how to display pdf file in asp net using c# : Extract text from pdf file using java application software tool html windows winforms online Excel18-part188

In  view  of  the  complex  nature  of  the  sample,  and  the  apparent  data
quality, we will now explore what can be gained by adding several adjustable
C
a
-K
a
combinations  to  our  analysis,  letting  their  pK
a
’s  float  within  non-
overlapping ranges. We will also account for activity effects by introducing
an adjustable activity coefficient f, by modifying the instructions in column
C to represent [H
+
] as 10
–pH/f
, and by letting pK
w
float as well. Below we will
see how far this approach will carry us.
22 In the spreadsheet, add the concentrations Ca6 through Ca8, and the labels and values
for the corresponding Ka’s and pKa’s.
23 Introduce another adjustable constant, f, and modify the calculation of [H+] in column
C, and that of the various pK’s, as described in section 4.10.
24 Extend the instruction for Vb in column D to incorporate the three additional concen-
trations and equilibrium constants.
25 Return to Solver, extend the range of concentrations by changing the right-most
number in the By Changing Cells from 5 to 8, then add D5:D8 for the pKa’s, and finally,
again separated by a comma, add the addresses of pKw and f. Quite a laundry list!
26 In the Solver Parameters dialog box, press Add… to get the Add Constraint box, and use
it to set both lower and upper limits on the values for the pKa’s. Constrain pKa1 to>=
1.9 and, with a separate instruction,<= 2.7. Similarly constrain the other pKa’s to their
proper ranges: 3.2pKa24.0, 4.2pKa3 5.0, 6.0 pKa4 7.0, 7.8pKa58.6,
9.0 pKa69.8, 10.0 pKa7 11.0, 11.2 pKa8 13.0, and 13.0 pKw14.6. Then
go back to the Solver Parameters, and restart the curve fitting process using the Solve
button.
4.11 A practical example
167
Table 4.11-1:The concentrations C
a
(in mM),the values of pK
a
,and the logarithm of the value
of SRR,obtained for the various iterations on the data.
Iteration
# 1
#2
#3
#4
#1
#2
#3
#4
C
a1
=
89
97
89
75
pK
a1
=
2.3*
2.45
2.40
2.05
C
a2
=
67
83
76
72
pK
a2
=
3.9*
4.01
3.78
3.34
C
a3
=
51
20
35
pK
a3
=
4.8*
4.92
4.34
C
a4
=
30
18
19
pK
a4
=
6.87
6.64
6.26
C
a5
=
17
14
pK
a5
=
8.42
7.91
C
a6
=
102
92
72
66
pK
a6
=
9.8*
9.59
9.58
9.27
C
a7
=
30
33
pK
a7
=
10.77
10.20
C
a8
=
88
129
153
79
pK
a8
=
11.6*
11.90
12.26
11.68
pK
w
14.0*
14.0*
14.0*
13.49
f=
1*
1*
1*
0.68
log SRR =
0.1
-1.2
-2.3
-3.5
* : values fixed
Extract text from pdf file using java - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
get text from pdf online; delete text from pdf file
Extract text from pdf file using java - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
can't copy and paste text from pdf; copy text from protected pdf
The  entire  optimization  uses a single criterion,  minimizing the sum of
squares  of  the  residuals,  SRR.  As  is  readily  seen  from  Table  4.11-1,  SRR
decreases by about an order of magnitude every time we add more adjust-
ability to the curve-fitting procedure. This is so because we deal here with
adjusting to the precise shape of the curve, not with noise reduction. Note
that the values obtained for the various concentrations change from one try
to  another,  indicating  that  these  are  fitting  parameters  rather  than  true
chemical concentrations.
As illustrated in Figs. 4.11-4 through 4.11-6, one can indeed obtain a very
close fit to the experimental data. While we have now abandoned any pre-
tense  of  a  simple  one-to-one  correlation  with  specific  chemicals  in  the
sample, we stand to gain substantially in usefulness of the analysis. In order
to do so we must keep in mind the real purpose of the analysis, which is to be
able to screen out spoiled silage, and perhaps even to suggest adjustments
in order to prevent future spoilage. For that we do not need a precise correla-
tion  with  specific  chemicals,  rather  illusory  anyway  in  such  a  complex
sample. Instead, we need a correlation with silage condition as judged by
other methods.
Comparison of such results with those of chemical analyses of a selected
number of silage samples makes it possible to express the concentrations of
amino acids, lactic acid, acetic acid, and reducing sugars, as well as the total
nitrogen content, in  terms of linear  combinations of the  eight  computed
C
a
’s. This, in turn, can be used to find a correlation with the quality of the
silage. Such a correlation was indeed established: good silage should have a
moderate concentration of lactic acid, and a much smaller concentration of
acetic acid.  Moreover, it should  have little protein degradation, i.e.,  most
soluble nitrogen should be in the form of amino acids. While the numerical
values obtained for these concentrations from the titration curve are impre-
cise  and  somewhat  interdependent,  precision  is  not  what  is  ultimately
important here: good quality control typically deals with ranges of accept-
able or unacceptable values rather than with single numbers. On the basis of
such ranges, simple criteria of silage quality were formulated. The titration
is readily automated, and can provide virtually instantaneous  analyses of
the samples in terms of these general criteria, which can then be used to
advise farmers.
In  the  Moisio–Heikonen  paper  another,  more  elaborate  but also  more
time-consuming data-analysis method was used – as detailed in Fresenius J.
Anal. Chem. 354 (1996) 271 – but that is immaterial here. It is with fast and
inexpensive methods such as these that enough samples can be analyzed to
maintain a consistently high quality of the dairy products during the winter
months.
You, reader, may well wonder why so much space is devoted to this partic-
ular  example.  The  reason  is  simple:  the  availability  of  computers  has
changed the practice (though perhaps not  yet the teaching) of  analytical
168
Acids, bases, and salts
Generate and draw Code 39 for Java
the Java Code 39 Generation Package and extract the file. Encode data for Code 39 barcode image text in Java LEFT"); //Draw Code 39 images in the file with EPS
extract text from pdf java open source; delete text from pdf preview
Generate and draw UPC-A for Java
the Java UPC-A Generation Package and extract the file. Encode data for UPC-A barcode image text in Java Class RIGHT); //Draw UPC-A images in the file with EPS
copy pdf text to word; copy pdf text with formatting
4.11 A practical example
169
Fig.4.11-4:The progress curve, and the residuals, during intermediate stages of the
curve fitting. The fitted parameter values are shown in color.
C# PowerPoint: Read, Decode & Scan Barcode Image from PowerPoint
reading barcode image from PPT slide using VB.NET C# PowerPoint: Decode PDF-417 Barcode Image, C# PowerPoint Mail linear barcode image from PowerPoint file in C#
cut and paste pdf text; delete text from pdf acrobat
Java Imaging SDK Library: Document Image Scan, Process, PDF
Using RasterEdge Java Image SDK, developers can easily open and compress a multitude of file formats, such as Gif, Png, Tiff, Jpeg2000, DICOM, JBIG2, PDF, MS Word
erase text from pdf file; edit pdf replace text
170
Acids, bases, and salts
Fig.4.11-5:The progress curve, and the residuals, during intermediate stages of the
curve fitting using more adjustable parameters. The fitted parameter values are shown
in color.
DocImage SDK for .NET: Document Imaging Features
file Use annotation of embedded image, text or rubber page in document to image file Allow conversion Type 6 (OJPEG) encoding Image only PDF encoding support.
get text from pdf into excel; extracting text from pdf
DocImage SDK for .NET: HTML Viewer, View, Annotate, Convert, Print
moved, resized, and rotated independently from source file. including Microsoft Word, Excel, PPT, PDF, Tiff, Dicom and encode JBIG2 images using Microsoft .NET
copy text from pdf reader; copy and paste pdf text
4.11 A practical example
171
Fig.4.11-6:The final, fitted progress curve, and the residuals. The fitted parameter
values are shown in color.
.NET Excel Document Add-on | Manipulate Excel File in .NET
And prerequisite for using these functions is to reference .NET and GIF image formats, and to TIFF, PDF and SVG on to read and decode barcodes from Excel file.
copy text from scanned pdf to word; extract text from pdf image
.NET Windows Forms Bar Code Installation and Creation Tutorial &
using Rasteredge.WinForms.Barcode; // construct a linear barcode object EAN13 ' set EAN-13 code text to encode draw barcode and save into image file in gif
copy text from pdf to word; how to copy and paste pdf text
chemistry. For example, in a method called near-infrared analysis (or NIR
for  aficionados  of  alphabet  soup)  a  very  similar  approach  is  used:  the
spectra can be obtained quickly and with high precision, but are not easily
interpreted in terms of specific chemical features. But they can be correlated
with practically useful properties, such as the protein and water content of
grain. Consequently, a consistent quality of flour can now be maintained
even though the wheat derives from different soils, and growing conditions
fluctuate from year to year.
Similar analyses are now common in the quality control procedures of
many  consumer products, such as  beer  and  wine, coffee, fruit juice, and
infant formula, where consistency is demanded even though the quality of
the raw starting materials may vary with source and season. This is chemical
analysis at its best, and the above example is emphasized here because it
clearly illustrates this type of approach, which in general combines precise
measurements with sophisticated numerical analysis to produce practical
results.
4.12
Summary
In this chapter we have encountered the most important analytical aspects
of acids and bases: (a) their individual speciation, as described by the mass
action law, and as reflected in the distribution and logarithmic concentra-
tion  diagrams,  (b)  their  buffer  action,  and  (c)  their  neutralization,  as
exploited in acid–base titrations.
In the past, much effort has been expended on finding the precise location
of the equivalence point, using either differentiation of the titration curve,
or its linearization. In our discussion of acid–base titration, we have used as
our point of departure expressions for the progress of the titration rather
than those for the titration curve itself. This was done primarily for mathe-
matical convenience, since it is much more straightforward to express V
b
/V
a
explicitly  in  terms  of  [H
+
]  than  to  achieve  its  converse.  By  insisting  on
solving for  [H
+
]  as a function of titrant volume, the traditional  approach
caters to the experimental procedure of volumetric analysis rather than to
the real analytical problem addressed by it: how large a volume of titrant
must be added in order to reach a given equivalence point, as defined by its
pH or  proton concentration, and  as indicated by a color  change or  a  pH
reading.  Parenthetically,  since  the  traditional  approach  leads  to  rather
intractable mathematics, it is also a poor choice of teaching tools if clarity
and simplicity rather than obfuscation are our goals.
The availability of a master equation for acid–base titrations, and of con-
venient non-linear least-squares curve-fitting methods such as incorpo-
rated in Excel’s Solver, have made the determination of the unknown
sample concentration(s) relatively easy: a spreadsheet is all that is required
for such an analysis. Of course, there is no guarantee that all component
172
Acids, bases, and salts
.NET Windows Forms QR Code Bar Code Control & SDK
using Rasteredge.WinForms.Barcode; // construct a linear barcode Symbology.qrcode ' set qrcode code text to encode draw barcode and save into image file in gif
copy and paste text from pdf; acrobat remove text from pdf
.NET PowerPoint Add-on |PowerPoint Document Imaging in .NET
Support loading a PowerPoint (.pptx) file using Visual C# or and GIF) and other documents (PDF, TIFF and SVG Text and graphics annotation objects can be created
copy text from pdf online; extract text from pdf to excel
chemicals and their individual concentrations and pK
a
’s in a complicated
mixture can always be resolved; that can only beexpected for those concen-
trations and pK
a
’s that significantly affect the titration curve. This is illus-
trated in Fig. 4.10: even for a single acid such as orthophosphoric acid, the
third pK
a
can easily be missed, since its effect on the titration curve is often
quite small.
The exercises with added simulated noise demonstrate the differences in
robustness of the various data-analysis methods. Clearly, differentiation is
easily affected by noise. Of the linear plots, the Gran2 plot is the more
robust, because it uses that part of the titration curve that is determined
largely by the strong base (or acid) typically used as titrant. In principle, the
Schwartz plot is more linear than the Gran1 plot; in practice, it is also more
sensitive to noise, at least to the type of volume noise we have simulated
here, so that the linearityadvantage disappears. For simple titration curves,
non-linear least-squares data fitting appears to be the most robust of the
methods discussed; it is also the most generally applicable of these
methods. While non-linear least-squares methods are not always trouble-
free, they seem to work well here, apparently because the progress curve is
always monotonic.
We then encountered activity effects, the skunk at the party, because when
activity effects must be taken into account, the mathematical description of
acid–base  equilibria  becomes  more  complicated.  Fortunately,  activity
effects do not change the equivalence volumes, which is the main reason why
activity corrections are seldom made in analytical applications. On the other
hand, when the primary goal of the titration is the precise determination of
the  pK
a
-values,  activity  corrections  can  usually  be  restricted  to  mere
changes in the pK
a
-values by making the measurements at constant ionic
strength.
Finally we have seen in section 4-11 how acid–base titrations can be used
in practice, even without any preliminary separations or sample clean-up,
and what trade-offs are made in such analyses. This example illustrates a
rather  radical  departure  from  the  traditional  emphasis  on  titrations  as
methods of high precision. As illustrated in Table 4.11-1, even when precise
concentrations of well-defined  chemical species cannot  be  derived from
such complex mixtures, they nonetheless can be made to yield very useful
quantitative information.
As our last exercise of this chapter we will fit data to a small segment of a
titration curve. It is, of course, poor analytical practice to use only part of a
curve, but we will use it here merely to demonstrate the general  power of
computer  fitting  of  experimental  data.  We  will  use  data,  given  by
Papanastasiou et al. in Anal.Chim.Acta 277 (1993) 119, for the titration with
0.1 M NaOH of a 50 mL sample containing both formic and propionic acid.
The authors show the entire titration curve in their Fig. 6, but in their Table 6
only  list numerical values for  the buffer  region of  the curve. Nonetheless,
19 low-noise  data  pairs  are  given,  while  the  solution  involves  only  four
4.12 Summary
173
parameters: the concentrations of the two monoprotic acids, and their acid
dissociation constants. Therefore, the problem is well-defined, and is readily
solved.
pH 
V
b
pH 
V
b
pH 
V
b
pH 
V
b
3.639
1.00
4.050
1.80
4.432
2.59
4.860
3.52
3.727
1.17
4.133
1.97
4.545
2.84
4.932
3.67
3.800
1.31
4.207
2.12
4.638
3.04
5.036
3.87
3.888
1.48
4.278
2.27
4.710
3.20
5.107
4.01
3.975
1.65
4.34
2.42
4.778
3.35
Instructions for exercise 4.12
Open a spreadsheet.
Deposit labels for four columns, one each for pH, [H+], V
b
, and V
b,calc
.
Copy the above data in the appropriate columns.
In the column so labeled, calculate [H+] from the pH as [H+]=10–pH.
Deposit labels and initial guess values for the following constants: C
1
, C
2
, K
1
, and K
2
,
where 1 and 2 denote the two monoprotic acids.
With these values, calculate in the column for V
b,calc
the appropriate expression for the
titration of a mixture of two monoprotic acids.
Also deposit a label for SRR, the sum of the squares of the residuals, and compute it
from the data in columns V
b
and V
b,calc
with the function=SUMXMY2.
Manually adjust the guess values to obtain an approximate fit between the experimen-
tal and calculated values.
The stage is now set for using Solver. Use it to minimize the value of SRR by letting it
adjust the values of C
1
, C
2
, K
1
, and K
2
.
10 Now extend the columns for pH, [H+], and V
b,calc
to compute the remainder of the
curve, up to pH 11, and compare your results with those in the above-quoted paper.
11 Even though the agreement between experimental and computed data should already
be very good, it is of course possible to refine these data by taking activity effects into
account, as was done by Papanastasiou et al. Try it. In this case, the ionic strength I is
simply given by I=[Na
+
]+[H
+
]. For a fair comparison with the results of
Papanastasiou et al. delete the Davies term –0.3Ifrom the expression for the activity
coefficients.
174
Acids, bases, and salts
chapter
5
ot h e r  i o n i c
equ i l i b r i a
Quantitative chemical analysis involves many types of ionic equilibria other
than those between acids and bases, and the present chapter samples some
of  them. The  formation  of metal  complexes takes  place in  homogeneous
solution,  and  strongly  resembles acid–base  chemistry.  In  extraction,  two
different  solvents  are  used,  but  both  solutions  are  still  homogeneous.
Problems of solubility and precipitation involve two different physical forms
of  the  compound  of  interest:  one  dissolved,  the  other  a  solid  phase.
Electrochemical equilibria also involve at least two phases, of which one is
an electronic conductor, typically a metal, and the other an ionic conductor
such as an aqueous solution. Despite these differences in their physics, we
will encounter much analogy in the mathematical description of these equi-
libria, which is why the present chapter is best read after chapter 4.
5.1
Complex formation
The formal description of the equilibrium between a 1 : 1 complex of a metal
ion M and a ligand L and its constituent parts,
M+L
ML
(5.1-1)
traditionally uses the formation constant
(5.1-2)
where, for the sake of simplicity of notation, we have deleted all valencies.
The dimension of such a formation constant is M–1, conveniently indicating
that we deal here with a formation constant rather than a dissociation con-
stant (with the dimension M). This is one of several good reasons (another
one is the ease of checking equations for their proper dimensionality, a most
efficient way to catch many errors) to keep the dimensions of equilibrium
K
f
=
[ML]
[M][L]
175
constants  rather than remove them through the introduction of standard
states.
We will define the concentration fraction of metal ions without attached
ligand as
(5.1-3)
and the corresponding concentration fraction of metal ions complexed with
one ligand as
(5.1-4)
where we present the right-most forms of (5.1-3) and (5.1-4) to emphasize
the analogy with the acid–base formalism, with [L] taking the place of [H
+
],
and 1/K
f
that of K
a
.
The progress of the titration of a solution of volume V
M
and concentration
C
M
of metal ions with a volume V
L
of titrant solution containing a concentra-
tion C
L
of free ligand L then follows as
(5.1-5)
where [L] is the concentration of free ligand. This is fully analogous to the
progress of the titration of a weak base with a strong acid,
(4.3-11)
Instructions for exercise 5.1
Open a new spreadsheet. Place the labels Cm, Cl, and six labels Kf in cells A1 through
H1, so that we can explore the effect of changing K
f
.
In row 2 enter some corresponding numerical values, such as 0.1, 0.1, 0, 1, 100, 104(as
1E4 or =10^4; 10^4 is treated as if it were text), 10
6
, and 10
8
.
In row 4 enter the labels pL, [L], and six labels Vl/Vm.
In column A, starting in row 6, place the pL values 0 (0.1) 10, i.e., ranging from 0 to 10
with increment 0.1, and in column B compute the corresponding values of [L]=10
–pL
.
In cell C6 calculate V
L
/V
M
according to (5.1-4) and (5.1-5). In order to make it easy to
copy this instruction to the adjacent columns, use the formula=($A$2*C$2*$B6/(1 +
C$2*$B6)+$B6)/($B$2-$B6), containing the partially absolute addresses C$2 and $B6.
Copy this instruction from C6 to the entire block C6:H106. Bingo!
Plot all these curves V
L
/V
M
versus pL. Figure 5.1-1 illustrates the result you should
obtain with these parameter values. (Points are used to avoid the pesky vertical line
due to physically unrealizable values calculated for pL1.)
V
a
V
b
=
C
b
α
HB
+∆
C
a
-∆
V
L
V
M
=
C
M
α
ML
+[L]
C
L
-[L]
α
ML
=
α
1
=
[ML]
[M]+ [ML]
=
K
[L]
1+K
[L]
=
[L]
[L]+1/K
α
M
=
α
0
=
[M]
[M]+ [ML]
=
1
1+K
f
[L]
=
1/K
f
[L]+1/K
f
176
Other ionic equilibria
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested