how to display pdf file in asp net using c# : Find and replace text in pdf file application Library utility html .net web page visual studio Mathematics-Part1-Class-124-part1889

RELATIONS AND FUNCTIONS
27
Solution Note that the characteristic of sets {1, 4, 7}, {2, 5, 8} and {3, 6, 9} is
that difference between any two elements of these sets is a multiple of 3. Therefore,
(xy) 
R
1
x – y is a multiple of 3 
{xy} 
{1, 4, 7} or {xy} 
{2, 5, 8}
or {xy
{3, 6, 9} 
(xy
R
2
. Hence, R
1
R
2
. Similarly, {xy
R
2
{xy}
{1, 4, 7} or {x, y} 
{2, 5, 8} or  {xy} 
{3, 6, 9} 
x – y is divisible by
{xy} 
R
1
. This shows that R
2
R
1
. Hence, R
1
= R
2
.
Example 44 Let f : X 
Y be a function. Define a relation R in X given by
R = {(ab): f(a) = f(b)}. Examine whether R is an equivalence relation or not.
Solution For every a 
X, (aa
R, since f(a) = f(a), showing that R is reflexive.
Similarly, (a, b) 
f (a) = f (b
f(b) = f(a) 
(ba) 
R. Therefore, R is
symmetric. Further, (ab
R and (bc
f(a) = f(b) and f(b) = f(c
f(a)
f(c) 
(ac) 
R, which implies that R is transitive. Hence, R is an equivalence
relation.
Example 45 Determine which of the following binary operations on the set R are
associative and which are commutative.
(a) a 
b = 1 
ab 
R
(b)  a 
b = 
(
)
2
a b
+
ab 
R
Solution
(a) Clearly,  by  definition a 
b  = b 
a  =  1, 
a b 
R.  Also
(
b
c = (1 
c) =1 and a 
(b 
c) = a 
(1) = 1, 
abc 
R. Hence
R is both associative and commutative.
(b) a 
b = 
2
2
a b b a
+
+
=
b 
a, shows that 
is commutative. Further,
(
b
=
2
a b
+
c.
=
2
2
2
4
a b
c
a b
c
+
+
+ +
=
.
But
(
c) =
2
b c
a
+
=
2
2
2
2
4
4
b c
a
a b c a b
c
+
+
+ +
+ +
=
in general.
Hence, 
is not associative.
© NCERT
not to be republished
Find and replace text in pdf file - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
delete text from pdf acrobat; copy and paste text from pdf
Find and replace text in pdf file - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
copy text from pdf to word with formatting; get text from pdf online
MATHEMATICS
28
Example 46 Find the number of all one-one functions from set A = {1, 2, 3} to itself.
Solution One-one function from {1, 2, 3} to itself is simply a permutation on three
symbols 1, 2, 3. Therefore, total number of one-one maps from {1, 2, 3} to itself is
same as total number of permutations on three symbols 1, 2, 3 which is 3! = 6.
Example 47 Let A = {1, 2, 3}. Then show that  the number of relations containing (1, 2)
and (2, 3) which are reflexive and transitive but not symmetric is three.
Solution The smallest relation R
1
containing (1, 2) and (2, 3) which is reflexive and
transitive but not symmetric is {(1, 1), (2, 2), (3, 3), (1, 2), (2, 3), (1, 3)}. Now, if we add
the pair (2, 1) to R
1
to get R
2
, then the relation R
2
will be reflexive, transitive but not
symmetric. Similarly, we can obtain R
3
by adding (3, 2) to R
1
to get the desired relation.
However, we can not add two pairs (2, 1), (3, 2) or single pair (3, 1) to R
1
at a time, as
by doing so, we will be forced to add the remaining pair in order to maintain transitivity
and in the process, the relation will become symmetric also which is not required. Thus,
the total number of desired relations is three.
Example 48 Show that the number of equivalence relation in the set {1, 2, 3} containing
(1, 2) and (2, 1) is two.
Solution The smallest equivalence relation R
1
containing (1, 2) and (2, 1) is {(1, 1),
(2, 2), (3, 3), (1, 2), (2, 1)}. Now we are left with only 4 pairs namely (2, 3), (3, 2),
(1, 3) and (3, 1). If we add any one, say (2, 3) to R
1
, then for symmetry we must add
(3, 2) also and now for transitivity we are forced to add (1, 3) and (3, 1). Thus, the only
equivalence relation bigger than R
1
is the universal relation. This shows that the total
number of equivalence relations containing (1, 2) and (2, 1) is two.
Example 49 Show that the number of binary operations on {1, 2} having 1 as identity
and having 2 as the inverse of 2 is exactly one.
Solution A binary operation 
on {1, 2} is a function from {1, 2} × {1, 2} to {1, 2}, i.e.,
a function from {(1, 1), (1, 2), (2, 1), (2, 2)} 
{1, 2}. Since 1 is the identity for the
desired binary operation 
∗ (1, 1) = 1, ∗
(1, 2) = 2, 
∗ 
(2, 1) = 2 and the only choice
left is for the pair (2, 2). Since 2 is the inverse of 2, i.e., 
∗ 
(2, 2) must be equal to 1. Thus,
the number of desired binary operation is only one.
Example 50 Consider the identity function I
N
N 
N defined as I
N
(x) = x 
x 
N.
Show that although I
N
is onto but I
N
+ I
N
N 
N defined as
(I
N
+ I
N
) (x) = I
N
(x) + I
N
(x) = x + x = 2x is not onto.
Solution Clearly I
N
is onto. But I
N
+ I
N
is not onto, as we can find an element 3
in the co-domain N such that there does not exist any x in the domain N with
(I
N
+ I
N
) (x) = 2x = 3.
© NCERT
not to be republished
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
and ASP.NET webpage. Find and replace text in PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
extract text from pdf c#; copy text pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.
Help to find and get PDF text position details Allow to search defined PDF file page or the whole Ability to search and replace PDF text programmatically in VB
get text from pdf into excel; acrobat remove text from pdf
RELATIONS AND FUNCTIONS
29
Example 51 Consider a function f : 
0,
2
π
R
given  by f (x)  = sin x and
g : 
0,
2
π
R
given by g(x) = cos x. Show that f and g are one-one, but f + g is not
one-one.
Solution Since for any two distinct elements x
1
and x
2
in 
0,
2
π
, sin x
1
sin x
2
and
cos x
1
cos x
2
, both f and g must be one-one. But (f + g) (0) = sin 0 + cos 0 = 1 and
(f + g)
2
π
⎛ ⎞
⎜ ⎟
⎝ ⎠
sin
cos
1
2
2
π
π
+
=
. Therefore, f + g is not one-one.
Miscellaneous Exercise on Chapter 1
1. Let R 
R be defined as f (x) = 10x + 7. Find the function R 
R such
that g o f = f o g = 1
R
.
2. Let : W 
W be defined as f(n) = n – 1, if n is odd and f (n) = n + 1, if n is
even. Show that f is invertible. Find the inverse of f. Here, W is the set of all
whole numbers.
3. If f : R 
R is defined by f(x) = x
2
– 3x + 2, find f (f(x)).
4. Show that the function f : R 
{x 
R : – 1 < x < 1} defined by 
( )
1 | |
x
f x
x
=
+
,
x 
R is one one and onto function.
5. Show that the function f : R 
R given by f (x) = x
3
is injective.
6. Give examples of two functions f : N 
Z and g : Z 
Z such that o f is
injective but g is not injective.
(Hint : Consider f (x) = x and g(x) = |x|).
7. Give examples of two functions f : N 
N and g : N 
N such that g o f is onto
but f is not onto.
(Hint : Consider f (x) = x + 1 and 
1if
1
( )
1 if
1
x
x
g x
x
>
=
=
8. Given a non empty set X, consider P(X) which is the set of all subsets of X.
© NCERT
not to be republished
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
project along with sample codes, which you can find in the Demos folder under RasterEdge.Imaging.Demo directory with the file name RasterEdge.Imaging.Demo.PDF.
extract text from pdf open source; extract text from pdf with formatting
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Able to find and get PDF text position details in C# Support search PDF file with various search options, like Ability to search and replace PDF text in ASP.NET
find and replace text in pdf; extract text from pdf online
MATHEMATICS
30
Define the relation R in P(X) as follows:
For subsets A, B in P(X), ARB if and only if A 
B. Is R an equivalence relation
on P(X)? Justify your answer.
9. Given a non-empty set X, consider the binary operation 
: P(X) × P(X) 
P(X)
given by A 
B = A 
A, B in P(X), where P(X) is the power set of X.
Show that X is the identity element for this operation and X is the only invertible
element in P(X) with respect to the operation 
.
10. Find the number of all onto functions from the set {1, 2, 3, ... , n} to itself.
11. Let S = {abc} and T = {1, 2, 3}. Find F
–1
of the following functions F from S
to T, if it exists.
(i) F = {(a, 3), (b, 2), (c, 1)}
(ii) F = {(a, 2), (b, 1), (c, 1)}
12. Consider the binary operations 
R × R 
R and o : R × R 
R defined as
b = |a – b| and o b = a
a
R. Show that 
is commutative but not
associative, o is associative but not commutative. Further, show that 
abc 
R,
a 
(o c) = (a 
b) o (a 
c). [If it is so, we say that the operation 
distributes
over the operation o]. Does o distribute over 
? Justify your answer.
13. Given a non-empty set X, let 
: P(X) × P(X) 
P(X) be defined as
A * B = (A – B) 
(B – A), 
A, B 
P(X). Show that the empty set 
φ
is the
identity for the operation 
and all the elements A of P(X) are invertible with
A
–1
= A. (Hint : (A – 
φ
(
φ
– A) = A and (A – A) 
(A – A) = A 
A = 
φ
).
14. Define a binary operation 
∗ 
on the set {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5} as
      if 
6
6 if 
6
a b
a b
a b
a b
a b
+
+ <
∗ =
+ −
+ ≥
Show that zero is the identity for this operation and each element 
0 of the set
is invertible with 6 – a being the inverse of a.
15. Let A = {– 1, 0, 1, 2}, B = {– 4, – 2, 0, 2} and fg : A 
B be functions defined
by f (x) = x
2
– x, x 
A and 
1
( ) 2
1,
2
g x
x
=
x 
A. Are f and g equal?
Justify your answer. (Hint: One may note that two functions f : A 
B and
g : A 
B such that f(a) = g(a
a 
A, are called equal functions).
16. Let A = {1, 2, 3}. Then number of relations containing (1, 2) and (1, 3) which are
reflexive and symmetric but not transitive is
(A) 1
(B) 2
(C) 3
(D) 4
17. Let A = {1, 2, 3}. Then number of equivalence relations containing (1, 2) is
(A) 1
(B) 2
(C) 3
(D) 4
© NCERT
not to be republished
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
find detailed guidance on creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file
delete text from pdf online; copying text from pdf to excel
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create writable PDF file from text (.txt) file in VB with a demo project, which you can find in the programming, you can use specific APIs to create PDF file.
copy text from pdf without formatting; extracting text from pdf
RELATIONS AND FUNCTIONS
31
18. Let f : R 
R be the Signum Function defined as
1,
0
( )
0,
0
1,
0
x
f x
x
x
>
=
=
<
and g : R 
R be the Greatest Integer Function given by g(x) = [x], where [x] is
greatest integer less than or equal to x. Then, does fog  and gof coincide in (0, 1]?
19. Number of binary operations on the set {ab} are
(A) 10
(B) 16
(C) 20
(D ) 8
Summary
In this chapter, we studied different types of relations and equivalence relation,
composition of functions, invertible functions and binary operations. The main features
of this chapter are as follows:
ʄ
Empty relation is the relation R in X given by R = 
φ
X × X.
ʄ
Universal relation is the relation R in X given by R = X × X.
ʄ
Reflexive relation R in X is a relation with (aa
a 
X.
ʄ
Symmetric relation R in X is a relation satisfying (ab
R implies (ba) 
R.
ʄ
Transitive relation R in X is a relation satisfying (ab
R and (bc
R
implies that (a, c) 
R.
ʄ
Equivalence relation R in X is a relation which is reflexive, symmetric and
transitive.
ʄ
Equivalence class [a] containing a 
X for an equivalence relation R in X is
the subset of X containing all elements b related to a.
ʄ
A function f : X 
Y is one-one (or injective ) if
f(x
1
) = f(x
2
x
1
x
2
x
1
x
2
X.
ʄ
A function f : X 
Y is onto (or surjective) if given any y 
Y, 
x 
X such
that f(x) = y.
ʄ
A function f : X 
Y is one-one and onto (or bijective), if f is both one-one
and onto.
ʄ
The composition of functions f : A 
B and g : B 
C is the function
gof : A 
C given by gof(x) = g(f(x))
x 
A.
ʄ
A function f : X 
Y is invertible  if 
g : Y 
X such that gof = I
X
and
fog = I
Y
.
ʄ
A function f : X 
Y is invertible if and only if f is one-one and onto.
© NCERT
not to be republished
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET the following code table, you will find a piece
copy text from scanned pdf to word; copy formatted text from pdf
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Text to PDF. Text: Delete Text from PDF. Text: Replace Text in PDF. NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF In the following code table, you will find a VB
copy highlighted text from pdf; c# extract pdf text
MATHEMATICS
32
ʄ
Given a finite set X, a function f : X 
X is one-one (respectively onto) if and
only if f is onto (respectively one-one). This is the characteristic property of a
finite set. This is not true for infinite set
ʄ
binary operation 
on a set A is a function 
from A × A to A.
ʄ
An element e 
X is the identity element for binary operation 
: X × X 
X,
if 
e = a = e 
a 
a 
X.
ʄ
An element a 
X is invertible for binary operation 
: X × X 
X,  if
there exists b 
X such that 
b = e = b 
a where, e is the identity for the
binary operation 
. The element b is called inverse of a and is denoted by a
–1
.
ʄ
An operation 
on X is commutative if 
b = b 
a 
ab in X.
ʄ
An operation 
on X is associative if (
b
c = 
(
c)
ab, c in X.
Historical Note
The concept of function has evolved over a long period of time starting from
R. Descartes (1596-1650), who used the word ‘function’ in his manuscript
Geometrie” in 1637 to mean some positive integral power x
n
of a variable x
while studying geometrical curves like hyperbola, parabola and ellipse. James
Gregory (1636-1675) in his work “ Vera Circuli et Hyperbolae Quadratura
(1667) considered function as a quantity obtained from other quantities by
successive use of algebraic operations or by any other operations. Later G. W.
Leibnitz (1646-1716) in his manuscript “Methodus tangentium inversa, seu  de
functionibus” written in 1673 used the word ‘function’ to mean a quantity varying
from point to point on a curve such as the coordinates of a point on the curve, the
slope of the curve, the tangent and the normal to the curve at a point. However,
in his manuscript “Historia (1714), Leibnitz used the word ‘function’ to mean
quantities that depend on a variable. He was the first to use the phrase ‘function
of x’. John Bernoulli (1667-1748) used the notation 
φ
x for the first time in 1718 to
indicate a function of x. But the general adoption of symbols like f, F, 
φ
ψ
... to
represent functions was made by Leonhard Euler (1707-1783) in 1734 in the first
part of his manuscript “Analysis Infinitorium”. Later on, Joeph Louis Lagrange
(1736-1813) published his manuscripts “Theorie des functions analytiques” in
1793, where he discussed  about analytic function and used the notion f (x), F(x),
φ
(x etc. for different function of x. Subsequently, Lejeunne Dirichlet
(1805-1859) gave the definition of function which was being used till the set
theoretic definition of function presently used, was given after set theory was
developed by Georg Cantor (1845-1918). The set theoretic definition of function
known to us presently is simply an abstraction of the definition given by Dirichlet
in a rigorous manner.
ʍʍ
ʍʍ
ʍ
© NCERT
not to be republished
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on Visual Studio .NET
C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C# Unzip the download package and you can find a project Once done debugging with x86 dlls, replace the x86
how to copy and paste pdf text; extract text from pdf to excel
VB.NET PDF - Deploy VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer on Visual Studio.NET
C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C# Unzip the download package and you can find a project Once done debugging with x86 dlls, replace the x86
cut and paste pdf text; find and replace text in pdf file
Mathematics, in general, is fundamentally the science of
self-evident things. — FELIX KLEIN 
2.1  Introduction
In Chapter 1, we have studied that the inverse of a function
f, denoted by f
–1
, exists if f is one-one and onto. There are
many functions which are not one-one, onto or both and
hence we can not talk of their inverses. In Class XI, we
studied that trigonometric functions are not one-one and
onto over their natural domains and ranges and hence their
inverses do not exist. In this chapter, we shall study about
the restrictions on domains and ranges of trigonometric
functions which ensure the existence of their inverses and
observe their behaviour through graphical representations.
Besides, some elementary properties will also be discussed.
The inverse trigonometric functions play an important
role in calculus for they serve to define many integrals.
The concepts of inverse trigonometric functions is also used in science and engineering.
2.2  Basic Concepts
In Class XI, we have studied trigonometric functions, which are defined as follows:
sine function, i.e., sine : R → [– 1, 1]
cosine function, i.e., cos : R → [– 1, 1]
tangent function, i.e., tan : R – { x : x = (2n + 1) 
2
π
, n ∈ Z} → R
cotangent function, i.e., cot : R – { x : x = nπ, n ∈ Z} → R
secant function, i.e., sec : R – { x : x = (2n + 1) 
2
π
, n ∈ Z} → R – (– 1, 1)
cosecant function, i.e., cosec : R – { x : x = nπ,  n ∈ Z} → R – (– 1, 1)
Chapter
2
INVERSE TRIGONOMETRIC
FUNCTIONS
Arya Bhatta
(476-550 A. D.)
34
MATHEMATICS
We have also learnt in Chapter 1 that if f : X→Y such that f(x) = y is one-one and
onto, then we can define a unique function g : Y→X such that g(y) = x, where x ∈ X
and y = f (x), y ∈ Y. Here, the domain of g = range of f and the range of g =  domain
of f. The function g is called the inverse of f and is denoted by f
–1
. Further, g is also
one-one and onto and inverse of g is f. Thus, g
–1 
= (f 
–1
)
–1 
= f. We also have
(f 
–1
o f ) (x) = f 
–1
(f (x)) = f 
–1
(y) = x
and
(f o f 
–1
) (y) = f (f 
–1
(y))
= f (x) = y
Since the domain of sine function is the set of all real numbers and range is the
closed interval [–1, 1]. If we restrict its domain to
,
2 2
−π π
, then it becomes one-one
and onto with range [– 1, 1]. Actually, sine function restricted to any of the intervals
3
,
2
2
− π
π
,
,
2 2
−π π
3
,
2 2
π π
etc., is one-one and its range is [–1, 1]. We can,
therefore, define the inverse of sine function in each of these intervals. We denote the
inverse of sine function by sin
–1
(arc sine function). Thus, sin
–1
is a function whose
domain is [– 1, 1] and range could be any of the intervals 
3
,
2
2
− π −π
,
2 2
−π π
or
3
,
2 2
π π
, and so on. Corresponding to each such interval, we get a branch of the
function sin
–1
. The branch with range 
,
2 2
−π π
is called the principal value branch,
whereas other intervals as range give different branches of sin
–1
. When we refer
to the function sin
–1
, we take it as the function whose domain is [–1, 1] and range is
,
2 2
−π π
. We write  sin
–1
: [–1, 1] → 
,
2 2
−π π
From the definition of the inverse functions, it follows that sin (sin
–1
x) = x
if  – 1 ≤ x ≤ 1 and sin
–1
(sin x) = x if 
2
2
x
π
π
− ≤ ≤
. In other words, if y = sin
–1
x, then
sin y = x.
Remarks
(i) We know from Chapter 1, that if y = f(x) is an invertible function, then  x = f 
–1
(y).
Thus, the graph of sin
–1
function can be obtained from the graph of original
function  by interchanging x and y axes, i.e., if (a, b) is a point on the graph of
sine function, then (b, a) becomes the corresponding point on the graph of inverse
INVERSE TRIGONOMETRIC FUNCTIONS     35
of sine function. Thus, the graph of the function y = sin
–1
x can be obtained from
the graph of y = sin x by interchanging x and y axes. The graphs of y = sin x and
y = sin
–1
x are as given in Fig 2.1 (i), (ii), (iii). The dark portion of the graph of
y = sin
–1
x represent the principal value branch.
(ii) It can be shown that the graph of an inverse function can be obtained from the
corresponding graph of original function as a mirror image (i.e., reflection) along
the line y = x. This can be visualised by looking the graphs of y = sin x and
y = sin
–1
x as given in the same axes (Fig 2.1 (iii)).
Like sine function, the cosine function is a function whose domain is the set of all
real numbers and range is the set [–1, 1]. If we restrict the domain of cosine function
to [0, π], then it becomes one-one and onto with range [–1, 1]. Actually,  cosine function
Fig 2.1 (ii)
Let us now discuss cosec
–1
x and sec
–1
x as follows:
Since, cosec x = 
1
sinx
, the domain of the cosec function is the set {x : x ∈ R and
x ≠ nπ, n ∈ Z} and the range is the set {y : y ∈ R, y ≥ 1 or y ≤ –1} i.e., the set
R – (–1, 1). It means that y = cosec x assumes all real values except –1 < y < 1 and is
not defined for integral multiple of π. If we restrict the domain of cosec function to
,
2 2
π π
– {0}, then it is one to one and onto with its range as the set R – (– 1, 1). Actually,
cosec function restricted to any of the intervals 
3
,
{ }
2
2
− π −π
− −π
,
2 2
−π π
– {0},
3
,
{ }
2 2
π π
− π
etc., is bijective and its range is the set of all real numbers R – (–1, 1).
Fig 2.2 (i)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested