how to display pdf file in asp net using c# : Export text from pdf Library software component .net winforms wpf mvc Excel20-part191

[HS
]=[H
+
] [S
2–
] / K
a2
(5.4-13)
[H
2
S]=[H+] [HS] / K
a1
(5.4-14)
Finally, the solubility S
Hg
of mercury is defined as the total analytical con-
centration of all mercury species in the saturated solution. Assuming that
the concentration of dissolved HgS is negligible, we have
S
Hg
=[Hg
2+
]+[HgOH
+
]+[Hg(OH)
2
]+ [Hg(OH)
3
]
(5.4-15)
which, according to (5.4-3), is equal to S
S
=[H
2
S]+[HS
]+[S
2–
].
Instructions for exercise 5.4
Open a new spreadsheet.
Place the labels Ks0, Ka1, Ka2, Kf1, Kf2, and Kf3 in cells A1 through F1.
In row 2 enter corresponding literature values, such as K
s0
=10–53M2, K
a1
=10–7.02M,
K
a2
=10
–13.9
M, K
f1
=10
10.6
M
–1
, K
f2
=10
11.2
M
–1
, and K
f3
=10
–0.9
M
–1
.
In row 4 enter the labels pH, [H], pOH, [OH], pHg, pHgOH, pHg(OH)2, pHg(OH)3, pS,
pHS, pH2S, and pS(Hg), where the latter terms denotes the solubility of mercury (which
in this case happens to be equal to that of sulfur).
In column A, starting in row 6, place the pH values 0 (0.1) 14, and in columns B, C, and D
compute the corresponding values of [H+]=10–pH , pOH= 14 -pH, and [OH]=10–pOH .
In columns E through L calculate the negative logarithms of the concentrations of
[Hg
2+
], [HgOH
+
], etc. using (5.4-8) through (5.4-15).
Plot the corresponding logarithmic concentration diagram. It should resemble Fig.
5.4-1.
A diagram as complicated as Fig. 5.4-1 requires some explanation. At low
pH, the two dominant species (apart from H+and OH) are Hg2+ and H
2
S; in
the  double-logarithmic  representation  used, the lines  representing  them
coincide. In the range between pH 8 and 13, the dominant species are HS
and Hg(OH)
. In the middle range, at pH’s between 4 and 7, the dominant
species are H
2
S and Hg(OH)
2
, but at no pH are they Hg
2+
and S
2–
! The solu-
bility (colored line) of both mercury and sulfur is minimal in this middle pH
range,  and  even  there  does  not  get  below  8×10–20 M,  more  than  seven
orders of magnitude (or, more specifically, a factor of 25000000) larger than
the square root of K
s0 
. While both Hg(OH)
+
and Hg(OH)
3
are of little conse-
quence for the solubility, all other species (including Hg(OH)
2
) are crucial at
one pH or another.
It is instructive to see what happens when, e.g., the equilibria involving
the hydroxy species are deleted. This is readily simulated in the spreadsheet
5.4 Solubility
187
Export text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
erase text from pdf file; extract text from image pdf file
Export text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
copy text from protected pdf; extract text from pdf acrobat
188
Other ionic equilibria
Fig.5.4-1:The logarithmic concentration diagram for HgS. The colored line shows the
solubility S of mercury and sulfur.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Export PDF text content to TXT file with original layout
extract text from pdf java open source; c# extract pdf text
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Export PDF text content to TXT file with original layout
delete text from pdf online; copy text from scanned pdf to word
5.4 Solubility
189
Fig.5.4-2:The logarithmic concentration diagram for HgS calculated on the erroneous
assumption that Hg2+ does not form hydroxy complexes.
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
file. Able to export PDF document to HTML file. Able to create convert PDF to SVG file. Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file.
c# extract text from pdf; can't copy and paste text from pdf
VB.NET PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file
XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: PDF Export. A quick and efficient work to get text from PDF can be achieved with this VB.NET tutorial of PDF to text conversion.
delete text from pdf with acrobat; copy formatted text from pdf
by setting K
f1
,K
f 2
, and K
f 3
to a sufficiently small value, say10
–20
. (Just
setting them equal to zero gives trouble, since the spreadsheet will then try
to take the logarithms of zero concentrations.) The result is shown in Fig.
5.4-2. Such an (incorrect) diagram predicts that the solubility decreases at
high pH, whereas the opposite occurs; in fact, the solubility calculated at pH
14 in Fig. 5.4-2, 4 ×10
–27
M, is eleven orders of magnitude less than the value
calculated in Fig. 5.4-1, 4× 10
–16
M! This clearly shows  that  one  needs  to
have good information about the various chemical species involved before
reliable predictions can be made. And that is precisely where we want to be:
limited by real, chemical data, not by the mathematical means to manipu-
late them. The latter can be relegated to a spreadsheet.
5.5
Precipitation and dissolution
The equilibrium formation and dissolution of precipitates can be illustrated
with silver chloride. Ag
+
forms a series of chloro complexes, at least up to
AgCl
4
3–
. In the presence of solid AgCl the formal description is most readily
characterized by the following formalism:
AgCl
s
Ag
+
+Cl
K
s0
=[Ag
+
] [Cl
]
AgCl
s
AgCl
K
s1
=[AgCl]
AgCl
s
+ Cl
AgCl
2
K
s2
=[AgCl
2
] / [Cl
]
AgCl
s
+2Cl
AgCl
3
2–
K
s3
=[AgCl
3
2–
] / [Cl
]
2
AgCl
s
+3Cl
AgCl
4
3–
K
s4
=[AgCl
4
3–
] / [Cl
]
3
where the constants K
s
are overall formation constants rather than the step-
wise formation constants K
f
we have used so far. The two types of formation
constants can be interconverted by
K
s1
=K
s0
K
f1
K
f1
=K
s1
/ K
s0
K
s2
=K
s0
K
f1
K
f2
K
f2
=K
s2
/ K
s1
K
s3
=K
s0
K
f1
K
f2
K
f3
K
f3
=K
s3
/ K
s2
K
s4
=K
s0
K
f1
K
f2
K
f3
K
f4
K
f4
=K
s4
/ K
s3
With the above soluble species, the solubility of silver is given by
S
Ag
=[Ag
+
]+[AgCl]+[AgCl
2
]+[AgCl
3
2–
]+[AgCl
4
3–
]
=K
s0
/ [Cl
]+K
s1
+K
s2
[Cl
]+K
s3
[Cl
]
2
+K
s4
[Cl
]
3
=K
s0
{1/ [Cl
]+K
f1
+K
f1
K
f2
[Cl
]+K
f1
K
f2
K
f3
[Cl
]
2
+K
f1
K
f2
K
f3
K
f4
[Cl
]
3
190
Other ionic equilibria
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
from OpenOffice. Create PDF from CSV. Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF
extract text from pdf file; delete text from pdf acrobat
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
from OpenOffice. Create PDF from CSV. Create PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF
copy paste pdf text; c# read text from pdf
We are now ready to plot a logarithmic concentration diagram of all silver
species as a function of pCl. We will first make such a diagram for a solution
in equilibrium with solid AgCl.
Instructions for exercise 5.5
Open a new spreadsheet.
Place the labels pKs0, pKs1, pKs2, pKs3, and pKs4 in cells A1:E1.
In row 2 enter the literature values pK
s0
=9.75, pK
s1
=6.05, pK
s2
=4.13, pK
s3
=3.3,
pK
s4
=3.6.
In row 4 enter the labels pCl, pAg, pAgCl, pAgCl2, pAgCl3, pAgCl4, and pS.
In column A, starting in row 6, place the pCl values -2 (0.1) 10.
In column B calculate pAg from pAg=pK
s0
-pCl.
Likewise use pAgCl=pK
s1
, pAgCl
2
=pK
s1
+pCl, pAgCl
3
2–
=pK
s2
+2 pCl, and pAgCl
4
3–
=pK
s3
+3 pCl to compute the values in columns C through F.
Calculate pS=-log{10–pAg+10–pAgCl+10–pAgCl2+10–pAgCl3+10–pAgCl4}.
Plot the corresponding logarithmic concentration diagram. It should resemble Fig.
5.5-1.
The diagram of Fig. 5.5-1 illustrates the fact that the formation of com-
plexes such as AgCl
2
, AgCl
3
2–
, and AgCl
4
3–
leads to a quite high silver solubil-
ity  in concentrated  chloride  solutions.  (The effect is  exaggerated  here by
extending the calculation to pCl =-2 or [Cl
]=100, a rather unrealistically
high value.)
Note that we made the assumption that the solution is at all times in equi-
librium  with  solid  AgCl. However,  it  quite often  happens  that  the  actual
amount  of  precipitate  is  relatively  small.  For  example,  when  we  use  a
silver/silverchloride electrode, the AgCl is usually a thin, chocolate-brown
coating on an otherwise shiny silver wire. In that case it does not take a large
volume of a concentrated chloride solution to dissolve the AgCl, at which
point the diagram is no longer applicable. (For that very reason, never refill a
silverchloride  reference  electrode  with  simple  NaCl  or  KCl  solution,  but
instead use solutions presaturated with AgCl.)
How do we represent the solution when a precipitate can form or dissolve?
We need one piece of additional  information, namely  the total  analytical
concentration of silver when all precipitate is dissolved. (This depends both
on the amount of precipitate and on  the volume of solution, but we only
need the resulting analytical concentration in the absence of precipitate.)
Say that the amount of silver present in both solution and as a solid is such
that the solution would have a concentration of 1 mM if all the precipitate
5.5 Precipitation and dissolution
191
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
extract text from pdf to excel; copy highlighted text from pdf
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
pdf text replace tool; extracting text from pdf
were dissolved. Then the precipitate will be present only in the range where
the silver solubility (the colored line in Fig. 5.5-1) falls below 1 mM. Outside
that range, all silver is dissolved, predominantly as Ag
+
and AgCl at low chlo-
ride concentrations, and as poly-chloro complexes at high chloride concen-
trations.
Now we are ready to make the corresponding logarithmic concentration
diagram. We  will  use  the  IF  statement  of  the  spreadsheet  to  determine
whether  or not a precipitate will be  present,  and  let  the  calculation  self-
adjust accordingly.
10 In row 1, starting with F1, add a number of new labels: pCmax, Cmax, Kf1, Kf2, Kf3, and
Kf4. (In the K
f
formalism it is easier to use K
f
rather than pK
f
.)
11 In F2 place a maximum value for pC, i.e., its value in the absence of any precipitate. In
G2 calculate the corresponding value of pC
max
, i.e.,=10^–F2.
12 In row 4 enter the following additional column labels: denom, pAg, pAgCl, pAgCl2,
pAgCl3, pAgCl4. Yes indeed, the latter labels duplicate earlier ones, but don’t worry
about that.
192
Other ionic equilibria
Fig.5.5-1:The logarithmic concentration diagram for the chloro complexes of Ag(I) in
an aqueous solution equilibrated with solid AgCl. The colored line shows the silver solu-
bilityS
Ag
. Note that, in this case, the solubility of the “insoluble” neutral species, AgCl, is
quite substantial; between a pCl of 2 and 3 it is the dominant component of the silver
solubility S
Ag
.
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
PDF from RTF. Create PDF from Text. PDF Export. Convert PDF to Word (.docx). Convert PDF to Tiff. Convert PDF to HTML. Convert PDF to
copy pdf text with formatting; .net extract pdf text
13 In column H calculate [Cl] from pCl in column A.
14 In column I compute the common denominator (as in section 5.1) as if it were simply a
case of complex formation, without precipitation. For example, cell I6 might contain
the instruction =1+$G$2*H6*(1+$H$2*H6*(1+$I$2*H6* (1 +$J$2*H6))).
15 In column J calculate pAg. Cell J6 might read=IF(G6>$F$2,B6, -LOG($F$2/I6)). Or,
in normal English: if pS exceeds pC
max
, (in which case S is smaller than C
max
), then
keep the earlier answer (from column B), otherwise calculate pAg as
-log(C
max
/denom) where C
max
is the total analytical concentration in the precipitate-
free solution, see (5.1-12).
16 Likewise, in column K, compute pAgCl, using in K6 the command=
IF(G6 >$F$2,C6,-log($F$2*$G$2*H6/I6)).
17 Similarly, calculate pAgCl2, pAgCl3, and pAgCl4 in columns L:N.
18 Plot the corresponding logarithmic concentration diagram, using columns A, H, and J
through N. Compare with Fig. 5.5-2.
19 Vary the value of pS
max
in cell F2 and observe what happens. When the amount of solid
AgCl is too small to reach pK
s1
in the solution volume used, no precipitate will form at
any chloride concentration, as illustrated in Fig. 5.5-3.
5.5 Precipitation and dissolution
193
Fig.5.5-2:The logarithmic concentration diagram for the chloro complexes of Ag(I) in
aqueous solution, in the presence of a limited amount of silver. In this example, the total
amount of silver would take a 10mM solution (pS
max
=2) if it were all dissolved.
5.6
Precipitation titrations
The formation of precipitates can be used as the basis of a titration.
Interestingly, the formal description of the progress of a precipitation titra-
tion resembles that of the titration of a strong base with a strong acid, and
we will use the next few lines to show how this comes about. Imagine that a
sample volume V
s
of an iodide-containing solution of concentration C
s
is
titrated with a volume V
t
of the titrant solution containing a concentration
C
t
of a soluble silver salt such as AgNO
3
.For the sake of simplicity we will
ignore the formation of poly-iodo complexes of silver, which are inconse-
quential to the titration, and whose inclusion would not much change our
conclusions.Themass balancerelationsfor iodideandsilver willthen be
[I
]+[AgI]+P
AgI
=C
s
V
s
/ (V
s
+V
t
(5.6-1)
[Ag
+
]+[AgI]+P
AgI
=C
t
V
t
/ (V
s
+V
t
(5.6-2)
where P
AgI
is the concentration of iodide or silver removed by the precipita-
tion of AgI. By subtracting (5.6-2) from (5.6-1) we eliminate P
AgI
and obtain
[I
]-[Ag
+
]=(C
s
V
s
-C
t
V
t
)/ (V
s
+V
t
(5.6-3)
from which we derive the progress equation
194
Other ionic equilibria
Fig.5.5-3:The logarithmic concentration diagram for the chloro complexes of Ag(I) in
aqueous solution, when the amount of silver is too low to exceed the silver solubility at
any chloride concentration. In this example we have set pS
max
=6.
(5.6-4)
which is indeed  fully  homologous  with  the  progress  of  the  titration  of a
strong base with a strong acid,
(4.3-10)
Instructions for exercise 5.6
Open a new spreadsheet and give it a name.
Place the labels Ct, Cs and Ks0,AgI in cells A1 through C1.
Deposit plausible values for C
t
and C
s
in A2 and B2 respectively, and in cell C2 place the
literature value of K
s0,AgI 
, 8.3 ×10
–17
M
2
.
In row 4 enter the labels pAg, [Ag], and Vt/Vs.
In column A, starting in row 6, place the pAg values, starting with -log(Ct), using 0.1
increments, to say -log(Ct)+ 20, and compute the corresponding values of [Ag
+
] in
column B. (Tying the pAg scale to pC
t
avoids having an artificial near-horizontal line in
the graph at physically unrealizable pAg values.)
In column C calculate Vt/Vs using the right-hand side of (5.6-4).
Plot the resulting progress curve of V
t
/V
s
vs. pAg.
Now we will indicate how you can convert a progress curve into a titration curve
without reorganizing the spreadsheet. Highlight the progress curve. In the formula box
you will then see the formula for that curve, such as=SERIES (,′Fig5.6′!$A$6:$A$206,
′Fig5.6′!$C$6:$C$206,1). The name ‘Fig 5.6’ identifies the name of your spreadsheet,
and may of course be different in your case; if you have not yet given the spreadsheet a
name, it will just be ‘Sheet 1’.
In the formula box, now replace the two A’s by C’s, and vice versa, so that the revised
formula will read=SERIES(,′Fig5.6′!$C$6:$C$206,′Fig5.6′! $A$6:$A$206,1). Depress
the enter key.
10 This is all that is needed to exchange the x- and y-axes of the plot! You will now have the
titration curve, apart from some necessary re-scaling and re-labeling to clean up the
graph. Figure 5.6-1 shows what the result may look like.
Just as a pH electrode can monitor [H
+
], a silver electrode can report on
[Ag
+
]. This titration is therefore not only theoretically, but also experimen-
tally fully analogous to that of a strong base with a strong acid.
Because  the  solubility  products  K
s0
for  AgI,  AgBr,  and  AgCl  are  suffi-
ciently different,  it  is  possible  to  titrate  a  mixture  of  halides  with  silver,
V
a
V
b
=
C
b
+[H
+
]-[OH
-
]
C
a
-[H
+
]+[OH
-]
=
C
b
+[H
+
]-K
w
/[H
+
]
C
a
-[H
+
]+K
w
/[H
+
]
V
t
V
s
=
C
s
+[Ag+]-[I-]
C
t
-[Ag
+
]+[I
-
]
=
C
s
+[Ag+]-K
s0,AgI
/[Ag+]
C
t
-[Ag
+
]+K
s0,AgI
/[Ag
+
]
5.6 Precipitation titrations
195
simultaneously determining their individual concentrations. We therefore
extend the spreadsheet calculations to simulate such a curve.
For the titration of a mixture containing C
I
M iodide and C
Br
M bromide
the mass balance equations read
[I
]+[AgI]+P
AgI
=C
I
V
s
/ (V
s
+V
t
(5.6-5)
[Br
]+ [AgBr]+P
AgBr
=C
Br
V
s
/ (V
s
+V
t
(5.6-6)
[Ag
+
]+[AgI]+[AgBr]+P
AgI
+P
AgBr
=C
t
V
t
/ (V
s
+V
t
(5.6-7)
The P’s can again be eliminated by subtraction, whereupon we obtain
[I
]+[Br
]-[Ag
+
]=((C
I
+C
Br
)V
s
-C
t
V
t
)/ (V
s
+V
t
(5.6-8)
which leads directly to the expression for the progress of the titration
(5.6-9)
When the titration starts, AgI is precipitated, because it is much less
soluble than AgBr. The initial part of the titration is therefore described by
(5.6-4). As more silver nitrate is added, more silver iodide precipitates, until
almost all iodide has been precipitated, atwhich point the silver concentra-
tion increasesrapidly.Atagiven moment(whichinthiscasewilloccur before
thetitrationcurvereaches itsfirstequivalencepoint)silverbromidestarts to
=
C
I
+C
Br
+[Ag
+
]-(K
s0,AgI
+K
s0,AgBr
)/[Ag
+
]
C
t
-[Ag
+
]+(K
s0,AgI
+K
s0,AgBr
)/[Ag
+
]
V
t
V
s
=
C
I
+C
Br
+[Ag
+
]- [I
-
]-[Br
-
]
C
t
-[Ag
+
]+[I
-
]+[Br
-
]
196
Other ionic equilibria
Fig.5.6-1:The top of the spreadsheet computing the titration curve for the titration of
0.1 M iodide with 0.1 M silver. The equivalence point has the coordinates V
t
/V
s
=1,
pAg=-½log K
s0,AgI
=-0.5 log(8.3E–17)= 8.04.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested