how to create pdf viewer in c# : Extract all text from pdf SDK control project winforms azure asp.net UWP MapInfoProfessionalUserGuide35-part1745

Chapter 13: Putting Your Data on the Map
Displaying your Data on a Map
MapInfo Professional 10.5
351
User Guide
The Table List has the following features:
• Modeless, so that you can open it and leave it open for the duration of your session. (Modeless 
windows do not have OK or Cancel buttons.)
• Dockable to any of the four sides of the MapInfo Professional window: top, left, bottom, and 
right. The Layer Control window and Table List Window can also share the same space.
• Drag and drop enabled, so that you can select tables and drag and drop them to a blank area to 
open them in a new Mapper window. When dropping tables on to an existing Mapper window, 
MapInfo Professional adds them to the Mapper window as new layers.
• Sorting enabled, to sort tables based on ascending order of table alias (name), descending 
order of table alias, and recently opened. Sorting criteria persist across different MapInfo 
Professional sessions.
• Multi-Selection enabled, to select multiple tables using the Ctrl or Shift keys.
• Context Menu enabled, so that when you right-click on table aliases (names) a pop-up menu 
displays and you can perform the desired operations.
• Searching enabled, you can search for a table name in the Table List Window by typing 
characters in a Search text box. The Table List Window list refreshes itself to show only those 
tables that contain the search characters.
For information about how to work with the Table List, see Working with Tables in the Table List 
on page 45.
Displaying Data Details using the Statistics Window
The Statistics window displays the details of a selected data record. This information must exist in 
the .TAB file’s metadata to display in the Statistics window. As the selection changes, the data is re-
tallied, and the statistics window is updated automatically.
Extract all text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
get text from pdf image; export text from pdf
Extract all text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
copy pdf text to word; delete text from pdf online
Chapter 13: Putting Your Data on the Map
Displaying your Data on a Map
MapInfo Professional 10.5
352
User Guide
To see the details of a data record:
1. Open a .TAB file with statistical data in it.
2. Select a geographical object in the Map window.
3. Do one of the following:
• Select Options > Show Statistics Window
• Click the Statistics tool 
.
To copy the contents of the Statistics window to the clipboard, press and hold the Ctrl key and press 
C. Go to the application you want to paste the Statistics data to and do one of the following:
• Right-click to display the shortcut men, click Paste.
• Hold down the Ctrl key and press Insert.
You cannot select particular contents of the Statistics window.
When you want statistics for an entire table, use Query > Select All to select all records in a table.
Figure: Statistics Window
Displaying Your Remote DBMS Data
The process for displaying spatialized data from Oracle, SQL Server, or PostGIS is different from the 
tables we have discussed so far. For more information about accessing remote data, see 
Understanding Remote Tables and Databases on page 129.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Able to extract vector images from PDF. Extract all images from whole PDF or a specified PDF page. C#: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
copy text from pdf; copy text from pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Extract all images from whole PDF or a specified PDF page in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; VB.NET: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
copy pdf text to word document; delete text from pdf acrobat
Chapter 13: Putting Your Data on the Map
Geocoding – Assigning Coordinates to Records
MapInfo Professional 10.5
353
User Guide
Displaying and Importing Data from a Web Map Service
A Web Map Service (WMS) is a technology that gives you a source for data over your Intranet or 
over the Internet. This innovation is based on a specification from the Open GIS Consortium (OGC) 
and allows you to use raster map images from servers that also comply with the specification. You 
must specify the coordinate system within your data request to ensure that the images you retrieve 
“sync up” or register with your other map data. 
This specification supports transparent pixel definition for image formats as well. This allows you to 
use the images you retrieve as overlays and not solely as the bottom layer of your map.
WMS data may not exist for the geography you are looking for. Further, the data that is provided is 
determined by the WMS server.
L
You must have a working Internet connection to retrieve or use WMS data.
• For instructions on retrieving and displaying data from a Web Map Service, see Retrieving Map 
Data from Web Map Services in the Help System.
Geocoding – Assigning Coordinates to Records 
To display your data on a map, you must first assign X and Y coordinates to each record. One way 
that MapInfo Professional assigns these coordinates is by matching geographic information in your 
database table to geographic information in another table (referred to as a search table) that already 
has X and Y coordinates associated with it.
For example, you want to assign X and Y coordinates to a customer record whose address is 127 
Winston Ave. MapInfo Professional reads that address and looks for a matching address in the 
search table, such as a StreetPro table. (This search table already has X and Y coordinates 
associated with its records.)
When MapInfo Professional matches 127 Winston Ave in your table to 127 Winston Ave in the 
search table, it assigns the corresponding X and Y coordinates to your record. The geocoded point 
becomes part of your database. You can then view these points by displaying your table in a Map 
window.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET: Extract All Images from PDF Document. This is an example that you can use it to extract all images from PDF document. ' Get page 3 from the document.
erase text from pdf file; copy and paste text from pdf to word
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
DotNetNuke), SharePoint. All text content of target PDF document can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout. C#.NET
export highlighted text from pdf to word; find and replace text in pdf file
Chapter 13: Putting Your Data on the Map
Geocoding – Assigning Coordinates to Records
MapInfo Professional 10.5
354
User Guide
What Do I Need to Know Before Geocoding?
It is important to know your data and what you want to use it for before you select a method of 
geocoding. Ask yourself these questions:
What kind of geographic information do I have in my database? 
Do you have street addresses, towns, cities, postal codes, states, countries? Do you have 
potentially ambiguous information? For example, if you have a database of customer street 
addresses, will you have 125 Main Street in Smithtown and a 125 Main Street in Nassau? If so, you 
may have to refine your search using town boundaries or postal codes. 
What kind of maps do I have to work with? 
You will need computerized maps that are at the level of detail that match your data. For example, if 
you want to geocode a database of customers in specific counties by street address, you will need 
maps of the desired counties that go to street level. A map of the United States that only goes to a 
county level would not work for you. You can purchase the appropriate maps for your geocoding 
application from MapInfo Professional or your reseller.
How geographically accurate does the placement of my data have to be? 
Taking into account the first two questions, you must decide how accurate the geocoding must be. If 
you are trying to pinpoint the locations of cable wires, crime scenes, or fire hydrants, a high degree 
of accuracy is needed. In this case, you should geocode your data to street level.
If, however, you are going to use your data to thematically shade postal code boundaries, town 
boundaries, county boundaries, state boundaries, or country boundaries, you may not need a high 
degree of accuracy. 
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
enable users abilities to read and extract PDF form data Able to retrieve all form fields from adobe PDF it should have functions for processing text, image as
c# extract pdf text; copy text from pdf without formatting
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
DLLs: Read and Extract Field Data in VB.NET. Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF field Console.WriteLine(" Content: " + obj.Text) ElseIf TypeOf
extract text from pdf java; copy text from scanned pdf
Chapter 13: Putting Your Data on the Map
Geocoding – Assigning Coordinates to Records
MapInfo Professional 10.5
355
User Guide
In this case, geocoding against boundary files such as USZIPBDY.TAB, which we provide, would be 
sufficient for your needs. Since this file does not include point postal codes (postal codes assigned 
to a single building or company), the hit rate may not be as good as when you geocode by street.
Understanding the Geocoding Process
To assign X and Y coordinates to the records in your table, choose Geocode from the Table menu. 
MapInfo Professional displays the Geocode dialog box, where you enter the following information:
• The name of your table for which you want to assign X and Y coordinates. 
• The column in your table that contains the geographic information that will be used for matching.
• The name of the search table containing the geographic information that will be used for 
matching.
• The search table column containing the geographic information for matching:
The dialog box also offers you the option of geocoding your data in two modes: automatically or 
interactively. When you geocode a table automatically, MapInfo Professional geocodes exact 
matches only and ignores all other records. It is the faster method, since MapInfo Professional 
requires no user interaction once the geocoding process begins. When you geocode a table 
interactively, MapInfo Professional pauses when it fails to match a record and lets you select from a 
list of close matches. 
L
We recommend that you geocode your table automatically first and then go back and 
geocode interactively to match the remaining records. 
Not Getting Geocoding? Try this Example...
The objective of geocoding is to place data from your database accurately on a map. Let us call your 
data the source table. You can think of the geographical coordinates on a map as a target table. 
To geocode a record:
• MapInfo has to match an address in the source table with a location on the target table
Most of the problems in geocoding occur in trying to take the address data in the source file and 
match it to addresses in the target tables.
C# PDF - Extract Text from Scanned PDF Using OCR SDK
SharePoint. Recognize the whole PDF document and get all text content. Recognize a page of PDF document and extract its text content.
copy text from scanned pdf to word; extract text from pdf online
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
1; int pageCount = 2 // Search text from second page SearchResult results = pdf.Search("RasterEdge", option, pageOffset Search specified string from all the
pdf text replace tool; can't copy and paste text from pdf
Chapter 13: Putting Your Data on the Map
Geocoding – Assigning Coordinates to Records
MapInfo Professional 10.5
356
User Guide
For more about the automatic and interactive geocoding modes, see Modes of Geocoding on 
page 356.
Modes of Geocoding
MapInfo Professional has two geocoding modes: automatic and interactive. The process of 
matching target addresses with source addresses is the same in both modes. 
Automatic mode matches addresses based on the choices in the Geocode dialog box. 
When Geocoding is in automatic mode, only exact matches are geocoded. When some of your data 
fails to match exactly (due, perhaps, to typographical errors), you need to geocode in Interactive 
mode to match the near misses by hand. It is generally best to do two passes through your table, 
with the first pass set on Automatic and the second pass set on Interactive. This approach takes less 
processing time.
• For instructions on geocoding in automatic mode, see Geocoding Automatically in the Help 
System.
Interactive mode stops at each address that does not meet the geocode parameters and permits 
you to assist in the matching process. When you geocode interactively, you are not changing the 
data. You are merely redirecting MapInfo Professional to look for different information. 
• For more information, see Geocoding Interactively in the Help System.
In most cases, the best geocoding strategy is to geocode in automatic mode and then geocode in 
interactive mode to deal with the records MapInfo Professional was unable to handle automatically.
Manual mode. Automatic and interactive geocoding work well for databases with “clean” data. 
Sometimes, however, you know where a point should be on the map, but the location data does not 
allow for a match. Manual geocoding is the process of placing your data records on the map by 
clicking its location on the map. This method works best when you have a small table which contains 
data that you are very familiar with.
• For more information, see Geocoding Manually in the Help System.
Methods of Geocoding
In addition to geocoding automatically and manually, you have choices in how precise you want the 
geocoded record to be. Let’s look at the variety of ways you can geocode your table.
Geocoding by Address
Street addresses typically consist of two or three components:
• Street number
• Street name
• Apartment, Suite, Floor, Room number or some other piece of information. Many addresses do 
not have this component
MapInfo Professional has one procedure for dealing with the street number and another procedure 
for dealing with the street name. MapInfo Professional deals with the third component, if present, as 
though it were a part of the street name.
Chapter 13: Putting Your Data on the Map
Geocoding – Assigning Coordinates to Records
MapInfo Professional 10.5
357
User Guide
When you geocode your table with street addresses, MapInfo Professional matches the addresses 
in your table to the street names and address ranges in a street table, such as StreetPro (Pitney 
Bowes Software Inc.’s premier streets data product) and assigns X and Y coordinates to your 
records. When you display your records, MapInfo Professional will spot the record at the location of 
the record’s address. MapInfo Professional places the record on the proper side of the street, offsets 
it from the side of the street to the specified distance, and insets it from the end of the street the 
specified percentage of the line. The Options dialog box controls these parameters. For more about 
setting the street offset in the Options dialog box, see Street Offset in the Help System.
Geocoding by Boundary
In computer mapping, the term boundary is used to designate enclosed regions or areas such as 
countries, cities, and postal codes. When you geocode your table with boundaries, MapInfo 
Professional matches the boundary name in your table with the boundary name in the search table. 
MapInfo Professional assigns the boundary centroid X and Y coordinates to your data records. The 
centroid of a boundary is its approximate center point.
For example, you have a table of wholesale outlet stores. You want to assign X and Y coordinates to 
each record according to county. MapInfo Professional reads the county name from your table, 
matches it with the county name in the search table, and assigns the county centroid coordinates to 
each of your records. The outlet locations will display at the county centroid in a Map window.
Geocoding by US_ZIPS.tab (Postal Code Centroid File)
US_ZIPS.tab is a point file that is included with the base MapInfo Professional package. The file 
consists of postal code centroid points for every postal code in the United States. This file can be 
used to geocode any database that includes postal code information. This file includes postal codes 
that are assigned to individual buildings or companies.
You can use any of the above methods to geocode your records, or you can use a combination of 
address and boundary geocoding to increase the potential for a successful match. 
Geocoding by Server
If you have access to a geocoding server such as MapMarker or Envinsa Server, you can geocode 
using a more extensive data set. 
Refining Your Geocoding Search 
When geocoding, you might refer to objects whose names are used for other objects that do not 
interest you (for example, a city name that is common to two or more states). To eliminate this 
problem, refine your search by selecting another column (from, typically, another table). To further 
refine the search, specify the state for each city, rather than just the city name.
If your area of interest isn't unique enough for MapInfo Professional to automatically determine the 
position or location, you will need to refine your geocode search by specifying a particular boundary 
that contains your area of interest. This will provide MapInfo Professional with geographic locations 
on where to position your points.
Chapter 13: Putting Your Data on the Map
Geocoding – Assigning Coordinates to Records
MapInfo Professional 10.5
358
User Guide
Finding an Exact Street Match
When MapInfo Professional geocodes, it attempts to find an exact match between source and target 
street names. That means that the addresses must be the same, character for character. However, 
matching is not case sensitive; upper and lower case letters are successfully matched with one 
another. MapInfo Professional does not get an exact match in many cases and uses a file of 
abbreviation equivalences to improve its “hit rate”. Once you understand the various ways in which a 
match can fail, you are in a better position to understand what you can do to improve things.
The next table illustrates exact matching. The first column contains a street name from a target table 
and the second column contains the corresponding street name from a source table. The third 
column says why they do not match. The fourth column indicates whether the particular problem is 
one which can be corrected through using the abbreviation file. This table assumes that the 
addresses are the contents of a single column in a table. While the street number would often be in 
the same column, we don’t indicate street numbers here because they are handled differently than 
street names.
Target Address
Source 
Address
Comment
Correctable 
with 
Abbreviation 
File?
LaSal St
LaSalle St
“LaSal” is the wrong spelling.
No
La Salle St
LaSalle St
“La Salle” is the wrong spelling.
No
LaSalle Ave
LaSalle St
“Ave” does not match “St”.
No
LaSalle Street
LaSalle St
“Street” does not match “St”.
Yes
LaSalle Ave
LaSalle Av
“Ave” does not match “Av”.
Yes
LaSalle St.
LaSalle St
The target address has a period after 
“St”. That period is not in the source 
and causes the match to fail.
Yes
LaSalle
LaSalle St
“St” is missing from target.
No
LaSalle St
LaSalle
Target has “St” and source does not.
No
LaSalle St North
LaSalle St
Target has “North,” which is not in 
source.
No
LaSalle St North
LaSalle St N
Target has “North” instead of “N”.
Yes
North LaSalle St
N LaSalle St
Target has “North” instead of “N”.
Yes
North LaSalle St
LaSalle St
Target has “North,” which is not in 
source.
No
Chapter 13: Putting Your Data on the Map
Geocoding – Assigning Coordinates to Records
MapInfo Professional 10.5
359
User Guide
MapInfo Professional’s matching process is not case-sensitive; it does not care whether a letter is 
upper case or lower case. This means that MapInfo Professional treats the following as the same: 
Main, MAIN, main, maIN.
MapInfo Professional has a file called the Abbreviations File (MAPINFOW.ABB), which you can use 
to record acceptable alternate spellings for abbreviations. For example Av for Ave. or BL for Blvd. 
etc. Using this file increases your hit rate because there are more acceptable spellings for the same 
abbreviations.
• For more information, see Solving Problems with Abbreviations and Substitutions in the Help 
System.
Placing Geocoded Points
When you are geocoding to street level (by address), you can specify certain aspects of the resulting 
points’ position in relationship to the street. You can specify the offset of the point from the side of 
the street, and the inset of the point from the end of the street. 
• For more information, see Street Offset in the Help System.
Street Inset
The street inset is the distance a geocoded point is set from the end of the street. You can specify a 
distance, or an inset can be a percentage of the length of the street. To avoid skewing the position of 
inset points, MapInfo Professional performs a proportional calculation that insets the points located 
at either end of the street the specified percentage or distance, but that decreases the inset as point 
locations approach the center. Points located at the center of the street remain in their original 
position. 
• For more information, see Street Inset and Controlling How Much to Inset and Offset a Point 
when Geocoding in the Help System.
LaSalle St Apt 3
LaSalle St
Target has an apartment number which 
does not match anything in the source.
Yes
Tenth St
10th St
“Tenth” and “10th” do not match.
Yes
10th Av
Tenth Av
“10th” and “Tenth” do not match.
Yes
Saint John’s Lane
St John’s Lane
“Saint” and “St” do not match.
Yes
Target Address
Source 
Address
Comment
Correctable 
with 
Abbreviation 
File?
Chapter 13: Putting Your Data on the Map
Geocoding – Assigning Coordinates to Records
MapInfo Professional 10.5
360
User Guide
Matching Street Names
MapInfo Professional begins by comparing the street address in the target table with the street 
addresses in the source table. When it finds an exact match, it may be finished or it may have to 
deal with region information, such as town, county, or postal code area.
When MapInfo Professional cannot match the street name for a particular row, it applies the 
abbreviation file to the target address. This file consists of pairs of items, such as “STREET ST” and 
“AVE AV”. When MapInfo Professional finds “STREET” in a target address, it changes it into “ST”; 
similarly it changes “AVE” to “AV”. MapInfo Professional doesn’t actually change your data in the 
target table. It substitutes abbreviations only for the purpose of making matches. The substitution is 
only effective during the matching process. The address in your table remains the same. It does not 
write the correct address form back to your table.
Once MapInfo Professional has made an abbreviation substitution it attempts to match the resulting 
street name against the street names in the source table. When it fails to find an exact match at this 
point it:
• In Automatic mode, it moves to the next row
• In Interactive mode, it presents you with the closest matches and you pick the best match. 
MapInfo Professional then moves on to the next row.
At this point MapInfo Professional will have done the best it can at identifying street names. The next 
step is to deal with address numbers for those addresses where it has matched a name. 
Matching Address Numbers
Given that MapInfo Professional has identified a street, it has to deal with street numbers. MapInfo 
Professional stores address ranges with each street segment. MapInfo Professional takes the street 
number from the target address and compares it to the ranges for each segment in the source table. 
For example, assume that we are trying to match “343 LaSalle St”. MapInfo stores the beginning 
and ending address for each segment, differentiating between left and right sides of the street, as 
follows:
To match “343 LaSalle St” MapInfo Professional would scan the address ranges until it finds the one 
where “343” goes. Since 343 is between 333 and 375, the applications locates this address on that 
street segment (the middle one in the table). Once MapInfo Professional has matched an address 
number to a street segment it moves to the next row. When it fails to match a target street number to 
an address range on the appropriate street it:
• In Automatic mode, it moves to the next row
Name
FromLeft
ToLeft
FromRight
ToRight
LaSalle St
269
331
268
330
LaSalle St
333
375
332
374
LaSalle St
377
401
376
400
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested