how to create pdf viewer in c# : C# extract pdf text control Library system web page .net windows console Excel11-part181

use for smoothing, the smoother the result will indeed look, but the more we
risk distorting the underlying curve. With truly experimental data we cannot
see that so clearly, because we do not know the underlying curve. This is why
an experiment with artificial noise added to a known curve can be instruc-
tive.
A similar conclusion follows from a comparison of the calculated deriva-
tive with the correct one. The k-values obtained near the beginning of the
curve are obviously more reliable than those from the tail end, where any
theoretical decay is masked by the noise. Averaging all k-values is therefore a
bad deal, since it indiscriminately mixes reasonably good data with lower-
quality  ones.  In  general,  taking  the  derivative  of  noisy  data  is  a  quite
demanding test, except when we know specifics about the function that we
can exploit. In section 3.4 we will utilize the fact that the underlying curve is
a single exponential to fit these same noisy data, using a least-squares criter-
ion, and thereby extract a reliable value of k . Then you will be able to judge
for yourself which is the better way.
The  above example  illustrates  the  quantitative  limitations  of  so-called
‘blind’ smoothing or differentiating a curve with a moving polynomial. (The
term ‘blind’ refers to the fact that no information regarding the nature of the
underlying curve is used.) However, the method can be useful for qualitative
applications, such as smoothing a noisy curve in a graph. We will demon-
strate this in the next exercise, inspired by Press & Teukolsky (Comp.Phys.4:6
(1990) 669), in which we simulate a spectrum containing Lorentzian peaks
of various widths, add Gaussian noise, and then filter the resulting curve.
Instructions for exercise 3.3-2
Open a new spreadsheet.
In column A deposit a heading (such as #) and, in A3:A1002, the integers 1 (1) 1000 to
simulate, say, equidistant wavelengths or wavenumbers.
In column B deposit Gaussian noise (T
ools D
ata Analysis  Random Number
Generation  D
istribution Normal, Me
an 0, S
tandard Deviation 1).
In column C calculate a noise-free simulated spectrum. For this you may want to use
Lorentzian line-shapes, which are of the form y =1/[a(x-b)
2
+c], where b defines the
x-value at the center of the peak. The spectrum simulated in Fig. 3.3-2 is the sum of five
such Lorentzians. For instance, cell C3 might contain the instruction =1/($I$3*(A3-
$J$3) +$K$3)+1/($I$4*(A3 -$J$4)+ $K$4)+
+1/($I$7*(A3-$J$7)+$K$7), where
the parameters a, b, and c are listed in a parameter table in block I3:K7.
In I9 deposit the label na, and in J9 its value.
In D3:D1002 calculate the sum of the noise-free spectrum and na times the noise of
column B.
3.3 Least squares for equidistant data: smoothing and differentiation
97
C# extract pdf text - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copy text from protected pdf; copying text from pdf to excel
C# extract pdf text - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
export text from pdf to word; extract highlighted text from pdf
98
More on least squares
Fig.3.3-2:A simulated 1000-point spectrum with five well-separated Lorentzian peaks
of various widths, without (a) and with (b) Gaussian noise, and the noisy spectrum after
filtering with a 25-point smoothing polynomial of (c) first-order, (d) third-order, and (e)
fifth-order respectively. Parameters used for the simulated spectrum: a
1
=0.001,
b
1
=300, c
1
=1, a
2
=0.003, b
2
=600, c
2
=1, a
3
=0.01, b
3
=750, c
3
=1, a
4
=0.03, b
4
=850,
c
4
=1, a
5
=0.1, b
5
=925, c
5
=1, na=0.1. Curve (f) shows the fit of the same noisy data set
(b) after using Barak’s adaptive-degree polynomial filter for a 25-point moving polyno-
mial of order between 0 and 10.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; C#: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
can't copy and paste text from pdf; get text from pdf file c#
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
extract text from pdf; copy pdf text to word
InH3:H7depositthenumbers1through5,andinI1:K1thecolumnheadingsa,b,andc.
Deposit numerical values in block I3:K7. You may want to start with those listed in the
legend of Fig. 3.3-2, and then (after you have made the on-the-sheet graphs) vary those
parameters to your taste.
Make on-the-sheet graphs of C3:C1002 and D3:D1002 vs. A3:A1002.
10 We start with the simplest possible filter, one that merely averages a number of adja-
cent data to reduce the noise. Go to cell E15, and there deposit the 25-point averaging
formula=(D3+D4+D5 ++D27)/25. Copy this instruction down to E991.
11 Add a graph of the so filtered spectrum. For reference you may want to include in that
plot either the noise-free curve (as in Fig. 3.3-2) or the noisy one.
12 For the second filter, in cell F3, we use instead the formula=(-253*D3-138*D4-
33*D5 +62*D6+
-253*D27)/5175, where we use the convoluting integers for a
cubic 25-point smoothing filter: -253, -138, -33, 62, 147, 222, 287, 342, 387, 422, 447,
462, 467, 462, 447, 422, 387, 342, 287, 222, 147, 62, -33, -138, and -253. Note that
these numbers are symmetrical around the middle of the set. The corresponding nor-
malizing factor is 5175. Again, copy this formula to F991, and plot the resulting curve.
13 Finally, in column G, calculate a third filtered curve, this time using the convoluting
integers for a fifth-order 25-point smoothing filter: 1265, -345, -1122, -1255, -915,
-255, 590, 1503, 2385, 3155, 3750, 4125, 4253, 4125, 3750, … , -345, 1265. The normal-
izing factor is 30 015. Again plot the data.
14 Save as NoisySpectrum.
Figure 3.3-2 shows typical results. The simple first-order averaging filter,
panel (c) in Fig. 3.3-2, is most effective in reducing the noise, but also intro-
duces  the  largest  distortion,  visible  even  on  the  broadest  peaks.  This  is
always a trade-off: noise reduction is gained at the cost of distortion. The
same can  be seen  especially  with  the  narrower peaks,  where the higher-
order filters distort less, but also filter out less noise. In section 10.9 we will
describe  a  more  sophisticated  filter,  due  to  Barak,  which  for  each  point
determines the optimal polynomial order to be used, and thereby achieves a
better compromise between noise reduction and distortion.
3.4
Weighted least squares
The least-squares analysis we have encountered so far works with a special
class of functions, namely polynomials. (In chapter 2 we considered the sim-
plest polynomials, the functions y=a
, y =a
1
x, and y =a
0
+a
1
x; in sections
3.1 and 3.2 we used y =a
0
+a
x
1
+a
x
2
and y =a
0
+a
x+a
x
2
respectively.)
Many types of experimental data can be described in terms of polynomials.
3.4 Weighted least squares
99
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. C#.NET Project DLLs: Insert Text Content to PDF.
extract text from pdf acrobat; cut and paste text from pdf
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Different from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to text file with
cut and paste pdf text; copy pdf text to word with formatting
However, there are also many types of data that do not readily fit this mold. A
prime example is a single exponential: we saw in the preceding section that
fitting  an  exponential  to  a  quadratic  is  not  very  satisfactory.  Moreover,
invoking higher-order terms does not really help.
Consider the concentration of a chemical species reacting according to a
first-order irreversible reaction A →B with reaction rate constant k. In this
case the concentration of A is described by [A]=[A]
0
exp(-kt) where [A] is
the concentration of species A, t is the time elapsed since the beginning of
the experiment (at t=0), and [A]
0
is the corresponding initial concentration,
[A]
0
=[A]
t=0
. Imagine that we follow the concentration of A spectrometri-
cally, and want to extract from the resulting data the initial concentration
[A]
0
and/or the rate constant k. In that case we must fit the exponential to a
polynomial. Using a least-squares polynomial fit, this is no simple task.
On the other hand, it is easy to transform the exponential into a polyno-
mial, by simply taking the (natural) logarithm. This yields the equation of a
straight line, ln[A]=ln[A]
0
-kt, which is of  the  form y =a
0
+a
1
xwith y =
ln[A], a
0
=ln[A]
, a
1
=-k, and x =t, the ‘independent’ variable. There is only
one  minor  problem:  in  analyzing  ln[A]=ln[A]
0
-kt instead  of  [A]=[A]
0
exp(-kt) we minimize the sum of squares of the deviations in ln[A] rather
than those in [A]. When the dominant ‘noise’ in [A] is proportional to [A],
minimizing the sum of the squares of the deviations in ln[A] would indeed
be appropriate. However, it will not be so when the magnitude of that noise
is independent of [A]. In the latter case we can still use the transformation as
long as we include with each input value y
i
a weight w
i
to transform the noise
as well.
The  weights  depend on  the particular  transformation  used. In  general,
when the experimental data y are transformed to some new function Y (as in
the above example, where Y=ln y), the corresponding global weight w will
be given by
(3.4-1)
Weighted least-squares analysis is also called for when we must average
data of different precision. In section 2.5 we already encountered the need
for weighting of the experimental data when their individual standard devi-
ations are known. In that case the individual weights are simply the recipro-
cals of the variances of the individual measurements,
(3.4-2)
In general, then, there are two quite different reasons for using weighted
least squares:  (a) global weights may be required when the data  analysis
involves a transformation of  the dependent variable, while (b) individual
weights  are  needed  when  we  consider  data  of  different  (but  known)
w=
1
σ
2
w=
1
(dY/dy)
2
100
More on least squares
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
This page is mainly designed to tell you how to read or retrieve field data from PDF and how to extract and get field data from PDF in C#.NET project.
get text from pdf online; extract text from image pdf file
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
find and replace text in pdf file; c# read text from pdf
precision. The variances of individual data are seldom known, which is why
the use of global weights is the more common. However, when both (a) and
(b)  apply  simultaneously,  we  have  the  general  expression  for  the total
weights
(3.4-3)
of which (3.4-1) and (3.4-2) are the special cases for equal variances 
σ
i
or
constancy of dY/dy respectively.
We saw in sections 3.1 and 3.2 that the mathematical expressions to fit
data to a multi-parameter function, or to a higher-order polynomial such as
a quadratic, can be quite daunting, but that they are readily accessible when
the spreadsheet has built-in facilities to do the least-squares analysis. Excel
does not have comparable built-in capabilities for weighted least-squares
analysis. However, it does have the facility to accept add-in programs coded
in  a language  Excel  understands, VBA  (=Visual  BASIC  for Applications),
and you may already have used the added Weighted Least Squares in sec-
tions  3.1  and 3.2.  If you are curious how  such an  add-in program  works,
consult chapter 10, where it is described in  detail, including its complete
‘text’.
The example we will use below is again that of an exponential decay: y =y
0
exp(- kt). We already generated such a signal, in NoisyExponential, without
and with added Gaussian noise. For the exponential y=y
0
exp(–kt) we have
Y=ln y and w =1/(dY/dy)=y
2
.
Instructions for exercise 3.4
Recall NoisyExponential.
Add column headings in row 4 for Y, w, t, yw, and ynw.
In cell H6 deposit‘=LN(D6)’, in cell I6‘=D6^2’, and in cell J6‘=A6’, then copy these
three instructions down to row 56. (We here repeat the column for t in order to fit the
fixed format required by the Weighted Least Squares macro.)
Highlight these three columns, starting at H6 and extending it down as far as column H
contains numbers. At a given moment, noise will make y negative, at which point Y
cannot be calculated, which will show as #NUM!. That point, and the data following it,
cannot be used, because they are clearly biased towards positive values of y, without
the negative y-values contributing to Y.
Call the Weighted Least Squares routine (T
ools M
acro WLS1).
Also call the Regression analysis, and apply it to the same data set. (You could also use
the Weighted Least Squares analysis for this, after copying the values in columns H and
w=
1
σ
2
(dY/dy)
2
3.4 Weighted least squares
101
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Search PDF Text. C#.NET PDF SDK - Search and Find PDF Text in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF DLLs for Finding Text in PDF Document.
delete text from pdf file; copy paste pdf text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
PDF in C#, C# convert PDF to HTML, C# convert PDF to Word, C# extract text from PDF, C# convert PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files
cut and paste text from pdf document; erase text from pdf file
J to, say, columns M and O, provided these are not used otherwise, and column N is
empty. If you were to do the unweighted analysis in the block starting at H6, you would
have to erase the data in column I, and you would overwrite the earlier results.)
In order to compare the results with the theoretical values in row 1, use the spread-
sheet to take the antilogs ( =10^…) of the coefficient and standard deviation of the
intercept, because both routines yield Y
0
=ln y
0
rather than y
0
.
In K6:K56 and L6:L56 calculate the curves y
w
and y
uw
for the weighted and unweighted
curves, each reconstituted with the parameters provided by the weighted or
unweighted least-squares fittings respectively, then plot these together with the data
in B6:B56 and D6:D56. They might look like Fig. 3.4.
Because no two sets of noise are alike, your plot will be different, but most
likely the conclusion will be similar: for this type of data, where the noise is
constant, a weighted least-squares fit is far superior to an unweighted fit. The
numerical data tell the same story: in this particular example, the weighted
least-squares fit yielded a slope -k of -0.0991±0.0036, and an intercept ln
y
0
=-0.0214 ±0.0224 so that y
0
=0.952±5.3%, whereas the unweighted fit
gave -k=-0.1181 ±0.0076, ln y
0
=0.0800 ±0.1363 hence y
0
=1.20±37%.
However, the opposite conclusion would be drawn if the noise had been pro-
portional to the magnitude of the signal y, and you had not taken that into
account in the weights! You can use the spreadsheet to verify this yourself.
The moral of this exercise is that you need to know something about the func-
tion to which you fit (in order to use the correct transform), and about the
nature of the noise in your data, before you can get rid of most of it. And, as
always, the less noise you have to start with, the better off you are.
102
More on least squares
Fig.3.4:Fitting a noisy exponential curve (points) with unweighted (thin black line) or
weighted (solid black line) least-squares fit. The underlying, noise-free curve (heavy
colored line) is shown for comparison.
3.5
Another example of weighted least squares: enzyme kinetics
Enzymekineticsprovideaprimeexampleof theapplicabilityof weightedleast
squares.Thereasonistwofold:(a)theexperimentsoftenhavelargeexperimen-
taluncertainties,andarethereforeinneedofleast-squaresanalysistointerpret
themquantitatively,and(b)thereare severalmethods toanalyzethedata,i.e.,
different ways of linearizing the theoretical expression. When unweighted
least-squares analysis is used,these different analysis methods yield different
results when operating on the very same experimental data!When weighted
leastsquaresareused,allanalysismethodsyieldthesameresults.
The expression for the simplest form of enzyme kinetics was first given by
Henri (Compt. Rend. 135 (1902) 916), but is often named after Michaelis &
Menten (Biochem.Z. 49 (1913) 333), who investigated the same enzyme and
used the same equation. The expression is
(3.5-1)
where v is the initial rate of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction, S is the concen-
tration of its substrate, v
m
is the maximum rate, and Kis a constant.
One popular way to rectify (3.5-1) is to convert it to the Lineweaver–Burk
form
(3.5-2)
so that a plot of 1/v versus 1/S yields a straight line with intercept 1/v
m
and
slope K/v
m
. Another linearization, due to Hanes, is obtained by multiplying
all terms with S:
(3.5-3)
where a plot of S/v versus S yields a straight line of intercept K/v
m
and slope
1/v
m
. Typically, the determination of the initial rate v is the dominant source
of  experimental  uncertainty,  and  below  we  will  use  that  as  our  starting
assumption. We will use a data set from M. R. Atkinson, J. F. Jackson, & R. K.
Morton,  Biochem. J.  80 (1961) 318, to illustrate the need  to  use  weighted
least-squares analysis in such a case. The experimental data are as follows:
Concentration Sof
Initial rate vof nicotinamide-
nicotinamide mono-
adenine dinucleotide formed,
nucleotide, in mM
in micromoles
0.138
0.148
0.220
0.171
0.291
0.234
0.560
0.324
0.766
0.390
1.460
0.493
S
v
=
S
v
m
+
K
v
m
1
v
=
1
v
m
+
K
Sv
m
v=
Sv
m
K+S
3.5 Another example of weighted least squares: enzyme kinetics
103
The weighting factors needed for the above two cases are different. For the
Lineweaver–Burk plot  we have  y= v,  Y=1/v, and  therefore, according  to
(3.4-1),  w=1/(dY/dy)
2
=1/(d(1/y)/dy)
2
=1/(1/y
2
)
2
=y
4
=v
4
whereas  for
the Hanes plot we find Y=S/v so that w=v
4
/S
2
.
Instructions for exercise 3.5
Open an Excel spreadsheet.
Enter the column headings S, v, 1/v, w, 1/S, S/v, w, and S.
Enter the data in the first two columns, labeled S and v.
In the next columns, calculate 1/v, w=v4, 1/S, S/v, w=v4/S2, and copy Sfrom the first
column.
Highlight the data in the third through fifth column, and click on T
ools  M
acro 
M
acros WLS1. The coefficients will appear below the data.
Similarly, highlight the data in the last three columns, and analyze them the same way.
The Lineweaver–Burk analysis yields slope K/v
m
and intercept 1/v
. Use the next two
rows to convert this information into the parameters of interest, Kand v
. Here, K=
slope / intercept, and v
m
=1 / intercept.
Calculate the corresponding standard deviations, either by hand (using the rules of
error propagation through quotients, i.e., via relative errors) or (easier and less error-
prone) with the macro Progression. Note that Progression handles only one parameter
at a time, so that you must apply it separately to Kand v
m
. Also note that the weighted
least-squares macro places the standard deviations underthe coefficients, whereas
Progression puts them next to the parameters.
Similarly, the Hanes analysis yields slope 1/v
m
and intercept K/v
m
, from which you
again compute Kand v
m
, and the corresponding standard deviations. Note that the
roles of slope and intercept are interchanged in the Lineweaver–Burk and Hanes plots.
Compare the results of the two approaches.
10 Copy the entire block down.
11 Modify the just-copied block by replacing all weights by 1’s.
12 Now repeat the analysis. Forcing all terms w to 1 will of course yield the equivalent,
unweighted results.
13 Compare what you got; it should look like Fig. 3.5.
The unweighted Lineweaver–Burk and Hanes plots yield different answers
even though they analyze the same data set. On the other hand, when we use
appropriate global weighting factors, both methods yield identical results,
as they should. Need we say more about the importance of proper weight-
ing?
104
More on least squares
3.6
Non-linear data fitting
So far we have seen that experimental data can be fitted to many functions,
such  as  a  line,  a  polynomial,  or  (after  transformation)  an  exponential.
However, there are many more functions for which this does not seem pos-
sible. For example, no way is known to fit y =a
1
exp(-k
1
t)+a
2
exp(-k
2
t) by
using what is called a linear least-squares fit, where the term linear refers to
the fact that the expression is linear in the coefficients, here a
1
, a
2
, k
1
and k
2
.
(As we have seen, the expressions for y can be quite non-linear in the inde-
pendent parameter x; that is still considered a linear least-squares fit.)
3.6 Non-linear data fitting
105
Fig.3.5:Spreadsheet for the analysis of the data on the kinetics of nicotinamide
mononucleotide adenyltransferase by Atkinson et al., Biochem.J. 80 (1961) 318. The
results should be read as, e.g., on line 30: K=0.4406 ±0.0906 for the unweighted
Lineweaver–Burk method, K=0.5821 ±0.0522 for the unweighted Hanes plot, or, on
line 31, v
m
=0.5853± 0.1039 for Lineweaver–Burk, v
m
=0.6848 ±0.0383 for Hanes.
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
1
WEIGHTED:
 Lineweaver-Burk 
Hanes
2
S
v
1/v
w
1/S
S/v
w
S
3
4
0.138
0.148
6.7568
0.0005
7.2464
0.9324
0.0252
0.1380
5
0.220
0.171
5.8480
0.0009
4.5455
1.2865
0.0177
0.2200
6
0.291
0.234
4.2735
0.0030
3.4364
1.2436
0.0354
0.2910
7
0.560
0.324
3.0864
0.0110
1.7857
1.7284
0.0351
0.5600
8
0.766
0.390
2.5641
0.0231
1.3055
1.9641
0.0394
0.7660
9
1.460
0.493
2.0284
0.0591
0.6849
2.9615
0.0277
1.4600
10
11
Coeff.:
1.4709
0.8398
Coeff.:
0.8398
1.4709
12
St. Dev.:
0.0761
0.0559
St. Dev.:
0.0559
0.0761
13
14
K=
0.5710
0.0481
K=
0.5710
0.0481
15
vm =
0.6799
0.0352
vm =
0.6799
0.0352
16
17 UNWEIGHTED:
 Lineweaver-Burk 
Hanes
18
S
v
1/v
w
1/S
S/v
w
S
19
20
0.138
0.148
6.7568
1.0000
7.2464
0.9324
1.0000
0.1380
21
0.220
0.171
5.8480
1.0000
4.5455
1.2865
1.0000
0.2200
22
0.291
0.234
4.2735
1.0000
3.4364
1.2436
1.0000
0.2910
23
0.560
0.324
3.0864
1.0000
1.7857
1.7284
1.0000
0.5600
24
0.766
0.390
2.5641
1.0000
1.3055
1.9641
1.0000
0.7660
25
1.460
0.493
2.0284
1.0000
0.6849
2.9615
1.0000
1.4600
26
27
Coeff.:
1.7085
0.7528
Coeff.:
0.8500
1.4603
28
St. Dev.:
0.3033
0.0782
St. Dev.:
0.0596
0.0818
29
30
K=
0.4406
0.0906
K=
0.5821
0.0522
31
vm =
0.5853
0.1039
vm =
0.6848
0.0383
In order to overcome this limitation of linear least-squares fitting, i.e., its
restriction to a specific  type  of function,  ingenious algorithms have been
developed  to  fit  data  to  any function that  can  be  described  analytically,
using a single criterion, such as minimizing the sum of squares of the devia-
tions between the data and the model. Such routines use a variety of tech-
niques,  often  including  a  method  of  steepest  descent  as  well  as  a
Newton–Raphson algorithm, to as it were ‘feel’ their way towards that criter-
ion. Excel has several such algorithms in its Solver. Below we will use several
examples to demonstrate both the power, and some of the limitations, of
using Solver.
3.6a
Some kinetic data
First we will get acquainted with the method by applying it to a set of experi-
mental multi-parameter data from a paper on the kinetics of the thermal
isomerization of bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane by R. Srinivasan & A. A. Levi, J. Am.
Chem. Soc. 85 (1963) 3363, as quoted in N. R. Draper & H. Smith, Applied
Regression Analysis, 2nd ed., Wiley 1981). In order to reduce the tedium of
having to enter 38 data sets, we have used a smaller subset for this example,
leaving out all duplicate measurements as well as all data at 612 K and 631 K.
The dependent variable y is the fraction of the parent compound remaining
after a reaction time of t minutes, while T is the temperature of the experi-
ment, in K. The data are as follows:
Reaction time t, in min
Temperature T, in K
15
30
45.1
60
90
120
150
600
0.949
0.900
620
0.938
0.877 0.827 0.787
0.696
0.582
639
0.808
0.655
0.425
0.309
You will notice that the temperature range investigated is rather limited,
and that not all possible time–temperature combinations were measured.
Still, the fractions range from 0.3 to 0.95, and there are enough data to work
on.
Instructions for exercise 3.6-1
Open an Excel spreadsheet.
In cells A1 and A2 enter the labels a and b respectively.
In cells B1 and B2 deposit initial guess values; 0 and 0 will do for now.
In cell D1 deposit the label SRR.
In cells A4 through E4 place the labels time t, temp T, y(exp), y(calc), and RR.
106
More on least squares
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested