how to display pdf file in asp net using c# : Cut text pdf Library control component .net azure html mvc Excel16-part186

trated strong acid, the  buffer  strength  is simply [H
+
];  for  a  concentrated
strong base, it is [OH
]. At intermediate pH values, weak acids and their con-
jugate bases must be used to provide buffer action.
The buffer strength for the aqueous solution of a single monoprotic acid
and its conjugate base follows from (4.7-1) as
B= [H
+
]+C
α
0
α
1
+[OH
-
]=[H
+
]+
+[OH
-
]
(4.7-3)
The product 
α
0
α
1
has a maximum at pH =pK
a
, where 
α
0
=
α
1
=
1
2
, so that
the product has the value 
1
4
. For a single monoprotic buffer mixture (i.e., the
mixture of a monoprotic acid and its conjugated base), the pH in the region
of  maximal  buffer  action,  pH≈ pK
a
 can  often  be  estimated  from  the
Henderson approximation
pH ≈pK
a
+pC
a
′-pC
b
(4.7-4)
where C
a
′and C
b
′are the concentrations of acid and conjugate base (e.g.,
acetic  acid  and  sodium  acetate)  used  to  make  the  buffer  mixture,  their
values being computed as if they were independent, non-interconverting
species. The corresponding buffer strength is
1/B ≈1/C
a
′+1/C
b
(4.7-5)
For a mixture of monoprotic acids or bases, the buffer strength is
B= [H
+
]+
C
α
a
α
b
+[OH
-
]
(4.7-6)
where each  pair  of  conjugated acid  and base comprises one term in the
summation. So-called ‘universal’ buffer mixtures, such as those associated
with the names  of Prideau & Ward  and Britton  & Robinson,  are  carefully
selected to allow the pH to be varied continuously with strong acid or base,
while still providing buffer action at each pH.
Instructions for exercise 4.7
Recall the spreadsheet Monoprotic Acid, or start a new one with columns for pH and
[H
+
], and fixed locations for C and K
a
.
Make a column for B using (4.7-3).
Plot the buffer strength as a function of pH. Vary Cand K
a
and observe their effects.
Figure 4.7 illustrates such a curve, and emphasizes the contribution to B of the buffer
strength by separately and in color displaying the quantity B-[H
+
]-[OH
]=C
α
0
α
1
.
C [H
+
] K
a
([H
+
]+K
a
)2
4.7 Buffer action
147
Cut text pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
erase text from pdf file; acrobat remove text from pdf
Cut text pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
delete text from pdf with acrobat; a pdf text extractor
4.8
Diprotic acids and bases, and their salts
So far we have only considered monoprotic acids and bases. Fortunately, the
corresponding  relations  for  diprotic  and  polyprotic  acids  and  bases  are
quite similar. The relations for diprotic acids and bases will be given here,
while those for their polyprotic counterparts (with three or more dissociable
protons) can be found in section 4.9.
For a diprotic acid H
2
A such as oxalic acid we have
H
2
A
H
+
+HA
-
(4.8-1)
(4.8-2)
HA
H++A2–
(4.8-3)
(4.8-4)
(4.8-5)
(4.8-6)
(4.8-7)
while we write for a diprotic base such as carbonate (where B
2–
=CO
3
2–
)
α
A
2–
=
α
0
=
[A
2-
]
[H
2
A]+[HA
-
]+[A
2-
]
=
K
a1
K
a2
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+
]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
α
HA
=
α
1
=
[HA
-
]
[H
2
A]+[HA
-
]+ [A
2-
]
=
[H
+
]K
a1
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+
]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
α
H
2
A
=
α
2
=
[H
2
A]
[H
2
A]+[HA
-]
+[A
2-
]
=
[H
+
]
2
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+]
K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
K
a2
=
[H
+
][A
2-
]
[HA
-
]
K
a1
=
[H+][HA-]
[H
2
A]
148
Acids, bases, and salts
Fig.4.7:The buffer strength of a single buffer mixture, C=0.1 M, pK
a
=4.7. The black
curve shows the contribution to Bof C
α
0
α
1
.
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in VB.NET. Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader component installed.
copy formatted text from pdf; copy text from pdf online
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C#.NET Demo Code: Cut Image in PDF Page in C#.NET. PDF image cutting is similar to image deleting.
copy and paste text from pdf; copy and paste text from pdf to excel
H
2
B
H
+
+HB
-
(4.8-8)
(4.8-9)
HB
-
H
+
+B
2–
(4.8-10)
(4.8-11)
(4.8-12)
(4.8-13)
(4.8-14)
Likewise, for Ca(OH)
2
we can write
Ca
2+
+H
2
O
H
+
+CaOH
+
(4.8-15)
(4.8-16)
CaOH
+
+H
2
O
H
+
+Ca(OH)
2
(4.8-17)
(4.8-18)
(4.8-19)
(4.8-20)
(4.8-21)
One of the advantages of using a formalism that treats acids and bases the
same (by considering bases in terms of their conjugate acids) is that it makes
it very easy to represent otherwise ambiguous species that can act as either
α
Ca(OH)
2
=
α
0
=
[Ca(OH)
2
]
[Ca
2+
]+[CaOH
+
]+[Ca(OH)
2
]
=
K
a1
K
a2
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+
]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
α
CaOH
+
=
α
1
=
[CaOH+]
[Ca
2+
]+[CaOH
+
]+[Ca(OH)
2
]
=
[H+]K
a1
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+
]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
α
Ca
2+
=
α
2
=
[Ca
2+
]
[Ca
2+
]+[CaOH
+
]+[Ca(OH)
2
]
=
[H
+
]
2
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+
]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
K
a2
=
[H
+
][CaOH)
2
]
[CaOH
+
]
K
a1
=
[H
+
][CaOH
+
]
[Ca
2+
]
α
B
2-
=
α
0
=
[B2- ]
[H
2
B]+[HB
-
]+ [B
2-
]
=
K
a1
K
a2
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+
]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
α
HB
-
=
α
1
=
[HB
-
]
[H
2
B]+[HB
-
]+[B
2-
]
=
[H
+
]K
a1
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+
]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
α
H
2
B=
α
2
=
[H
2
B]
[H
2
B]+ [HB
-
]+[B
2-
]
=
[H
+
]
2
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+
]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
K
a2
=
[H+][B2- ]
[HB
-
]
K
a1
=
[H
+
][HB
-
]
[H
2
B]
4.8 Diprotic acids and bases, and their salts
149
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C#.NET Sample Code: Clone a PDF Page Using C#.NET.
copy text from protected pdf; get text from pdf c#
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - PDF File Pages Extraction Guide. Detailed VB.NET Guide for Extracting Pages from Microsoft PDF Doc.
delete text from pdf file; erase text from pdf
acid  or  base,  such  as  acid  salts  (e.g.,  bicarbonate)  and  amino  acids.  For
example, for an amino acid such as alanine, which we will represent here in
its protonated form as H
2
A
+
, we have
H
2
A
+
H
+
+HA
(4.8-22)
(4.8-23)
HA
H
+
+A
(4.8-24)
(4.8-25)
(4.8-26)
(4.8-27)
(4.8-28)
Please note that equations (4.8-5) through (4.8-7), (4.8-12) through (4.8-
14),  (4.8-19)  through  (4.8-21), and  (4.8-26)  through  (4.8-28)  are  identical
when the concentration fractions are written merely as 
α
2,
α
1,
and 
α
0,
where
α
2
is the concentration fraction of the fully protonated form (H
2
A for a dipro-
tic acid, HA
+
for a diprotic amino acid, H
2
B
2+
for a diprotic base), 
α
0
that of
the fully deprotonated form, while 
α
1
is the concentration fraction of the
intermediate form. For the buffer strength of the solution of a diprotic acid
and/or its conjugate bases we then have
B=[H
+
]+C(
α
2
α
1
+
α
1
α
0
+4
α
2
α
0
)+ [OH
-
]
(4.8-29)
which can  be compared  with  (4.7-1) for a monoprotic  acid  and/or  base.
When the pK
a
’s differ by 3 or more, the overlap between the two dissociation
processes is small, in which case the term 4
α
2
α
0
in (4.8-29) can be neglected,
so  that  the  system  can  be  approximated  as  behaving  as  two  separate
monoprotic acids, each of concentration C but with pK
a1
and pK
a2
respec-
tively.
For  the titration  of  the fully  protonated  form of a  diprotic  acid  with  a
strong monoprotic base we have
(4.8-30)
where  C
a
(
α
1
+2
α
0
 denotes  the  number  of  moles  of  protons  that  are
removed from the fully diprotonated acid. For the intermediary form (the
acid salt, the basic salt, or the neutral or zwitterionic form of an amino acid)
we likewise have
V
b
V
a
=
C
a
(
α
1
+2
α
0
)-∆
C
b
+∆
α
A
-
=
α
0
=
[A
-
]
[H
2
A
+
]+ [HA]+[A
-
]
=
K
a1
K
a2
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+
]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
α
HA
=
α
1
=
[HA]
[H
2
A
+
]+[HA]+[A
-
]
=
[H
+
]K
a1
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+
]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
α
H
2
A+
=
α
2
=
[H
2
A
+
]
[H
2
A
+
]+[HA]+[A
-
]
=
[H
+
]
2
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+
]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
K
a2
=
[H
+
][A
-
]
[HA]
K
a1
=
[H
+
][HA]
[H
2
A
+
]
150
Acids, bases, and salts
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s), etc. Class: PDFDocument. Class: PDFPage. Text Process. Following classes will be used in your program. And PDF file text
copy text from scanned pdf to word; copy pdf text to word document
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s), etc. Class: PDFDocument. Class: PDFPage. Text Process. Following classes will be used in your program. And PDF file text
cut and paste text from pdf document; .net extract pdf text
(4.8-31)
Similarly, the titration of the fully deprotonated base with a strong mono-
protic acid is described by
(4.8-32)
and the titration of the intermediary, half-deprotonated base (or, depending
on your point of view, the half-protonated acid) with a strong acid by
(4.8-33)
Instructions for exercise 4.8
Open a new spreadsheet, Diprotic acid.
A diprotic acid has two dissociation constants. To reflect this, make labels and assign
spaces for C
a
, C
b
, K
w
, K
a1
, and K
a2
. Either use numerical values for K
a1
and K
a2
that cor-
respond to a given diprotic acid (of which several are shown in Table 4.8-1), or use your
imagination. In the latter case, just make sure that K
a2
<K
a1
(i.e., pK
a1
<pK
a2
).
Make columns for pH, [H+], [OH], denom, 
α
2
α
1
, and 
α
0
, where denom represents the
common denominator [H
+
]
2
+[H
+
] K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
.
Plot the distribution diagram.
Change the chart to single-logarithmic, and plot the logarithmic concentration
diagram for C=1 M, and/or
V
a
V
b
=
C
b
(
α
2
-
α
0
)+∆
C
a
-∆
V
a
V
b
=
C
b
(
α
1
+2
α
2
)+ ∆
C
a
-∆
V
b
V
a
=
C
a
(
α
0
-
α
2
)-∆
C
b
+∆
4.8 Diprotic acids and bases, and their salts
151
Table 4.8-1: The pK
a
-values for some diprotic acids,bases,and aminoacids.
Acid or base
pK
a1
pK
a2
Amino acid
pK
a1
pK
a2
carbonic acid
6.35
10.33
alanine
2.35
9.87
catechol
9.40
12.81
asparagine
2.14
8.72
fumaric acid
3.05
4.49
glutamine
2.17
9.01
hydrogen sulfide
7.02
13.91
glycine
2.35
9.78
8-hydroxyquinoline
4.91
9.81
isoleucine
2.32
9.75
maleic acid
1.91
6.33
leucine
2.33
9.75
malic acid
3.46
5.10
methionine
2.20
9.05
malonic acid
2.85
5.70
phenylalanine
2.20
9.31
oxalic acid
1.25
4.27
proline
1.95
10.64
phthalic acid
2.95
5.41
serine
2.19
9.21
piperazine
5.33
9.73
threonine
2.09
9.10
salicylic acid
2.97
13.74
tryptophan
2.35
9.33
sulfuric acid
<-1
1.99
valine
2.29
9.72
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit
copy text from scanned pdf; copy highlighted text from pdf
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images. Supports to resize images in conversion.
copy pdf text with formatting; extract text from pdf image
152
Acids, bases, and salts
Change the chart to double-logarithmic, and plot 
α
2
α
1
, and 
α
versus [H
+
], which will
also produce the logarithmic concentration diagram for C=1 M.
Make a column for the buffer strength B, then plot Bvs. pH.
Make a column for the progress curve, V
b
/V
a
, for the titration of the diprotonated form
with strong acid.
Plot the resulting progress curve, V
b
/V
a
versus pH.
10 Also plot the corresponding titration curve, pH vs. V
b
/V
a
.
11 Add a column of noise, as well as space for a noise amplitude parameter na. Fill the
column with Gaussian noise of zero mean and unit standard deviation.
12 In the next column, (V
b
/V
a
)
n
, add natimes that noise to V
b
/V
a
. This will simulate
‘experimental’ data. Then add the adjustable variables C
aa
, K
aa1
, and K
aa2
, and with
these (as well as K
w
and C
b
) calculate the corresponding theoretical data (V
b
/V
a
)
n
.
13 Use Solver to recover close approximations for the values of C
a
, K
a1
, and K
a2
, by start-
ing from different initial values for C
aa
, K
aa1
, and K
aa2 
with, say, na=0.01. Keep in mind
that you should vary the pK
a
’s rather than the K
a
-values themselves. Then try different
numerical values for C
a
, K
a1
, K
a2
, and na, and observe what happens.
4.9
Polyprotic acids and bases, and their salts
In order to extend the discussion to polyprotic acids and bases, we first con-
sider a triprotic acid such as orthophosphoric acid,
H
3
A
H
+
+H
2
A
(4.9-1)
(4.9-2)
H
2
A
H
+
+HA
2–
(4.9-3)
(4.9-4)
HA
2–
H
+
+A
3–
(4.9-5)
(4.9-6)
α
H
3
A
=
α
3
=
[H
3
A]
[H
3
A]+[H
2
A
-
]+[HA
2-
]+[A
3-
]
K
a3
=
[H
+
][A
3-
]
[HA
2-
]
K
a2
=
[H
+
][HA
2-
]
[H
2
A
-
]
K
a1
=
[H
+
][H
2
A
-
]
[H
3
A]
(4.9-7)
(4.9-8)
(4.9-9)
(4.9-10)
For a general n-protic acid we have, analogously,
(4.9-11)
where m=1, 2, …, n, and where we have deleted the ain K
a
in order to make
the notation somewhat more readable.
The buffer strength of a triprotic acid, as a function of its total analytical
concentration and of pH, is given by
B= [H
+
]+C(
α
3
α
2
+
α
2
α
1
+
α
1
α
0
+4
α
3
α
1
+4
α
2
α
0
+9
α
3
α
0
)+[OH
-
] (4.9-12)
where the coefficients 1, 4, and 9 of the alpha products are the squares of the
differences between  the indices  of these alpha’s. Indeed,  (4.7-5),  (4.8-25),
and (4.9-12) can be generalized for an arbitrary n-protic buffer to
B= [H
+
]+C 
(j-i )
2
α
i
α
j
+[OH
-
]
(4.9-13)
Again,  when  the  pK
a
’s  are  well-separated,  the  terms  with  coefficients
higher than 1 can usually be neglected. For a mixture of k different (non-
interconvertible) buffers,  their individual contributions should be added,
i.e.,
B= [H
+
]+
C
k
(j -i )
2
α
ik
α
jk
+[OH
-
]
(4.9-14)
For the titration of the triprotonated acid with a monoprotic strong base
we have
n
k
i=0
n
k
j=i+1
k
n
i=0
n
j=i+1
α
m
=
[H
+
]
m
K
1
K
2
 K
n–m
[H
+
]
n
+[H
+
]
n–1
K
1
+[H
+
]
n-2
K
1
K
2
+ +K
1
K
2
K
n
=
K
a1
K
a2
K
a3
[H
+
]
3
+[H
+
]
2
K
a1
+[H
+
]K
a1
K
a2
+K
a1
K
a2
K
a3
α
A3-
=
α
0
=
[A
3-
]
[H
3
A]+ [H
2
A
-
]+[HA
2-
]+ [A
3-
]
=
[H
+
]K
a1
K
a2
[H
+
]
3
+[H
+
]
2
K
a1
+[H
+
]K
a1
K
a2
+K
a1
K
a2
K
a3
α
HA2-
=
α
1
=
[HA
2-
]
[H
3
A]+ [H
2
A
-
]+[HA
2-
]+[A
3-
]
=
[H
+
]
2
K
a1
[H
+
]
3
+[H
+
]
2
K
a1
+[H
+
]K
a1
K
a2
+K
a1
K
a2
K
a3
α
H
2
A-
=
α
2
=
[H
2
A
-
]
[H
3
A]+ [H
2
A
-
]+[HA
2-
]+[A
3-
]
=
[H
+
]
3
[H
+
]
3
+[H
+
]
2
K
a1
+[H
+
]K
a1
K
a2
+K
a1
K
a2
K
a3
4.9 Polyprotic acids and bases, and their salts
153
(4.9-15)
or, in general,
(4.9-16)
where  F
a
=
α
2
+2
α
1
+3
α
0
for the  titration  of the  acid, F
a
=
α
1
+2
α
0
-
α
3
for
that of the diprotic salt (as in monosodium phosphate), and F
a
=
α
0
-2
α
3
-
α
2
for the titration of the monoprotic salt (e.g., disodium phosphate), all the time
using a strong monoprotic base as the titrant. Similarly, we have, for the titra-
tion of a fully deprotonated triprotic base with a strong monoprotic acid,
(4.9-17)
with F
b
=
α
1
+2
α
2
+3
α
3.
For the equivalent titration of the monoprotic salt
we have, likewise, F
b
=
α
2
+2
α
-
α
0
, and for the titration of the diprotic salt
with, say, HCl, F
b
=
α
-
α
-2
α
0.
For tetraprotic,  pentaprotic, hexaprotic
etc.,  acids,  (4.9-16)  remains  valid  but  the  expression  for  F
a
must  be
extended; similarly, (4.9-17)  applies in  general to all bases  titrated with  a
single, strong monoprotic acid although the definition of F
b
must reflect the
particular base.
The above expressions can be generalized further to encompass an arbi-
trary mixture of acids, titrated with any mixture of bases, or vice versa, in
which case they take the form
(4.9-18)
and
(4.9-19)
respectively. These, then, are general master equations for acid–base titra-
tions.  Their  availability  makes  it  possible  to  use  the  general  data  fitting
method described in section 4.6 to analyze any acid–base titration.
Instructions for exercise 4.9
Either open a new spreadsheet, Triprotic acid, or extend the spreadsheet you made in
Section 4.8.
The new spreadsheet should store C
a
,C
b
, K
w
, and three K
a
-values. Again, select either
literature values for a triprotic acid, or use made-up numbers, as long as K
a1
>K
a2
>K
a3
.
V
a
V
b
=
C
b
F
b
+∆
C
a
F
a
-∆
V
b
V
a
=
C
a
F
a
-∆
C
b
F
b
+∆
V
a
V
b
=
C
b
F
b
+∆
C
a
-∆
V
b
V
a
=
C
a
F
a
-∆
C
b
+∆
V
b
V
a
=
C
a
(
α
2
+2
α
1
+3
α
0
)-∆
C
b
+∆
154
Acids, bases, and salts
It should have columns for pH, [H+], [OH], denom, and four alphas. Here, denom
should be the common denominator of (4.9-7) through (4.9-10).
Plot the resulting distribution diagram.
Plot the corresponding logarithmic concentration diagram for C=1 M by using a single-
logarithmic scale. Note how the slopes of the various acid species vary between -3 and
+3, and change every time the lines pass a pH value equal to a pK
a
.
Make a column for the buffer strength B, and plot this quantity as a function of pH.
Make a column for the progress V
b
/V
a
of the titration, and plot the resulting progress
and titration curves.
Add Gaussian noise, and make columns for (V
b
/V
)
n
and (V
b
/V
)
t
respectively, where
the latter column requires a set of guess values for the acid concentration and its pK’s.
See under what conditions use of Solver can recover a reasonably close value of the acid
concentration, and of its pK’s.
4.10
Activity corrections
Our treatment of acid–base equilibria so far has been based on the mass
action law, i.e., on the constancy of the equilibrium constants. Comparison
with  experiment  shows  that this  relatively  simple  model  is  by  and  large
correct, just as it would be essentially correct to say that the earth rotates
around the sun according to Kepler’s laws. If one looks much closer, one will
find that it is not quite so, but that the influence of the moon must be taken
into account as a small correction if a more precise description is required.
In fact, there is a hierarchy of corrections here, starting with the influence
of the  moon,  then  that  of  the  planets,  and  eventually  that  of  all  other
heavenly bodies. Although it might appear to be a hopeless task to include
an  almost  endless  number  of  stars  and  galaxies,  in  practice  the  list  of
effects we need to include is restricted by the limitations on the experimen-
tal precision of our measurements, and  a simple hierarchy of corrections
suffices for all practical purposes. A similar situation applies to acid–base
equilibria.
The mass action law formalism, through its equilibrium constants, takes
into account the interactions of the solvent with the various acids, bases,
and salts; these certainly are the dominant effects, comparable to Kepler’s
law  in the above  analogy.  However,  the formalism of the mass action law
does not explicitly consider the mutual interaction of the solute particles,
nor the effect of these solutes on the concentration of the solvent. Activity
coefficients f have therefore been introduced in order to incorporate such
secondary  effects;  they  are  individual  correction  factors  that  multiply
4.10 Activity corrections
155
concentrations,  somewhat  analogous  to  the  individual  weights  w intro-
duced in least squares methods (see section 3.4).
The  hierarchy  of  corrections  starts  with  long-range  effects,  which  are
noticeable  even  in  rather  dilute  solutions,  where  the  average  distances
between the interacting particles are relatively large. The interactions are
then predominantly coulombic, resulting from the mutual attraction of ions
with charges of opposite sign, and the corresponding repulsion of ions with
charges of the same sign. Interestingly, although an ionic solution is electro-
neutral, the attractive and repulsive forces do not quite compensate each
other,  but  result  in  a  net  attraction,  just  as  they  do  in  an  ionic  crystal.
Fortunately, this effect depends only on the charges involved rather than on
the chemical nature of the solutes, and therefore can be described in rather
general terms, as is done in the Debye–Hückel theory.
The  dominant  parameter  in  the  Debye–Hückel  theory  is  the  ionic
strength I, defined as
(4.10-1)
where z
i
is the ionic valency, and c
i
the ionic concentration. This definition is
such that, for the simple case of  the solution  of a single, strong  1,1-elec-
trolyte,  the ionic strength  is equal to  the salt concentration (just as, for  a
single, strong, concentrated monoprotic acid, the buffer strength is equal to
its concentration). To a first approximation, the Debye–Hückel result is
(4.10-2)
which describes the  deviations from ‘ideal’ behavior  (as described by the
mass-action law) in dilute (I1 mM) solutions quite well.
In more concentrated solutions, additional mutual interactions must be
considered, which can only be described in terms of ion-specific parame-
ters. We will not do that here, but instead use an expression that, again, does
not require any species-specific parameters, yet tends to yield a reasonably
good description for the average behavior of more concentrated solutions
(even though it may not represent any particular solution very well). This is
the so-called Davies expression,
(4.10-3)
which, again, is restricted to ions, because log f
i
=0 hence f
i
=1 when z
i
=0,
i.e., for neutral species.
It is convenient  to  separate  the  ionic  valency z
i
from  the  remainder  of
(4.10-3), which we do by rewriting (4.10-3) as
(4.10-4)
log f =-0.5 
I
1+√I
-0.3 I
log f
i
=-0.5 z
i
2
√I
1+√I
-0.3 I
log f
i
=
-0.5 z
i
2
√I
1+√I
I=
1
2
i
z
i
2
c
i
156
Acids, bases, and salts
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested