how to display pdf file in asp net using c# : Copy pdf text to word application control utility azure web page winforms visual studio Excel14-part184

we  will  consider  these  as  fully  dissociated,  and  therefore  treat  them  as
strong bases.
4.2
Conservation laws, proton balance, and pH calculations
Imagine being asked to calculate the pH of a 0.1 M solution of acetic acid in
water. What principles would you use to find the answer to such a question,
and how would you go about it? Obviously, the pH will depend on how much
acid is used (0.1 M), and on the strength of the particular acid, i.e., on the
total analytical  concentration C and  the dissociation constant K
a
. Here is
how these numbers can be used to arrive at the answer.
We start with two types of general relationships, the law(s) of conserva-
tion of mass, and the law of conservation of charge. We then combine these
into one, the proton balance, which always can be derived from the conser-
vation of mass and charge but which, fortunately, often can be written down
merely  by  inspection.  Combining  the  proton  balance  with  the  relations
already encountered in section 4.1 then yields the answer.
In  terms of  the specific example used  in  the preceding  paragraph, the
mass balance requires that
[HA]+[A
]= 0.1 M
(4.2-1)
where we  will  usually  delete  the  dimension,  which  is fine  as  long  as  we
always use standard units, such as liters (but not mL!) for volumes, moles for
amounts, and moles per liter (M) for concentrations.
The charge balance ensures that the solution is macroscopically electro-
neutral, by counting all cations and anions per liter of solution, i.e.,
[H
+
]=[A
-
]+[OH
-
]
(4.2-2)
In this particular example, we can also interpret (4.2-2) in a different way,
namely as a proton balance, an expression in which we specify which solu-
tion species have gained protons by comparison with the starting materials
(here H
2
O and HA) and which have lost protons. The proton balance focuses
on H
+
, the species of interest in pH calculations. Likewise, in complexation
equilibria, we will encounter an analogous ligand balance, and in electro-
chemical equilibria an electron balance.
In order to answer the above question regarding the pH of 0.1 M acetic
acid, we consult the logarithmic concentration diagram for a monoprotic
weak acid with C= 0.1 M and K
a
=10
–4.76
M, and find the pH for which (4.2-
2) is satisfied. Below we will use the spreadsheet to find that pH.
Alternatively we can use a stick diagram, which is a simplified version of
the logarithmic concentration diagram, to obtain a quick-and-dirty pH esti-
mate which, nonetheless, is  usually  correct to  within  0.3 pH units. In the
present example, either method yields a pH of 2.88.
4.2 Conservation laws, proton balance, and pH calculations
127
Copy pdf text to word - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copying text from pdf to excel; copy text from pdf to word with formatting
Copy pdf text to word - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
extract text from pdf to word; export text from pdf to word
We  note  that  pH =2.88  is  where,  in  the  logarithmic  concentration
diagram, the lines for [H
+
] and [A
-
] intersect. This is no accident: at this pH,
the proton balance [H+]=[A-]+[OH-] can be approximated to [H+]≈[A-],
because at the intersection of the lines for [H
+
] and [A
-
], [OH
-
] is more than
eight  orders  of  magnitude  (i.e.,  a  factor of  more than  100000000  times)
smaller than [A-]. That is good enough reason to neglect [OH-] with respect
to [A
-
] in the expression [A
-
]+[OH
-
].
What would be the pH of 0.1 M sodium acetate? Again, we use the mass
balance (4.2-1), as well as a second mass balance, which specifies that
[Na
+
]= 0.1 M
(4.2-3)
whereas the charge balance now must include sodium ions, and therefore
reads
[H
+
]+ [Na
+
]=[A
-
]+ [OH
-
]
(4.2-4)
Here, then, we have two mass balance equations plus the electroneutrality
condition; there is always  only one electroneutrality condition, while  the
number  of  mass  balance  equations  depends  on  the  number  of  non-
interconvertible ionic species  present. Since all three conditions must be
met simultaneously, it is convenient to combine them in one expression,
[H+]+ [HA]=[OH-]
(4.2-5)
which you may recognize as a proton balance, starting from undissociated
H
2
Oand the fully dissociated salt NaA. To wit: H
2
Ocan gain a proton to
become(hydrated)H
+
,A
-
can gain aproton tobecomeHA,andH
2
Ocanlose
aprotontoyieldOH
-
.Inthiscase,then,the requiredsolution is foundasthat
pH where (4.2-5) is satisfied: pH =8.88. And, again, it corresponds to an
intersection in the logarithmic concentration diagram, since [H
+
]« [HA] so
that[H
+
]+[HA]=[OH
-
]for all practical purposes reduces to[HA]≈[OH
-
].
These matters are discussed in much greater detail in my Aqueous acid–base
equilibria and titrations, Oxford Univ. Press, 1999.
Instructions for exercise 4.2
Recall spreadsheet Monoprotic Acid.
Copy the instructions in row 153 to row 155, then modify the instructions in cells G155
and I155 to yield [HA] and [A
-
] instead of their logarithms.
Consider the standard form of (4.2-1), i.e., with all non-zero terms moved to the left-
hand side of the expression: [H
+
]-[A
-
]-[OH
-
]=0. Use cell J155 to calculate that left-
hand side of the standard form, which in this case would read=B155–I155–D155. The
proton condition corresponds to the pH that will make J155 zero.
The easiest way to find that pH is by using the Goal Seek routine of Excel. Select T
ools
G
oal Seek; in the resulting dialog box you S
et cell J155 To v
alue 0 By c
hanging cell
128
Acids, bases, and salts
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into The portable document format, known as PDF document, is a they are using different types of word processors.
acrobat remove text from pdf; copy text from protected pdf to word
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. Ability to copy PDF pages and paste into another PDF file.
c# read text from pdf; copy text from protected pdf
A155, then click on OK. Bingo, the spreadsheet will have found the pH, and will show it
in cell A155.
Goal Seek is based on the principle of the Newton–Raphson algorithm, discussed in
more detail in section 8.1, which finds a first estimate by determining the slope of the
function, then extrapolates this to find the zero, uses this new estimate to obtain a
second estimate, and so on.
You can also use Goal Seek without first having made an elaborate spreadsheet table;
all that is needed is a blank spreadsheet and a single, analytical expression in terms of a
single adjustable parameter.
To see that for yourself, somewhere else on the spreadsheet use three cells, which we
will here call cells a, b and c. In cell a place a reasonable guess value for the [H+]; this is
the value that will be adjusted to make the proton condition zero. The proton condition
in standard form should go in cell b, i.e., it should code for [H
+
]-[A
-
]-[OH
-
]=[H
+
]-
C K
a
/ ([H+]+K
a
)-10–14 / [H+]. The third cell, c, is merely for your convenience, to cal-
culate the pH from [H
+
]. Note that we here do not need to use any approximations.
Engage Goal Seek and S
et cell b To v
alue 0 By c
hanging cell a, at which point the answer
appears in cell c.
The Newton–Raphson method often works, especially when the first estimate is close
to the final value. However, one can generate situations where it will either fail to yield
an answer, or produce an incorrect one. This is so because the Newton–Raphson
method relies on the derivative of the function at the estimate, which may differ sig-
nificantly from the derivative at the desired root. It may then be necessary first to use
an approximate method to obtain an initial estimate for the variable parameter. In the
present case, the Newton–Raphson method will typically work as long as the initial pH
estimate is physically realizable for the given values of Cand pK
a
, in which case the
proton balance written in standard form is a monotonic function of [H
+
].
10 On your own, now find the pH of 0.1 M sodium acetate, based on the proton condition
(4.2-5) in its standard form, i.e., [H
+
]+[HA]-[OH
]=0.
11 On the logarithmic concentration diagram for 0.1 M acetic acid made in exercise 4.1,
note the above answers for the pH of 0.1 M acetic acid, and for 0.1 M sodium acetate,
and see whether they indeed correspond with an intersection of two curves.
12 Find the pH of 0.1 M NH
3
in water (the pK
a
of ammonia is 9.24, see Table 4.1), and that
of 0.1 M NH
4
Cl. For NH
3
and H
2
O, the proton balance is [H+]+[NH
4
+]-[OH -]=0; for
NH
4
Cl+H
2
O it is [H
+
]-[NH
3
]-[OH
-
]=0. Verify these proton balances, by deriving
them from the mass and charge balance relations, and by considering proton gains
and proton losses.
13 Also plot the corresponding logarithmic concentration diagram, and on it indicate the
pH values just calculated. Rationalize why they again correspond with specific inter-
sections, and note these on the plot.
14 Save the spreadsheet as Monoprotic Acid.
4.2 Conservation laws, proton balance, and pH calculations
129
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
copy paste pdf text; erase text from pdf file
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
copy text from pdf reader; copy and paste text from pdf to word
4.3
Titrations of monoprotic acids and bases
In a typical titration, known volumes of a reagent of known concentration
are added to a known volume of a sample of unknown concentration, and
addition  is  continued  at  least  until  an  equivalent  amount  of  reagent  is
added, at which point some measurable physical or chemical property indi-
cates that a so-called equivalence point has been reached. The unknown
concentration can then be calculated. Numerous properties can be used as
indicators; historically, the first equivalence point indicator was the obser-
vation that bubble formation (effervescence) upon addition of potassium
carbonate  to  vinegar  would  stop  once  the  equivalence  point  had  been
reached or passed. Nowadays, the progress of most acid–base titrations is
monitored either with a color indicator or, preferably, with a pH meter.
In  a  titration,  then,  the  assignment  is  to  determine  the  volume  of  the
titrant necessary to reach the equivalence point, while one measures the pH
(or a related quantity, such as the color of the added indicator) to monitor
how close one is to that equivalence point. It is therefore logical to express
the titration curve in terms of the titrant volume as a function of pH or [H
+
].
This  approach,  which  will  be  followed  here,  leads  to  simple  theoretical
expressions  for  the  course  of  the  titration,  expressions  that  can  all  be
described in terms of a simple  master equation, and that  allow easy and
direct comparison with experimental data.
Alternatively one can try to express pH or  [H
+
]  as a function  of titrant
volume, reflecting how the typical volumetric experiment is performed (by
measuring volumes) rather than what problem the titration tries to answer.
Unfortunately, this more traditional approach leads to much more compli-
cated  mathematics, thereby hampering  comparison  between  theory and
experiment. We will not use it here, since it is poorly suited to quantitative
analysis.
Below we will first consider monoprotic acids and bases. One of the sim-
plest titrations is that of a strong monoprotic acid, such as HCl, with a strong
monoprotic base, such as NaOH. Say that we titrate a sample of volume V
a
of
hydrochloric acid of unknown concentration C
a
by gradually adding strong
base of concentration C
b
, the total volume of base added to the sample being
V
b
. Conservation of mass and charge then leads to the following expression
for the progressof this titration:
(4.3-1)
where we have used the abbreviation
∆=[H
+
]-[OH
-
]=[H
+
]-K
/ [H
+
]
(4.3-2)
with K
w
, the ion product of water (of the order of 10
–14
M
2
), as defined in (4.1-
8). The derivation of (4.3-1) is so simple that we will briefly indicate it here
V
b
V
a
=
C
a
-∆
C
b
+∆
130
Acids, bases, and salts
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
export text from pdf to excel; copy paste text pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Convert
extract text from pdf acrobat; cut and paste text from pdf
for the above specific example of titrating HCl with NaOH. We start from the
charge balance equation
[H
+
]+[Na
+
]=[Cl
-
]+[OH
-
]
(4.3-3)
and then express [Na
+
]and [Cl
-
]in terms of the original sample concen-
tration C
a
and sample volume V
a
,and the concentration C
b
of the titrant
used:
[Cl
-
]=C
a
V
a
/ (V
a
+V
b
)
(4.3-4)
[Na
+
]=C
b
V
b
/ (V
a
+V
b
)
(4.3-5)
where the dilution factors V
a
/ (V
a
+V
b
) and V
b
/ (V
a
+V
b
) take into account
the mutual dilution of sample and titrant. Substitution of (4.3-4) and (4.3-5)
into (4.3-3), and collection of terms in V
a
and V
b
, then yields (4.3-1).
For the titration of single weak acid with strong base, such as that of acetic
acid with NaOH, we have instead of (4.3-1)
(4.3-6)
where the concentration fraction of A
-
is defined in (4.1–10). Note that (4.3-
1) is the special case of (4.3-6) for 
α
0
=
α
A
-
=1, i.e., for K
a
» [H
+
]. Indeed, a
strong acid can be defined as one for which K
» [H
+
] for all physically realiz-
able values of [H
+
], a definition equivalent to stating that a strong acid is vir-
tually completely dissociated at all realizable pH values.
The derivation of (4.3-6) is equally simple: instead of (4.3-3) and (4.3-4) we
now use
[H
+
]+[Na
+
]=[A
-
]+[OH
-
]
(4.3-7)
[A
-
]=C
a
α
0
V
a
/ (V
a
+V
b
)
(4.3-8)
and combine this with (4.3-5). Note that replacing [Cl
-
] by [A
-
] only results
in the multiplication of C
a
by 
α
0
, so that multiplication of C
a
in (4.3-1) by 
α
0
directly yields (4.3-6).
For the titration of a mixture of acids with a single strong base, (4.3-6) can
be generalized to
(4.3-9)
where the summation extends over all (weak or strong) acids in the sample.
For the titration of a strong base with a strong acid we have
(4.3-10)
and for the titration of mixture of bases with a single strong acid
V
a
V
b
=
C
b
+∆
C
-∆
V
b
V
a
=
C
α
0
-∆
C
b
+∆
V
b
V
a
=
C
α
0
-∆
C
b
+∆
4.3 Titrations of monoprotic acids and bases
131
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
extracting text from pdf; extract text from image pdf file
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png, Gif Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF
extract highlighted text from pdf; copy text from pdf without formatting
(4.3-11)
Finally, the titration of a mixture of acids with a mixture of bases leads to
the relation
(4.3-12)
while that of a mixture of bases with a mixture of acids is described by
(4.3-13)
Equations (4.3-12) and (4.3-13) are general relations for acid–base titra-
tions of monoprotic acids and bases, and specifically include the effects of
dilution of sample by the added titrant, and vice versa, through the dilution
factors V
a
/ (V
a
+V
b
)  and V
b
/ (V
a
+V
b
) introduced in (4.3-4), (4.3-5) and
(4.3-8). Note, however, that any additional dilution (such as might result
from rinsing the inside of the titration vessel) is not taken into account. In
using the above equations, it is therefore advisable to flow in the titrant, by
making  the  tip of  the  buret touch the  inside wall of the  titration  vessel,
rather than to add the titrant dropwise. Falling drops often lead to splashing
on  the  inside walls of  the titration vessel, which  then  need  to be  rinsed
down. Moreover, the use of droplets can lead to large reading errors, since
half a droplet left hanging on a typical buret tip introduces a reading error of
about 1/40 mL. Flowing in the titrant is done most conveniently while a
magnetic stirrer mixes the incoming titrant with the sample, but is more
difficult when titrant and sample must be mixed manually by swirling the
titration vessel.
Instructions for exercise 4.3
Recall the spreadsheet Monoprotic Acid.
IncellA7depositthelabelCb=,andincellA8acorrespondingnumericalvalue,e.g.,0.1.
In cell J11 deposit the column heading Vb/Va, and in cell J13 the formula=($A$2*H13-
B13+ D13)/($A$8+B13-D13), which you will recognize as (4.3-6).
Copy this formula so that it will be used in J13:J153.
Make a plot of V
b
/V
a
vs. pH, which will show the progress curve. Restrict the range of
V
b
/V
a
from 0 to 2, in order to avoid the very large positive and negative values calculated
by the program at pH-values that are physically not realizable for the chosen values of
C
a,
C
b
and pK
a
.
V
a
V
b
=
C
b
α
1
+∆
C
a
α
0
-∆
V
b
V
a
=
C
α
0
-∆
C
α
1
+∆
V
a
V
b
=
C
α
1
+∆
C
a
-∆
132
Acids, bases, and salts
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
code, such as, PDF to HTML converter assembly, PDF to Word converter assembly and PDF to PNG converter control. C#.NET DLLs: Use PDF to Text Converter Control
copy text from pdf online; get text from pdf online
In a titration curvewe instead plot the pH versus V
b
/ V
a
. In order to plot such a curve,
repeat the pH in column K (because Excel will automatically use the left-most selected
column for the horizontal axis), then plot J13:J153 versus K13:K153. Alternatively, make
a copy of the progress curve, double-click on it, then click on the data points. When
(some of) these are highlighted, go to the formula bar, and there exchange all A’s for J’s,
and vice versa, and deposit this change with the enter key. Finally, change the axis labels
and titles around. This second method is more work, but does not require that column A
be repeated in the spreadsheet.
Some representative curves are shown in Figs. 4.3-1a and 4.3-1b, as they might show
when placed on the spreadsheet, in which case the actual calculations would of course
have to be displaced downwards in order to remain visible.
Experiment with different K
a
-values, such as 1, 10
–2
, 10
–4
, 10
–6
, 10
–8
, and 10
–10
M. Also,
experiment for a given K
a
such as 10
–4
, with various values of C
a
and C
b,
again changing
them by, say, two orders of magnitude to see the effects.
Save as Monoprotic Acid.
4.4
Schwartz and Gran plots
Progress and titration curves are, typically, S-shaped. For the precise deter-
mination of the equivalence point it is often useful to rectify those curves.
While this cannot alwaysbe done, rectification is possible for thetitration of
4.4 Schwartz and Gran plots
133
Fig.4.3-1:(a) The progress curve, and (b) the titration curve, for the titration of 0.1 M
acetic acid (pK
a
=4.7) with 0.1 M NaOH.
(a)
(b)
asingle (weak or strong) monoprotic acid with a single strong monoprotic
base, or vice versa, and leads to the Schwartz plot. A somewhat simpler but
approximate rectification method yields the Gran plots. Here we will briefly
exploreboth.
We again start from the electroneutrality condition
[H
+
]+ [Na
+
]=[A
-
]+ [OH
-
]
(4.3-7)
in which we now consider dilution:
(4.4-1)
so that
(4.4-2)
(4.4-3)
which yields the Schwartz equation
[H
+
] V
b
′=K
a
(V
eq
-V
b
′)
(4.4-4)
in which the equivalence volumeV
eq
is defined as
V
eq
=C
a
V
a
/C
b
(4.4-5)
and where
V
b
′=V
b
+(V
a
+V
b
) ∆ /C
b
(4.4-6)
The  equivalence  volume  is  the  primary  goal  of  an  analytical  titration,
because  it  allows  us  to  determine  the  unknown  concentration  C
a
from
(4.4-5) as
C
a
=C
b
V
eq
/V
a
(4.4-7)
At any time during the titration, the volume V
a
of the original sample is
known, as is the volume V
b
and concentration C
b
of the titrant used at any
time during the titration. Moreover, because the pH is monitored, ∆ is also
known. Consequently, all terms on the right-hand side of (4.4-6) are known,
and so is V
b
’. The Schwartz equation (4.4-4) therefore allows us to rectify the
entire titration curve simply by plotting [H
+
]V
b
′versus V
b
′. Such a Schwartz
plot yields a single straight line, with slope -K
a
, and ending at the horizon-
tal  axis  precisely  where  V
b
′=V
eq
,  making  it  very  easy  to  determine  the
equivalence volume  V
eq 
while,  as  an  added  benefit,  the slope of the plot
yields  the value of K
a
. Note that (4.4-4)  applies to weak  and strong  acids
alike; when the titrated acid is a strong one, the slope of the plot is (in theory)
infinitely steep, i.e., the graph shows a vertical line.
Often,  the  second  part  on  the  right-hand  side  of  (4.4-6)  can  be
neglected, especially in the region just before the equivalence point, where
([H
+
]+K
a
){V
a
+∆(V
a
+V
b
)/C
b
}=C
a
K
a
V
a
/C
b
=K
a
V
eq
∆(V
a
+V
b
)([H
+
]+K
a
)+C
b
V
b
([H
+
]+K
a
)=C
a
K
a
V
a
[H
+
]+
C
b
V
b
V
a
+V
b
=
C
α
0
V
a
V
a
+V
b
+[OH
-
]=
C
a
K
a
V
a
(V
a
+V
b
)([H
+
]+K
a
)
+[OH
-
]
134
Acids, bases, and salts
∆=[H
+
]-[OH
-
] is  small  because,  there,  both  [H
+
]  and [OH
-
]  are  small.
Under those conditions, V
b
′≈V
b
, so that (4.4-4) reduces to
(4.4-8)
This is the basis of the first Gran plot, in which we make a graph of [H
+
]V
b
versus V
b
. The approximate sign ≈is used in (4.4-8) because it is obvious by
inspection that (4.4-8) cannot be reliable over the entire range of the titra-
tion. For example, at the beginning of the titration, V
b
=0, which would lead
to K
a
V
eq
=0, clearly an incorrect result for any finite value of K
a
. Likewise,
(4.4-7) yields a physically imposible result past the equivalence point, where
(V
eq
-V
b
)  is negative, so that  [H
+
]K
a
would  have to be  negative,  which  it
cannot be.
In a typical titration of an acid, the titrant is a strong base. In that case, the
titration curve past the equivalence point is quite similar to that of the titra-
tion of  a  strong acid  with a strong  base. For  that  situation, another  Gran
plot is available, which actually is often the more useful one. We now start
from(4.3-1) which we simplify by using the approximation ∆=[H
+
]-[OH
-
]
≈-[OH
-
]. The result, V
b
/V
a
≈(C
a
+[OH
-
])/(C
b
-[OH
-
]), can  then be re-
arranged to
[OH
-
] (V
a
+V
b
)=C
b
V
b
-C
a
V
a
=C
b
(V
b
-V
eq
)
(4.4-9)
where we have again used the definition (4.4-5) of the equivalence volume.
Equation  (4.4-9)  is  the  basis for the second Gran  plot,  in  which we  plot
[OH
-
 (V
a
+V
b
 versus  V
b
 Because  of  the  assumption  ∆≈-[OH
-
 the
second Gran plot is only useful past the equivalence point. In that range it is
often also convenient in the titration of polyprotic acids, where the Schwartz
plot and the first Gran plot are usually no longer applicable.
Instructions for exercise 4.4
Recall the spreadsheet Monoprotic Acid.
In rows 13 through 153 of the next column, which will be either K or L depending on
what option you used in exercise 4.3 under (6), calculate V
b
′/V
a
=V
b
/V
a
+(1+
V
b
/V
a
)(∆/C
b
), and next to it compute the quantity [H
+
] V
b
′/V
a
, then make the
Schwartz plot. It will save time and effort to scale both through division by the constant
V
a,
because you already have a column for V
b
/V
a
.
Next make a column for the product [H+] V
b
/V
a
, and use it to make a Gran1 plot.
Finally, in the next column, calculate the quantity [OH-] (1+V
b
/V
a
), then use it to
make the Gran2 plot of [OH
-
] (1+V
b
/V
a
) versus V
b
/V
a
.
Thumbnail sketches of such plots are shown as parts of Figs. 4.5-1 through 4.5-3.
Save your work as Monoprotic Acid.
[H
+
]V
b
≈K
a
(V
eq
-V
b
)
4.4 Schwartz and Gran plots
135
Playing  with  theoretical  expressions,  as  we do here, can sometimes be
misleading. No matter how good the theory, experimental data never quite
follow  the  theory,  because  of  experimental  uncertainties.  It  is  therefore
useful to make the theoretical data somewhat more realistic, by the addition
of synthetic noise. For this we will use the Gaussian noise generator avail-
able in Excel. Keep in mind that such noise is again the ideal case, and that
real noise will usually not be as well-behaved. Nonetheless, adding Gaussian
noise is better  than  not  adding any,  and  it can  help  us anticipate which
methods are ‘robust’ and which are so sensitive to noise that their use will be
‘of theoretical significance only’.
Recall the spreadsheet Monoprotic Acid.
Insert two new columns between those for V
b
/V
a
and V
b
′/V
a
, and label them ‘noise’
and ‘(Vb/ Va)n’ respectively.
In the noise column enter Gaussian noise (using T
ools D
ata Analysis Random
Number Generation  OK  D
istribution Normal, Me
an=0, S
tandard Deviation =1),
and in the next column add a fraction defined by a spreadsheet constant na(for noise
amplitude) times this noise to the (V
b
/V
a
)
n
column.
10 Modify the spreadsheet code so that all columns to the right of the noise column refer
to the new (V
b
/V
a
)
n
column rather than to V
b
/V
a
.
11 Likewise modify the charts to reflect the added noise. You can do this by first activating
the charts by double clicking. Then click on a data point to get the= SERIES instruc-
tion showing in the formula bar. Modify the corresponding instructions in the formula
bar to refer to the proper column, and finally use the enter key to deposit them.
12 You will notice that the Schwartz plot is somewhat more affected by the noise than the
Gran plots, but that all three are still quite serviceable as long as the noise amplitude is
not too large.
13 Save again as Monoprotic Acid.
4.5
The first derivative
Analytically useful acid–base titration curves are characterized by a rather
fast pH change near the equivalence point. This suggests that the location of
the equivalence point might be determined experimentally from that of the
maximum in its first derivative, d(pH)/dV
b
, or the zero-crossing of its second
derivative, d
2
(pH)/dV
b
2
. The advantage of such an approach is that it does
not rely on any particular theoretical model, but instead exploits the charac-
teristic  feature of the titration curve, i.e., its fast  pH change in the region
around the equivalence point. The method does not even require that the
pH meter is carefully calibrated.
136
Acids, bases, and salts
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested