free pdf viewer c# .net : C# get text from pdf Library SDK API .net asp.net windows sharepoint EXCEL%20readings7-part147

The following formula uses the SUM function to add the values in the
range A1:A12.
=SUM(A1:A12)
The next formula compares cell A1 with cell C12 by using the = operator.
If the values in the two cells are identical, the formula returns TRUE; oth-
erwise it returns FALSE.
=A1=C12
This final formula subtracts the value in cell B3 from the value in cell B2
and then multiplies the result by the value in cell B4:
=(B2-B3)*B4
Editing Formulas
If you make changes to your worksheet, you may need to edit formulas. Or, the for-
mula may return one of the error values described later in this chapter, and you
need to edit the formula to correct the error. You can edit your formulas just as you
edit any other cell.
There are several ways to get into cell edit mode:
1. Double-click the cell. This enables you to edit the cell contents directly
in the cell. This technique works only if the Edit directly in cell option
is in effect. You can change this option in the Edit tab of the Options 
dialog box.
2. Press F2. This enables you to edit the cell contents directly in the cell. If
the Edit directly in cell option is not turned on, the editing will occur in
the formula bar.
3. Select the formula cell that you want to edit and then click in the formula
bar. This enables you to edit the cell contents in the formula bar.
4. Click the Edit Formula button (it has an equal sign icon) in the edit line to
access the Formula Palette. 
Excel 2002 does not have an Edit Formula button.
34
Part I: Basic Information
C# get text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
extract text from pdf acrobat; copy text from pdf reader
C# get text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
copy text from pdf without formatting; extract text from pdf using c#
When you edit a formula, you can select multiple characters by dragging the
mouse over them or by holding down Shift while you use the arrow keys. You can
also press Home or End to select from the cursor position to the beginning or end
of the formula. If you use Ctrl+Shift, pressing the arrow keys allows you to select
“words” within the formula.
Suppose you have a lengthy formula that contains an error,and Excel won’t
let you enter it because of the error. In this case,you can convert the formula
to text and tackle it again later.To convert a formula to text, just remove the
initial equal sign (=).To try the formula again,insert the initial equal sign to
convert the cell contents back to a formula.
Using Operators in Formulas
As previously discussed, an operator is the basic element of a formula. An operator
is a symbol that represents an operation. Excel supports the following operators:
Chapter 2: Basic Facts about Formulas
35
Using the Formula Bar as a Calculator
If you simply need to perform a calculation, you can use the formula bar as a
calculator. For example, enter the following formula into any cell:
=(145*1.05)/12
Because this formula always returns the same result, you might prefer to store the
formula’s result rather than the formula. To do so, press F2 to edit the cell. Then press
F9 followed by Enter. Excel stores the formula’s result (12.6875), rather than the
formula. This technique also works if the formula uses cell references.
You’ll find that this technique is most useful when you use worksheet functions. For
example, to enter the square root of 221 into a cell, enter =SQRT(221), press F9, and
press Enter. Excel enters the result: 14.8660687473185. You also can use this
technique to evaluate just part of a formula. Consider this formula:
=(145*1.05)/A1
If you want to convert just the expression within the parentheses to a value, get into
cell edit mode and select the part that you want to evaluate. In this example, select
145*1.05. Then, press F9 followed by Enter. Excel converts the formula to the
following:
=(152.25)/A1
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
try this C# demo. // Open a document. String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); // Get a text
export text from pdf to excel; delete text from pdf preview
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field Learn how to retrieve all annotations from PDF file in C# project. // Get PDF document
find and replace text in pdf file; copying text from pdf to word
+
Addition
-
Subtraction
/
Division
*
Multiplication
%
Percent
&
Text concatenation
^
Exponentiation
=
Logical comparison (equal to)
>
Logical comparison (greater than)
<
Logical comparison (less than)
>=
Logical comparison (greater than or equal to)
<=
Logical comparison (less than or equal to)
<>
Logical comparison (not equal to)
You can, of course, use as many operators as you need. Formulas can prove
quite complex.
Reference Operators
Excel supports another class of operators known as reference operators. Reference
operators, described in the following list, work with cell references.
: (colon)
Range operator. Produces one reference to all the cells
between two references.
, (comma)
Union operator. This combines multiple cell or range refer-
ences into one reference.
(single space) Intersection operator. This produces one reference to cells
common to two references.
Sample Formulas That Use Operators
These examples of formulas use various operators:
 The following formula joins (concatenates)the two literal text strings to
produce a new text string: Part-23A:
=”Part-”&”23A”
 The next formula concatenates the contents of cell A1 with cell A2:
=A1&A2
36
Part I: Basic Information
C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
On this Visual C# tutorial page, you will see how SDK in your application to extract and get text from Tiff Extracted text can be output to Word or PDF document
pdf text replace tool; copy text from scanned pdf
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C# users are able to extract image from PDF document page and get image information for indexing and accessing. C# Project: DLLs for PDF Image Extraction.
delete text from pdf; copy pdf text with formatting
Usually, concatenation is used with text, but concatenation works with
values as well. For example, if cell A1 contains 123 and cell A2 contains
456, the preceding formula would return the value 123456. Note that,
technically, the result is a text string. However, this text string functions
as a numeric value.
The following formula uses the exponentiation operator to raise 6 to the
third power, to produce a result of 216.
=6^3
A more useful form of the above formula uses a cell reference instead of
the literal value. Note this example that raises the value in cell A1 to the
third power:
=A1^3
This formula returns the cube root of 216 (which is 6):
=216^(1/3)
The next formula returns TRUE if the value in cell A1 is less than the
value in cell A2. Otherwise, it returns FALSE.
=A1<A2
Logical comparison operators also work with text. If A1 contains Alpha
and A2 contains Gamma, the formula returns TRUE because Alpha comes
before Gamma in alphabetical order.
The following formula returns TRUE if the value in cell A1 is less than or
equal to the value in cell A2. Otherwise, it returns FALSE.
=A1<=A2
The next formula returns TRUE if the value in cell A1 does not equal the
value in cell A2. Otherwise, it returns FALSE.
=A1<>A2
Unlike some other spreadsheets (such as 1-2-3), Excel doesn’t have logical
AND or OR operators. Rather, you use functions to specify these types of
logical operators. For example, this formula returns TRUE if cell A1 con-
tains either 100 or 1000:
=OR(A1=100,A1=1000)
This last formula returns TRUE only if both cell A1 and cell A2 contain
values less than 100:
=AND(A1<100,A2<100)
Chapter 2: Basic Facts about Formulas
37
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET Sample Code: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File in C#.NET. You can easily get pages from a PDF file, and then use these pages to create and
cut text pdf; copy pdf text to word
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction In addition, C# users can append a PDF file get PDFDocument object from one file String inputFilePath1
c# get text from pdf; copy text from encrypted pdf
Operator Precedence
You  can (and should) use parentheses in your formulas to control the order  in
which the calculations occur. As an example, consider the following formula that
uses references to named cells.
=Income-Expenses*TaxRate
The goal is to subtract expenses from income and then multiply the result by the
tax rate. If you enter the above formula, you discover that Excel computes the
wrong answer. Rather, the formula multiplies expenses by the tax rate and then
subtracts the result from the income. The correct way to write this formula is:
=(Income-Expenses)*TaxRate
To understand how this works, you need to be familiar with a concept called
operator precedence—the set of rules that Excel uses to perform its calculations.
Table 2-1 lists Excel’s operator precedence. Operations with a lower precedence
number are performed before operations with a higher precedence number.
Use parentheses to override Excel’s built-in order of precedence. Returning to
the previous example, the formula without parentheses is evaluated using Excel’s
standard operator precedence. Because multiplication has a higher precedence, the
Expense cell multiplies by the TaxRate cell. Then, this  result is subtracted from
Income— producing an incorrect calculation.
The  correct  formula  uses  parentheses  to  control  the  order  of  operations.
Expressions within parentheses always get evaluated first. In this case, Expenses is
subtracted from Income, and the result multiplies by TaxRate.
T
ABLE
2-1 OPERATOR PRECEDENCE IN EXCEL FORMULAS
Symbol 
Operator
Precedence
-
Negation
1
%
Percent
2
^
Exponentiation
3
* and /
Multiplication and division
4
+ and -
Addition and subtraction
5
&
Text concatenation
6
=, <, >, <=, >=, and <>
Comparison
7
38
Part I: Basic Information
VB.NET PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in
annotating features, provides developers with a great .NET solution to annotate .pdf file with both text & graphics. From this page, you will get a simple VB
copy text from scanned pdf to word; how to copy and paste pdf text
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Able to find and get PDF text position details in C#.NET application. Allow to search defined PDF file page or the whole document.
can't copy and paste text from pdf; copy paste text pdf
Nested Parentheses
You  can  also  nest parentheses in  formulas.  Nesting  means  putting parentheses
inside of parentheses. If you do so, Excel evaluates the most deeply nested expres-
sions first and works its way out. The following example of a formula uses nested
parentheses.
=((B2*C2)+(B3*C3)+(B4*C4))*B6
This formula has four sets of parentheses. Three sets are nested inside the fourth
set. Excel evaluates each nested set of parentheses and then sums the three results.
This sum is then multiplied by the value in B6.
It’s a good idea to make liberal use of parentheses in your formulas, even when
they aren’t necessary. Using parentheses clarifies the order of operations and makes
the formula easier to read. For example, if you want to add 1 to the product of two
cells, the following formula performs will do the job:
=A1*A2+1
You may  find  it much  clearer, however,  to  use the following formula  (with
superfluous parentheses):
=(A1*A2)+1
Every left parenthesis, of course, must have a matching right parenthesis. If you
have many levels of nested parentheses, you might find it difficult to keep them
straight. If the parentheses don’t match, Excel pops up a message telling you and
won’t permit you to enter the formula. 
Fortunately,Excel lends a hand in helping you match parentheses.When you
enter or edit a formula that has parentheses,pay attention to the text.When
the cursor moves over a parenthesis,Excel momentarily displays the paren-
thesis and its closing parenthesis in bold.This lasts for less than a second, so
watch carefully.
In some cases, if your formula contains mismatched parentheses, Excel may pro-
pose a correction to your formula (Excel 97 introduced this Formula AutoCorrect
feature). Figure 2-3 shows an example of Excel’s AutoCorrect feature in action.
Chapter 2: Basic Facts about Formulas
39
It is tempting to simply accept the correction proposed in the dialog box,
but be careful. In many cases, the proposed formula, although syntactically
correct, isn’t the formula that you want. In Figure 2-3, I omitted the closing
parentheses after January.Excel proposed this correction:
=SUM(January/SUM(Total))
In fact, the correct formula is:
=SUM(January)/SUM(Total)
Figure 2-3: Excel’s Formula AutoCorrect feature often suggests a 
correction to an erroneous formula.
Calculating Formulas
You’ve probably noticed that the formulas in your worksheet get calculated imme-
diately. If you change any cells that the formula uses, the formula displays a new
result with no effort on your part. This occurs when Excel’s Calculation mode is set
to Automatic. In this mode (the default mode), Excel follows certain rules when cal-
culating your worksheet:
Don’t Hard-Code Values
When you create a formula, think twice before using a literal value in the formula. For
example, if your formula calculates 7.5 percent sales tax, you may be tempted to enter
a formula such as:
=A1*.075
A better approach is to insert the sales tax rate into a cell and use the cell reference
in place of the literal value. This makes it easier to modify and maintain your
worksheet. For example, if the sales tax range changes to 7.75 percent, you need to
modify every formula that uses the old value. If the tax rate is stored in a cell, you
simply change one cell and all the formulas automatically get updated.
40
Part I: Basic Information
When you make a change (enter or edit data or formulas, for example),
Excel calculates immediately those formulas that depend on new or edited
data.
If working on a lengthy calculation, Excel temporarily suspends calcula-
tion when you need to perform other worksheet tasks; it resumes when
you finish.
Formulas are evaluated in a natural sequence. For instance, if a formula in
cell D12 depends on the result of a formula in cell D11, cell D11 is calcu-
lated before D12.
Sometimes, however, you may want to control when Excel calculates formulas.
For example, if you create a worksheet with thousands of complex formulas, you’ll
find that things can slow to a snail’s pace while Excel does its thing. In this case,
you can set Excel’s calculation mode to Manual. Do this in the Calculation panel of
the Options dialog box. (Select Tools Options to display this dialog box.)
When you work in Manual calculation mode, Excel displays Calculate in the sta-
tus bar  when you  have  any  uncalculated formulas. You can use the  following
shortcut keys to recalculate the formulas:
F9: Calculates the formulas in all open workbooks.
Shift+F9: Calculates only the formulas in the active worksheet. It does not
calculate other worksheets in the same workbook.
Ctrl+Alt+F9: Forces a complete recalculation of all open workbooks. Use
it if Excel (for some reason) doesn’t seem to return correct calculations.
Ctrl+Shift+Alt+F9: Rechecks all of the dependent formulas, and then
forces a recalculation of all open workbooks.
The Ctrl+Shift+Alf+F9 key sequence works only in Excel 2002.
Excel’s Calculation mode isn’t specific to a particular worksheet.When you
change Excel’s Calculation mode, it affects all open workbooks—not just
the  active  workbook. Also, the  initial  Calculation  mode  is  set  by  the
Calculation mode saved with the first workbook you open.
Chapter 2: Basic Facts about Formulas
41
Cell and Range References
Most formulas reference one or more cells by using the cell or range address (or
name if it has one). Cell references come in four styles; the dollar sign differentiates
them:
 Relative:The reference is fully relative. When the formula is copied, the
cell reference adjusts to its new location. Example: A1
 Absolute:The reference is fully absolute. When the formula is copied, the
cell reference does not change. Example: $A$1
 Row Absolute:The reference is partially absolute. When the formula is
copied, the column part adjusts, but the row part does not change.
Example: A$1
 Column Absolute:The reference is partially absolute. When the formula is
copied, the row part adjusts, but the column part does not change.
Example: $A1
Creating an Absolute Reference
When you create a formula by pointing to cells, all cell and range references are
relative. To change a reference to an absolute reference, you must do so manually
by adding the dollar signs. Or, when you enter a cell or range address, you can use
the F4 key to cycle among all possible reference modes.
If you think about it, you may realize that the only reason you would ever need
to change a reference is if you plan to copy the formula. Figure 2-4 demonstrates
this. Note the formula in cell C4:
=C$3*$B4
This formula calculates  the area  for various widths (listed in column B) and
lengths (listed in Row 3). After you enter the formula, it can then be copied down
and across. Because the formula uses absolute references to row 3 and column B,
each copied formula produces the correct result. If the formula uses relative refer-
ences, copying the formula causes the references to adjust and produce the wrong
results.
42
Part I: Basic Information
Chapter 2: Basic Facts about Formulas
43
A1 vs. R1C1 Notation
Normally, Excel uses what is referred to as A1 notation. Each cell address consists of a
column letter and a row number. However, Excel also supports R1C1 notation. In this
system, cell A1 is referred to as cell R1C1, cell A2 as R2C1, and so on.
To change to R1C1 notation, select ToolsOptions to get the Options dialog box,
click the General tab, and place a check mark next to R1C1 reference style. Now,
notice that the column letters all change to numbers. And, all of the cell and range
references in your formulas also adjust.
Look at the following examples of formulas using standard notation and R1C1
notation. The formula is assumed to be in cell B1 (also known as R1C2).
Standard
R1C1
=A1+1
=RC[-1]+1
=$A$1+1
=R1C1+1
=$A1+1
=RC1+1
=A$1+1
=R1C[-1]+1
=SUM(A1:A10)
=SUM(RC[-1]:R[9]C[-1])
=SUM($A$1:$A$10)
=SUM(R1C1:R10C1)
If you find R1C1 notation confusing, you’re not alone. R1C1 notation isn’t too bad
when you’re dealing with absolute references. But when relative references are
involved, the brackets can drive you nuts.
The numbers in brackets refer to the relative position of the references. For example,
R[-5]C[-3] specifies the cell that appears five rows above and three columns to the
left. Conversely, R[5]C[3] references the cell that appears five rows below and three
columns to the right. If you omit the brackets, it specifies the same row or column. For
example, R[5]C refers to the cell five rows below in the same column.
Although you probably won’t use R1C1 notation as your standard system, it does have
at least one good use. R1C1 notation makes it very easy to spot an erroneous formula.
When you copy a formula, every copied formula is exactly the same in R1C1 notation.
This remains true regardless of the types of cell references you use (relative, absolute,
or mixed). Therefore, you can switch to R1C1 notation and check your copied
formulas. If one looks different from its surrounding formulas, it’s probably incorrect.
Continued
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested