% can be conifer and no more then
65% can be broadleaf.
Shrubs
VSH
The area has less than 10% tree crown cover and
natural shrubs constitute 20% or more of the ground
d
cover.  Shrubs are defined as multi-stemmed  woody
perennial plants, both evergreen and deciduous.
Qualifier:     d
Herbs/grasses
VHB
The area has less than 20% tree cover, less than 20 %
shrub cover, and 20% or more natural herbaceous
cover.  Herbs for this classification are defined as
grass-like vascular plants, including ferns and forbs,
bs,
without a woody stem.  Some dwarf woody plants may
ay
be included in this category. A class qualifier must be
be
assigned to this category.
Qualifiers:     ag, n, ur, r, d, and u
Bryophytes
VCR
The area has more then  5% vegetation  cover and
greater then 50% of the vegetation cover are mosses
es
and lichens, such as in rock outcrops.
Rock
NNB
The area has less than 5% vegetation cover and the
e
substrate is exposed rock, such as in natural rock
k
faces, boulders, bedrock, or fragmented rock.
Exposed soil
NEL
Areas  where  recent  disturbance,  either  human  or
natural, has exposed the soil substrate, such as in
n
development  sites  or  soil  slides.    The  main
n
characteristic is exposed  soil  under  active  erosion
n
processes.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
outPutFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 doc2.InsertPages(pages, pageIndex) ' Output the new document doc2.Save(outPutFilePath
rotate pages in pdf expert; pdf rotate page and save
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Similarly, Tiff image with single page or multiple pages is supported. Description: Convert to PDF and save it on the disk. Parameters:
permanently rotate pdf pages; pdf rotate page
Module 4 - 145
Human-made
surfaces 
(high
imperviousness)
NHR
Areas  covered  by  highly  impervious  man-made
made
surfaces such as pavement, concrete, and buildings
s
with  total  impervious  area  >40%.  This  class  can
n
include industrial, commercial, and residential areas
as well as roads and greenhouses.
Qualifiers:     ag, ur, r, and d
Human-made
surfaces (medium
imperviousness)
NMR
Areas covered by moderately impervious man-made
ade
surfaces with total impervious area between 10-40%.
.
This class is similar to the human made surface (high
h
imperviousness) class but more vegetation is present.
Qualifiers:     ag, ur, r, and d
Human-made
surfaces 
(low
imperviousness)
NLR
Areas of low impervious human made surfaces with
h
total impervious area < 10%.  Such areas may include
de
low density suburban houses, barns, horse tracks,
,
paddocks, or gravel or packed soil parking lots.
Qualifiers:     ag, n, ur, r, and d
Row Crops
NAG
Areas of agricultural crops and farmland.  Agricultural
ral
areas  where  rows  cannot  be  identified  should  be
classified  as  Herbs/grasses  with  an  agriculture
re
qualifier.
Planted tree farm
NTF
Areas used as tree farms, including Christmas tree
e
farms, ornamental tree nurseries, and fruit orchards.
Dug-out pond  or
reservoir
DOP
Dug-out ponds, either of natural or man made origin,
in,
which have been excavated and are maintained.  They
are mostly cleared of vegetation and may be under
er
sudden human induced water fluctuations.
Natural wetland
WN
This class includes natural wetlands which are largely
y
undisturbed by human modification and retain most
t
of their natural characteristics.
Class Qualifiers Used for Photointerpretation and Field Sampling
Qualifier
Code
Description
Agriculture
ag
This  area  may  be  used  for  agricultural  purposes
including hay fields and grazing pastures.
Natural
n
This area is dominated by native herb/grass species and
its appearance is not modified by human use.
Urban/residenti
al
ur
This area is composed of residential lawns, and may
contain clumps  of shrubs and trees.  Vegetation is
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it on the disk.
how to rotate a single page in a pdf document; rotate single page in pdf reader
C# PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in C#.net
Description: Convert to DOCX/TIFF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. Parameters: zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size.
save pdf rotate pages; rotate pdf pages
Module 4 - 146
controlled  and  maintained  by  fertilizing,  weeding,
mowing, and pruning.
Recreation
r
This area is used for recreational fields, with heavily
controlled and highly maintained vegetation.  Examples
of this area include golf courses, school fields, or parks.
Disturbed
d
This area has been recently disturbed and is undergoing
early successional stages. Vegetation may consist of
native and non-native grasses and/or small shrubs, and
small patches of exposed soil may be visible.
Unknown
u
The use of this area cannot be identified.
Land Cover Classes Used Only in Field Sampling
These classes cannot be identified from orthophotographs but should be
applied, along with the above listed classes, during field sampling.
Class
Code
Description
Flood plain
VFP
Area of the flood plain subject to annual prolonged
flooding.  Scouring by high water flows may result in
exposed soil or a cover of very flood tolerant species or
annuals that germinate after flooding recedes.
Disturbed
wetland
DWN
Ponds  or  wetlands  which  have  been  disturbed  by
digging  or  drenching  but  retain  some  natural
characteristics  such  as  well  developed  wetland
vegetation and a fairly natural water fluctuation regime.
Module 4 - 147
Class Qualifiers Used Only in Field Sampling
Qualifier
Code Description
Veteran trees
v
The area includes young or mature forest with scattered
large old trees within.
Wildlife trees
w
This qualifier will be used in combination with forest
classes when snags are present and have significant
potential wildlife value.
Vegetation Structural Stages Used Only in Field Sampling
Class Stage
Code Description
Shrubs
Low shrubs 3a
Communities dominated by shrub vegetation less
than 2m tall; tree seedlings may be abundant; time
since  last  disturbance  is  >20  years  for normal
forest succession.
Shrubs
Tall shrubs 3b
Communities dominated by shrub vegetation more
than 2m tall; tree seedlings may be abundant; time
since  last  disturbance  is  >40  years  for normal
forest succession.
Forest
cover
sapling
4
Typically there is a high density of trees: the main
characteristics of this stage are: trees that have
overtopped  shrub  and  herb  layers  where  self
thinning is not evident.  Trees are usually younger
than 40 years for normal forest succession.
Forest
cover
young
5
The main characteristics of this stage is that self-
thinning has become evident and the forest canopy
shows three distinct layers (overstory, intermediate,
and suppressed).  Dominant trees are generally
between 40 and 80 years of age.
Forest
cover
mature
6
The main characteristic of this stage is the canopy
has begun to open and the understory has become
well developed.  Dominant trees are generally older
then 80 years.
Module 4 - 148
Table 4.2  SHIM Riparian Land Cover Signature Key
Coniferous forest VNF
This area has a natural tree crown cover of 20 % or more of
the total polygon area, and at least 80 % of the trees are
re
conifers
Broadleaf forest VBF
This area has a natural tree crown cover of 20 % or more of
the total polygon area, and at least 65 % of the trees are
re
broadleaf.
Mixed forest VMF
This area has a natural tree crown cover of 20 % or more of the
total polygon area, but of the total trees no more then 80 % can
an
be conifer and no more then 65 % can be broadleaf.
Module 4 - 149
Shrubs VSH
The area has less than 10 % tree crown cover and natural shrubs
constitute 20 % or more of the ground cover.  Shrubs are defined as
s
multi-stemmed    woody  perennial  plants,  both  evergreen  and
and
deciduous.       
Qualifier:     d
Herbs/grasses
VHB
The area has less than 20 % tree cover, less than 20 %
shrub cover, and 20 % or more natural herbaceous
cover.  Herbs for this classification are defined as
grass-like vascular plants, including ferns and forbs,
bs,
without a woody stem.  Some dwarf woody plants may
ay
be included in this category.
A class qualifier must be assigned to this category.
Qualifiers:     ag, n, ur, r, d, and u
Herbs/grasses
Agriculture
VHBag
This  area  may  be  used  for  agricultural  purposes
including hay fields and -grazing pastures.
Module 4 - 150
Natural
VHBn
This area is dominated by native herb/grass species and its
its
appearance is not modified by human use.
Recreation
VHBr
This  area is used for recreational fields, with  heavily
controlled and highly maintained vegetation.  Examples of
of
this area include golf courses, school fields, or parks.
Disturbed
VHBd
This area has been recently disturbed and is undergoing
g
early  successional  stages.  Vegetation  may  consist  of
of
native and non-native grasses and/or small shrubs, and
d
small patches of exposed soil may be visible.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested