how to display pdf file in asp net using c# : Export text from pdf to word control software platform web page winforms wpf web browser Excel13-part183

Hanes plot, and 1/v in the Lineweaver–Burk plot, and they did not give the
same results. The weighting converted both to use v as the dependent vari-
able, and then they agreed, of course, and we obtain the same result with
the non-linear least-squares fit to (3.5-1). But when we use S as our depen-
dent variable, we get a different result with the non-linear least squares,
because we again compare apples and pears. And, of course, when we use
non-linear least squares on (3.5-2) we get the same result as with the linear
least-squares analysis of the Lineweaver–Burk plot, and non-linear least-
squares of (3.5-2) would yield the same answers as linear least  squares
based on a Hanes plot.
The take-home message is the following. The spreadsheet makes it very
easy to use least squares, either linear or non-linear, so that the mechanics
of least-squares fitting are no longer a problem. But we will still get differ-
ent results depending on which assumption we make regarding the depen-
dent parameter. And that choice the spreadsheet cannot make for us. This
is where the intelligent judgement of the experimentalist comes in. Least-
squares analysis is non-trivial, not because its algebra is rather compli-
cated (it is, but the spreadsheet can take care of that), but because it
requires knowledge about the nature of the experimental uncertainties
involved.
This brings us to a final comment: it is very easy to modify the non-linear
least squares to include weighting, since the user determines the residuals.
We can include any weighting factors we want in our column with residuals,
thereby converting Solver to a weighted non-linear least-squares optimizer.
The important part is to include the proper weighting. For that we need to
know what is (are) the major source(s) of the experimental uncertainty. And
therein lies the problem: we are often too much in a hurry to find out where
the  experimental  uncertainty  comes  from.  Unfortunately,  without  that
knowledge, we cannot expect to get reliable answers, no matter how sophis-
ticated the software used.
3.6e
SolverAid
Solver  does  not  provide  estimates  of  the  precision  of  its  answers.
Fortunately,  this  limitation  is  readily  remedied,  because  it  is  relatively
straightforward to write a macro that will compute the standard deviations
of the parameters found by Solver. Such a macro is fully described in chapter
10, and is there called SolverAid. Here we will merely illustrate how to use it
(assuming it has been installed), using as our example spreadsheet exercise
3.6-3 of the preceding section.
3.6 Non-linear data fitting
117
Export text from pdf to word - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copy text from pdf to word with formatting; a pdf text extractor
Export text from pdf to word - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
get text from pdf image; extract text from pdf open source
12 Call SolverAid. It should be findable in T
ools M
acros.
13 SolverAid will sequentially present three input boxes, one each for the parameters
Solver found, for SRR, and for the values of v
calc
. Either highlight the corresponding cell
or cell block (which should be a contiguous vertical column), or enter the correspond-
ing address (or address range) in the window of the input box, then press the Enter key.
14 That is all. SolverAid will place the values for the standard deviations of the parameters
to the immediate right of those parameters if there is free or over-writable space there;
otherwise it will present the results in the form of a series of message boxes. SolverAid
will also provide the standard deviation of the dependent variable, in the cell to the
right of SRR.
3.7
Summary
In this chapter we have seen that unweighted  least-squares analysis  on a
spreadsheet is a cinch. When no standard deviations are required, the trend-
line (callable only from a graph) is very convenient. When standard devia-
tions are needed, the Regression analysis routine in the Analysis ToolPak can
be used. Both can be used for a line as well as for multi-parameter fitting,
and for fitting to a polynomial, with or without a requirement that the curve
goes through the origin. There is no need to struggle with equations such as
(3.1-1) through (3.1-4), or (3.2-1) through (3.2-4): the general software takes
care of it all. The above methods require no initial guess values for any of the
parameters to be determined.
For  so-called  equidistant  data  sets  (where  equidistance  applies  to  the
independent variable), least-squares fitting is even simpler, and takes a form
tailor-made for an efficient moving polynomial fit on a spreadsheet, requir-
ing only access to a table of so-called convoluting integers, or software (such
as described in section 10.9) where these integers are automatically com-
puted.
When the data  are  transformed before  they are fitted, a weighted  least
squares is usually called for. Again, this is no big deal, since an add-in macro
is provided here for that purpose. It can even be used as a general-purpose
least-squares  routine:  when  no  weights  are  specified,  unit  weights  are
assigned  automatically,  i.e.,  weighting  is  omitted.  Moreover,  because  its
source code is provided in chapter 10, this program can readily be modified
to suit specific needs. For example, when  more  statistical parameters are
required, appropriate additional output statements can easily be incorpo-
rated in the  macro. Again,  a  weighted least squares need no  initial  guess
values.
Finally we have seen how non-linear least-squares work. Excel provides a
118
More on least squares
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
PDF from CSV. Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to
copying text from pdf into word; copy text from locked pdf
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
export highlighted text from pdf to word; extract text from pdf image
collection of competent,  multi-parameter approaches  in its Solver. When
linear least-squares fitting is possible, that should always be the first choice,
because  it  yields  unambiguous  answers,  without  the  possibility  of  false
minima. On the other hand, many problems do not allow such a straight-
forward solution, in which case one may have to turn to non-linear least-
squares fitting. Non-linear least-squares algorithms use (very sophisticated)
trial-and-error methods, and therefore need initial estimates of the parame-
ter values they are asked to determine. The answer provided can depend on
the initial guess values given. Although it can therefore yield non-optimal
(and sometimes even completely incorrect) answers, it can be an extremely
powerful general-purpose tool  when  used  with  appropriate  precautions.
Solver  does  not  provide  estimates  of  the  precision  of  its  results,  but
SolverAid does. Table 2.6-1 summarized many of the salient aspects of the
various methods available in Excel.
In  this  and  the  previous  chapter  we  have  emphasized  least-squares
methods.  Because  computers  can  facilitate  their  implementation,  such
methods have become part and parcel of quantitative science. The empha-
sis must now shift to the appropriate choice of functions to be fitted, and to a
careful  consideration  of  the  nature  of  the  experimental  uncertainties.
Unfortunately, the latter topic is beyond the scope of this short book.
3.7 Summary
119
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
.net extract text from pdf; c# extract text from pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
NET control to export Word from multiple PDF files in VB. Create editable Word file online without email. Supports transfer from password protected PDF.
extract pdf text to excel; copy and paste text from pdf to excel
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Support to convert multi-page PDF file to multi-page Tiff file. Able to export PDF document to HTML file. Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file.
copy text from protected pdf; edit pdf replace text
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
PDF Export. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF Export. VB.NET sample code. Conversion of PDF to Text. A quick and efficient
extract text from pdf open source; extract text from pdf acrobat
part iii chemical equilibrium
chapter
4
aci d s,  b a s e s,
an d  sa lt s
4.1
The mass action law and its graphical representations
The fundamental law of chemical equilibria was formulated in 1864 by two
Norwegian brothers-in-law, the theoretician Cato Guldberg and the experi-
mentalist Peter Waage, and was refined by them and others in the following
decades; it is now known as the Guldberg–Waage or mass action law. It has
been amply confirmed in  the  time since it was discovered, and  it can be
understood in term of thermodynamics; here we will simply state and use it.
When chemical species are involved in an equilibrium of the form
aA +bB+cC +
pP +qQ+rR+
(4.1-1)
then the mass action law specifies that there exists a fixed relationship
between the corresponding concentrations [A], [B], [C],
,[P], [Q], [R],
,
andtheirstoichiometriccoefficientsa, b,c,
,p,q, r,
,namelythattheratio
(4.1-2)
(or its inverse) is constant. Such a ratio is called an equilibrium constant,
because it specifies the relation between the concentrations of the various
participating chemicals at equilibrium. As far as the chemicals involved are
concerned, it is arbitrary whether we formulate such an equilibrium as in
(4.1-1)  or,  alternatively,  as  p[P]+q[Q]+r[R]+
a[A]+b[B]+c[C]+,
because chemicals neither know nor care how we write their equilibrium.
On the other hand, a specific way of writing may have mnemonic value for
us, humans. It is here that convention comes in. For acid–base equilibria in
aqueous solution, the area with which we will be mostly concerned in this
chapter, it is customary to define the equilibrium in terms of acid dissocia-
tion, whereby the acid loses one or more protons. The corresponding con-
stants are called dissociation constants. For instance, for the dissociation of
a weak monoprotic acid we write
[P]
p
[Q]
q
[R]
[A]
a
[B]
b
[C]
121
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
from OpenOffice. Create PDF from CSV. Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF
extract pdf text to word; copy text from pdf to word with formatting
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
from OpenOffice. Create PDF from CSV. Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF
delete text from pdf; copy text from encrypted pdf
HA
H
+
+A
-
(4.1-3)
(4.1-4)
where K
a
has the dimension of a concentration, i.e., with the unit M. Where a
logarithm is taken, as in pH  or pK
a
, the dimension is  always deleted, but
standard dimensions are implied; in other words, the property is thought to
be divided by the same property in its standard state, with a numerical value
of 1.
In contrast, for equilibria involving the formation of complexes, we typi-
cally define equilibria in terms of the formation of such complexes, in which
case the constants involved are called formation constants. Here a typical
example would be
Ag++Cl
AgCl
(4.1-5)
(4.1-6)
By convention, solvation is usually left out of these expressions, on the
assumption (useful for dilute solutions, but not necessarily valid for concen-
trated ones) that the solvent concentration is so large that it is essentially
constant, and can therefore be included in the numerical value of the equi-
librium constant. Here we will follow this convention, and in aqueous solu-
tions we will therefore not distinguish formally between H
2
CO
3
and CO
2
, or
between  NH
3
and  NH
4
OH.  Likewise,  the  hydrated  proton  will  be  repre-
sented simply by H+. Perhaps the most obvious example of this convention
is the autoprotolysis of water,
H
2
O
H
+
+OH
-
(4.1-7)
where, assuming [H
2
O] to be essentially constant, the equilibrium expres-
sion K
a
=[H
+
][OH
-
]/[H
2
O] is conventionally simplified to
K
w
=[H+][OH-]
(4.1-8)
In many experimental situations, one controls the total analytical con-
centration,  C, i.e.,  the  sum  of the concentrations  of  the  various possible
forms present. For example, we may weigh a certain amount of acetic acid
and/or sodium acetate, and dissolve it in a given amount of water, in which
case we know the total analytical concentration C=[HAc]+[Ac-]. In situa-
tions like that it is often useful to define the concentration fraction of a par-
ticular species in  the mixture. For the  simple monoprotic acid defined in
(4.1-3) we have
(4.1-9)
α
HA
=
α
1
=
[HA]
[HA]+[A-]
=
[H
+
]
[H+]+K
a
K
s0
=
[AgCl]
[Ag
+
][Cl
-
]
K
a
=
[H
+
][A
-
]
[HA]
122
Acids, bases, and salts
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
extract text from pdf c#; extract text from scanned pdf
(4.1-10)
where the right-hand form of the equations is obtained after substituting
the definition (4.1-4) of the dissociation constant, and where we have intro-
duced  the  formalism  of  labeling  the  concentration  fractions  with  the
number of attached, exchangeable protons: 1 for HA, 0 for A
. The concen-
trations of HA and A
then follow as
(4.1-11)
and
(4.1-12)
It is convenient to treat bases as if they were acids. Consequently, instead
of describing NH
3
, or its hydrated form NH
4
OH, as dissociating into NH
4
+
+
OH
-
, we consider NH
4
+
as the acid, dissociating into H
+
+NH
3
. For a mono-
protic base B such as ammonia we therefore write
HB
+
H
+
+B
(4.1-13)
(4.1-14)
(4.1-15)
(4.1-16)
Below we will show how such equilibria can be visualized in logarithmic
concentration  diagrams. The  corresponding  spreadsheets  are  often  very
useful for pH calculations.
Instructions for exercise 4.1
Open a new Excel spreadsheet.
In cell A1 enter the label C=, and in cell A2 a corresponding numerical value, such as
0.1. Also deposit, in cell A4, the label Ka =, and a corresponding value in A5, such as
=10^-4.76, the K
a
of acetic acid. Name the contents of cells A2 and A5 (but use Ca,
conc, or some other name instead of the invalid name C).
In row 11, starting with cell A11 (and thereby leaving space near the top of the spread-
sheet for small diagrams), enter the labels pH, [H
+
], log[H
+
], [OH
-
], log[OH
-
], 
α
HA,
log[HA], 
α
A
-
, and log[A
-
]. In order to type the symbol 
α
, type an a, highlight it, then
select and enter the symbol font in the font box on the left of the formatting toolbar.
α
B
=
α
0
=
[B]
[HB
+
]+[B]
=
K
a
[H
+
]+K
a
α
HB+
=
α
1
=
[HB
+
]
[HB
+
]+[B]
=
[H
+
]
[H
+
]+K
a
K
a
=
[H
+
][B]
[HB
+
]
[A
-
]= C
a
α
0
=
C
a
K
a
[H
+
]+K
a
[HA]= C
a
α
1
=
C
a
[H
+
]
[H
+
]+K
a
α
A
=
α
0
=
[A
-
]
[HA]+[A
-
]
=
K
a
[H
+
]+ K
a
4.1 The mass action law and its graphical representations
123
In cell A13 deposit the value 0, in cell A14 the value 0.1, then highlight both, and drag
the common handle down to cell A153. Alternatively, in cell A14 deposit the instruction
=A13+0.1, then copy this down to row 153.
In column B calculate the corresponding values for [H+] (i.e., in cell B13 calculate=
10^-A13), and in column C compute the values of log[H
+
], e.g., -A13 in cell C13.
Likewise, in column D, calculate the corresponding values of [OH-], e.g., in D13 as
either =10^(A13-14) or =(10^-14)/B13, and in column E calculate the correspond-
ing logarithm, log[OH
-
]=pH-14.
Use (4.1-9) to compute 
α
1
from K
a
and the corresponding value of [H
+
].
In column G calculate log[HA], keeping in mind that [HA]=C 
α
HA
=C 
α
1
.
In columns H and I likewise compute the corresponding values for 
α
A
and log[A
] on
the basis of (4.1-10).
10 We will now make two graphs commonly used in considering ionic equilibria. The first
of these is the distribution diagram, in which we plot the concentration fractions 
α
as
a function of pH. (In acid–base problems, pH will often be our dependent variable, i.e.,
will serve as our x-axis.) The distribution diagram is readily made by plotting columns
A, F and H. (Remember: in order to highlight non-contiguous columns in Excel, first
highlight the first column, then release the shift key and depress the Ctrl key, move the
cursor to the next column to be highlighted, switch over to the Shift key, highlight the
second column, etc.)
11 Anchor the graph on cell B1, and specify an xyplot. Label the graph as a distribution
diagram, and label its axes as pH (with a range from 0 to 14) and alpha (range: 0 to 1).
Place this graph on the spreadsheet using the area otherwise occupied by cells B1:E10.
(If you so prefer, make it on a separate chart, or do both.) The graph shows the regions
in which each of the species is dominant. At pH <pK
a
, the dominant species is HA,
whereas A
has the higher concentration at pH >pK
a
.
12 By changing the numerical values in A2 and A5 you can explore how the distribution
diagram depends on these two parameters. As can also be seen from (4.1-9) and (4.1-
10), the concentration fractions are independent of the total analytical concentration,
but they do depend strongly on the value of K
a
. In fact, the point where the two curves
intersect is defined by pH =pK
a
; the two 
α
’s there have the value 0.5. Table 4.1 lists
several acids and bases, and their pK
a
’s.
13 Another graph is the logarithmic concentration diagram. Its meaning is initially
perhaps somewhat less intuitive, because it uses a double-logarithmic scale, but it is
usually more informative because it shows minor as well as major concentrations;
moreover, it has very simple limiting slopes. The logarithmic concentration diagram is
obtained by plotting columns A, C, E, G and I. (In order to specify its range, start by
highlighting cell A31, then use Shift+ End+↓ to cell 153, release the Shift key and
depress Ctrl, use the mouse to move the cursor over to cell C153, release Ctrl and
depress Shift, then go up with Shift+End +↑, release Shift in favor of Ctrl, move to cell
124
Acids, bases, and salts
E13, switch back to Shift, then Shift +End+↓ to cell E153, and so on, until you have
highlighted all five columns.
14 Go to I
nsert Ch
art etc. to make an xy graph. Using the mouse and the vertical slide-
bar on the right of the spreadsheet, move the cursor to the top of the sheet, and deposit
the chart symbol in cell F1. Plot the (vertical) log c scale from -10 (at the bottom) to 0
(at the top), the (horizontal) pH scale from 0 to 14. Alternatively you can use the
pc=-log cscale by clicking on the vertical axis, then on Fo
rmat Axis, and selecting
Scale Min
imum: 0, Max
imum: 10, and check-marking Values in r
everse order.
15 If you want the numbers on the pH scale to show below the graph, double-click on the
figure, then on one of these numbers, then right-click on Format Axis. In the corre-
sponding dialog box, on the page Patterns, select to have the T
ick-Mark Labels Low for
a log c scale, High for pc=-log c.
16 Print the first page of the spreadsheet containing the graphs (it should look similar to
Fig. 4.1) or, when you made the graphs on separate sheets, print these. When you use
on-sheet graphs, you may want to reduce the widths of all columns in order to print it
all on one sheet of paper. You can do that as follows. First select the entire sheet, by
clicking on the gray rectangle where the row with the column labels ABCDEFG… meets
the column with the row numbers 1234567… Then use Fo
rmat  C
olumns W
idth
and enter an appropriate numerical value for C
olumn Width.
17 Again vary the numerical values of Cand K
a
to see their effects. Note that Cmoves
some (though not all) curves up or down, while K
a
displaces the same curves sideways.
4.1 The mass action law and its graphical representations
125
Fig.4.1 The top of the spreadsheet of exercise 4.1.
Use order-of-magnitude changes, since small changes hardly show on logarithmic
scales. Identify (and annotate as such) the four curves shown as depicting the loga-
rithms of the concentrations of H
+
, OH
-
, HA and A
-
respectively.
18 The lines representing [H+] and [OH-] are straight, while those for HA and A-are bent
yet contain two straight asymptotes. Verify mathematically (using (4.1-9) and (4.1-10))
and numerically (from the data in the spreadsheet, or by plotting the corresponding
asymptotes) that, for log[HA], these asymptotes are logCand log(C[H
+
]/K
a
)=logC -
logK
a
-pH, whereas those for [A
] are log(CK
a
/[H
+
])=logC+logK
a
+pH, and logC
respectively. Incidentally, those asymptotes form the basis of the stick diagram, which
is easy to sketch, and very convenient for quick-and-dirty pH estimates when you
don’t have a computer handy, or when an approximate answer is all you need.
19 Save the spreadsheet as Monoprotic Acid.
For the single, monoprotic acids and bases in the above example, the dis-
tribution  and  logarithmic  concentration  diagrams  are  rather  simple,  yet
they clearly show the relative and absolute concentrations respectively of
the various species present. Such diagrams become all the more useful when
we consider more complicated systems, such as polyprotic acids and bases,
where it otherwise becomes increasingly difficult to envision what happens
as a function of pH. We will do so in exercises 4.5 and 4.6.
As can be seen from Table 4.1, several acids have pK
a
’s for which only a
lower limit is listed, as<-1. These acids are fully dissociated in water, and
are  therefore  called  strong  acids.  Examples  are  HCl,  HClO
4
and  HNO
3
.
Likewise  there are bases that are almost completely dissociated in  water,
such as NaOH and KOH, as indicated by their large pK
a
’s. In this workbook
126
Acids, bases, and salts
Table 4.1:The pK
a
-values for some monoprotic acids and bases.
acid
pK
a
base
pK
a
acetic acid
4.76
ammonia
9.24
benzoic acid
4.20
aniline
4.60
butyric acid
4.82
benzylamine
9.35
dinitrophenol
4.11
butylamine
10.64
formic acid
3.74
ethanolamine
9.50
hydrofluoric acid
3.17
histamine
5.96
hydrochloric acid
<-1
hydroxylamine
5.96
lactic acid
3.86
lithium hydroxide
13.6
nitric acid
<-1
methylamine
10.64
nitrous acid
3.15
morpholine
8.49
perchloric acid
<-1
1,10-phenanthroline
4.68
phenol
9.98
potassium hydroxide 14.5
trichloroacetic acid 
0.66
pyridine
5.23
trifluoromethylsulfonic acid <-1
sodium hydroxide
14.1
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested