foxit pdf viewer c# : Rotate pdf page by page application software cloud html winforms .net class 10Apr02%20complete%20SHIM%20with%20all%20bookmarks16-part98

Module 4 - 151
Urban/
residential
VHBur
This area is composed of residential lawns, and may contain
in
clumps  of  shrubs  and  trees.    Vegetation  is  controlled  and
nd
maintained by fertilizing, weeding, mowing, and pruning.
Human-
made
surfaces
(high
imperviousn
ess)
NHR
Areas covered by highly impervious man-made surfaces such as
as
pavement, concrete, and buildings with total impervious areas >
s >
40%.  This class can include industrial, commercial and residential
areas.
Rotate pdf page by page - rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Empower Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C#
pdf rotate pages separately; rotate individual pdf pages reader
Rotate pdf page by page - VB.NET PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
PDF Document Page Rotation in Visual Basic .NET Class Application
rotate individual pages in pdf; rotate pdf pages and save
Module 4 - 152
Human-made
surfaces (medium
imperviousness)
NMR
Areas  covered  by  moderately  impervious  man-made
ade
surfaces with total impervious area between 10-40 %.
.
This class is similar to the human made surface (high
h
imperviousness) class but more vegetation is present.
nt.
Qualifiers:     ag, ur, r, and d
Human-made
surfaces 
(low
imperviousness)
NLR
Areas of low impervious human made surfaces with total
l
impervious area < 10 %.  Such areas may include low
w
density suburban houses, barns, horse tracks, paddocks,
s,
or gravel or packed soil parking lots.    
Qualifiers:     ag,
n, ur, r, and d
Row Crops
NAG
Areas of agricultural crops  and farmland.   Agricultural
ral
areas where rows cannot be identified should be classified
as Herbs/grasses with an agriculture qualifier.
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Delete PDF Page. using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; How to VB.NET: Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File.
how to rotate one page in pdf document; how to permanently rotate pdf pages
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Professional .NET PDF control for inserting PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class application.
rotate pages in pdf online; how to rotate pdf pages and save
Module 4 - 153
Row Crops
NAG
Areas of agricultural crops  and farmland.   Agricultural
ral
areas where rows cannot be identified should be classified
as Herbs/grasses with an agriculture qualifier.
Natural wetland WN
This class includes  natural wetlands which  are largely
y
undisturbed by human modification and retain most of
f
their natural characteristics.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
how to rotate a pdf page in reader; rotate single page in pdf reader
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Delete PDF Page. Demo Code: How to Delete a Single PDF Page from PDF File in C#.NET. How
rotate pages in pdf permanently; pdf save rotated pages
Module 4 - 154
C# TIFF: How to Rotate TIFF Using C# Code in .NET Imaging
Convert Tiff to Jpeg Images. Convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PDF to Tiff. Move Tiff Page Position. Rotate a Tiff Page. Extract Tiff Pages.
rotate pdf page by page; pdf reverse page order preview
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C#.NET Sample Code: Clone a PDF Page Using C#.NET. Load the PDF file that provides the page object.
permanently rotate pdf pages; pdf reverse page order online
Module 5 - 155
GPS Surveying Procedures
5.1 Purpose
The purpose of this SHIM Module is to provide guidelines for field and office
procedures,  and  data  standards  for  watercourse  mapping  using  Global
Positioning System (GPS) technology.  These guidelines apply to SHIM inventory
but can be generally applied across many stream mapping projects.
GPS surveying is used extensively in the resource industry in British Columbia,
especially in the forest industry where GPS technology has effectively replaced
older methods such as tight-chain traverses for most tasks.  There is much
literature  already available from  agencies  such as the  Resources  Inventory
Committee (RIC), Geographic Data BC (GDBC), Ministry of Water, Land and Air
Protection (MWLAP), and the Ministry of Forests (MoF) provide standards and
approaches for GPS use for resource mapping.  For example:
British Columbia Standards, Specifications and Guidelines for Resource
Surveys using GPS Technology.  Available at:
http://home.gdbc.gov.bc.ca/gsr/gsr_standards.htm
Course Materials: RIC GPS Standards - Using GPS Technology -
Comprehensive GPS Training for Resource Mapping
Ministry of Forests Quality Assurance Procedures and Guidelines for GPS
Surveys
The above source documents are referenced throughout this module.
5.2  Introduction
Stream mapping projects are typically carried out as a partnership of many
agencies  and  organisations  within  a  community.    Personnel  within  these
organisations  will  have  varied  skills,  knowledge,  and  experience.    It  is
recommended that  all personnel, except perhaps field operators, read and
understand this SHIM Module in its entirety.  However, certain sections within
SHIM Module 5 are intended for different team members acting in different
capacities for the project.
ɷ  Sections 5.3 and 5.4 are intended for project teams to make
decisions on how to allocate resources, personnel, etc. on a stream-
mapping project.
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
Existing PDF Pages. Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text
how to rotate pdf pages and save; rotate pdf pages
C# PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Page: Replace PDF Pages. An Excellent PDF Control Allows C# Users to Replace the Original PDF Page with New PDF Page from Another PDF File in C#.NET.
how to rotate all pages in pdf in preview; rotate pdf page few degrees
Module 5 - 156
ɷ  Section 5.5 provides an introduction to the information requirements
for stream mapping, the advantages and limitations of using GPS for
stream mapping, and provides practical scenarios for a stream-
mapping project.  Section 5.5 describes the project requirements in
terms of personnel, training, and equipment.
ɷ  Section 5.6 is intended for field personnel and others who must
understand the different methods of capturing positional data in the
field using GPS receivers.  It describes different possible methods for
capturing data for stream mapping.  By knowing many different data
capture methods, field operators can ensure they are using their time
most efficiently.  This section is intended only to supplement training
and field experience, not to replace them.
ɷ  Section 5.7 is intended for people who will be performing the GPS
data processing.  Contrary to popular belief, this is a fairly simple
procedure and does not require in-depth knowledge of GPS.  There is,
however, a discussion on reference stations (including real-time
correction) which should be understood by decision-makers.
ɷ  Section 5.8 deals with issues of GPS data quality and integrating GPS
data with data from other sources.  It is intended for GIS technicians
and people who will be making decisions about the quality of the GPS
data.  This section is intended only as a supplement to other training
or experience in GIS or mapping software and especially in GPS data
quality issues.
ɷ  Section 5.9 discusses GPS data processing, including managing data
using Pathfinder Office and ArcView software and editing GPS data
using the GPS data dictionary tool extension for ArcView. This section
is intended for people performing the GPS data processing.
ɷ  Appendix A, C and D contain the data dictionary, data standards and
technical GPS requirements for stream mapping using GPS.  Although
most of the standards are contained in the main text, they are
summarised in Appendix C due to their importance.  Appendix C can
be separated and attached to a contract or other instructions as well.
5.3  Urban Stream Mapping Program
5.3.1  Stream Information Requirements
Accurate  and  reliable  information  is  required  to  make  practical,
reasonable,  and  defensible  land-use  and  environmental  protection
decisions about streams.  Both positional and attribute information is
required (Fig. 5.1).
Positional  information  provides  the  location  and  other  geographical
characteristics of a stream.  The location of the stream’s centreline in
space allows users to:
ɷ  Plot the stream on maps, orthophotos, and other base maps.
ɷ  Compute physical parameters of a stream such as the length
of a reach.
Module 5 - 157
ɷ  Calculate distances to lot boundaries and other features
affecting land-use decisions.
Figure 5.1 Positional information plotted on a base map for an example stream
Attribute information provides the physical and biological characteristics
of a stream (Fig. 5.2).  For example, the bankfull width of a segment of
the stream is a physical characteristic, and the nature of the riparian
vegetation may be considered a biological (or habitat) characteristic.
Combining attribute information with positional information allows users
to:
ɷ  Calculate values and proportions such as the area of a riparian
zone or the length of riffle habitat within a reach.
ɷ  Perform queries such as to display sections with gravel
substrate downstream of a potential erosion site.
ROAD
ROAD
Location
of Culvert
(UTM)
Distance to
Legal Boundary
Stream Plotted
on Base Map
Lot 101
Lot 102
Lot 103
Lot 202
Lot 203
Lot 201
Lot 301
L
en
g
th
of
R
ea
ch
Culvert:  Concrete
3m wide
17m long
G
e
r
av
l
C
o
b
b
l
e
G
ra
v
e
l
C
o
b
b
l
e
Fines
W 8
b
 m
W
b
17
m
W
b
1
2
m
W
b
1
0
m
Confluence:  Named Creek
Confluence:  Dry Channel
Module 5 - 158
Figure 5.2:  Attribute information for an example stream
Attribute information must be attached to a positional feature (e.g. a
point or a line) to be effective.  Attribute information is collected along
with  or  separate  from  position  information,  depending  on  local
requirements.
For example, if a municipality is interested only in the location of the
stream centreline for zoning purposes, that basic information is sufficient
for their needs.  However, there is other information which should be
collected as well such as the bankfull width (which defines the top of
bank and is often more important for calculation of setbacks), and fish
habitat  information.   This  attribute information will be required for
planning or habitat management.  Although it is possible to collect only
positional information, strong consideration must be given to collecting
stream attributes.
5.3.2  Accuracy Requirements
The positional accuracy requirement for urban stream mapping is 5
metres, at 95% confidence.  This means that features derived from a GPS
survey (or any other means such as compass and chain surveys) must be
within five metres of the true location of the feature, 95 percent of the
time.  This applies to such features as the centreline of a stream, and to
reference points along that stream.
This level of accuracy  is  intended to  be compatible with municipal
mapping requirements to serve as a stream base map.  Note:  There are
practical constraints on data collection in terms of the levels of accuracy
and the costs of the survey (accuracy greater than 5 metres only comes at
a much higher cost).
Most municipal mapping is compiled at a scale of 1:5,000 (one millimetre
on the map equals five metres on the ground), or better.  This implies
that features on those maps will be accurate to at least 2.5 metres
(measurable  0.5mm  on  a  map  scale).   Many  features  in  municipal
mapping databases are much more accurate.
Stream locations, however, are often not nearly as accurate as the rest of
the features in municipal and resource mapping (Fig. 2.1).  Even though
the  planning  (mapping)  department  may  consider  their  data  to  be
accurate to, say one-half metre, the consensus from people using stream
data for planning and management is that five metre accuracy would be
sufficient, and that seldom can they trust existing mapping to that level.
Although most GPS manufacturers claim sub-metre or 2-5 metre accuracy
for their equipment and software, these are marketing claims and should
not be taken seriously.  In real-world conditions with local obstruction,
tree cover, and other factors, five-metre accuracy is achievable only with
the best GPS equipment and careful methods.  Figure 5.3 is taken from
recent scientific testing of different GPS receivers under forest canopy
reported to be typical of conditions for most urban stream mapping in
BC.  The testing was conducted at the UBC Research Forest in Maple
Ridge, BC.
Module 5 - 159
Figure 5.3  Global Positioning System (GPS) positional data collected under dense
forest canopy
This receiver performed the best among other GPS receivers and currently is one
of two commercially available GPS receivers capable of 5-metre accuracy under
dense  forest  canopy  (SHIM  Module  5,  Section  5.5.3  provides  equipment
requirements and recommendations).  These results indicate that five-metre
accuracy is possible, with appropriate equipment and careful field and office
methods.  Note: Under difficult conditions, further interpreting or smoothing of
the location provided by the GPS manufacturer’s software is almost always
required.  This interpretation process (deriving a best-fit line) is perhaps the
most important factor affecting the quality of the final locations.
Figure 5.4  Similar GPS receiver under identical conditions
Figure 5.4 shows results from a different GPS receiver, similar in price,
specifications, and target market to the receiver in Figure 5.3 (both are
marketed  as  providing  sub-metre  accuracy).    The  test  results  were
conducted under exactly similar forest conditions, satellite configuration,
and weather.  The second GPS receiver should be considered accurate to
10 metres, not to 5 metres.  This results show a common problem with
some GPS receivers, where the data is considered good (if the true
location is not known), but is confounded with “systematic error”.  These
comparison demonstrate that GPS equipment must be chosen with care.
Module 5 - 160
In order to ensure that the target accuracy is met, there are standard
Quality  Assurance  (QA)  and  Quality  Control  (QC)  procedures  to  be
followed.  Quality issues are discussed in Section 5.8.2, and in the
Ministry of Forests’ QA Procedures.
5.4  Using GPS for Urban Stream Mapping
5.4.1  Advantages of GPS
Although differences do exist, GPS technology is considered to be the
most  accurate,  reliable  and  productive  means  of  capturing  stream
position information at present.  GPS data can be stored on a field
computer to capture standardised and complete attribute note (comment)
information in the field.
Most urban streams have forest cover and it is very difficult to capture
their location or characteristics from aerial photography.  Most agencies
use existing maps for stream assessment and have found that streams
can be >10 metres in error.  In some cases, vital tributaries, reaches, or
entire streams are not mapped.
Producing accurate, reliable, and complete maps of urban streams is
often possible only using GPS or other ground survey methods.  With
careful equipment choices, field procedures, and data analysis, accuracy
of five metres or better is readily achieved, even under dense forest cover
typical of coastal areas of British Columbia.
Corrected GPS positions are inherently geo-referenced, that is, they have
global co-ordinates such as UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator).  GPS
data is easily and  automatically integrated with other data such  as
municipal cadastral mapping, provincial resource mapping, and digital
orthophotos using all common GIS and mapping programs.  There is no
requirement  for  time-consuming connections to local  monuments  or
photo-identifiable points in the field.
Errors in conventional surveying methods (such as compass and tight-
chain  traverse)  accumulate  throughout  the  traverse  as  the  survey
progresses.  Errors in GPS positions are independent and whether the
survey is 10 metres or 10 kilometres, the error remains constrained to
each  data  co-ordinate  captured  given  the  local  conditions  of  GPS
reception.
As well, conventional survey methods require crews of at  least two
people, with much starting, stopping, and note keeping and data entry.
GPS methods require only one person - if a second person is needed for
safety, that person can perform other tasks such as measuring cross
sections or setting reference points.  Extensive experience in the forest
industry suggest that one person using GPS methods can survey twice as
much in the same time as with two people using conventional methods
and it is almost always more accurate.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested