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17 March 2006
Interagency, Intergovernmental
Organization, and Nongovernmental
Organization Coordination During
Joint Operations Vol I
Joint Publication 3-08
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PREFACE
i
1. Scope
Volume I discusses the interagency, intergovernmental organization (IGO), and
nongovernmental organization (NGO) environment and provides fundamental principles and
guidance to facilitate coordination between the Department of Defense, and other US Government
agencies, IGOs, NGOs, and regional organizations.  Volume II describes key US Government
departments and agencies, IGOs and NGOs — their core competencies, basic organizational
structures, and relationship, or potential relationship, with the Armed Forces of the United States.
2. Purpose
This publication has been prepared under the direction of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs
of Staff.  It sets forth joint doctrine to govern the activities and performance of the Armed Forces
of the United States in operations and provides the doctrinal basis for interagency coordination
and for US military involvement in multinational operations.  It provides military guidance for
the exercise of authority by combatant commanders and other joint force commanders (JFCs)
and prescribes joint doctrine for operations and training.  It provides military guidance for use
by the Armed Forces in preparing their appropriate plans.  It is not the intent of this publication
to restrict the authority of the JFC from organizing the force and executing the mission in a
manner the JFC deems most appropriate to ensure unity of effort in the accomplishment of the
overall objective.
3. Application
a. Joint doctrine established in this publication applies to the commanders of combatant
commands, subunified commands, joint task forces, subordinate components of these commands,
and the Services.
b. The guidance in this publication is authoritative; as such, this doctrine will be followed except
when, in the judgment of the commander, exceptional circumstances dictate otherwise.  If conflicts arise
between the contents of this publication and the contents of Service publications, this publication will
take precedence unless the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, normally in coordination with the other
members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has provided more current and specific guidance.  Commanders
of forces  operating  as part of a multinational  (alliance or coalition) military command  should
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ii
Preface
JP 3-08
follow multinational doctrine and procedures ratified by the United States.  For doctrine and
procedures not ratified by the United States, commanders should evaluate and follow the
multinational command’s doctrine and procedures, where applicable and consistent with US law,
regulations, and doctrine.
For the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff:
WALTER  L. SHARP
Lieutenant General, USA
Director, Joint Staff
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SUMMARY OF CHANGES
REVISION OF JOINT PUBLICATION 3-08, DATED 9 OCTOBER 1996
iii
Expands coverage of intergovernmental and nongovernmental coordination
Includes details of the Department of Homeland Security’s role in civil support
Explains the role of the Homeland Security Council
Adds discussion of the Department of Defense’s role in homeland security
Explains the new relationships for Federal interagency coordination during
homeland defense and civil support
Revises the discussion on organizing for successful interagency,
intergovernmental organization, and nongovernmental organization
coordination
Adds coverage on forming a joint task force
Updates descriptions of Federal Agencies, intergovernmental organizations,
and nongovernmental organizations
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iv
Summary of Changes
JP 3-08
Intentionally Blank
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
v
PAGE
VOLUME I
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY............................................................................................... vii
CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION TO INTERAGENCY, INTERGOVERNMENTAL
ORGANIZATION, AND NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION
COORDINATION
• Purpose...................................................................................................................... I-1
• Coordinating Efforts.................................................................................................. I-2
• The Growing Requirement for Close Coordination..................................................... I-4
• Command Relationships............................................................................................ I-4
• Considerations for Effective Cooperation................................................................... I-5
• Comparison of United States Agency Organizational Structures................................. I-6
• Organizational Environments ..................................................................................... I-6
• Building Coordination.............................................................................................. I-10
• Media Impact on Coordination ................................................................................. I-12
CHAPTER II
ESTABLISHED INTERAGENCY, INTERGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION,
AND NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION RELATIONSHIPS
• Interagency, Intergovernmental Organization, and Nongovernmental
Organization Connectivity.................................................................................... II-1
• Historical Basis of the Interagency Process............................................................... II-1
• The National Security Council System..................................................................... II-2
• Federal Interagency Coordination:  Homeland Defense and Civil Support................ II-6
• Department of Defense Coordination of Civil Support with State
and Local Authorities........................................................................................... II-12
• Interagency, Intergovernmental Organization, and Nongovernmental
Organization Coordination:  Foreign Operations.................................................. II-13
• Interagency, Intergovernmental Organization, and Nongovernmental
Organization Structure in Foreign Countries........................................................ II-17
• The Role of Intergovernmental Organizations ......................................................... II-20
• The Nongovernmental Organizations’ Connection to Joint Operations ..................... II-24
vi
Table of Contents
JP 3-08
CHAPTER III
ORGANIZING FOR SUCCESSFUL INTERAGENCY, INTERGOVERNMENTAL
ORGANIZATION, AND NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION
COORDINATION
• Organizing for Success........................................................................................... III-1
• Interagency and Nongovernmental Organization Crisis Response:
Domestic Operations............................................................................................. III-3
• Crisis Response:  Foreign Operations...................................................................... III-8
• Forming a Joint Task Force................................................................................... III-12
• Joint Task Force Mission Analysis......................................................................... III-14
• Organizational Tools for the Joint Task Force........................................................ III-16
• Other Joint Task Force Interagency Considerations............................................... III-21
• Information Management...................................................................................... III-25
• Training and Readiness......................................................................................... III-26
GLOSSARY
Part I Abbreviations and Acronyms.................................................................... GL-1
Part II Terms and Definitions............................................................................... GL-5
FIGURE
I-1
Comparison of United States Agency Organizational Structures...................... I-7
II-1
National Security Council Organization........................................................ II-4
II-2
Incident Command System/Unified Command............................................. II-11
II-3
Notional Joint Interagency Coordination Group Structure............................. II-21
III-1 Model for Coordination Between Military and Nonmilitary
Organizations - Domestic Civil Support..................................................... III-4
III-2 Model for Coordination Between Military and Nonmilitary
Organizations - Foreign Operations............................................................ III-9
III-3 United States Government Foreign Disaster Assistance Response Team..... III-10
III-4 Joint Task Force Establishing Authority Responsibilities............................ III-13
III-5 Notional Composition of a Civil-Military Operations Center...................... III-18
III-6 Civil-Military Operations Center Functions................................................ III-20
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
COMMANDER’S OVERVIEW
vii
Provides an Introduction to Interagency, Intergovernmental Organization, and
Nongovernmental Organization Coordination
Discusses Established Interagency, Intergovernmental Organization, and
Nongovernmental Organization Relationships
Covers Organizing for Successful Interagency, Intergovernmental
Organization, and Nongovernmental Organization Coordination
The Purpose of Interagency, Intergovernmental Organization, and
Nongovernmental Organization Coordination
Attaining our national
objectives requires the
efficient and effective use
of the diplomatic,
informational, economic,
and military instruments
of national power
supported by and
coordinated with those of
our allies and various
intergovernmental,
nongovernmental, and
regional organizations.
Interagency coordination is the coordination that occurs between
agencies of the US Government (USG), including the Department of
Defense (DOD), for the purpose of accomplishing an objective.
Similarly, in the context of DOD involvement, intergovernmental
organization (IGO) and nongovernmental organization (NGO)
coordination refer to coordination between elements of DOD and
IGOs or NGOs to achieve an objective.
The integration of US political and military objectives and the
subsequent translation of these objectives into action have
always been essential to success at all levels of operation.
Military operations must be coordinated with the activities of other
agencies of the USG, IGOs, NGOs, regional organizations, the
operations of foreign forces, and activities of various host nation (HN)
agencies.  Sometimes the joint force commander (JFC) draws on the
capabilities of other organizations; sometimes the JFC provides
capabilities to other organizations; and sometimes the JFC merely
deconflicts his activities with those of others.  Interagency coordination
forges the vital link between the military and the diplomatic,
informational, and economic instruments of power of the USG.
Successful interagency, IGO, and NGO coordination enables
the USG to build international support, conserve resources, and conduct
coherent operations that efficiently achieve shared international goals.
viii
Executive Summary
JP 3-08
Within the US
Government (USG), the
Armed Forces and other
USG agencies perform in
supported and supporting
roles with other
commands and agencies.
Harnessing the power of
disparate organizations
with competing priorities
and procedures is a
daunting task.
During combat operations such as Operation ENDURING
FREEDOM and Operation IRAQI FREEDOM or in foreign
humanitarian assistance (FHA) operations such as PROVIDE
COMFORT, DOD was the lead agency and was supported by other
agencies.  When DOD is tasked to provide military support to civil
authorities, its forces perform in a supporting role.  Whether supported
or supporting, close coordination between the military and other
non-DOD agencies is a key to successful interagency
coordination.
USG agencies — including DOD — may be placed in supported or
supporting relationships with IGOs.  Even when placed in a supporting
role, however, US military forces always remain under the command
authority of the President.  In many operations though, USG agencies’
relationship with IGOs is neither supported nor supporting.  In such
cases, cooperation is voluntary and will be based upon shared goals
and good will. NGOs do not operate within military, governmental, or
IGO hierarchies.  Therefore, the relationship between the Armed Forces
and NGOs is neither supported nor supporting.
Coordinating and integrating efforts between the joint force and
other government agencies, IGOs, and NGOs should not be
equated to the command and control of a military operation.
Military operations depend upon a command structure that is often
very different from that of civilian organizations.  These differences
may present significant challenges to coordination efforts.  The various
USG agencies’ different, and sometimes conflicting, goals, policies,
procedures, and decision-making techniques make unity of effort a
challenge.  Still more difficult, some IGOs and NGOs may have policies
that are explicitly antithetical to those of the USG, and particularly the
US military.
The following basic steps support an orderly and systematic approach
to building and maintaining coordination:
Forge a collective definition of the problem in clear and
unambiguous terms.  Differences in individual assumptions and
organizational perspectives can often cloud a clear understanding of
the problem.
Command Relationships
Building Interagency, Intergovernmental Organization, and
Nongovernmental Organization Coordination
ix
Executive Summary
Understand the overall USG strategic goal in addition to the
Objectives, End State, and Transition Criteria for each involved
organization or agency.  Commanders and decision makers should
seek a clearly defined military end state supported by attainable
objectives and transition criteria.
Understand the Differences Between US National Objectives,
End State and Transition Criteria and those of IGOs and NGOs.
Although appropriate IGOs and NGOs may participate in some level
in defining the problem, ultimately their goals and objectives are
independent of those of the US military.
Establish a Common Frame of Reference.  Differences in
terminology and — in the case of foreign organizations — the use of
English as a second language complicates coordination.
Capitalize on Experience.  Review the after-action reports and
lessons learned using the Joint and Services Lessons Learned Systems,
including the Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and
Stabilization (S/CRS) Essential Task Matrix, and the US Army
Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute to assess proposed
courses of action (COAs) and to reduce the requirement to relearn on
the job.
Develop COAs or Options.  Commanders and their staffs should
focus on the military enabling capabilities that contribute to national
security policy objective attainment and are part of the interagency
plan of action.
Establish Responsibility.  A common sense of ownership and
commitment toward resolution is achievable when all participants
understand what needs to be done and agree upon the means to
accomplish it.
Plan for the Transition of Key Responsibilities, Capabilities,
and Functions.  In most multiagency operations, civilian organizations
will remain engaged long after the military has accomplished its assigned
tasks and departed the operational area.  Therefore, prior to employing
military forces, it is imperative to plan for the transition of responsibility
for specific actions or tasks from military to nonmilitary entities.
Direct All Means Toward Unity of Effort.   Lead agency
responsibility is situationally dependent, with the National Security
Council (NSC) staff setting the agenda for and normally designating
the lead agency for situations in which DOD will participate.  While
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