how to create pdf viewer in c# : Copy paste text pdf application Library tool html asp.net wpf online Excel10-part180

as in education and in socioeconomic status are either absent or inconse-
quential. There may well be such genetically linked IQ differences, but care-
fully  controlled  experiments,  in  which  the  effects  of  environmental  bias
were minimized, such as in studies of the IQ of German children of black and
white American GI’s, have so far failed to demonstrate them. The difference
in  IQ between  blacks and  whites  in  the  US  is  about  15%,  similar  to  that
between  Sephardic  and  Ashkenazic  Jews  in  Israel,  or  between  (white)
Catholics and (white) Protestants in Northern Ireland (T. Sowell, Race and
Culture, 1994). If you are interested in such matters, read The Bell Curve (R. J.
Herrnstein & C. Murray, Free Press, 1994) and its rebuttal in The Bell Curve
Debate (R. Jacoby & N. Glauberman, eds, Times Books, 1995). The point here
is not the complex relation between IQ, culture, and race, but the unwar-
ranted over-extension of statistical inference.
In this chapter we have considered the random experimental fluctuations
that can be described meaningfully by statistics, thereby yielding estimates
of the precision of the experimental result, i.e., the repeatability of a particu-
lar experiment under precisely the same conditions. The real question one
usually would want to be answered is, of course, that of accuracy, i.e.: how
reliable, how close to the truth, is our answer? Unfortunately, this is a ques-
tion beyond the realm of statistics.
Little can be said in general about systematic error, and the consequent
emphasis in this chapter on the effect of random error might suggest that
the latter is the more important. However, comparison of results of the same
experimental  parameter  as  obtained  by  completely  different  methods
usually indicates the opposite, namely that systematic errors are typically
the  more consequential ones.  Statistics therefore  should  be applied, and
interpreted, with a good deal of humility. In no case should precision be mis-
taken for an estimate of accuracy.
The rate constant k of a first-order chemical reaction is the characteristic
parameter of that reaction rate. Such a rate constant has the dimension of a
reciprocal  time, and  one  might therefore  be tempted to assume  that the
reaction is complete in a time 1/k. This is incorrect. The rate law for a first-
order reaction, say A → products, is [A]=[A]
t=0
exp [-kt], so that, far from
being completely consumed, more than one-third of A is still unreacted at
t=1/k or kt=1: [A]
t=1/k
=[A]
t=0
exp[–1]= 0.37 [A]
t=0
. Now one could define
a new time, say 3/k (after which the reaction is 95% complete, since exp[-3]
=0.0498),  4.6/k (after which  it is 99% complete), or  7/k (after which it  is
99.9% complete), but since the level of completeness (95%, 99%, 99.9%, etc.)
is essentially arbitrary, and would apply only to first-order kinetics anyway,
no such proposals have found favor in the chemical community. The char-
acteristic  parameter  k contains  the  information  concerning the  reaction
rate, and additional rate-related parameters are neither needed nor useful.
The characteristic parameter for experimental variability is the standard
deviation.  Just  as  1/k does  not  indicate  completion  of  the  reaction,  the
2.12 Summary
87
Copy paste text pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
export highlighted text from pdf to word; copy text from pdf to word
Copy paste text pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
extract text from pdf; get text from pdf online
standard deviation does not indicate the outer limits of the experimental var-
iability. Alternative parameters can be defined in an attempt to more closely
indicate the expected outer limits of that variability. One such measure is the
so-called confidence limit, an unfortunate name that invokes associations
with confidence artists and confidence games. Confidence limits are useful
for indicating the imprecision in results calculated from a limited number of
replicate measurements. As we saw in section 2.2, the sample standard devia-
tion of a small set of samples is highly variable, and is a poor estimate of the
population standard deviation of the underlying distribution.
The  confidence limit starts from the  estimated sample standard  devia-
tion, and multiplies it by a factor tthat reflects both the number of measure-
ments made, and the acceptable probability. For example, for a sufficiently
large number of replicate measurements following a single Gaussian distri-
bution, a 95% confidence  limit  will correspond with  1.96
σ
, and indicates
that, for such a distribution, 19 out of 20 data can be expected to lie within
those limits. In that case the confidence limit is t
σ
where t= 1.96 and 
σ
is the
calculated sample standard deviation. But if the standard deviation is based
on only triplicate measurements, t=4.3, and for duplicate measurements,
t=12.7, representing  the  much larger imprecision  in the result  of such  a
small number of replicas. For 99% confidence limits one can expect to find
99 out of 100 data within those limits, again provided that we deal with a
single  Gaussian  distribution  and  take  a  sufficiently  large  number  of
samples, in which case t= 2.58. For triplicate and duplicate measurements
the corresponding values are t=9.92 and t =63.7 respectively.
The values of t for a particular percentage and number of replicate data
are readily found in Excel with the function TINV (probability, number of
degrees of freedom), where the probability is the complement of the percent-
age (0.05 for 95% confidence limits, 0.01 for 99%, 0.001 for 99.9%, etc.), and
the number of degrees of freedom is one less than the number of replicate
measurements. The above results for the 99% confidence limits of 1000, 3,
and 2 replicate measurements are therefore obtained with the commands
=TINV(0.01, 999), =TINV(0.01, 2), and =TINV(0.01, 1), respectively.
In this book we will not use confidence limits, primarily because they are
of  limited  usefulness  in  fitting  experimental  data  to  functions,  but  also
because there is no agreement on what percentage (95%, 99%, 99.9%, etc.) to
use, and the term suggests a non-existing connection with accuracy rather
than with mere experimental repeatability. Still, confidence limits do serve a
useful purpose  in emphasizing  that statistics based on small numbers of
measurements yield highly imprecise results.
As our final spreadsheet exercises of this chapter we will analyze experi-
mental data published some 140 years ago, reported by J. D. Forbes in Trans.
Royal  Soc. Edinburgh 21  (1857)  135,  and  quoted  in  S. Weisberg,  Applied
Linear Regression, 2nd ed., Wiley 1985. Forbes suspected a relation between
the logarithm of the barometric pressure, in those days used to determine
altitude in the mountains, and the boiling point of water. The latter would be
88
Introduction to statistics
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
get text from pdf into excel; copy text from locked pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Page: Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET DLLs: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Page.
extract text from pdf using c#; extract formatted text from pdf
far easier to measure, since a (mercury) barometer was then a bulky, fragile,
and  generally  mountaineer-unfriendly  instrument.  He  therefore  deter-
mined the barometric pressure (in inches of mercury) and the boiling point
of water (in degrees Fahrenheit) at various high places in Scotland and in the
Alps. Tables linking barometric pressure to altitude already existed.
Boiling point
Atmospheric
Boiling point
Atmospheric
of water
pressure
of water
pressure
t
p
o
F
p/ mm Hg
t
p
o
F
p/ mm Hg
194.5
20.79
201.3
24.01
194.3
20.79
203.6
25.14
197.9
22.40
204.6
26.57
198.4
22.67
209.5
28.49
199.4
23.15
208.6
27.76
199.9
23.35
210.7
29.04
200.9
23.89
211.9
29.88
201.1
23.99
212.2
30.06
201.4
24.02
Forbes found that there is indeed a linear  relation between the boiling
point t
p
of water and the logarithm of the barometric pressure p. Here are his
data; use them to derive an equation to calculate the barometric pressure p
from the boiling point t
. For the resulting imprecision in p assume that t
p
can be determined with a standard deviation of 0.1 
o
F.
Instructions for exercise 2.12
Open a spreadsheet.
Deposit appropriate column headings, and enter the experimental data.
Add a column in which you calculate log p.
Plot the experimental data points of log pversus t
.
Use a least-squares fit to find the relation between t
p
and log p.
In the graph made under (4) show the fitted line.
Also make a graph of the residuals.
Express pin terms of t
p
including estimates of the resulting imprecision.
As you go through this exercise you will, of course, come upon the one
point that does not seem to fit the line. Forbes agonized about this particular
point, but he did report it, even though he considered it “evidently in error”.
The best thing you can do is to include it as well, or to make two calculations,
one with and the other without the suspect point, and to list both results, in
which case you leave the choice whether to include or reject the ‘outlier’ to
the user.
2.12 Summary
89
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; VB.NET: Copy and Paste Image in PDF Page.
copy formatted text from pdf; copy pdf text with formatting
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C# Guide C#.NET Demo Code: Copy and Paste Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. This C#
delete text from pdf acrobat; extract text from pdf to word
chapter
3
mo r e  o n
le a s t  s qu a r e s
In this chapter we will describe some of the more sophisticated uses of
least squares, especially those for fitting experimental data to specific
mathematical functions. First we will describe fitting data to a function of
two or more independent parameters, or to a higher-order polynomial
such as a quadratic. In section 3.3 we will see how to simplify least-squares
analysis when the data are equidistant in the dependent variable (e.g., with
data taken at fixed time intervals, or at equal wavelength increments), and
how to exploit this for smoothing or differentiation of noisy data sets. In
sections 3.4 and 3.5 we will use simple transformations to extend the reach
of least-squares analysis to many functions other than polynomials.
Finally, in section 3.6, we will encounter so-called non-linear least-squares
methods, which can fit data to any computable function.
3.1
Multi-parameter fitting
We can expand least-squares fitting to encompass more than one depen-
dent variable. Here we will fit data to an equation of the form y =a
0
+a
1
x
1
+
a
2
x
2
. Please note that the method to be used is not restricted to merely two
dependent variables, but can in principle be applied to any number of x
i
-
values.  In  practice,  the  Regression  routine  of  Excel  can  handle  up  to  16
different dependent variables. Typically, the different x
i
represent indepen-
dent parameters, although we will exploit the fact that this need not be so in
section 3.2.
In order to find expressions for the least-squares coefficients for this situa-
tion, we can form the sum of the squares of the residuals, SRR= ∑(y -a
0
-
a
1
x
1
-a
2
x
2
)
2
 and  then  derive  the  values  of  a
0
 a
 and  a
2
by  setting
(SRR)/a
0
=0, (SRR)/a
1
=0, and (SRR)/a
2
=0. This yields three simul-
taneous equations that can be solved to yield closed-form solutions for a
0
,
90
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
extract text from pdf with formatting; extract text from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
can't copy text from pdf; copy text from encrypted pdf
a
1
, and a
2
. However, the resulting expressions are fairly complicated, even
when written compactly in terms of three-by-three determinants:
x
2
2
x
1
x
2
x
2
y
a
0
=
x
1
x
2
x
1
2
x
1
y

D
(3.1-1)
x
2
x
1
y
x
2
2
x
2
y
x
2
a
1
=
x
1
x
2
x
1
y
x
1

D
(3.1-2)
x
2
y
N
x
2
y
x
1
x
2
x
2
a
2
=
x
1
y
x
1
2
x
1

D
(3.1-3)
y
x
1
N
x
2
2
x
1
x
2
x
2
D=
x
1
x
2
x
1
2
x
1
(3.1-4)
x
2
x
1
N
and  only  somewhat  simpler  expressions  for  the  corresponding  standard
deviations.  Even on a spreadsheet, you  would not want  to  evaluate  these
when you would not have to. Fortunately, that is precisely the case: you don’t
have to. This is so because the  standard  least-squares routine available in
Excel will work as readily with multiple x
i
-values as it does with one single x.
We therefore need to give only a very simple example to demonstrate how
this works.
Instructions for exercise 3.1
Open an Excel spreadsheet.
In row 1 enter the labels a0=, a1=, a2=, and na=, and in row 2 some corresponding
numbers, such as 2, 3, 4, and 0.
In cell A4 deposit the label y, in cells C4 and D4 the labels x1 and x2, and in cell F4 the
label noise.
In cell A6 deposit the formula for y=a
0
+a
1
x
1
+a
2
x
2
+na*noise, where nastands for
the noise amplitude specified in row 2, and noise for the Gaussian noise (with zero
mean and unit standard deviation) you will deposit in column F. Copy this instruction
some distance down.
3.1 Multi-parameter fitting
91
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF to Text Using VB. Integrate following RasterEdge text to PDF converter SDK dlls into your VB.NET project assemblies;
.net extract text from pdf; c# get text from pdf
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
copying text from pdf to word; copy text from scanned pdf
Starting with row 6, in columns C and D deposit some numbers, say, 1, 2, 3, … and 1, 1,
2, 2, 3, 3, … for x
1
and x
2
respectively. Make sure that the sequences x
1
and x
2
are not
linearly related, otherwise the problem will not have a unique solution, in which case
the program will fail and give you an error message. 
In column F, starting with cell F6, deposit Gaussian noise. (Select T
ools D
ata
Analysis, highlight Random Number Generation, click OK, select D
istribution Normal,
Me
an =0, S
tandard Deviation=1, click on O
utput Range, then click on the adjacent
window, specify the output range, and click OK.)
Make sure that columns A, C, D, and F have equal lengths.
Call the Regression: T
ools D
ata Analysis, select Regression, click OK, specify the
Input Y
Range, the Input X
Range, and the O
utput Range (but leave four lines below the
data columns empty for reasons that will soon become apparent), then click OK. You
will find the coefficients of the Intercept, and of the two X Values, together with their
standard deviations, here called Standard Errors.
Compare these results with your values of a
0
, a
1
, and a
2
.
10 Change the noise amplitude to a non-zero value, say 0.1, and repeat the Regression
analysis.
Later in this chapter you will encounter a weighted least-squares analysis
program. For the latter, the usual, unweighted least-squares analysis is just a
special case, with all the weights set equal to 1. Therefore you can also use
this  weighted  least-squares  program,  which  you  will  need  later  in  this
chapter anyway. It is organized differently, because it does not use an input
dialog box, but instead requires a fixed input format: the first column must
contain the y-values, the second the weights,  the  third  (and  subsequent)
column(s) the x-value(s). You can leave the weight column empty, or fill it
with 1’s, but you cannot leave it out. This is why, so far, you have left the B
column blank.
11 Highlight the block of data: the columns for yand w, as well as the two x-columns.
12 Select T
ools  M
acro M
acros, then activate WLS1 and press Run.
13 There you are: you should see the coefficients, and their standard deviations, right
under the data columns.
14 Compare the results of the two routines.
15 Save the spreadsheet as MultiparameterFit.
92
More on least squares
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Text in C#.NET. Integrate following RasterEdge C#.NET text to PDF converter SDK dlls into your C#.NET project assemblies;
a pdf text extractor; extracting text from pdf
3.2
Fitting data to a quadratic
We will now consider the special case of a multi-parameter least-squares
fitting in which the various x
i
’s form a power series, i.e., x
1
=x, x
2
=x
2
, etc.
We will illustrate this with a simple example, viz. fitting data to a parabola, y
=a
0
+a
1
x+a
2
x
2
. Again, the algebraic expressions are cumbersome:
x
4
x
3
x
2
y
a
0
=
x
3
x
2
xy

D
(3.2-1)
x
2
x
y
x
4
x
2
y
x
2
a
1
=
x
3
xy
x

D
(3.2-2)
x
2
y
N
x
2
y
x
3
x
2
a
2
=
xy
x
2
x

D
(3.2-3)
y
x
N
x
4
x
3
x
2
D=
x
3
x
2
x
(3.2-4)
x
2
x
N
and, again, the  spreadsheet can handle this problem without any further
ado, as demonstrated by the following exercise. The spreadsheet achieves
this flexibility through the magic of matrices. If you are curious to see how
that works, look at the even more general Weighted Least Squares program
in chapter 10.
Instructions for exercise 3.2
Recall MultiparameterFit.
Compute the x
2
-values in column D to be equal to x
1
2
.
Use Regression as well as the Weighted Least Squares macro WLS1 to calculate the
coefficients a
0
, a
, and a
.
Use Tr
endline P
olynomial Ord
er 2, using the Option to Display E
quation on Chart.
Verify that all three routines indeed yield the same results.
3.2 Fitting data to a quadratic
93
We note that this method can be used for any power law or sum thereof. It
can even be mixed with a multiparameter fit. For instance, one could use it
to fit y to a function such as a
0
+a
1
x
1
4
+a
2
log x
2
+a
3
√x
3
, or whatever suits
your fancy. Keep in mind, though, that these various x-values are assumed to
be free of experimental  errors, and that  a substantial data redundancy is
needed  when  a  large  number  of  coefficients  needs  to  be  determined.
Moreover, the parameters, though not necessarily mutually independent,
should at least be distinguishable: if you try to fit y =a e
bx+c
=a e
c
a
bx
, no
computer in the world will be able to find unique values for aand c, because
there are infinitely many combinations of a and c that yield the same value
for a e
c
. Finally, the larger the noise in the data, the less reliable the results
will be. And, of course, there must be a good theoretical reason to use such a
complicated model in the first place.
3.3
Least squares for equidistant data: smoothing and
di≈erentiation
When experimental data are obtained automatically, by an instrument, they
are often equidistant in the dependent parameter, such as time, wavelength,
or magnetic field strength. Many more data points may be collected than are
really needed, but such data may need to be smoothed to remove instru-
mental noise; sometimes, they also need to be differentiated. In such cases,
fitting the data with a moving polynomial is very useful.
In this method, a low-order polynomial, such as a parabola, is fitted to a
small number of contiguous data. The (usually odd) number of data points
included must be significantly larger than the number of parameters defin-
ing the polynomial, i.e., when one fits the data to a parabola, y =a
0
+a
1
x+
a
2
x
, at least five but preferably many more data points should be included.
One then uses the fitted polynomial to calculate the smoothed y-value, or its
derivative, at the midpoint of the polynomial.  And it is here  that you will
appreciate using an odd number of data, because in that case the midpoint
coincides with an already existing x-value.
Subsequently, the point at one extreme of the data set is dropped, a new
point at the other end is added, and the process is repeated. In this way the
polynomial slithers along the entire curve. Because a low-order polynomial
is fitted to a still relatively small data  set, the resulting distortion is often
small even though, in this case, we do not utilize any knowledge regarding
the shape of the underlying curve. The justifying assumption is that the data
do not exhibit structural features on the scale of the length of the moving
polynomial; if they do, then these features will be lost in the smoothing pro-
cedure.
As explained in chapter 8, the least-squares analysis for such an equidis-
tant data set (i.e., with constant x-increments) can be simplified to a set of
94
More on least squares
multiplying integers. In a spreadsheet, least-squares smoothing or differen-
tiation are then very easy, as the following exercise will demonstrate. The
method has been discovered and rediscovered repeatedly; in analytical
chemistry it is usually associated with the names of Savitzky and Golay.
Tables of the multiplying numbers, often called convoluting integers, are
available in the Savitzky–Golay paper, Anal. Chem. 36 (1964) 1627 and its
correcting complement, J. Steinier et al., Anal. Chem.44 (1972) 1906, as well
as in several textbooks (e.g., in Appendix B.6 of my Principles of
Quantitative Chemical Analysis). The principle of the method is explained
in section 8.5. Here we will use convoluting integers for 13-point smoothing
and 13-point differentiation, and will apply them to an artificially noisy
exponential ofthe form y =y
0
e
–kt
.
Instructions for exercise 3.3-1
Open a new spreadsheet.
In row 1 deposit labels for y
, k, and the noise amplitude na, and in row 2 some corre-
sponding values, such as 1, 0.1, and 0.05 respectively.
In row 4, starting with cell A4, deposit the labels t, y, noise, y+noise, smooth, deriv, and
k.
Fill column A, starting with cell A6, with the numbers 0, 1, 2, …, 50.
In cell B6 calculate yaccording to y=y
0
e
–kt
, and copy this down to B56. This will gener-
ate the theoretical function y
0
e
–kt
.
In cells C6:C56 deposit Gaussian noise with zero mean and unit standard deviation.
In cell D6 calculate y=y
0
e
–kt
+na*noise to simulate a noisy exponential.
In column E we will compute a smoothed value of the noisy exponential, using a 13-
point moving parabola. Leave cells E6:E11 blank, because you cannot calculate a
smoothed value in the first (and last) 6 points of the data. In cell E12 calculate the
smoothed value as =(-11*D6+9*D8+16*D9 +21*D10+ 24*D11 +25*D12+24*D13
+21*D14+16*D15 +9*D16 -11*D18)/143. The coefficients -11, 0, 9, 16, 21, 24, 25,
24, 21, 16, 9, 0, and -11 as well as the common divider, 143, are taken from a table of
convoluting integers. The above coefficients can also be found at the end of section
9.2b.
Copy this instruction down to cell E50, again leaving six cells (E51:E56) blank. This
should calculate smoothed values of the function.
10 Plot the original, noise-free curve in B6:B56, the noisy one in D6:D56, and the subse-
quently smoothed one in E6:E56, all versus the time in A6:A56. Make sure to include
the missing points, otherwise these points appear time-shifted in the graph. The result
should look like Fig. 3.3-1.
3.3 Least squares for equidistant data: smoothing and differentiation
95
11 In F12:F50 calculate the derivative, using the convoluting integers -6, -5, -4, -3,
-2, - 1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, and the common divider 182 
, where 
is the spacing
between adjacent x-values; here, 
=1. In other words, the formula in F12 should read
=(- 6*D6 - 5*D7 - 4*D8 -3*D9 - 2*D10 -D11 +D13+ 2*D14+3*D15+4*D16+
5*D17 +6*D18)/182.
12 You could compare this derivative with its correct value by calculating the latter in
column G as -k y
0
e
–kt
. Better yet, calculate k as the ratio of the derivative obtained and
its correct value, obtainable in cell G12 as=F12/B12. Copy this instruction down to
G50, also compute the average,=AVERAGE (G12: G50), and compare these results
with the value of k in row 2.
13 Save the spreadsheet as NoisyExponential.
The smoothing indeed removes some of the noise, but by no means all of
it. Moreover, it drops the beginning and end of the curve. If we had used a
longer polynomial of, say,  25 contiguous points, a smoother curve would
have resulted, but more points would have been lost at the curve extremes.
Moreover, use of a longer polynomial involves an enhanced risk of system-
atic distortion, since the method assumes that all those 25 contiguous data
points fit a parabola, which they do not quite. In general, the more points we
96
More on least squares
Fig.3.3-1:Smoothing a noisy exponential curve. Top: to a noise-free curve (colored line)
was added Gaussian noise, thereby generating the solid data points. Bottom: a moving
13-point polynomial was then used to smooth the latter.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested