free pdf viewer c# : Get text from pdf image Library application class asp.net windows .net ajax lbnl-6672e4-part1434

other plots demonstrated at least minimally acceptable turf quality. Having a rain sensor used 
13% to 24% less water than no rain sensor. Compared to having no rain sensor, three of the four 
SMS brands saved a significant amount of water, from 16% to 54% in the first half, and from 
28% to 83% in the second half of 2006. 
2.3.12 Improving Urban Irrigation Efficiency by Capitalizing on the Conservation 
Potential of Weather-Based “Smart” Controllers 
By P.W. Mayer and W.B. DeOreo. 
Journal AWWA, Vol. 102, No. 2, pages 86-97. 
February 2010.  
http://www.waterdm.com/sites/default/files/JAWWA%20(2010)%20The%20
Conservation%20Potential%20of%20Weather-
Based%20'Smart'%20Controllers.pdf 
This article examines the effect of 3,112 smart controllers (49.1% of the total) installed at 2,294 
sites throughout California. The sites met the data requirements for inclusion in the study: one 
full year each of pre- and post-installation billing data, corresponding climate data, and a 
measurement of the site's landscape area. For each site, data on the daily gross ETo and 
precipitation from the nearest CIMIS weather station were aligned with historical billing data. A 
daily model was used to deduct each site's effective precipitation from the daily ET. The 
theoretical irrigation requirement (TIR) was determined by assuming an irrigation efficiency of 
100%, which likely resulted in underestimating irrigation requirements. The application rate 
(AR) in inches for each site was calculated by dividing the outdoor water use by the landscape 
area and applying a standard unit conversion factor. The AR is a measure of how closely a site's 
irrigation applications match the TIR derived from proximal ET weather stations. 
2.3.13 Landscape Irrigation with Evapotranspiration Controllers in a Humid Climate 
By S.L. Davis and M.D. Dukes. 
Presented at the 5th National Decennial Irrigation Conference, December 5-8, 
2010 as paper no. IRR109573. 
Transactions of the ASABE American Society of Agricultural and Biological 
Engineers, Vol. 55, No. 2, pages 571–580.  
March/April 2011. 
http://abe.ufl.edu/mdukes/pdf/publications/SW/SW9330_landscape-irr-humid-
climate.pdf 
This article summarizes the findings of research studies concerning ET controllers. Based on the 
studies, ET controllers can save as much as 63% of irrigation water use without sacrificing 
landscape quality when implemented in moderate to high water use situations and programmed 
correctly. In southwest Florida, only homes that irrigated more than 450 mm per year saw 
irrigation savings from an ET controller. The irrigation adequacy and scheduling efficiency of 
the ET controllers that underwent SWAT testing fluctuated depending on rainfall. Assuming that 
33
Get text from pdf image - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
get text from pdf c#; extract text from pdf java open source
Get text from pdf image - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
extract text from pdf file; delete text from pdf with acrobat
acceptable levels for irrigation adequacy and scheduling efficiency are 80% and 95%, 
respectively, SWAT scores for the Florida controllers exceeded those thresholds during only a 
few periods. A maximum of 10% of scores were passing in any of the three evaluation periods 
that experienced frequent rainfall, indicating that many controllers had trouble accounting for 
rainfall. SWAT scores predict water savings only when there is a potential for savings because 
there was excess irrigation before the ET controller was installed. 
2.3.14 Water Conservation Potential of Smart Irrigation Controllers on St. 
Augustinegrass  
By M.S. McCready, M.D. Dukes, and G.L. Miller.  
Agricultural Water Management, Vol. 96, No. 11, pages 1623–1632. 
November 2009.  
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378377409001784  
This research evaluated the effectiveness of ET-based irrigation controllers, soil moisture sensor 
(SMS) controllers, and rain sensors based on irrigation applied and turfgrass quality. Testing 
took place on St. Augustinegrass during four periods: April 22–June 30, 2006; September 23–
December 15, 2006; May 1–August 31, 2007; and September 1–November 30, 2007. Two 
brands of SMS controllers were tested: LawnLogic LL1004 and Acclima Digital TDT RS500, 
with individual units set at three different soil moisture thresholds. Mini-Clik rain sensors (RS) 
were set at rainfall thresholds of 3 and 6 mm and at three irrigation frequencies (1, 2, and 7 days 
per week). Two ET controllers were tested, the Toro Intelli-Sense and the Rain Bird ET 
Manager. For comparison, a timer-based treatment provided 2 days of irrigation per week with 
no sensor to bypass irrigation. Testing involved 72 plots of turf. All controller programming 
reflected settings that might be used in residential or commercial landscapes. 
2.3.15 Evaluation of California Weather-Based “Smart” Irrigation Controller 
Programs 
Prepared by P. Mayer, W. DeOreo, M. Hayden, and R. Davis, Aquacraft, Inc.; 
E. Caldwell and T. Miller, National Research Center, Inc.; and P.J. Bickel. 
Presented to the California DWR by the Metropolitan Water District of 
Southern California and the East Bay Municipal Utility District. 277 pages. 
July 2009.  
http://www.irrigatoinessentials.com/userfiles/file/DWR_SMARTcontroller 
_eval_09.pdf. 
The authors evaluated on-site sensor-based controllers and signal-based WBICs at urban 
(residential and commercial) landscapes in California. As of the report date, the EPA had filed its 
intent to apply the WaterSense label to smart controllers, but had not identified a testing 
protocol. The authors discuss water savings by brand of controller, the factors that affect water 
savings, and cost-effectiveness. The authors state, "Even the best, most water-efficient controller 
cannot make up for poor system design, installation, and maintenance...." Also: "In this study, 
34
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C# users are able to extract image from PDF document page and get image information for indexing and accessing. C# Project: DLLs for PDF Image Extraction.
c# extract pdf text; delete text from pdf preview
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
RsterEdge XDoc PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file and specified region on PDF page, then get image information for
extract all text from pdf; cut and paste pdf text
41.8% of the study sites increased their irrigation water use after installation of the smart 
controller."  
The authors analyzed controller cost-effectiveness using the average and median water 
savings per customer estimated for sites measuring 4,000; 12,000; 25,000; or 150,000 square 
feet. Those areas reflect the usual range of residential and non-residential landscapes found in 
northern and southern California. The avoided cost of water for the California water agencies in 
the study ranged from about $100 to $1,000 per acre-foot.  
2.3.16 Evaluation of Sensor-Based Residential Irrigation Water Application on Homes 
in Florida 
By M.D. Dukes and M.B. Haley, Univ. of Florida. 
2009. 
http://www.irrigation.org/Resources/Technical_Papers.aspx 
*Abstract only, obtained through search of the Irrigation Association  
Website. 
This project aimed to determine whether an automatic residential irrigation system with soil 
moisture sensor controllers could reduce irrigation while maintaining turfgrass quality. 
Approaches tested were (1) automatic timer-based irrigation set and operated by the participant; 
(2) automatic timer with a soil moisture sensor; (3) automatic timer with a rain sensor; and (4) 
automatic timer with a rain sensor plus educational materials, including a recommended run-time 
schedule. Irrigation water use, quarterly turf quality ratings, and weather data were collected 
continuously for 59 homes during 26 months. Both weekly and hourly irrigation water use were 
recorded, and the fraction of total household use was calculated. The soil moisture sensor system 
provided the largest savings, cumulatively applying 65% less water for irrigation than the timer-
only method.  
2.3.17 Landscape Irrigation by Evapotranspiration-Based Irrigation Controllers under 
Dry Conditions in Southwest Florida 
By S.L. Davis, M.D. Dukes, and G.L. Miller. 
Agricultural Water Management, Vol. 96, No. 12, pages 1828–1836.  
2009.  
http://econpapers.repec.org/article/eeeagiwat/v_3a96_3ay_3a2009_3ai_3a12_
3ap_3a1828-1836.htm 
Based on positive water savings reported for ET controllers used in arid climates, the authors 
tested three brands of controllers: Toro's Intelli-sense utilizing the WeatherTRAK ET 
Everywhere service (Hydropoint Datasystems, Inc.); SL1600 controller with SLW15 weather 
monitor (Weathermatic, Inc.); and Smart Controller 100 (ET Water Systems LCC). The 
controllers' irrigation applications were evaluated compared to a timer schedule intended to 
replicate that of a typical homeowner. Other methods tested were TIME, based on the historical 
net irrigation requirement, and RTIME, which was 60% of TIME. Each technique was replicated 
35
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); // get a text manager from the document object
.net extract pdf text; delete text from pdf
C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
In addition to raster image files, text extraction from PDF is also supported by our OCR toolkit. For instance, you may get text content from whole PDF file
copy text from encrypted pdf; copy text pdf
four times in a total of 20 plots of St. Augustine grass, each of which was irrigated by one 
individual irrigation system. Techniques were compared to each other and to a timer-based 
schedule without rain sensor (derived from TIME). The study period, August 2006–November 
2007, was dry compared to the 30-year historical average.  
2.3.18 Irrigation by Evapotranspiration-Based Irrigation Controllers in Florida 
By S.L. Davis, M.D. Dukes, and G.L. Miller. 
Presented at the 29th Annual International Irrigation Show, Anaheim, CA.  
9 pages. 
November 2–4, 2008.  
abe.ufl.edu/mdukes/pdf/publications/ET/2008-Final-IA-Manuscript-SLD.pdf 
This presentation reported on the same research as described in reference 2.3.18, above. The 
study evaluated the ability of three brands of ET-based controllers to schedule irrigation 
compared to a timer. Five systems were evaluated: three ET controllers, a timer method set 
according to recommendations from the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural 
Sciences, and 60% of the first timer-based treatment. The ET controllers provided an average of 
35% to 42% water savings compared to a timer schedule without a rain sensor and maintained 
acceptable turfgrass quality. Also, potential water savings from using a rain sensor set to a 6 mm 
threshold averaged 21% throughout the study.  
2.3.19 Effectiveness of Runoff-Reducing Weather-Based Irrigation Controllers 
(SmarTimers) 
By S.D. Jakubowski, Municipal Water District of Orange County. 
Slides presented at WaterSmart ’08 Innovations Conference, Las Vegas, NV. 
October 2008. 
http://www.newportbeachca.gov/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=
6208 
This study examined the pollution prevention, reduction in urban runoff, and improvement in 
water quality, as well as water savings, attributable to WBICs. The author defined a weather-
based irrigation controller (SmarTimer) as a controller that (1) estimates or measures depletion 
of available plant soil moisture; (2) replenishes water as needed while minimizing excess 
irrigation; and (3) requires minimal human intervention to modify irrigation appropriately 
throughout the season. The study, which ran from 2004–2006, used direct, targeted marketing 
including a rebate offered to participants. The study spanned three ET zones (coastal, central, 
and foothills) and utilized eight brands of WBIC. The study calculated average calendar monthly 
usage both pre- and post-retrofit and statistically compared the two periods. Of the 899 single-
family residential water accounts included in the study, 49% saw no significant difference and 
51% showed significantly different water usage (64% saved, 36% used more). Participants 
realized a net average savings of 35.7 gallons per day (gpd). Of the 323 commercial accounts 
36
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Note: When you get the error "Could not load file or assembly 'RasterEdge
copying text from pdf to word; copy text from protected pdf
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
NET image annotating features, provides developers with a great .NET solution to annotate .pdf file with both text & graphics. From this page, you will get a
find and replace text in pdf file; cut and paste text from pdf
included in the study, 59% saw no significant difference; 41% had significantly different water 
usage (73% saved, 27% used more); and net savings averaged 460 gpd.   
2.3.20 Evaluation of Evapotranspiration-Based and Soil-Moisture-Based Irrigation 
Control in Turf 
By G. Grabow, A. Vasanth, D. Bowman, R. Huffman, and G. Miller. 
Presented at the 2008 World Environmental and Water Resources Congress, 
American Society of Civil Engineers, May 12–16, Honolulu, Hawaii. Pages 1-
9. 
http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/40976(316)117 
This study, performed in fall 2006 in Raleigh, NC, compared amounts of water applied and 
resulting turf quality for one ET-based irrigation system, two SMS-based systems, and a timer-
controlled schedule. The effect of irrigation frequency also was examined. Turf ET was 
estimated using both an atmometer and the Penman-Monteith equation applied to weather data. 
This 20-week study showed that on average the add-on SMS system applied the least water, 
whereas the ET-based system applied the most. Averaged across all technologies, weekly 
irrigation frequencies used the least amount of water, followed by biweekly and then daily 
frequencies. All technologies and frequencies maintained minimally acceptable turf quality 
throughout most of the study period. During the last month, however, turf quality declined 
considerably for both the add-on SMS and the timer-based system. The on-demand sensor-based 
system provided the best combination of water use efficiency and turf quality. 
2.3.21 Summary of Smart Controller Water Savings Studies: Literature Review of 
Water Savings Studies for Weather and Soil Moisture Based Landscape 
Irrigation Control Devices 
Prepared by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, 
Southern California Area Office, Temecula, CA; and Technical Service 
Center Water Resources Planning and Operations Support Group, Denver, 
CO. 
Final Technical Memorandum No. 86-68210-SCAO-01. 21 pages. 
April 2008.  
http://www.usbr.gov/waterconservation/docs/WaterSavingsRpt.pdf 
This document summarizes results from about 26 studies of water savings achieved for 
residential landscapes by weather-based controllers, soil moisture-based controllers, and 
controllers based on both weather and soil moisture. The purpose of this summary report was to 
document the overall status of emerging controller technologies for weather- and soil moisture-
based landscape irrigation, with the intent of assisting water agencies in their efforts to promote 
such technologies. Topics include urban runoff, turf, scheduling, and reported water savings. 
Most of the studies reviewed are described elsewhere in this list of resources. 
37
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Dim inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from the
extract pdf text to excel; delete text from pdf file
VB.NET PDF: Get Started with PDF Library
C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF VB.NET PDF: Get Started with .NET PDF Library Using VB. Simple Sample Code for Creating Blank Page to PDF in VB
get text from pdf file c#; copying text from pdf into word
2.3.22 Pilot Implementation of Smart Timers: Water Conservation, Urban Runoff 
Reduction, and Water Quality 
By Kennedy/Jenks Consultants. 
Prepared for the Municipal Water District of Orange County, K/J project no. 
0753001. 130 pages plus appendixes. 
March 2008.  
http://www.mwdoc.com/documents/SmarTimerReport.pdf  
This report describes detailed analyses of pre- and post-retrofit data for Smart Timers installed at 
323 commercial and 899 residential sites. The project also involved evaluating associated 
changes in runoff and water quality. The results for installation of Smart Timers at single-family 
residential (SFR) sites were: irrigation water use declined in 33% of SFRs; increased 
significantly in 15% to 20% of SFRs; and showed no change in about 50% of SFRs. The results 
for installation of Smart Timers at commercial sites were: irrigation water use decreased 
significantly in 15% to 30% of the sites. For about 10% to 20% of commercial sites, water 
consumption increased after Smart Timers were installed. 
2.3.23 Sensor-Based Automation of Irrigation on Bermudagrass, During Wet Weather 
Conditions 
By B. Cardenas-Lailhacar, M.D. Dukes, and G.L. Miller. 
Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, March/April 2008, pages 120-
128. 
DOI: 10.1061/ASCE0733-94372008134:2120. 
http://abe.ufl.edu/mdukes/pdf/publications/SMS/Cardenas-SMS-paper-
JID.pdf 
The objectives of this research were to quantify irrigation water use and evaluate differences in 
turf quality for (1) timer-based scheduling with and without a rain sensor; (2) a timer-based 
schedule compared to a system that uses a soil moisture sensor (SMS); and (3) various 
commercially available SMS systems. The experimental area comprised 3.7 m x 3.7 m plots of 
common bermudagrass in Gainesville, FL. Monitoring took place from July 20 to December 14, 
2004, and from March 25 to August 31, 2005. Four SMS brands were tested, each of which was 
scheduled to irrigate one, two, or seven days a week. Because sustained wet weather occurred 
during both monitoring periods, there were no sig
nificant differences in turfgrass quality detected 
among the plots. The rain sensors applied 34% less water than no rain sensor. The water savings 
for three of four SMS brands, compared to no sensor, ranged from 69% to 92%, depending on 
irrigation frequency. 
2.3.24 Residential Water Savings Associated with Satellite-Based ET Irrigation 
Controllers 
By D.A. Devitt, K. Carstensen, and R.L. Morris. 
38
Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, Vol. 134, No. 74, pages 74–
82. DOI:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9437(2008)134:1(74). 
January 2008. 
http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9437(2008)134:1(74) 
This study monitored the irrigation water use of 27 residential sites in Las Vegas, NV. The sites, 
which had various percentages of turfgrass in mixed landscapes, were monitored to quantify 
savings from satellite-based irrigation controllers. Seventeen sites were equipped with ET-based 
satellite controllers, and 10, serving as control sites, were retrofitted with non ET-based 
controllers. Thirteen of 16 sites equipped with ET-based controllers saved water compared to 4 
of 10 control sites.  
2.3.25 Expanding Disk Rain Sensor Performance and Potential Irrigation Water 
Savings 
By B. Cardenas-Lailhacar and M.D. Dukes. 
Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, Vol. 134, No. 1, pages 67–73. 
2008.  
http://www.abe.ufl.edu/mdukes/pdf/publications/RS/Cardenas-Dukes-RS-
paper-JID.PDF 
This article reports on an experiment performed to: (1) evaluate two types of rain sensors (RS) 
for setpoint accuracy, number of irrigation cycles bypassed, and duration of bypass mode; (2) 
quantify the amount of water RS could save; and (3) estimate payback period. The authors tested 
12 Mini-click and 4 wireless rain-click rain sensor models by Hunter Industries, Inc. The study 
was performed in Florida, from March 25 through December 31, 2005, a period when 62% of 
days had rainfall. Three rainfall setpoints were established for the Mini-click devices: 3, 13, and 
25 mm thresholds. On average, all RS responded close to their setpoints.  
2.3.26 Residential Irrigation Water Use in Central Florida 
By M.B. Haley, M.D. Dukes, and G.L. Miller. 
Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, September/October 2007, 
pages 427–434. 
http://abe.ufl.edu/mdukes/pdf/irrigation-efficiency/Haley-FL-residential-irrig-
JID.pdf 
The first objective of this study was to document irrigation water use on typical residential 
landscapes (T1) in the Central Florida ridge region. The second objective was to determine 
whether (1) scheduling irrigation by setting controllers based on historical ET (T2) and (2) 
reducing the percentage of turf area along with setting the controllers based on historical ET (T3) 
would reduce irrigation water use. This study lasted 30 months beginning in January 2003. The 
average T1 or T2 irrigated landscape contained approximately 75% turfgrass (60% to 88% 
39
range). The T3 landscapes averaged 31% (5% to 66% range) turfgrass. The rest of the 
landscaped area contained Florida native plants or low-water-use species.  
Irrigation accounted for 64% of residential water use for all homes during the study. T1 
irrigation averaged 74% of total water use, T2 averaged 66%, and T3 averaged 51%. Average 
monthly water use at T2 homes was 105 mm per month, 30% less than at T1 homes. T3 homes 
showed a 50% reduction in water use (74 mm per month). Average monthly water use among the 
three irrigation treatments differed statistically (p<0.001). Increasing the proportion of landscape 
area from 23% ornamental plants irrigated with sprinklers (T1 and T2) to 62% ornamental plants 
irrigated with micro-irrigation (T3) saved the most water. Micro-irrigation applied low volumes 
of water to only some of the landscaped beds and then only to the root zone. 
2.3.27 Evaluation of Evapotranspiration and Soil Moisture-based Irrigation Control on 
Turfgrass  
By M. Shedd, M.D. Dukes, and G.L. Miller. 
Presented at the World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2007: 
Restoring Our Natural Habitat, pages 1–21.  
May 2007. 
http://cedb.asce.org/cgi/WWWdisplay.cgi?159624 
This study evaluated the effectiveness of various technologies for reducing residential irrigation 
in terms of amount of water applied and quality of turfgrass. Two types of soil moisture sensors 
(LawnLogic and the Acclima Digital TDT RS500) were tested at low, medium, and high soil 
moisture thresholds. Mini-Clik rain sensors were incorporated in seven timer-based experiments. 
Three of the rain sensors were set to bypass irrigation at 3 mm of rainfall; four were set for 6 
mm. Two ET controllers were tested, the Toro Intelli-Sense controller and the Rain Bird ET 
Manager. Timer-based irrigation without a rain sensor  irrigating two days per week (2-WORS) 
provided a baseline. SMS systems reduced water use by 0% to 63% compared to 2-WORS. Rain 
sensors reduced water use by 7% to 33%. ET-based irrigation reduced water use 36% to 59% 
compared to 2-WORS. At low thresholds, the SMS systems saved significant amounts of water, 
but reduced turf quality to unacceptable levels. The SMSs set at a medium threshold, timer-based 
irrigation, and both ET-based systems produced good turfgrass quality while reducing irrigation 
water use compared to 2-WORS. Water savings for the medium-threshold SMS systems ranged 
from 11% to 28%. 
2.3.28 Evaluation of Soil Moisture-Based and ET-Based Irrigation Control in Turf 
By A. Vasanth, G.L. Grabow, D. Bowman, R.L. Huffman, and G.L. Miller. 
2007. 
http://www.irrigation.org/resources/technical_papers/ 
*Abstract only, found through search of the Irrigation Association website. 
A study initiated in the fall of 2006 compared two types of commercially available irrigation 
control technologies, one based on ET estimates, and the other on feedback from soil moisture 
40
sensors. The amount of water applied and the turf quality from one ET- and two SMS-based 
systems were compared to results of a standard timer-based irrigation schedule. Irrigation 
frequency was another component of the study. On average, the add-on soil-moisture-based 
system applied the least amount of water, whereas the ET-based treatment applied the most. 
Once-a-week irrigation used the least amount of water and daily frequencies the most when 
averaged across all technologies. In general, all technologies and frequencies maintained 
minimally acceptable turf quality, although some systems resulted in noticeably stressed turf 
during the last month of the study. The on-demand, SMS-based system provided the best 
combination of water efficiency and turf quality. 
2.3.29 Precise Irrigation Scheduling for Turfgrass Using a Subsurface Electromagnetic 
Soil Moisture Sensor 
By J.M. Blonquist, S.B. Jones, and D.A. Robinson. 
Agricultural Water Management, Vol. 84, No. 1–2, pages 153-165. 
2006.  
http://www.usu.edu/soilphysics/rsrch/SBIrrigation/2006_AgWatMan_Blonqui
st-etal_IrrigationMan.pdf  
Research objectives were to (1) examine the effects of scheduling irrigation of turfgrass based on 
ET estimates from a weather station compared to data from a novel time-domain transmission 
(TDT) SMS, and (2) apply a computer-based numerical model to simulate volumetric soil water 
content dynamics at the burial depth of the sensor and to evaluate any drainage occurring below 
the turfgrass rooting depth.  
This article describes an electromagnetic technology that automates irrigation based on 
sensed soil moisture. Researchers installed an Acclima Digital TDT sensor in a plot measuring 
about 280 m
2
on the Utah State University Greenville Research Farm. The sensor connected to a 
CS3500 controller, which can log estimated water content as well as control irrigation. The 
experiment was conducted July 30–September 16, 2004 (a total of 39 days). Two different 
sprinkler heads were used, the first a single-impact Rainbird130IBH with a 3/16-inch nozzle that 
was used July 30–August 15. During that period the Acclima TDT system applied approximately 
13.0 mm of water (13%) more than the amount recommended based on ET estimates from a 
local weather station. From August 16–September 16, the sprinkler head was a lower-
flow, gear
-
driven Hunter1 PGP with #9 nozzle. During that period, the Acclima system used approximately 
20.0 mm, or 16%, less water than the recommended amount and 53% less than an average 
fixed 
irrigation rate of 50 mm week. The cumulative totals for the TDT and both sprinklers were 
comparable to irrigating based on the ET estimate.  
The authors used the HYDRUS-2D numerical model to simulate the dynamics of 
volumetric soil water content at the burial depth of the sensor. The model estimated irrigation 
and precipitation inputs and ET outputs from the soil profile to predict drainage occurring below 
the grass rooting depth of 10 cm. The TDT system could save an estimated $5.00 to $100.00 per 
month based on average water prices in the United States and a 1,000 m
2
irrigated turfgrass plot, 
providing a payback period of 6 to 12 months. 
41
2.3.30 LADWP Weather-Based Irrigation Controller Pilot Study: Executive Summary 
By A. Bamezai, Western Policy Research. 
Submitted to the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. 8 pages. 
August 2004.  
ftp://ftpdpla.water.ca.gov/users/prop50/09610_Mojave/Regional%20Water%2
0Conservation%20Program/EXCERPTS%20Regional%20Water%20Conserv
ation%20Program/LADWP%20Weather%20Based%20Irrigation%20Controll
er%20Pilot%20Study%20EXCERPT.pdf 
This study evaluated two weather-based irrigation scheduling technologies: (1) Hydropoint Inc.’s 
ET controller sold under the trade name WeatherTrak, which replaces a controller; and (2) 
Water2save LLC’s weather-based irrigation scheduler, which is added to an existing controller. 
WeatherTrak utilizes paging technology to receive weather-related data signals, internally 
processes them, and generates an irrigation schedule. Water2save is an interrupt and control 
device equipped with wireless Personal Communications Service technology that allows two-
way communication between Water2save and the device.  
The goals of the study were to (1) assess the performance of weather-based irrigation 
technologies, and (2) assess customer acceptance of those technologies in predominantly non-
single family residential and small commercial settings. The study recruited 25 sites comprising 
about 83 acres of landscape (35 acres of turf, the rest shrubs), including homeowner associations, 
schools, commercial sites, and public parks. Water use was tracked for at least a year after the 
controller retrofits, and statistical models were used to compare two years of pre-retrofit to 1 year 
of post-retrofit consumption, accounting for weather. Both technologies rely on broadcast signals 
and adjust irrigation patterns to respond to weather conditions. Water2save’s and Hydropoint’s 
technologies reduced irrigation by 28.3% and 17.4%, respectively. Because Water2save’s sites 
experienced more wasteful irrigation before the retrofits, they had a higher conservation 
potential. The percentage of pre-retrofit conservation potential converted into savings was higher 
for Hydropoint’s landscapes (95%) than for Water2save’s (71%), however. The authors 
estimated that both technologies together reduced outdoor consumption by 27%, achieving about 
78% of total pre-retrofit conservation potential. Estimated outdoor water consumption savings 
across all test sites in the study was roughly 17 inches per year for pure turf landscapes and an 
assumed half of that for pure shrub landscapes. Savings estimates from this study closely 
matched the results of at least two previous studies in Irvine, CA.  
2.3.31 The Residential Runoff Reduction Study 
By The Municipal Water District of Orange County and Irvine Ranch Water 
District. 
256 pages. 
July 2004.  
http://www.mwdoc.com/documents/R3Study-FINALREVISED10-28-04.pdf  
The Residential Runoff Reduction (R3) study tested the effects of weather-based (ET) irrigation 
controllers and an education program on irrigation water use and the quantity and quality of dry-
42
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested