free pdf viewer c# winform : Extract text from image pdf file Library application component .net html winforms mvc Manual3-part1686

31 
The second block of information is the similar, except that these objects have no sex and no 
lower and upper age limit, but can optionally have a land requirement (Table 9).  The objects 
include livestock (e.g., cows and goats), a farm structures (e.g., a henhouse), or hectares of 
coffee plantation:  
•  a female head of the household 
•  innovation segment: early adopters to laggards 
•  form of expectations: rational, .. 
•  liquidity: liquid means available for investments 
•  leverage:…  
The specification of these five assets is not optional. If no data on these are available, then all 
values are to be set to zero.   
Table 9 Asset composition 
Object 
ID  Type  LR  UB1  UV1  UB2  UV2  UB3  UV3  UB4  UV4  UB5  UV5 
Female head 44  -1 
100  1 
Innovat. 
45  -2 
10  1 
40  2 
60 
80  4 
100  5 
Expect. 
46  -3 
29  0 
100  2 
Liquidity  47  -4 
100  500  0 
Leverage  48  -5 
89  0 
95  0 
100  0 
Cow 
.91  50  0 
70  2 
80 
90  7 
100  23 
Goat 
.13  40  0 
60  1 
80 
90  4 
100  8 
Cow in shed 4 
100  0 
Coffee 1 
14  1 
30  0 
40  0 
60 
80  0 
100  4 
… 
Note: LR stands for land requirement; UB and UV stand for "upper bound" and "upper value" respectively, of 
which the UB is expressed cumulatively as a percentage of total agents. 
Extract text from image pdf file - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
c# extract pdf text; cut and paste text from pdf document
Extract text from image pdf file - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
can't copy and paste text from pdf; copy formatted text from pdf
32 
Maps.xls: The physical landscape 
MAS  models  of  land-use/cover  change  (MAS/LUCC)  couple  a  cellular  component  that 
represents a landscape with an agent-based component that represents human decision-making 
(Parker et al 2003). The landscape component is defined in the map-file. It contains six spatial 
layers of information as summarized in Table 10. The interface offers two options for analyzing 
a matrix file. The first is “Solve again”, which takes the matrix file, removes all string values 
from the file, saves it under a different name, and solves the file again using an executable 
called “MilpCheck.exe”. Three  different  solving routines are  available and if  the matrix is 
feasible then the solution vector is saved as a separate file. 
The other option “Back to Excel” takes the matrix file and copies and pastes its values (matrix 
coefficients, bounds, and right-hand-side values) to Matrix.xls saving it under its original name, 
but with the extension “.xls”. If the matrix has first been analyzed using “Solve again” then the 
solution vector is automatically imported into the file. This option is suitable for analyzing 
matrices that were infeasible.  
The information is numerically encoded and organized in a raster format. Grid cells with no 
information get a value “-1”. Each cell represents a certain amount of land, e.g., 1 hectare.  
The map-files can be produced in two ways: in a Microsoft Excel workbook, if the number of 
columns  is  less  than  256  and  which  is  then  converted  to  plain  text  format  using 
ScenarioManager.xls, or in ArcView GIS using the exporting routine to save it in ASCII format. 
All maps have to be in a grid cell format. Polygons must be converted to grid cells. Yet, by 
defining the grid sufficiently small, the grid format can approximate any polygon.  
Table 10: Spatial layers in Map.xls 
Nr.  Layer 
1.  The location of agents’ farmsteads 
2.  Each agents’ membership of a population 
3.   Each agents’ membership to a population cluster 
4.  Each agents’ membership to an innovation segment 
5.  The location of agents’ plots 
6.  The soil type of each plot 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document. C#.NET extract image from multiple page adobe PDF file library for Visual Studio .NET.
get text from pdf file c#; find and replace text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
By using RsterEdge XDoc PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file and specified region on PDF page, then get image
.net extract text from pdf; copy and paste text from pdf to word
33 
Figure 10 shows an abstract of a very simple map-file in Excel for the location of farmsteads. 
This simple landscape shows two farmsteads (coded with IDs 0 and 1). All locations without a 
farmstead should be denoted with “-1”. Note that when using the downloadable version of 
MPMAS, the maximum number of farmsteads that can be included is 50. 
Figure 10 Example spatial layer for the location of farmsteads 
Network.xls: The diffusion of innovations 
Population.xls randomly assigned each agent to a network segment. The file Network.xls can be 
used to control the access of agents to innovations. If all agents have access to a particular 
technology (e.g. a traditional crop variety), then this technology does not have to be included in 
the Network.xls, yet if the technology is relatively new (i.e., an innovation) and is only partially 
diffused in the sample population, then the network file can be used to represent this partial 
diffusion.  
The diffusion of innovations is based on a network threshold model (Valente 1994). This type 
of model is based on the idea that information diffuses gradually through interpersonal networks 
and that once enough information has reached a particular agent, it will then consider adoption. 
How much information is ‘enough’ is agent-specific and determined by the threshold level. In 
line with Valente (1994), five network thresholds are specified as shown in Table 11. 
Agents that belong to the group of early adopters (nr.2) will only consider adoption after the 
group of innovators has adopted, that is when the adoption rate has reached 2.5 percent. 
2
LOCATION OF FARMSTEADS (ID)
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
0
-1
-1
-1
-1
1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Create high resolution PDF file without image quality losing in ASP.NET application. Add multiple images to multipage PDF document in .NET WinForms.
delete text from pdf; copy text from pdf with formatting
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively.
delete text from pdf file; extract text from pdf to word
34 
Table 11 Network threshold values 
Threshold 
Characterization 
< 2.5% 
Innovators 
2.5 – 16% 
Early adopters 
16 – 50 % 
Early majority 
50 – 84 % 
Late majority 
84 – 100 % 
Laggards 
The actual adoption decision is both a function of these individual network thresholds and the 
expectations of agents. Agents will only adopt if (a) they have reached their network threshold; 
(b) they expect the innovation to bring a positive net contribution to meeting their objectives (it 
brings an agent utility). This two-stage adoption procedure yields a realistic way of simulating 
the diffusion of innovations. 
Agents’ membership to network thresholds was assigned Population.xls. The diffusion model is 
sensitive to the proportion of agents in each network. The allocation of many agents to the first 
segment will speed up the diffusion of innovations, while the diffusion will be stagnant if less 
than 2.5 percent of all agents are allocated to the first segment. Ideally, the distribution of agents 
follows the threshold values -- that is 2.5% is defined as innovators, 13.5% as early adopter, 
34% as early majority, etc. This can, however, not be guaranteed as the assignment to network 
groups is partially random. To overcome this, a calibrating factor called ‘overlap’ is included. 
The overlap factor is multiplied by all network thresholds and can attain values between 0 and 
1. If set to 1, then the network thresholds are unadjusted, while if set to 0, then all thresholds 
become 0 and all agents can hence immediately adopt. The model needs to be tested for an 
appropriate value of the overlap factor (most usually it will have to be set to values between 0.5 
and 0.8). 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Application. Best and professional adobe PDF file splitting SDK for Visual Studio .NET. outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#.
.net extract pdf text; export highlighted text from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
c# get text from pdf; copy text from scanned pdf to word
35 
Table 12 Innovations 
Nr.  Parameter 
Explanation 
Object ID 
This should match with the object ID in all other files (e.g. <perennials.xls>, 
<population.xls>, and <demography.xls>. 
Type 
The type of object. There are two basic types: Objects with a negative type refer 
to agent characteristics, while objects with a positive type refer to asset 
characteristics (incl. innovations). 
Divisibility 
Set to 1 for all divisible innovations. E.g., a cow is indivisible (set to 0) while a 
hectare of coffee is divisible (set to 1) 
Acquisition costs  The purchasing price of an innovation in the first year. For livestock, make sure 
this is consistent with <livestock.xls>. 
Note that this cost refers only to “proper investments”, i.e. productive activities 
with a gestation between first input use and full output of more than 1 year. If 
shorter than 1 year, then the price must be included in file <Market.xls>.  
Lifetime 
The maximum age of an object. For example, a coffee plantation lasts 12 years, 
and cows are culled before they turn 10 years old. 
Suitability 
The soil types an innovation can be used on, if not restricted to any soil type then 
set the suitability to 0. 
Minimum 
investment 
Optionally a minimum amount can be specified. E.g, when investing into a new 
coffee plantation, the investment should be more than 0.2 ha. 
Column 
The activity index in the programming matrix. In case of investment objects, the 
MATRIX includes two separate activities: one for production and one for 
investment. This index must refer to the production activity. 
Row 
The constraint index in the programming matrix. 
10 
Permanent crop 
yield 
The row coordinate in the programming matrix where the yields appear (-1 if not 
a permanent crop) 
11 
Coefficient 
The pieces per unit of the investment good (e.g., days/laborer) 
The solution in the investment mode is taken and enters the production mode after 
multiplication with this factor. The factor is therefore used to convert the units in 
the solution vector of the investment mode to units of the RHS in the production 
mode. 
12 
Level of 
innovation 
Specifies for what segment the innovation is accessible, if accessible for all set to 
0. 
13 
Availability 
The year at which the innovation is introduced into the population 
14 
Accessibility 
The year at which the innovation can be acquired for the particular innovation 
segment. 
15 
Share own capital  The share of the acquisition cost that needs to be paid from own liquid means. 
16 
Interest rate on 
borrowed capital 
For what is not paid from own means an additional interest cost is incurred.  
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively.
delete text from pdf online; edit pdf replace text
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
When you have downloaded the RasterEdge Image SDK for also provided you with detailed PDF processing demo Imaging.Demo directory with the file name RasterEdge
extract all text from pdf; export highlighted text from pdf
36 
Network.xls lists all innovations and specifies various types of information for each of these as 
is briefly explained in Table 12. The network-file uses three types of interest rates. (1) The long-
term interest rate is the interest over borrowed capital with a gestation of longer than one year. 
(2) The short-term interest rate is the rate for borrowing capital from, say a bank, for a period of 
one year. (3) The interest rate on equity is the rate you receive when depositing money at a bank 
(say, at your current account). This is the opportunity costs of capital. In absence of any banks 
or informal savings, this rate can be set very low.  
BasicData.xls: General parameters 
Parameters that do not immediately relate to a single input file but are required by several 
separate model components are included in BasicData.xls. About 48 parameters are included in 
this file. For instance, the choice of consumption model is included in BasicData.xls because 
this impacts  both on the matrix-file and on the  market-file. The  file is organized  in eight 
categories  of  parameters  as  shown  in  Table  13.  Most  parameters  in  this  file  are  self-
explanatory. 
Table 13 Parameters in BasicData.xls 
Category 
Explanation 
General parameters 
Integers counting the frequency of same events, like the number of catchments, 
villages, networks, etc. 
Innovation parameters 
Various parameters that allow the user to fine-tune the innovation diffusion 
process, such as the ‘overlap’ parameter described in Section 6. 
Rental markets 
For making land markets endogenous in the model 
Policy parameters 
For the simulation of policy options such as subsidies for permanent crops 
Switches for various sub-
models 
Defines which consumption is implemented  and whether there is a crop growth 
model, livestock or perennial crop model. If not then no respective file is read 
by the program. 
Soil information 
Defines the size of a single grid cell in hectares and defines which number of 
different soil types and classes. Soil classes refer to land suitability. 
Debugging of the 
programming matrix 
The most important dynamics can be switched off using these options: (a) aging 
of agent household members and assets; (b) and updating of soil fertility (only if 
a soil model is defined). In addition matrices can be saved by entering a matrix 
number. 
Fine-tuning of the solver  This tells the solver how long it can maximally take to solve a single MP model 
or how many iterations is can go through. 
37 
CropWat.xls: Crop water requirements 
Crop yields were modeled following the FAO CropWat model (Clarke et al. 1998, Smith 1992). 
The workbook CropWat.xls specifies for each crop activity that appears in Matrix.xls the crop 
water  requirement  and  the crop  yield  potential.  For  each  selected  crop  activity  in the  MP 
tableau, MPMAS will recalculate a crop yield based on the crop water requirement and the crop 
water supply—the latter specified in Routing.xls and is explained in the next section. 
The crop-water requirement (CWR) for crop c in month m is the product of a crop water 
coefficient (Kc), the potential evapotranspiration (ET0), and the planted area (Area): 
CWR
c,m
= Kc
c,m
* ET0
m
* Area
c,m 
(1) 
in which ET0 is a function of the local climatic conditions and can be derived from CropWat 
7.0. The Kc values can be obtained from specialized literature or as standard values in the 
CropWat model.  
Monthly values for CWR do not change over time and are therefore specified in the workbook 
CropWat.xls. Each of the crop activities specified in Matrix.xls also needs to be included in 
CropWat.xls. In CropWat.xls the activity and constraint indices in the MP tableau are specified 
for each crop activity and are linked to Matrix.xls.  
The CWR can either be met through irrigation (IRR) or precipitation—converted into effective 
precipitation (EP) to capture the share of precipitation that is actually available to the crop, 
depending on its growth stage. The calculation of effective precipitation is rather complex in 
CropWat and was simplified using a regression equation. The equation can be parameterized by 
inserting into CropWat a large range of precipitation values and crop water requirements for a 
selection of crops and then obtaining the EP values. The EP values can then be regressed on the 
crop water requirements and precipitation using ordinary least squares: 
EP
cm
=a+b1*CWR
cm
+b2*(CWR
cm
)
2
+c1*PREC
m
+c2*(PREC
m
)
2
+d*CWR
cm
*PREC
m
(2) 
The part of the crop water requirement that is unfulfilled by either precipitation or irrigation is 
called the deficit irrigation (DIRR): 
DIRR
cm
= CWR
cm
– ER
cm
– IRR
(3) 
38 
If there is deficit  irrigation then the crop yield is reduced. The magnitude of the  deficit is 
expressed  as  the  quotient  of  the  deficit  irrigation  and  the  crop  water  requirement 
(DIRR
cm
/CWR
cm
), which is called the Kr value. In reality it matters much in what stage of the 
growing  period  the  water  deficit  occurs.  Yet,  as  a  simplification,  the  quotients  of  deficit 
irrigation and the crop water requirement are simply averaged over all months with non-zero 
crop water requirements: 

= 
∗∑






>   
(5) 
Following Berger (2001) it is assumed that the crop yield is lost completely if the average Kr 
falls below  0.5,  while  for  Kr  values  greater  than or  equal  to 0.5 the  average  Kr  value is 
multiplied by the crop yield potential (YPOT
c
) to simulate the actual crop yield (Y
c
): 
=

∗
  
≥.
  
<.
(4) 
Routing.xls: The crop water supply 
Routing.xls simulates the irrigation water supply as based on the Edic-cedec model (Berger 
2000). The physical landscape is divided into irrigation sectors while the irrigation water supply 
is defined per sector. There are three sources of irrigation water in MPMAS: 
•  River flows: This is the water supply from streams in the watershed 
•  Surface runoff from neighboring irrigation sectors: The runoff from neighboring irrigation 
sectors. 
•  Lateral flows: The sub-surface flows from neighboring irrigation sectors. 
The  first three worksheets  in  Routing.xls  define  the  quantity of  water from  each  of  these 
sources. The first worksheet <EdicRiverFlows0> defines this quantity in m3/second while the 
two  other  worksheets  <EdicSurfaceRunoff0>  and  <EdicLateralFlows0>  define  it  as  a 
proportion of the river flows. These last two sheets contain a matrix in which the surface and 
sub-surface flows between all sectors can be defined. If irrigation water is only directly derived 
from streams then all values can be set to zero. 
39 
The last worksheet in Routing.xls, <EdicIrrigationMethods0>, defines the efficiency of various 
irrigation methods and contains parameters of the Edic-cedec model. 
Table 14 Efficiency of various irrigation methods defined in Routing.xls 
Name 
Surface 
runoffs at 
night 
Evapotransp
iration 
surface  subsurface  groundwate
te
Flood 
0.111 
0.267 
0.400 
0.133 
0.089 
Furrow 
0.111 
0.400 
0.311 
0.111 
0.067 
Terracing 
0.111 
0.544 
0.233 
0.067 
0.044 
Drip 
0.111 
0.800 
0.000 
0.053 
0.036 
Improved Furrow 
0.111 
0.444 
0.267 
0.111 
0.067 
Advanced Furrow 
0.111 
0.444 
0.267 
0.111 
0.067 
Sprinkler 
0.111 
0.711 
0.067 
0.067 
0.044 
Tape 
0.111 
0.800 
0.000 
0.053 
0.036 
Center Pivot 
0.111 
0.800 
0.000 
0.053 
0.036 
Micro sprinkler 
0.111 
0.800 
0.000 
0.053 
0.036 
Region.xls: The distribution of water over agents 
Region.xls defines the distribution of water rights over agents. Water rights are defined as a 
proportion of the total irrigation water supply of an irrigation sector that an agent is allowed to 
use. This proportion  is  assumed  constant over  the whole  year  and during all  years  in the 
simulation run. 
MPMAS has two options for distributing water over agents: 
1.  Random water rights: Similar to the data structure in Population.xls, the water rights can 
be distributed over agents randomly. Upper and lower  bounds can be  defined  for each 
inflow and for each sector. 
2.  Actual water rights: For each agent it is defined what proportion of the total irrigation 
water supply per sector and per inflow the agent can use.  
40 
Perennials.xls: Parameters of perennial crops 
Whereas the population file specifies the course of human life, the permanent crop file specifies 
that of trees. It contains the following information for each year in the life span of a permanent 
crop: 
•  yield 
•  pre-harvest costs (e.g., spraying) 
•  harvest cost 
•  total labor requirement 
•  total machinery requirement 
•  peak labor requirements 
Furthermore, it specifies the acquisition cost and life span, both of which should be the same as 
specified in the network file. 
Because alternative levels of  input use are  possible for  a crop, a separate  permanent  crop 
activity is specified for each input level. For instance, in the Uganda case, coffee can be grown 
on five different soil types, with 3 alternative levels of labor use, and with or without fertilizer; 
this translates into 30 different coffee activities. Switching between input levels and between 
soil types is thereby prevented and to switch input levels the agent is required to fulfill the 
acquisition cost and start anew in year 0. 
Livestock.xls: Parameters of livestock 
The livestock file is similar to the permanent crop file in that different parameter values can be 
specified for each year. The livestock file is, however, different from the permanent crop file in 
that more than one output can be specified and the matrix coefficients of these outputs are 
directly entered in this file, rather than the network file. 
The  first  two  outputs  of  each  livestock  type  are  gain  in  live  weight,  which  is  specified 
cumulatively, and numbers of female offspring. Female offspring is treated differently as this 
has a course of life of its own starting with year zero. Male offspring remains in the file as its 
sole purpose is meat production. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested