how to display pdf file in asp net using c# : Extract text from pdf c# SDK software service wpf winforms html dnn Excel15-part185

Unfortunately, there are two reasons why taking the derivative of the
titration curve is usually not a recommended procedure for establishing
the equivalence point. (a) The theory of titration curves shows that the
equivalence point of a practical titration (i.e., one performed with a titrant
of real rather than infinite concentration) does not quite coincide with the
value of V
b
where d(pH)/dV
b
is maximal. Fortunately, the resulting titration
error is usually small enough to be negligible. (b) Much more importantly,
taking the derivative of the titration curve greatly enhances the effect of
experimental noise, often making it necessary to filter the experimental
data first, which may introduce far greater titration errors. This sensitivity
to noise is aggravated by the fact that experimental fluctuations are typi-
cally largest in the region of the equivalence point, where inadequate
mixing speed, slow electrode response, and small buffer strength, can all
conspire to generate experimental errors. As we will see in section 4.6, it is
no longer necessary to consider the derivative to find an equivalence
point, but for the sake of completeness we will briefly describe this proce-
dure nonetheless. To this end we will use the Savitzky–Golay method you
may already have encountered in section 3.3 (where it was used for
smoothing rather than differentiation). This method requires that the data
are equidistant in the independent variable. Since our spreadsheet data are
based on constant pH increments, we will calculate the values of
d(pH)/d(V
b
/V
a
) as 1/{d(V
b
/V
a
)/d(pH)}, first with a moving five-point
parabola.
Instructions for exercise 4.5
Recall the spreadsheet Monoprotic Acid.
Add yet another column, this one labeled ‘deriv’, in which you calculate the quantity
d(pH)/d(V
b
/V
a
)=1/{d(V
b
/V
a
)/d(pH)}. Because the derivative is computed at the mid-
point of a five-point polynomial, the first calculated point will yield a result for the third
point in the column, so that the column with results will start two rows lower than the
column with input data, and likewise will end two rows earlier.
The instruction to be entered on the third row should read=1/(-2*a-b+d+2*e)
where a, b, d, and erefer to the first, second, fourth and fifth cells in the column for
(V
b
/V
a
)
n.
(There are two other factors that, fortuitously, cancel each other in this case
since their product is involved: a normalizing factor of 10, and the data spacing of 0.1 pH
units.) Copy the instruction down to the third-from-the-bottom row of this deriv
column.
Make a graph of d(pH)/d(V
b
/V
a
)
n
versus V
b
/V
a
. Display V
b
/V
a
only between 0.99
and 1.01, and leave the vertical scale undefined (so that the spreadsheet can 
scale it).
4.5 The first derivative
137
Extract text from pdf c# - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
copying text from pdf to word; export text from pdf
Extract text from pdf c# - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
extract text from pdf file; extract formatted text from pdf
Vary the amplitude naof the noise, and observe the results. While the value of nawill
also affect the progress and titration curves, and the Schwartz and Gran plots, you will
notice that it has a much more dramatic effect on the first derivative. In fact, the theoret-
ical shape of the first derivative is visible only for na<0.001, whereas the linear
(Schwartz and Gran) plots barely show the effects of noise. At na=0.01 the linear plots
are noisy but can still be used, especially when combined with a least-squares line, but
the derivative fails miserably to indicate the position of the equivalence point. At na=
0.03, only the Gran2 plot is still serviceable.
The derivative curve can be made less sensitive to noise by using a larger number of
points. Try this by using a thirteen-point (instead of a five-point) parabola, with the
coefficients -6a, -5b, -4c, -3d, -2e, -f, h, 2i, 3j, 4k, 5l and 6m, where athrough mare
the first through 13
th
values in the row for (V
b
/V
a
)
n.
The proper scale factor in this case is
no longer 1, but 182×0.1=18.2. Note that a 13-point parabola will calculate the
seventh point in the deriv column; you must therefore leave the first and last six points
open in the calculation (but still include them in defining the graph). As can be seen in
Figs. 4.5-1 through 4.5-3, a relatively small amount of random noise can dominate the
plot of the first derivative d(pH)/dV
b
vs. V
b
or, as shown here, of d(pH)/d(V
b
/V
a
) vs.
V
b
/V
a
, even when a 13-point moving parabola is used to calculate it.
Figures 4.5-1 through 4.5-3 show thumbnail sketches such as you might
embed at the top of your spreadsheet, for three different amounts of added
noise. In viewing these figures you should keep in mind that the added noise
is somewhat artificial, because it only affects the volume axis, and not the
pH axis.  (If desired you can of course add noise to the  pH  data as well.)
Nonetheless it indicates that the Gran plot past the equivalence point (i.e.,
for a strong base) is the most robust. Note that noise of magnitudes such as
that  shown  for  na=0.03  is  experimentally  completely  unnecessary  and
unacceptable, and is used here only to emphasize the point that the various
data analysis methods have quite different sensitivities to noise. Not every-
thing that looks good in theory works well in practice, and the spreadsheet is
a good tool to find this out.
138
Acids, bases, and salts
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; C#: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
extracting text from pdf; cut and paste text from pdf document
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C#.NET Sample Code: Insert Text Character to PDF Using C#.NET. This
cut and paste pdf text; copy pdf text with formatting
4.5 The first derivative
139
Fig.4.5-1:The progress and titration curves, the Schwartz and Gran plots, and the first
derivative of the titration curve, for the titration of 0.1 M acetic acid (pK
a
=4.7) with
0.1 M NaOH, without Gaussian noise added, na=0. The first derivative is computed
with a 13-point moving parabola. 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
extract all text from pdf; export highlighted text from pdf
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Text in C#.NET. How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF to Text in C#.NET. C# programming sample for PDF to text converting.
copy text from pdf without formatting; extract text from pdf online
140
Acids, bases, and salts
Fig.4.5-2:The progress and titration curves, the Schwartz and Gran plots, and the first
derivative of the titration curve, for the titration of 0.1 M acetic acid (pK
a
=4.7) with
0.1M NaOH, with some Gaussian noise added, na=0.005. The first derivative is com-
puted with a 13-point moving parabola. 
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as or retrieve field data from PDF and how to extract and get field data from PDF in C#
copy text from pdf; get text from pdf c#
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
extract text from image pdf file; copy formatted text from pdf
4.5 The first derivative
141
Fig.4.5-3:The progress and titration curves, the Schwartz and Gran plots, and the first
derivative of the titration curve, for the titration of 0.1 M acetic acid (pK
a
=4.7) with
0.1 M NaOH, with more Gaussian noise added, na=0.03. The first derivative is com-
puted with a 13-point moving parabola. 
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Search and Find PDF Text in C#.NET. If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C#.NET PDF Demo Code: Search Text From PDF File in C#.NET.
delete text from pdf preview; find and replace text in pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
PDF in C#, C# convert PDF to HTML, C# convert PDF to Word, C# extract text from PDF, C# convert PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files
c# extract text from pdf; delete text from pdf online
4.6
A more general approach to data fitting
The traditional way to finding the equivalence point, by observing when the
color of an indicator dye changes, is equivalent to associating that equiv-
alence point with a fixed pH, and monitoring when that pH has been passed.
In that case we typically use one drop to distinguish between being ‘before’
and ‘beyond’ the equivalence point, and our resolution will be determined
by the size of the drop used, which is usually of the order of about 0.05 mL.
The approaches we have discussed so far to determine the precise loca-
tion of the equivalence point use more than just one point, and are therefore
in principle less prone to experimental error. The Schwartz and Gran plots
rely on a linearization of the titration curve; unfortunately, for samples that
contain more than one monoprotic acid or base, linearization is no longer
possible, nor is it (in general) for polyprotic acids and bases. And as for the
alternative, we have seen that taking the derivative is easily overwhelmed by
experimental noise. Is there no more robust yet general way to determine
the equivalence volume with better precision?
Fortunately, there is such a method, which is both simple and generally
applicable, even to mixtures of polyprotic acids and bases. It is based on the
fact that we have available a closed-form mathematical expression for the
progress of the titration. We can simply compare the experimental data with
an  appropriate  theoretical  curve  in  which  the  unknown  parameters (the
sample  concentration,  and  perhaps  also  the  dissociation  constant)  are
treated as variables. By trial and error we can then find values for those vari-
ables that will minimize the sum of the squares of the differences between
the theoretical and the experimental curve. In other words, we use a least-
squares criterion to fit a theoretical curve to the experimental data, using the
entire data set. Here we will demonstrate this method for the same system
that we have  used so far: the  titration of a single monoprotic acid with  a
single, strong monoprotic base.
Despite its ‘trial and error’ nature, such a method is easily implemented
on a spreadsheet. We make two columns, one containing the experimental
data, the other the theoretical curve as calculated with assumed parameter
values. In a third column we calculate the squares of the residuals (i.e., the
differences between the two), and we add all these squares to form the sum
of squares, SRR. This sum of the residuals squared, SRR, will be our data-
fitting criterion. We now adjust the various assumed parameters that define
the theoretical curve, in such a direction that SRR decreases. We keep doing
this  for  the  various  parameters  until  SRR  has  reached  a  minimum.
Presumably,  this  minimum  yields  the  best-fitting  parameter  values.
Incidentally, the  third column  is not needed  when  we  use  the  command
=SUMXMY2(experimental data, theoretical data).
142
Acids, bases, and salts
Instructions for exercise 4.6
Recall the spreadsheet Monoprotic Acid, and add a few more columns to it.
Alternatively, when the computer gets bogged down (as may happen when it has a rel-
atively small memory and/or low cpu frequency), start with a new sheet. In that case,
follow instructions (1a) and (1b); otherwise go directly to (2).
1a Open a new spreadsheet, label and assign spaces for the constants C
a
, C
b
, K
a
, and K
w,
and for the noise amplitude N.
1b Enter columns for pH, [H+], V
b
/V
a,
Gaussian noise, and (V
b
/V
a
)
n.
Calculate V
b
/V
a
directly from (4.3-6) together with (4.1-10) and (4.3-2), then compute (V
b
/V
a
)
n
from
V
b
/V
a
by adding na times the noise.
Now that we have a noisy data set (V
b
/V
a
)
n
that we will consider as our ‘experimental’
data, make separate labels and spaces for the variables C
aa
and K
aa
to be used in the
theoretical curve. Also find a space for the label and value of the sum SRR.
In the next column, calculate a noise-free, theoretical curve, based on equations
(4.3-6), (4.1-10), and (4.3-2), and using C
aa
, C
b
, K
aa
, and K
w
. Label the resulting column
(V
b
/V
a
)
t,
where the subscript t stands for theoretical.
In a final column, labeled RR for residuals squared, calculate the squares of the differ-
ences between the data in corresponding rows in columns (V
b
/V
a
)
and (V
b
/V
a
)
t
.
In the space reserved for the value of SRR, enter the sum of the squares of the differ-
ences between the ‘experimental’ curve (V
b
/V
a
)
n
and the ‘theoretical’ curve (V
b
/V
a
)
t
.
Before we are ready to do the ‘trial-and-error’ adjustment, we must make one
modification. This is necessary because our experimental data set is not very realistic,
in that it contains non-realizable, negative numbers, reflecting the fact that (V
b
/V
a
)
n
is
not really a true experimental data set but has been generated artificially. We exclude
such non-realizable numbers by modifying the RR column using an IF statement. Say
that the V
b
/V
a
data are in column C (or wherever V
b
/V
a
is listed), the (V
b
/V
a
)
n
data in
column E, and the (V
b
/V
a
)
t
data in column F. Then a line in, e.g., row 87 of column RR
should read=IF(C87<0, 0, IF(B87 >Kw/Cb, 0, (E87–F87)^2)). This will add mere zeros
to the sum ∑, and therefore contribute nothing to it, whenever the data are outside the
physically realizable range. The upper limit specifies that [OH
] cannot exceed C
b
.
Finally, in order to see what you are doing, plot on the spreadsheetboth (V
b
/V
a
)
n
(as
data points) and (V
b
/V
a
)
(as a line) versus pH.
With everything in place, enter some guess values for the variables C
aa
and K
aa 
(make
sure that they differ from C
a
and K
a
), and observe the plot as well as the value of SRR.
Now change one of the variables, see whether SRR increases or decreases, then change
it further in the direction of the decreasing SRR value until the change becomes minor.
(At this point you can take rather large steps, first perhaps by 0.1 in C
aa
or by one order
of magnitude in K
aa
.) Then adjust the other variable. You will notice in the plot that the
4.6 A more general approach to data fitting
143
two variables affect the graph in mutually independent, orthogonal ways: C
aa
moves
the progress curve sideways, whereas K
aa
changes the height of the step. This makes it
easy to see in what direction to adjust the variables.
After this initial, crude adjustment, repeat the process with smaller increments, say by
0.01 in C
aa
or by a factor of 0.1 in K
aa
. After that, a third round will yield a result to
within 0.001 in C
aa
and a factor of 0.01 in K
aa
, most likely good enough to stop.
10 Examine the values of C
aa
and K
aa
you have found; they should be rather close to their
theoretical counterparts, C
a
and K
a
. When you used a small value for the noise ampli-
tude na, the agreement should be quite good; there will of course be less agreement in
the presence of a significant amount of noise.
In practice, doing this least-squares minimization by hand may be inter-
esting once (and may then serve to illustrate the principle of the method),
but it pretty soon will become tedious. Fortunately, computer  algorithms
have been designed to perform this search efficiently, and Excel contains
several of them.
11 Click on T
ools  Solv
er to get the Solver Parameters dialog box. There, Se
t Target Cell:
to where you display the value of SRR, Equal to: Min
V
alue, B
y Changing Cells: to where
you display the values of C
aa
, K
aa,
then select O
ptions. This opens the Solver Options
dialog box, in which you select Show Iteration R
esults, then push OK to bring you back
to the earlier dialog box, where you now press S
olve.
12 By having instructed Solver to show its iteration results, you can see the process as it
progresses. Whenever the Show Trial Solution box appears, press Continue to keep
going. When the Show Trial Solution box gets in the way of your graph, just pick it up by
its blue top edge and place it somewhere where it does not block your sight.
13 Chances are that you will notfind a satisfactory solution. How come? For the answer,
look at what we ask the program to do: to adjust C
aa
by 0.1, and K
aa
by less than 0.0001.
Since the program adjusts its step size to the largest variable that it must adjust, it will
grossly overshoot its K
aa
target any time, and therefore cannot find a solution!
14 Understanding the cause of the problem is, as usual, most of its solution. The problem
should disappear when we adjust pK
aa
instead of K
aa.
Indeed, it will, as you can verify
by inserting a location for pK
aa
, referring to that location instead of to K
aa
in the solver
dialog box, and entering the value of 10^–K
aa
in the space for K
aa
. When you now try
the solver, it will work like a charm! Figure 4.6 illustrates the method. Note that RR
reaches a minimum, but does not become zero.
In the above exercise we have on purpose used a rather excessive amount
of artificial noise in order to illustrate the method. The example shows that
this method deals quite  competently with noise, even at levels where the
144
Acids, bases, and salts
4.6 A more general approach to data fitting
145
Fig.4.6:Four successive stages in the automatic curve fitting of a very noisy progress
curve (na= 0.1) for the titration of 0.1 M weak acid (C
a
=0.1 M, K
a
=2×10–5 M) with
0.1 M NaOH. The initial guess values used in the fitting were C
a
=0.25 M, K
a
=1×10–7M.
The spreadsheet parameters are shown to the left of the graphs.
derivatives have collapsed completely, and the Schwartz and Gran plots are
no longer useful. In practice, a  progress curve as noisy as  the one shown
indicates  faulty  equipment  or  some  other  serious  problem,  and  should
never be accepted! Even so, Solver recovered C
a
to within 0.3%. When na is
smaller, the errors  in C
a
and  K
a
are  reduced  proportionally. For  a  typical
titration  of  a single  monoprotic  acid  or  base,  the  concentration error  in
using  Solver  is  usually  less  than  0.1%,  at  which  point  the  data-analysis
method itself is no longer contributing to the uncertainty in the answer.
The above example used an artificial curve, but the same approach can be
applied directly to experimental data. Take a set of titration data, enter them
in the spreadsheet. (For convenience of displaying the data graphically on
the spreadsheet, enter the pH as the first column, the titrant volume V
b
in
the next column.) Then calculate columns for [H
+
], (V
b
/V
a
)
t,
and RR, and let
Solver  do  the  rest. There  are  no special  requirements  on data  spacing or
range; the higher the quality of the input data, the better the resulting values
for  C
aa
and  K
aa
. The only requirement is that the appropriate theoretical
model is used.
An  unweighted  least-squares  analysis  such  as  illustrated  here  usually
suffices for chemical analysis, but for the most precise K
a
-values one might
want to use weighted least squares as  developed by G. Nowogrocki et al.,
Anal. Chim. Acta 122  (1979)  185,  G. Kateman et  al.,  Anal. Chim. Acta 152
(1983) 61, and H. C. Smitet al., Anal.Chim.Acta153 (1983) 121.
4.7
Bu≈er action
As we have seen in section 4.3, the pH of a sample being titrated usually
changes rapidly near the equivalence point, and much less so before and
after that point. In section 4.5 we paid attention to the steep part of the
curve, but we can also exploit its shallow parts, where the pH appears to
resist change.A quantitative expression ofsuchpH-stabilizingbuffer action
is thebufferstrength, which is denoted by thesymbol B, and is given by
B=[H
+
]+C
α
0
α
1
+[OH
-
]
(4.7-1)
where 
α
1
and 
α
0
are the concentration fractions of the monoprotic acid and
its conjugate monoprotic base respectively, and C is its total analytical con-
centration.
A closely related measure is the buffer index or buffer capacity
β
, which is
the parameter originally introduced by Van Dyke. The two differ only by the
factor ln(10), i.e., the relation between B and 
β
is
β
=B ln(10)≈2.30 B
(4.7-2)
Strong acids and  strong bases  are  the  most  powerful buffers, but their
buffer action is restricted to the extreme ends of the pH scale. For a concen-
146
Acids, bases, and salts
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested