how to display pdf file in asp net using c# : Export text from pdf Library control class asp.net azure .net ajax Excel19-part189

We see that only complexes with formation constants of the order of 10
6
M
–1
or more will lead to titration curves with a sufficiently steep change in pL
near the equivalence point (at C
M
V
M
/C
L
V
L
=1) to be useful for volumetric
analysis.  None  of  the  common  monodentate  ligands, such  as  the halide
anions (Cl
, Br
, I
) or the pseudohalides (CN
, SCN
, N
3
), form such strong
complexes, nor do the carboxylic acid anions (such as acetate) or ammonia
(NH
3
). However, in section 5.2 we will encounter special ligands, the che-
lates, that do form sufficiently strong 1 : 1 complexes.
Many metal ions don’t stop at binding one ligand, but can surround them-
selves  with  several  ligands,  often  up  to  four  or  even  six. The  maximum
number of ligands usually depends on the ionic valencies of metal ion and
ligand, on the coordination number of the metal ion, and on steric consider-
ations. The  latter  are  most pronounced for complexes  of relatively small
metal ions with rather bulky ligands.
Apart from the use of formation constants rather than dissociation con-
stants, the formation of such poly-ligand complexes is quite analogous to,
say, a  phosphate anion binding up  to  three  protons,  and can likewise be
described in terms of stepwise equilibrium constants. However, one should
keep in mind that stepwise formation constants K
f
start counting from the
‘bare’ metal ion, whereas stepwise dissociation constants such as K
a
’s start
counting  from  the  most  highly  ‘complexed’  species:  K
f1
for  the  chloride
complexes  of  ferrous  ions  applies  to  the  equilibrium  Fe
2+
+Cl
FeCl
+
,
whereas K
a1
for phosphoric acid pertains to H
3
PO
4
H
+
+H
2
PO
4
.
An ion such as Fe
2+
can bind up to four chloride anions, or up to six thio-
cyanates. The formal description for the formation of such complexes is
5.1 Complex formation
177
Fig.5.1-1:Some progress curves for the titration of a metal ion with a ligand forming 1 : 1
complexes with that metal ion. Numerical values used: C
M
=C
L
=0.1 M, and (from left
to right) K
f
=0 and 1 (almost overlapping), 102, 104, 106, and 108M–1.
Export text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
get text from pdf c#; copy and paste pdf text
Export text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
.net extract pdf text; extract text from pdf java
(5.1-6)
(5.1-7)
(5.1-8)
etc., so that
[ML]=K
f1 
[M] [L]
(5.1-9)
[ML
2
]=K
f1
K
f2
[M] [L]
2
(5.1-10)
[ML
3
]=K
f1
K
f2
K
f3
[M] [L]3
(5.1-11)
and so on, while the corresponding concentration fractions 
α
are given by
α
0
=[M]  / 
{
[M]+[ML]+[ML
2
]+[ML
3
]+
}
=1 / denom
(5.1-12)
α
1
=[ML] / 
{
[M]+[ML]+[ML
2
]+[ML
3
]+
}
=K
f1
[L] / denom
(5.1-13)
α
2
=[ML
2
] / 
{
[M]+[ML]+[ML
2
]+[ML
3
]+
}
=K
f1
K
f2
[L]
2
/ denom
(5.1-14)
α
3
=[ML
3
] / 
{
[M]+[ML]+[ML
2
]+[ML
3
]+
}
=K
f1
K
f2
K
f3
[L]3/ denom
(5.1-15)
and so forth, where the common denominator is given by
denom=1 +K
f1
[L]+K
f1
K
f2
[L]2 +K
f1
K
f2
K
f3
[L]3 +
(5.1-16)
In row 1 replace the labels Kf by Kf1, Kf2, Kf3, Kf4, Kf5, and Kf6.
In row 2 enter some corresponding numerical values. For example, for the six thio-
cyanato complexes of Fe(III) we have K
f1
=10
1.96
, K
f2
=10
2.02
, K
f3
=10
–0.41
, K
f4
=
10–0.14, K
f5
=10–1.57, and K
f6
=10–1.51 respectively.
10 In row 4 replace the labels Vl/Vm by denom, [M], [ML], [ML
2
], [ML
3
], and [ML
4
], and
add two more: [ML
5
], and [ML
6
].
11 In column C calculate denom as given by (5.1-16) or, more compactly, as=1+K
f1 
[L]
(1+K
f2 
[L] (1+K
f3 
[L] (1 +K
f4 
[L] (1 +K
f5 
[L] (1+K
f6 
[L] ))))).
12 In column D calculate [M]=
α
0
C
M
where 
α
0
is given by (5.1-12).
13 In column E calculate [ML]=
α
1
C
M
, and likewise compute [ML
2
], [ML
3
], etc. in the next
columns. Again, this can be simplified by coding, e.g., cell F6 as=C$2*$B6*E6, which
can then be copied to G6 through K6.
14 Make the distribution diagram by plotting [M], [ML], [ML
2
], etc. vs. pL (=-log[SCN])
while setting C
M
equal to 1, and compare your graph with Fig. 5.1-2. Note that, in this
K
f3
=
[ML
3
]
[ML
2
][L]
K
f2
=
[ML
2
]
[ML][L]
K
f1
=
[ML]
[M][L]
178
Other ionic equilibria
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Export PDF text content to TXT file with original layout
extract text from pdf file using java; cut and paste pdf text
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Export PDF text content to TXT file with original layout
cut and paste text from pdf document; copy text from pdf
case, the species Fe
3+
, Fe(SCN)
2
+
, Fe(SCN)
4
-
and Fe(SCN)
6
3–
are the more important
ones.
15 Makethecorrespondinglogarithmicconcentrationdiagrambyusingasemi-logarithmic
frameandanyvaluefor C
M
.Again,Fig.5.1-3showsthetypeofresultyoucan expect.
16 Save the spreadsheet as Complexation, and close.
5.1 Complex formation
179
Fig.5.1-2:The distribution diagram for the thiocyanato complexes of Fe(III) as com-
puted with K
f 1
=101.96, K
f2
=102.02, K
f3
=10–0.41, K
f4
=10–0.14, K
f5
=10–1.57, and K
f6
=
10–1.51. The number of attached thiocyanate ligands L is indicated with each curve.
Fig.5.1-3:The logarithmic concentration diagram for the thiocyanato complexes of
Fe(III) for C
M
=0.1 M. The equilibrium constants are the same as in Fig. 5.1-2. 
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
file. Able to export PDF document to HTML file. Able to create convert PDF to SVG file. Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file.
export highlighted text from pdf to word; c# get text from pdf
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF Export. A quick and efficient work to get text from PDF can be achieved with this VB.NET tutorial of PDF to text conversion.
extract text from pdf using c#; extract text from pdf online
In the example shown in  Fig. 5.1-2 there is relatively little differentiation
betweenthevariousK
f
-values.Moreover,noneof thecomplexformationcon-
stants are particularly large. This is typical for metal complexes, and it is the
reason that these equilibria are not very useful for volumetric analysis.
However, we will see in section 5.3 how such equilibria can be exploited in
metal-selectiveextractions.
5.2
Chelation
Although there are many examples of the formation of 1 : 1 complexes, their
application  in  volumetric  analysis  is  mostly  restricted  to  those  between
metal cations  and  chelating ligands,  which  are  complexing  agents  that,
upon  complexation,  surround  the  metal  ions  and  thereby  satisfy  all  (or
almost all) of its coordination positions. Typically, those coordination posi-
tions are then occupied by metal–oxygen or  metal–nitrogen linkages,  the
coordinating groups being primarily carboxylic acids and amines.
The prototype of such a chelating ligand is EDTA (for ethylene diamine
tetraacetic acid) which forms strong 1 : 1 complexes with many divalent and
trivalent metal cations. EDTA has four carboxylic acid groups and two amino
groups, and is therefore a hexaprotic acid, but its complex formation is due
almost exclusively to its fully deprotonated anion, Y
4–
. This brings in the pH,
since the latter regulates the fraction 
α
Y0
of EDTA that is fully deprotonated.
In this case, then, the ligand concentration in solution, [L]=[Y
4–
], is given by
C
Y
α
Y0 
, where C
is the total analytical concentration of EDTA, and 
α
Y0
is a
strong function of pH, see Fig. 5.2. We can rewrite (5.1-2) as
(5.2-1)
which can be recast as
(5.2-2)
provided that the pH is kept constant. The parameter K
f
′=K
f
α
Y0
is called a
conditional formation constant, because it is indeed a constant on condi-
tion  that  the  pH  is  kept  constant,  in  which  case 
α
Y0 
is  also constant.  Of
course, the value of K
f
′depends (through 
α
Y0
) on the pH.
Equation (5.2-2) is a useful form for the EDTA complexes of  metal ions
such as magnesium and calcium that are rather strong bases, and therefore
have little tendency to form hydroxides.  However, many other metal ions
that can be titrated with EDTA will often form hydroxy complexes, and these
are usually titrated in the presence of complexing agents that keep hydrox-
ide formation at bay. In that case, the expression for the conditional forma-
tion  constant  must  take  such  complex  formation  of  the  metal  ion  into
account as well, and then reads K
f
′=K
f
α
Y0
α
M0
, where 
α
M0
is the fraction of
K
f
′=
[ML]
[M]C
Y
K
f
=
[ML]
[M]C
α
Y0
180
Other ionic equilibria
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
from OpenOffice. Create PDF from CSV. Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF
copy text from protected pdf to word; extract text from scanned pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
from OpenOffice. Create PDF from CSV. Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF
pdf text replace tool; copy text from protected pdf
the metal not bound to either  EDTA or the added complexing agent. The
quantity 
α
M0
will depend on the concentration of the added ligand, and so
will the conditional constant K
f
′.
Below we will determine the pH-dependence of 
α
Y0 
, which determines
the feasibility of a successful EDTA titration.
Instructions for exercise 5.2
Open a new spreadsheet.
Place the labels Cm, Cy, and Ka1 through Ka6 in cells A1 through H1.
In row 2 enter some values for the concentrations C
M
and C
Y
, and use the following acid
dissociation constants for EDTA: K
a1
=1 M, K
a2
=10
–1.5
M, K
a3
=10
–2.0
M, K
a4
=10
–2.68
M,
K
a5
=10
–6.11
M, and K
a6
=10
–12.17
M.
In row 4 enter the labels pH, [H], denom, a6, a5, a4, a3, a2, a1, and a0.
In column A, starting in row 6, place the pH values 0 (0.1) 14, and in column B compute
the corresponding values of [H
+
]=10
–pH
.
In column C calculate the denominator of (4.9-11), i.e., [H+]6+[H+]5K
a1
+[H
+
]
4
K
a1
K
a2
+
+K
a1
K
a2
K
a3
K
a4
K
a5
K
a6
=[H
+
]
6
(1 +(K
a1
/[H
+
]) (1+(K
a2
/[H
+
]) (1 +(K
a3
/[H
+
]) (1 +
(K
a4
/[H
+
]) (1+ (K
a5
/[H
+
]) (1+(K
a6
/[H
+
]))))))).
In columns D through J compute the concentration fractions 
α
of the various protona-
tion forms of EDTA, see (4.9-11). Again, you can simplify the coding by using
α
6
=[H
+
]
6
/denom (=$B6^6/$C6), 
α
5
=K
a1
α
6
/[H
+
] (=C$2*D6/ $B6), which can then
be copied to F6:J6.
Plot all these concentration fractions in a semi-logarithmic plot versus pH, so that the
resulting graph will be double-logarithmic, as in Fig. 5.2.
5.2 Chelation
181
Fig.5.2:The fractional concentrations
α
of thevariousformsofEDTA asa function ofpH.
Thefractionalconcentration
α
Y0
ofthechelatingspeciesY4–has been highlighted incolor.
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
cut text from pdf document; get text from pdf file c#
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
find and replace text in pdf file; extract text from pdf to word
The progress of the titration of a metal ion M with EDTA is analogous to
(5.1-4) and (5.1-5) except that K
f
must be replaced byK
f
′= K
f
α
Y0
, i.e.,
(5.2-3)
(5.2-4)
which shows how we can manipulate chelation equilibria by changing the
pH.  For  a  satisfactory  EDTA  titration  we  have, just as in  section  5.1,  log
K
f
′6.  By  using  so-called  metallochromic indicators,  or  a  mercury elec-
trode, one can monitor [Y
4–
]=
α
Y0
[Y] during the titration, analogous to how
one uses acid–base indicators or a glass electrode to follow [H
+
] during an
acid–base titration.
5.3
Extraction
In extractions one typically uses two solvents that have only limited mutual
solubility, so that they form two separate phases. Typically, one solvent is
polar (such as an aqueous solution), the other non-polar. Few ions will be
extracted into the non-polar solvent, but neutral complexes will be, and this
is often the basis for ion extraction. For example, only the neutral species
Fe(SCN)
3
will be  extracted  into a non-polar phase from among the ferric
thiocyanates illustrated in Fig. 5.1-2, even though Fe(SCN)
3
is only a minor
species in aqueous solution.
Two parameters  are  used  to  characterize extractions. The more  funda-
mental one is the partition coefficient, K
p
, which describes the concentra-
tion ratio of the species common to both solvents, such as (Fe(SCN)
3
in the
above example:
(5.3-1)
When we define the volume ratio as
v=V
organic
/V
aqueous
(5.3-2)
the mass fraction of Fe(SCN)
3
extracted by equilibrating a sample of volume
V
aqueous
with a volume V
organic
of extractant will be
(5.3-3)
while  the  fraction  remaining  in  the  original  sample  is  its  complement,
μ
aqueous
=1/(1+ vK
p
).
μ
organic
=
[Fe(SCN)
3
]
organic
V
organic
[Fe(SCN)
3
]
aqueous
V
aqueous
+[Fe(SCN)
3
]
organic
V
organic
=
vK
p
1+vK
p
K
p
=
[Fe(SCN)
3
]
organic
[Fe(SCN)
3
]
aqueous
α
MY
=
K
f
′[Y]
1+K
f
′[Y]
=
K
α
Y0
[Y]
1+K
α
Y0
[Y]
V
Y
V
M
=
C
M
α
MY
+[Y]
C
Y
-[Y]
182
Other ionic equilibria
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
export highlighted text from pdf; copying text from pdf to excel
A more practical parameter is the distribution coefficient D, which gives
the corresponding ratio of the total analytical concentrations,
(5.3-4)
The ligand concentration affects the fraction of ferric ions that is in the
form of the neutral complex Fe(SCN)
3
; on that basis one might want to use a
thiocyanate concentration of about 2.5 M (pL=-log[SCN]≈-0.4), where
[(Fe(SCN)
3
] goes through a maximum in  Fig. 5.1-2. Indeed, Fe(III) can be
extracted into oxygen-containing non-polar solvents such as diethyl ether
or isobutyl alcohol, and can then be determined spectrometrically in that
solvent.
In  the  spreadsheet exercise we  will  calculate  the  distribution of Fe(III)
based on the data of Fig. 5.1-3. The parameter involved in the extraction is
vK
p
, where the volume ratio vdepends on the experimental protocol, and K
p
on the nature of the extractant used.
Instructions for exercise 5.3
Recall spreadsheet Complexation.
In cell I1 place the label vKp, and in cell I2 a numerical value for it.
Modify the instruction for denom in column C by multiplying the term involving
(Fe(SCN)
3
by (1+vK
p
). For example, the instruction in cell C6 might now read (with the
modification printed in bold)=1+$C$2 +B6*(1 +$D$2*B6* (1 +$E$2*B6*(1+ $I$2 +
$F$2*B6*(1+$G$2*B6*(1 +$H$2*B6))))).
Change the label in G4 to read [ML3]aq, and in K4 and L4 add the labels [ML3]org and D
respectively.
In column K calculate [(Fe(SCN)
3
]
organic
=vK
p
[(Fe(SCN)
3
]
aqueous
where vKp is stored in
$I$2 while [(Fe(SCN)
3
]
aqueous
is found in column G.
In column L compute D; in L6 this can be done as=K6/SUM(D6:K6).
Add the curve for [(Fe(SCN)
3
]
organic
to the graph of Fig. 5.1-2. You can do this as follows:
highlight K6:K116, and copy it. Now go to the graph, activate it, and paste. If necessary,
click on the new curve until it is highlighted, right-click to get the Format Data Series,
and format it to your taste.
Plot the resulting distribution diagram. Figure 5.3-1 shows an example.
Also make a graph of D versus pSCN, see Fig. 5.3-2.
Note  that  Fe(SCN)
3
is  only  a  minor  constituent  of  the  set  of  ferri-
thiocyanate complexes, yet that is sufficient for an extraction. For the (rather
D=
C
Fe(III),organic
C
Fe(III),aqueous
5.3 Extraction
183
low) numerical value of vK
p
used in Figs. 5.3-1 and 5.3-2, and with extraction
from  1  M  NH
4
SCN,  D is  only  about  0.7,  and  four  successive  extractions
would be needed to remove at least 99% of Fe(III) from the aqueous phase.
(One extraction would leave 30% or 0.3, hence four successive extractions
will leave (0.3)
4
=0.008 or 0.8%.)
Often, metals are extracted at low pH, in order to prevent the (often irre-
versible)  formation  of  poorly  soluble  hydroxy  complexes  and  polymers.
184
Other ionic equilibria
Fig.5.3-1:The distribution diagram of an aqueous solution of Fe(III) in thiocyanate in
equilibrium with an organic extractant, with the parameter values of Fig. 5.1-2, vK
p
=10,
and pL=-log[SCN]. 
Fig.5.3-2:The corresponding distribution Dof Fe(III) between the organic and aqueous
phases; pL=-log[SCN].
Thiocyanate extractions are therefore often performed in 0.5 M HCl, i.e., at a
pH of 0.3. Furthermore, the acid used to enforce such a low pH may intro-
duce competing ligands, such as Cl
. In that case, we must also consider the
acid–base equilibrium of thiocyanate (HSCN has a pK
a
of 0.9) and the pos-
sibility of the formation of neutral ferric complexes of mixed ligand compo-
sition.
5.4
Solubility
So far we have used concentration as an open-ended variable, but it has an
upper limit: each dissolved species has a solubility, above which the solvent
can accommodate no more of it. While the solubilities for many salts are of
the order of 0.1 to 10 M, they are sometimes much lower, and may then be of
analytical use. In water, the solubility of ions is usually much higher than
that  of  neutral  compounds,  in  which  case  the  solubility  of  salts  can  be
described in terms of the equilibrium between the salt and its constituent
ions. For example, for barium sulfate the equilibrium BaSO
4
Ba
2+
+SO
4
2–
can be described in terms of the equilibrium constant K=[Ba
2+
] [SO
4
2–
] /
[BaSO
4
]. When solid BaSO
4
is present, the solution is saturated with BaSO
4
,
so that [BaSO
4
] can usually be considered constant, in which case we can
define the solubility product K
s0
=K [BaSO
4
],
K
s0
=[Ba
2+
] [SO
4
2–
]
(5.4-1)
The application of relations such as (5.4-1) is often so straightforward that
it does not require a spreadsheet. However, complications may arise when
one or more of the ionic species involved also participates in other equilib-
ria. In this example that might occur when the pH is so low that the forma-
tion of HSO
4
must be considered. In that case (5.4-1) must be combined
with K
a2
=[H
+
] [SO
4
2–
] / [HSO
4
] and with the applicable mass balance rela-
tions.  When  this  leads  to  an  equation  of  third  or  higher  order,  the
Newton–Raphson method (Excel’s Goal Seek) or a non-linear least-squares
search  (Excel’s  Solver)  may  be  employed  to  find  the  solution.  Although
either can be used for such a one-parameter problem, Solver is often the
more convenient one because it allows the user to set constraints (such as
that the sought  concentration  cannot be  negative), and  thereby to  avoid
non-physical answers.
In our spreadsheet exercise we will consider a textbook example, the solu-
bility of HgS as a function of pH, in a solution in equilibrium with solid HgS
that contains no other sources of mercury and sulfur. HgS is quite insoluble,
with a reported solubility product of 5× 10
–54
M
2
. The case is complicated by
the  fact  that the  two participant  ions,  Hg
2+
and  S
2–
,  are both  involved in
acid–base equilibria. For Hg
2+
these are the successive formation of three
hydroxy complexes HgOH
+
, Hg(OH)
, and Hg(OH)
3
, for S
2–
the consecutive
5.4 Solubility
185
protonations  to  HS
and  H
2
S. Consequently  we  must  first formulate  the
problem to make it suitable for spreadsheet solution.
The two basic relations are the solubility product
K
s0
=[Hg
2+
] [S
2–
]
(5.4-2)
and the mass balance
[Hg
2+
]+[HgOH
+
]+[Hg(OH)
2
]+[Hg(OH)
3
]=[H
2
S]+[HS
]+[S
2–
 (5.4-3)
In order to reduce the mathematical complexity we express the fractional
concentration of  Hg
2+
in terms of  [OH
] and  the  relevant formation con-
stants, i.e.,
(5.4-4)
Likewise, we write for the fractional concentration of S
2–
(5.4-5)
so that (5.4-3) can be rewritten as
(5.4-6)
By combining this with (5.4-2) we can now eliminate either [Hg
2+
] or [S
2–
],
and obtain explicit solutions for either species, as in
(5.4-7)
from which it follows that
(5.4-8)
This is an explicit expression for [Hg
2+
] in terms of [H
+
] and [OH
], ready
for  spreadsheet  evaluation.  Moreover, we can use it to calculate  all  other
species involved, through
[HgOH
+
]= K
f1 
[OH
] [Hg
2+
]
(5.4-9)
[Hg(OH)
2
]=K
f2 
[OH
] [HgOH
+
]
(5.4-10)
[Hg(OH)
3
]=K
f3 
[OH
] [Hg(OH)
2
]
(5.4-11)
[S
2–
]=K
s0 
/ [Hg
2+
]
(5.4-12)
[Hg
2+
]=
K
s0
α
Hg
2+
α
S
2-
=
K
s0
{
[H+]2+ [H+]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
}
K
a1
K
a2
{
1+K
f1
[OH
-
]+K
a1
K
f2
[OH
-
]
2
}
[Hg
2+
]=
[S2- ]
α
Hg
2+
α
S
2-
=
K
s0
α
Hg
2+
[Hg
2+
]
α
S
2-
[Hg
2+
]
α
Hg
2+
=
[S
2-
]
α
S
2-
α
S
2-
=
[S2- ]
[H
2
S]+[HS
-
]+[S
2-
]
=
K
a1
K
a2
[H
+
]
2
+[H
+
]K
a1
+K
a1
K
a2
=
1
1+K
f1
[OH
-
]+K
f1
K
f2
[OH
-
]
2
+K
f1
K
f2
K
f3
[OH
-
]
3
α
Hg
2+
=
[Hg
2+
]
[Hg
2+
]+[Hg(OH)
+
]+[Hg(OH)
2
]+[Hg(OH)
3
-
]
186
Other ionic equilibria
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested