free pdf viewer c# : Copy pdf text to word Library SDK component asp.net wpf html mvc JP3_08v1_0603174-part1412

II-12
Chapter II
JP 3-08
employment of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or high-yield explosives (CBRNE)
devices includes measures to identify, acquire, and employ resources to anticipate, prevent, or
resolve a threat or act of terrorism.  When a terrorist incident develops having a potential for
military involvement, the DOD executive agent may dispatch military observers to the incident
site, on mutual agreement between DOD and the FBI, to appraise the situation before any decision
is made to commit military forces.  The SecDef through the CJCS shall specifically authorize
any dispatch of US counterterrorism forces as observers.  (See DODD 3025.12, Military Support
for Civil Disturbance.)
(2) CM involves actions that comprise those essential services and activities required
to manage and mitigate problems resulting from disasters and catastrophes, including natural,
manmade, or terrorist incidents.  Such services may include transportation, communications,
public works and engineering, firefighting, urban search and rescue, hazardous materials, food,
and energy.  Support occurs under the primary jurisdiction of the affected state and local
government with the Federal government providing assistance when required.  DOD support to
CM involving the employment of CBRNE devices comprises USG interagency assistance to
protect public health and safety, restore essential government services, and provide emergency
relief to governments, businesses, and individuals affected by the consequences of a CBRNE
accident or incident.
j. The US military has acquired experience and developed expertise in protecting its members
from CBRNE devices and in operating in a contaminated environment.  With the threat now
reaching into the domestic arena, this experience and expertise is available to domestic civil
authorities.
k. Military commanders should scrutinize, with the assistance of legal counsel when
appropriate, each request for domestic aid to ensure that it conforms with statutory
limitations, especially in law enforcement assistance to civil authorities.  The SecDef must
personally approve any request to assist LEAs in preplanned national events.   Increased demand
for DOD assets in support of law enforcement will require careful review during the planning
phase to ensure that DOD support conforms to legal guidelines and does not degrade the mission
capability of combatant commanders.
5. Department of Defense Coordination of Civil Support with State and Local
Authorities
a. When a disaster threatens or occurs, and the assets of local and state governments are
fully committed, a governor may request federal assistance.  DOD may support local and state
authorities in a variety of tasks.
b. Army and Air National Guard forces have primary responsibility for providing military
assistance in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia in
civil emergencies, and are under the command of the state or territory adjutant general.  Reserve
personnel may be employed for civil emergencies in a volunteer status, be ordered to active duty
for annual training, or be called to active duty.  DOD support is generally provided in the
Copy pdf text to word - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
cut text from pdf document; c# extract pdf text
Copy pdf text to word - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
copy text from encrypted pdf; can't copy and paste text from pdf
II-13
Established Interagency, Intergovernmental Organization,
and Nongovernmental Organization Relationships
form of assistance or augmentation of skills and resources to the Federal agency field
office or to a state or local agency having responsibility for a particular activity.
c. The Domestic Preparedness Program was established in 1997 and provided funding
for DOD to train state and local first responders in 120 US cities in CBRNE training,
access to federal assistance, and exercises.
d. Each US state, territory, and possession has an office of emergency services (OES)
or an equivalent office responsible for preparedness planning and assisting the governor in
directing responses to emergencies.  The OES coordinates provision of state or territorial assistance
to its local governments through authority of the governor or adjutant general.  The OES operates
the state emergency operations center during a disaster or emergency and coordinates with
Federal officials for support, if required.  The state will usually designate a state coordinating
officer (SCO), with similar authorities to the FCO or PFO, to coordinate and integrate Federal
and state activities.  States may also assist other states through the use of interstate compacts.
e. DOD counterpart relationships to those of DCO, FCO or PFO, and SCO are established
at lower echelons to facilitate coordination.  Installation commanders may respond
immediately to a request from local or state governments to an emergency which may not
be at the level to be a Presidentially declared emergency.  Installation commanders may
respond to support for public fire, search and rescue services, public works, police protection,
social services, public health, and hospitals.  DOD support for local environmental operations
can begin immediately within the authority delegated to installation commanders.  This
immediate response by commanders will not take precedence over their primary mission.
Commanders should seek guidance through the chain of command regarding continuing assistance
whenever DOD resources are committed under immediate response circumstances.  When
providing assistance in response to a Presidentially-declared disaster or emergency, emergency
preparedness liaison officers (EPLOs) represent the DOD executive agent, the supported
commander, and their own Service.
6. Interagency, Intergovernmental Organization, and Nongovernmental
Organization Coordination:  Foreign Operations
a. The Political-Military Domain.  Within the Executive Branch, DOS is the lead foreign
affairs agency, assisting the President in foreign policy formulation and execution.  As such,
DOS oversees the coordination of DOD external POLMIL relationships with overall US foreign
policy.  External POLMIL relationships of DOD include:
(1) Bilateral military relationships.
(2) Coalition military forces.
(3) Multilateral mutual defense alliances.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into The portable document format, known as PDF document, is a they are using different types of word processors.
copy text from pdf in preview; copy paste text pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. Ability to copy PDF pages and paste into another PDF file.
extract text from pdf to excel; copy text from pdf without formatting
II-14
Chapter II
JP 3-08
(4) Treaties and agreements involving DOD activities or interests, such as technology
transfer, armaments cooperation and control, international aviation, law of the sea, nuclear
regulation, and environmental pollution.
(5) Use of US military assets for humanitarian or peace operations (including those
conducted under UN auspices).
b. Theater Focus.  The geographic combatant commander implements DOD external
POLMIL relationships within the AOR.  The combatant commander’s regional focus is similar
to the regional focus of DOS’s geographic bureaus, though the geographic boundaries differ.
Most other USG foreign affairs agencies are regionally organized as well, again with varying
geographic boundaries.  Within a theater, the geographic combatant commander is the focal
point for planning and implementation of regional and theater military strategies that
require interagency coordination.  In contrast, the DOS focal point for formulation and
implementation of regional foreign policy strategies requiring interagency coordination is the
geographic bureau at DOS headquarters in Washington, DC.  Although the geographic combatant
commander will often find it more expeditious to approach the US bilateral COMs for approval
of an activity in regional HNs, often the political effect of the proposed US military activity goes
far beyond the boundaries of the HN.  In such cases, the combatant commander should not
assume that the approval of the COM corresponds to region-wide approval of DOS, but instead
should ascertain that the COM has received instructions from DOS to give region-wide approval.
c. In a CCO, coordination between DOD and other USG agencies will normally occur
within the NSC/PCC and, if directed, during development of the POLMIL plan.  During
lesser operations and operations not involving armed conflict, the combatant commander’s staff
may deal directly with a COM or members of the country team regarding issues that do not
transcend the boundaries of the HN.  In some operations, a special envoy of the President or a
special representative of the UN Secretary General may be involved.
d. The joint interagency coordination group (JIACG) is an interagency staff group
that establishes regular, timely, and collaborative working relationships between civilian
and military operational planners.  Composed of USG civilian and military experts accredited
to the combatant commander and tailored to meet the requirements of a supported combatant
commander, the JIACG provides the combatant commander with the capability to collaborate at
the operational level with other USG civilian agencies and departments.  JIACGs complement
the interagency coordination that takes place at the strategic level through the NSCS.  Members
participate in deliberate, crisis, and transition planning, and provide links back to their parent
civilian agencies to help synchronize joint task force (JTF) operations with the efforts of civilian
USG agencies and departments.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
extract text from pdf with formatting; copy text from pdf to word with formatting
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
export text from pdf; pdf text replace tool
II-15
Established Interagency, Intergovernmental Organization,
and Nongovernmental Organization Relationships
“Interaction with the US Department of State and the United Nations was critical
throughout the operation.  Ambassador Oakley and I spoke regularly to coordinate
the efforts of the DOS and our military operations in the ARFOR [Army forces]
sector.  His support for our operation was superb and he played a key role in
communicating with the leadership of the Somali clans.  We followed his lead in
operations, just as we fully supported the operations of the DOS.”
Major General Steven L. Arnold, USA
Operations Other Than War in a Power Projection Army:
Lessons From Operation RESTORE HOPE and Hurricane Andrew Relief
Operations, Strategic Studies Institute, US Army War College, 1994
e. Campaign Planning and Interagency Coordination.  Campaign planning generally applies
to the conduct of combat operations, but combatant commanders and subordinate JFCs may be required
to develop campaign plans across the range of military operations.  A joint campaign plan is based on the
commander’s concept, which presents a broad vision of the required military aim or end state, and how
operations will be conducted to achieve objectives.  Thus, a campaign plan is an essential tool for
laying out a clear, definable path linking the mission to the desired end state.  Such a plan
enables commanders to help political leaders visualize operational requirements for achieving objectives.
Given the systematic military approach to problem solving and the usual predominance of resources, it
is often the combatant commander who formally or informally functions as the lead organizer of many
operations.
(1) Strategic Guidance.  The President and/or SecDef will promulgate strategic
guidance to provide long-term, intermediate, or ancillary objectives.  The combatant commander
will determine how to implement guidance at the theater or operational level to achieve
strategic objectives.  Theater-level campaign planning is linked to operational art, which provides
a framework to assist commanders in using resources efficiently and effectively, including
interagency assets, when producing campaign plans.  Among the many operational considerations,
the combatant commander’s guidance must define the following:
(a) What military or related political and social conditions (objectives) must be
produced in the operational area to achieve the strategic goal? (Ends)
(b) What sequence of actions is most likely to produce that condition? (Ways)
(c) How should resources of the joint force be applied to accomplish that sequence
of actions? (Means)
(d) What is the likely cost or risk to the joint force in performing a particular
sequence of actions?  (Considered during COA analysis).
(e) What organizational/command arrangements will be established for the joint
or Service forces tasked to accomplish the mission (unity of command)?
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
a pdf text extractor; find and replace text in pdf file
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Convert
copy text from protected pdf to word; .net extract text from pdf
II-16
Chapter II
JP 3-08
(2) To frame a campaign plan involving interagency coordination, the commander
must address this area within the context of all the instruments of national power.  The
commander will be guided by the interagency provisions of the POLMIL plan, when provided,
and will disseminate that guidance to the joint force in Annex V, the Interagency Coordination
Annex of the combatant commander’s OPLAN.  Developed in December 1999, Appendix V
(Planning Guidance, Annex V - Interagency Coordination) to Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff Manual 3122.03A, Joint Operations Planning and Execution System, Volume II, Planning
Formats and Guidance, remains an essential ingredient at the NSC and policy coordinating
committee in producing POLMIL plans.  For interagency transition and exit criteria Annex V
lays out to the greatest degree possible what the combatant commander desires as the entry and
exit conditions for the USG civilian agencies during the operation.  It notes that interagency
participation could be involved at the earliest phases of the operation or campaign starting with
flexible deterrent options.  Linking the interagency actions with the phases of the operation
assists in the scheduling and coordination.  Crucially important to the plan is the orderly flow of
operations to the desired end state and an efficient end of direct US military involvement.  The
development of Annex C should enhance early operational coordination with planners from the other
USG agencies that will be involved in the operation’s execution or its policy context.  During deliberate
interagency planning, heavy combatant command involvement, participation, and coordination will be
critical to success.
f. Plan Development and Coordination.  Although deliberate planning is conducted in
anticipation of future events, there may be situations which call for an immediate US military
response, e.g., noncombatant evacuation operation or FHA.  Combatant commanders
frequently develop COAs based on recommendations and considerations originating in one or
more US embassies.  In this regard, the country team is an invaluable resource because of its
interagency experience and links to Washington.  The JIACG can provide additional collaboration
with operational planners and USG agencies.  Emergency action plans in force at every embassy
cover a wide range of anticipated contingencies and crises and can assist the commanders in
identifying COAs, options, and constraints to military actions and support activities.  The staffs
of geographic combatant commands also consult with the Joint Staff and other key agencies not
represented on the country team or a JIACG to coordinate military operations and support
activities.  Initial concepts of military operations may require revision based on feasibility
analysis and consideration of related activities by IGOs or NGOs, particularly regarding
logistics.  For example, primitive seaport and airport facilities may limit the ability to move
massive amounts of supplies and constrain operations.  Such information is frequently provided
the country team that, in turn, may be in contact with relief organizations in country. Directly or
indirectly, refinement of the military mission should be coordinated with other USG agencies,
IGOs, and NGOs to identify and minimize mutual interference.
(1) Mission planning conducted by the geographic combatant commander should
be coordinated with the DOS, DOJ, and Department of Energy, through the Office of the
Secretary of Defense and the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to facilitate definition and clarification of
strategic aims, end state, and the means to achieve them.  Commanders and planners should
consider specific conditions that could produce mission failure, as well as those that mark success.
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
delete text from pdf file; extract text from pdf c#
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png, Gif Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF
edit pdf replace text; copy and paste text from pdf
II-17
Established Interagency, Intergovernmental Organization,
and Nongovernmental Organization Relationships
Commanders must ensure that unity of effort with other agencies contributes to the USG’s overall
strategic aims and objectives.
INTEGRATING INTERAGENCY PLANNING
Our experiences in Kosovo and elsewhere have demonstrated the necessity
to ensure that all concerned government agencies conduct comprehensive
planning to encompass the full range of instruments available to decision
makers.  We all must move forward with our efforts to achieve increased
levels of integrated interagency planning now.  To better support other
agencies, DOD needs to give greater consideration to political, diplomatic,
humanitarian, economic, information, and other nonmilitary activities in
defense planning.  In addition, the US Government must establish dedicated
mechanisms and integrated planning processes to ensure rapid, effective,
well-structured, multi-agency efforts in response to crises. Finally, we must
continue to emphasize that our senior officials routinely participate in
rehearsals, gaming, exercises, and simulations, as well as the CP IWG
[Contingency Planning Interagency Working Group] - which has become a
genuine leap forward in the effort to establish a sound system to incorporate
crisis and deliberate planning across the interagency.
SOURCE: Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Posture Statement
before the 106th Congress Committee On Armed Services,
United States Senate, 8 February 2000
(2) During campaign planning, the command should identify the target audiences
to be reached.  The JFC’s public affairs officer (PAO) must coordinate with civil affairs,
information operations, embassy public affairs officers, the intelligence community, IGOs, and
NGOs to develop and deconflict communications strategies and tactics in line with the JFC’s
intent.  The desired end state, essential tasks leading up to the end state, and exit criteria
must be clearly expressed to the US and international media in order to gain and maintain
public understanding and support.  USG agencies and organizations must determine and
coordinate the best methods to communicate their messages to avoid contradicting each other
and present the USG’s message coherently.
7. Interagency, Intergovernmental Organization, and Nongovernmental
Organization Structure in Foreign Countries
a. The Mission.  The US has bilateral diplomatic relations with some 180 of the world’s 191
countries.  The US bilateral representation in the foreign country, known as the diplomatic mission, is
established in accordance with the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, of which the US is a
signatory.  DOS provides the core staff of a mission and administers the presence of representatives of
other USG agencies in the country.  A mission is led by a COM, usually the ambassador, but at times the
chargé des affaires, ad interim (the chargé), when no US ambassador is accredited to the country or the
ambassador is absent from the country.  The deputy chief of mission (DCM) is second in charge of the
mission and usually assumes the role of chargé in the absence of the COM.  For countries with which the
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
code, such as, PDF to HTML converter assembly, PDF to Word converter assembly and PDF to PNG converter control. C#.NET DLLs: Use PDF to Text Converter Control
export highlighted text from pdf; extracting text from pdf
II-18
Chapter II
JP 3-08
US has no diplomatic relations, the embassy of a friendly country often accepts the duty of watching out
for US affairs in the country and at times houses an interests section staffed with USG employees.  In
countries where an IGO is headquartered, the US has a multilateral mission to the IGO in addition to the
bilateral mission to the foreign country.
(1) The Ambassador.  The ambassador is the personal representative of the President
to the government of the foreign country or to the IGO to which he or she is accredited and, as
such, is the COM, responsible for recommending and implementing national policy regarding
the foreign country or IGO and for overseeing the activities of USG employees in the mission.
The President with the advice and consent of the Senate appoints the ambassador.  The ambassador
has extraordinary decision making authority as the senior USG official on the ground during
crises.
(2) The Deputy Chief of Mission.  The DCM is chosen from the ranks of career
foreign service officers through a rigorous selection process to be the principal deputy to the
ambassador.  Although not appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate,
the DCM wields considerable power, especially when acting as the COM while in chargé status.
(3) The Embassy.  The headquarters of the mission is the embassy, located in the
political capital city of the HN to have regular access to the HN leadership.  Although the
various USG agencies that make up the mission may have individual headquarters elsewhere in
the country, the embassy is the focal point for interagency coordination.  The main building of
the embassy is termed the chancery; the ambassador’s house is known as the residence.  Each
embassy has an associated consular section, frequently located in the chancery, to provide services
to US citizens and to issue visas to foreigners wishing to travel to the US.
(4) Consulates.  The size or principal location of commercial activity in some countries
necessitates the establishment of one or more consulates — branch offices of the mission located
at a distance from the embassy.  A consulate is headed by a principal officer.  In addition to
providing consular services, the consulate is the focal point of interagency coordination for the
assigned consular district.
b. The Chief of Mission.  The bilateral COM has authority over all USG personnel in
country, except for those assigned to a combatant command, a USG multilateral mission, or an
IGO.  The COM may be accredited to more than one country.  The COM interacts daily with
DOS’s strategic-level planners and decision makers.  The COM provides recommendations and
considerations for crisis action planning directly to the geographic combatant commander and
commander of a JTF.  While forces in the field under a geographic combatant commander are
exempt from the COM’s statutory authority, the COM confers with the combatant commander
regularly to coordinate US military activities with the foreign policy direction being taken by the
USG toward the host country.  The COM’s political role is important to the success of military
operations involving the Armed Forces of the United States.  Each COM as a formal agreement
with the geographic combatant commander as to which DOD personnel fall under the force
protection responsibility of each.
II-19
Established Interagency, Intergovernmental Organization,
and Nongovernmental Organization Relationships
c. The Country Team.  The country team, headed by the COM, is the senior in-country interagency
coordinating body.  It is composed of the COM, DCM, the senior member of each US department or
agency in country, and other USG personnel as determined by the COM.  Each member presents the
position of his or her parent organization to the country team and conveys country team considerations
back to the parent organization.  The COM confers with the country team to develop foreign policy
toward the host country and to disseminate decisions to the members of the mission.
(1) The country team system provides the foundation for rapid interagency consultation
and action on recommendations from the field and effective execution of US programs and
policies.  Under the country team concept, agencies are required to coordinate their plans and
operations and keep one another and the COM informed of their activities.  Country team members
who represent agencies other than the State Department are routinely in contact with their parent
agencies.  Issues arising within the country team can become interagency issues at the national
level if they are not resolved locally or when they have broader national implications.
(2) In almost all bilateral missions, DOD is represented on the country team by
the US Defense Attaché’s Office (USDAO) and the security assistance organization (SAO)
(called by various specific names, such as the Office of Defense Cooperation, the Security
Assistance Office, the Military Group, etc., largely governed by the preference of the receiving
country).  The USDAO and the SAO are key military sources of information for interagency
coordination in foreign countries.
(a) USDAO.  The USDAO is an office of Service attachés managed by the Defense
Intelligence Agency.  A US defense attaché (DATT) heads the defense attaché office in country
and is a member of the country team.  The DATT is normally the senior Service attaché assigned
to the mission.  The attaches serve as liaisons with their HN counterparts and are valuable
sources of information for the COM and combatant commander on the military affairs of the
HN.  The DATT may be accredited to more that one country.  The Service attachés report to the
ambassador, but coordinate with and represent their respective Military Departments on Service
matters.  The attachés assist in the foreign internal defense (FID) program by exchanging
information with the combatant commander’s staff on HN military, political, humanitarian,
religious, social, and economic conditions and interagency coordination.
(b) SAO.  The SAO, the most important FID-related military activity under the
supervision of the COM, oversees the provision of US military assistance to the HN.  The SAO
— which may comprise a military assistance advisory group, another military activity, or a
security assistance officer — operates under the direction of the COM but reports administratively
to the combatant commander and is funded by the Defense Security Cooperation Agency.  The
SAO assists HN security forces by planning and administering military aspects of the security
assistance program.  The SAO also helps the country team communicate HN assistance needs to
policy and budget officials within the USG.  In addition, the SAO provides oversight of training
and assistance teams temporarily assigned to the HN.  The SAO is prohibited by law from
giving direct training assistance.  Instead, training is normally provided through special teams
and organizations assigned to limited tasks for specific periods (e.g., mobile training teams, technical
assistance teams, quality assurance teams).
II-20
Chapter II
JP 3-08
(c) US Defense Representative (USDR).  The USDR will normally be the senior
military official assigned to permanent duty with the mission.  The USDR is the in-country focal
point for planning, coordinating, and executing support to USG officials for in-country US
defense issues and activities that are not under the purview of the parent DOD components.  The
USDR is also the in-country representative of the SecDef, the CJCS, and the geographic combatant
commander and is responsible (under the direction of the COM) for coordinating administrative
and security matters for all DOD elements assigned to the country, except those under the control
of a combatant commander.
d. Geographic Combatant Commands.  To effectively bring all instruments of national power
to theater and regional strategies as well as campaign and operation plans, combatant commanders
are augmented with representatives from other USG agencies.
(1) The JIACG participates in deliberate, crisis, and transition planning.  Representing
USG agencies at the HQ of the geographic and selected functional combatant commands, each
JIACG is a multi-functional, advisory element that represents the civilian departments and agencies
and facilitates information sharing across the interagency community.  It provides regular,
timely, and collaborative day-to-day support for planning, coordination, preparation, and
implementation of interagency activities (see Figure II-3).  Specific objectives are to:
(a) Improve operational interagency campaign planning and execution.
(b) Exercise secure collaboration processes and procedures with participating
agencies.
(c) Promote habitual relationships among interagency planners.
(2) Geographic combatant commanders and, increasingly, JTF commanders are assigned a
political advisor (POLAD) by DOS.  The POLAD provides USG foreign policy perspectives and
diplomatic considerations and establishes linkages with US embassies in the AOR or joint operations
area (JOA) and with DOS.  The POLAD supplies information regarding  objectives of DOS that are
relevant to the geographic combatant commander’s theater strategy or commander, joint task force’s
(CJTF’s) plans.  The POLAD is directly responsible to the combatant commander or CJTF and can be
of great assistance in interagency coordination.
(3) Other USG agencies may detail liaison personnel to combatant command staffs
to improve interagency coordination.  For example, intelligence representatives may be assigned to
staffs of geographic combatant commands to facilitate intelligence and antiterrorism support.
8. The Role of Intergovernmental Organizations
IGOs may be established on a global or regional basis and may have general or specialized
purposes.  NATO and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) are regional
security organizations, while the African Union (formerly the Organization of African Unity) and the
II-21
Established Interagency, Intergovernmental Organization,
and Nongovernmental Organization Relationships
Figure II-3.  Notional Joint Interagency Coordination Group Structure
NOTIONAL JOINT INTERAGENCY
COORDINATION GROUP STRUCTURE
VIRTUAL
MissionAugmentation
(as needed)
Joint Interagency
Coordination Group
Core Element
Internationaland
Regional
Planners
USAmbassador
Country Team
Combatant
CommanderStaff
Directorates
Commander, Joint
Task Force(JTF),
JTFStaff
Washington
AgencyPlanners
Habitual Links
GROUPFUNCTIONS
Participatein combatantcommandengagement,deliberate,crisis and transitionplanning
Adviseoncivilianagencyplanningefforts
Work military-civilianoperational issues
Presentcivilianagency perspectives,approaches, capabilities,andlimitations
Providehabitual links to Washingtonand regional planners
Arrangeinterfaceoninteragencyactivities
Coordinate with regional players
NOTIONALCORESTAFFING
Director
Deputy
Departmentof State Regional Expert
Departmentof State FunctionalExpert
USAgencyforInternational Development Officer
Departmentof Justice
Departmentof Transportation
Departmentof HomelandSecurity
Departmentof Defense
Departmentof Defense
Executive Officer
Administration
SeniorCivilian
Military
Civilian
Civilian
Civilian
Civilian
Civilian
Civilian
Civilian
Civilian
Military
Military
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested