foxit pdf viewer c# : Edit pdf replace text software Library project winforms .net html UWP EXCEL%20readings36-part110

Matching Different Interest and
Payment Frequencies
Previous examples involved nominal interest compounding frequencies that match
the frequency of payments. Thus, for example, we might have a quoted nominal
rate compounded monthly with payments that are also monthly. As usual, the real
world isn’t always as cooperative.
EXAMPLE 32
A bank quotes a nominal rate compounded monthly of 6.3%, but allows payments
weekly at the equivalent interest rate. If I borrow $300,000 over 10 years, what will
the weekly payments be?
The easy way to resolve such problems is to use the custom Nomx_Effy interest
conversion function. This formula returns $777.51:
=PMT(Nomx_Effy(6.3%,12,52),10*52,300000,0,0)
EXAMPLE 33
We have set up annual accounts, but need to handle a monthly outgoing of
$12,500. Rather than annualize by multiplying by 12, what is the equivalent
annual amount using a deposit rate of 7% per annum nominal compounded
monthly? The monthly payment is in arrears, and the equivalent amount is to be
calculated at the end of each year.
First, calculate the monthly effective rate (using a custom VBA function). The
following formula returns 0.58333%:
=Nomx_Effx(7%,12)
Then, calculate the equivalent annual amount using the FV function. This for-
mula returns –$154,907.29:
=-FV(0.58333%,12,-12500,0,0)
In this example,the signs can be confusing.Normally we would treat the
outgoing as a negative and return a positive future value.However,we will
be using the result as an outgoing,so the signs are reversed.This can be
done either by using –12,500 as the outgoing,or by reversing the sign of the
result by using –FV (as in the example).
If the equivalent amount is to be calculated in advance, we would use the same
principles and apply the PV function.
324
Part III: Financial Formulas
Edit pdf replace text - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copy text from pdf to word; extract text from pdf to excel
Edit pdf replace text - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
copy and paste pdf text; extract pdf text to excel
Limitations of Excel’s Financial
Functions
Excel’s primary financial functions (PV, FV, PMT, RATE, NPER, CUMIPMT, and
CUMPRINC) are very useful, but they have two common limitations:
 They can handle only one level of interest rate.
 They can handle only one level of payment.
For example, the NPER function cannot handle the variations in payments that
arise with credit card calculations. In such calculations, the monthly payment is
based upon a reducing outstanding balance, and may also be subject to a minimum
amount rule.
The common solution to the problem of varying payments is to create a cash
flow schedule and use other financial functions that can handle multiple payments
and rates. Examples of the process appear in the next two chapters. Briefly, the
functions involved are:
 FVSCHEDULE, which handles accumulation of a Present Value at different
rates and which, when used in a formula, can calculate the present value
of a future amount at different rates.
 IRR, which handles the calculation of a single rate from regular cash
flows.
 NPV, which handles the calculation of the sum of the present values of
regular cash flows and which by formula can handle the sum of accumu-
lated values of regular cash flows.
 MIRR, which is a specialist IRR aimed at avoiding the multiple IRR prob-
lem by applying different rates to negative and positive regular cash
flows.
 XIRR, which handles the calculation of a single rate from irregular cash
flows.
 XNPV, which handles the calculation of the sum of the present values of
irregular cash flows and which, in a formula, can handle the sum of accu-
mulated values of irregular cash flows.
In a situation that involves only one or two variations, it may be possible to
avoid cash flow construction by using formulas nested in or applied to the basic
amortization formulas.
Chapter 11: Introducing Financial Formulas
325
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
PDF edit control compatible with Windows system. In document management system, users may have the need of replace content in PDF document, like text characters
copy and paste text from pdf; get text from pdf c#
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
SharePoint. A Professional C#.NET PDF edit control able to replace PDF text in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET web sever project. C#.NET
copying text from pdf into word; copy paste text pdf
Deferred Start to a Series of Regular Payments
In some cases, a series of cash flows may have a deferred start. We can calculate the
PV of a regular series of cash flows with a deferred start by using a formula like
this:
=PV(RATE,NPER,PMT,FV,Type)*(1+RATE)^-DEFER_PER
Here, DEFER_PER represents the number of periods for which the first cash flow
is deferred.
EXAMPLE 34
I want to borrow money on a deferred payment basis. The deferment period will be
one year. Thereafter, the loan will be for 10 years with monthly payments in
arrears. The interest rate is 8% per annum effective. The loan is to be secured on a
property that I am building, and the bank is prepared to lend, subject to payments
not exceeding 75% of the estimated income of $9,500 per month. How much can I
borrow?
The following formula uses the custom AnNEff_Effx function, and returns
$550,422.02:
=PV(AnnEff_Effx(8%,12,10*12,-9500*75%,0,0)*(1+AnnEff_Effx(8%,12))^-
12
Valuing a Series of Regular Payments
We can extend the basic principle of discounting successive, but different, levels of
payment by chaining the PV functions. For example, if PV1, PV2, and PV3 repre-
sent different present values of series of payments for time periods NPER1, NPER2,
and NPER3, the discounted value of all series of payments can be found by:
PV1 + PV2(1+I)^-NPER1 + PV2(1+I)^-(NPER1+NPER2)
EXAMPLE 35
What is the present value of a property yielding an income of $5,000 per month for
four years, rising to $6,500 per month for the next three years, and rising to $8,500
per month for the final three years? After 10 years, the property will be worth an
estimated $1,300,000. A discount rate of 10% per annum may be assumed and all
payments are in advance.
The following formula returns –$978,224.54:
=PV(AnnEff_Effx(10%,12),48,5000,0,1) +
PV(AnnEff_Effx(10%,12),36,6500,0,1)*
(1+AnnEff_Effx(10%,12))^-48 +
PV(AnnEff_Effx(10%,12),36,8500,1300000,1)*
(1+AnnEff_Effx(10%,12))^-(48+36)
326
Part III: Financial Formulas
C# PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Advanced PDF edit control and component for replacing PDF pages in both C# You can replace an entire PDF page with another PDF page from another PDF file
extract text from pdf file using java; copy paste text pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
from PDF. Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark
cut text from pdf document; delete text from pdf preview
Note how the final value of $1,300,000 has been nested in the final PV function.
The same answer could be achieved by “nesting” the successive Present Value
inside the preceding function as future values. But remembering that as the PV at
that time represents a right to the future income stream, the sign would have to be
reversed. The following formula returns $978,224.54:
=PV(AnnEff_Effx(10%,12),48,5000,-
PV(AnnEff_Effx(10%,12),36,6500,-
PV(AnnEff_Effx(10%,12),36,8500,1300000,1),1),1)
Of these two approaches, the first formula (using the basic discounting formulas)
looks easier as a method; it looks easier to build using the megaformula technique
or to break up into three cells that are then added together.
The following formula returns $200,344.00:
=PV(AnnEff_Effx(10%,12),48,5000,0,1)
This formula returns $139,559.07:
=PV(AnnEff_Effx(10%,12),36,6500,0,1)*(1+AnnEff_Effx(10%,12))^-48
This formula returns $638,331.47:
=PV(AnnEff_Effx(10%,12),36,8500,1300000,1)*(1+AnnEff_Effx(10%,12))^-
(48+36)
And the total of the three elements checks at $978,224.54.
Subject to exceptions involving just one or two changes in the series of pay-
ments, the solution will be to set up a cash flow schedule. This will be covered after
the next chapter because we first have to outline the basic tools of NPV and IRR.
Summary
This chapter introduced the financial functions and provided the basic concepts of
time value of money and equivalent interest rates. The chapter presented a series of
examples that used the key financial functions for accumulations, discounting, and
loan amortization.
The next chapter presents examples that use Excel for depreciation calculations,
and introduces the techniques of calculating net present values (NPV) and internal
rates of return (IRR).
Chapter 11: Introducing Financial Formulas
327
C# PDF bookmark Library: add, remove, update PDF bookmarks in C#.
GetLocation()); Console.WriteLine("Text: " + entry.GetText()); }. C#.NET Sample Code: Update PDF Document Outline Using C#.NET. Or you can also edit and update
copy text from scanned pdf to word; pdf text replace tool
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
word, ignore case, match string, etc. Ability to search and replace PDF text in ASP.NET programmatically. XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C#
extract formatted text from pdf; copy text from protected pdf
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text. Ability to change text font, color, size and location and output a new PDF document.
cut and paste text from pdf document; extract text from pdf with formatting
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Note. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Add Sticky Note. C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to change font size in PDF comment box.
edit pdf replace text; extract text from image pdf file
Chapter 12
Discounting and
Depreciation Financial
Functions
IN THIS CHAPTER
 Using the NPV and IRR functions
 Understanding the various approaches for cash flows
 Using cross-checking to verify results
 Dealing with multiple internal rates of return
 Understanding the limitations of IRRs and NPVs
 Extending NPV analysis using more than one rate
 Using the NPV function to calculate accumulated values
 Using the depreciation functions
T
HE
NPV (N
ET
P
RESENT
V
ALUE
)
and IRR (Internal Rate of Return) functions are per-
haps the most commonly used of the financial analysis tools. This chapter provides
many examples of using these functions for various types of financial analysis.
Using the NPV Function
The NPV function returns the sum of any series of regular cash flows, discounted to
the present day using a single discount rate. The syntax for Excel’s NPV function is
shown here (arguments in bold are required):
NPV(rate,value1,value2, ...)
Cash inflows are represented as positive values, and cash outflows are negative
values. The NPV function is subject to the same restrictions that apply to financial
functions such as PV, PMT, FV, NPER, and RATE. The only exception is that the
payment amounts may vary.
329
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit
copy text from pdf in preview; erase text from pdf file
If the discounted negative flows exceed the discounted positive flows, the func-
tion will return a negative amount. Similarly, if discounted positive flows exceed
discounted negative flows, the NPV function will return a positive amount.
If the NPV is positive, this indicates that at period zero, the investor could pay
out up to this additional amount and still achieve the discount rate. If the NPV is
negative, then the investor does not get the required discount rate. That rate is
often called a hurdle rate. The implication of a negative NPV is that the investor is
paying out too much. The “right price” requires the addition of the shortfall to the
Time 0 cash flow.
The discount rate used must be a single effective rate for the period used for the
cash flows. Therefore, if flows are set out monthly, you must use the monthly effec-
tive rate.
Definition of NPV
Excel’s NPV function assumes that the first cash flow is received at the endof the
first period. It is important to understand that this differs from the definition used
by most financial calculators, and it is also at odds with the definition used by
institutions such as the Appraisal Institute of America (AAI). For example, the AAI
defines NPV as the difference between the present value of positive cash flows and
the present value of negative cash flows.
If you use Excel’s NPV function without making an adjustment, the result will
not adhere to this definition.
Therefore, when using Excel’s NPV function, you will need to take into account
the time Point 0 cash flow. For this reason, the procedure to adopt when calculating
NPV using Excel is as follows:
 Treat the number of periods as points in time rather than the time period
between points.
 Always include a Point 0, even if cash flows do not arise until the end of
period 1 (Point 1).
 Use a formula like the one shown here to include the Point 0 cash flow:
=NPV(Rate,Range)*(1+Rate)
If you use this procedure, your calculations will adhere to the accepted defini-
tions of NPV, and the results will coincide with those made on your trusty financial
calculator. By the way, it’s not that Microsoft got it wrong. The online help clearly
states that the first cash flow in the range is assumed to be received at the end of
the first period. If you use the previous formula and always have a Time 0 period
(even if it is $0), you will always get the correct answer.
NPV Function Examples
This section contains a number of examples that demonstrate the NPV function.
330
Part III: Financial Formulas
All of the examples in this section are available on the companion CD-ROM.
EXAMPLE 1
Figure 12-1 shows a worksheet set up to calculate the net present value for a series
of cash flows in the range B6:B13.
Figure 12-1: This worksheet uses the NPV function.
The NPV calculation in cell B15 uses the following formula. This formula returns
–$33,629.14:
=NPV(B3,B6:B13)*(1+B3)
The worksheet in Figure 12-1 also shows a method of cross-checking the NPV
calculation. Column E contains a duplicate of the original cash flow, with one
exception. The Point 0 cash flow is equal to the original Point 0 cash flow, minus
the calculated NPV. In this example, the Point 0 cash flow is –$166,370.86. The
cross-check formula in cell E15, shown here, returns $0.00:
=NPV(B3,E6:E13)*(1+B3)
How does the cross-check work? The discount rate of 10% is used to calculate
the surplus or deficit that results from a desired 0% return. In this case, the surplus
is calculated as $33,629.14. That surplus is expressed in present value (Point 0)
terms. If the surplus is deducted from the Point 0 flow, then there should be no sur-
plus. In other words, if the reversed sign NPV is added to the Time 0 flow, the NPV
at the same rate must be 0. If it is 0, this means that the required discount rate
wasmet.
Chapter 12: Discounting and Depreciation Financial Functions
331
EXAMPLE 2
This example, shown in Figure 12-2, calculates the net present value of a cash flow
that begins at the end of the first period.
Figure 12-2: This worksheet calculates the NPV for a cash 
flow that begins at the end of the first period.
The NPV calculation, in cell B16, uses the following formula:
=NPV(B3,B7:B14)*(1+B3)
The calculations indicate that we can afford to pay $166,370.86 for the cash
flow, in order to meet a criterion rate of return of 10%.
This example uses another method of cross-checking the result (columns C and
D). Column C contains formulas that calculate the present value factor of each cash
flow. The formula in cell C7 is:
=(1+$B$3)^-A7
The present values are calculated in column D, by multiplying each cash flow by
its corresponding present value factor. The formula in cell D7 is:
=C7*B7
Column D contains all the present values calculated, and the sum of that column
is the sum of the present values. By definition, the sum of the present values (cell
D16) should equal the NPV.
EXAMPLE 3
This example (see Figure 12-3) calculates the net present value of a cash flow with
an initial (Time 0) positive cash flow.
332
Part III: Financial Formulas
Figure 12-3: This worksheet calculates the net present 
value for a cash flow that has an initial flow.
The net present value calculation is in cell B15, which contains the following
formula:
=NPV(B3,B6:B13)*(1+B3)
The calculation indicates that we can pay $165,939.65 for the right to receive
the cash flow, and receive a criterion rate of return of 10%. In this case, however,
we pay out $165,939.65 and have the immediate right to receive the Point 0 cash
flow of $40,000.
This example might seem unusual, but it is common in real estate situations in
which rent is paid in advance. In practice, completion rarely coincides with a rent
payment date, and the balance of rent previously paid covering the period after the
completion date is allowed for in the completion statement.
If we do not know the value, we put 0 in the capital column at period 0, and the
NPV represents the value using the required discount rate. If we know the quoting
price, we can put that in as a negative at period 0, and the NPV then represents how
much more or less we should pay to get the required discount rate.
EXAMPLE 4
This example (see Figure 12-4) calculates a net present value where there is a ter-
minal value, and where cash flows are in advance.
This example is a typical real estate cash flow of rentals payable annually in
advance, with an assumed sale after seven years for $450,000. Pay attention to
both ends of the cash flow. In this case, the investor is assumed to receive the first
rental of $30,000 immediately, and will also get the $40,000 payment made at the
end. That might not accord with the facts, and if the last payment is not receivable,
you must make it $0.
Chapter 12: Discounting and Depreciation Financial Functions
333
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested