how to display pdf file in asp net using c# : C# extract pdf text control application utility azure html web page visual studio Excel21-part192

precipitate, and the formal description of thetitration switches from (5.6-4)
to(5.6-9), sincethelatterappliesinthepresenceofbothsolids,AgIandAgBr.
The  switch-over  from  one  equation  to  the  other  will  occur  when  the
product [Ag
+
] times [Br
] exceeds K
s0,AgBr 
. The value of [Ag
+
] is directly avail-
able on the spreadsheet, in column B, and the value of [Br
] is given by C
Br
times the dilution term V
s
/(V
s
+V
t
), i.e., [Br
]=C
Br 
/(1 +V
t
/V
s
). Again, V
t
/V
s
is already on the spreadsheet, in column C.
The spreadsheet representation of the titration will now involve switching
from one equation to another, as soon as the product [Ag
+
] [Br
] exceeds the
value of K
s0,AgBr
. In this case, then, the titration curve really consists of separ-
ate pieces, not for reasons of mathematical convenience but as the direct
consequence of  the formation of a new precipitant  phase. In the  spread-
sheet we can accomplish this change-over between the two formalisms by
using IF statements. Note that it is still a completely straightforward calcula-
tion, without any circular reasoning.
11 In row 1 change the labels Ct and Cs into C(Ag) and C(I) respectively, and enter the
additional labels C(Br) and Ks0,AgBr in cells D1 and E1 respectively.
12 In row 2 enter an appropriate value for C
Br
, and the literature value for K
s0,AgBr
,
5.2× 10
–13
M
2
.
13 In cell D4 enter the column label Vt/Vs once more.
14 Now comes the working part. In cell D6 enter the following instruction:=IF(B6<
$E$2*(1 +C6)/$D$2,C6,($B$2+$D$2 +B6–($C$2 +$E$2)/B6)/($A$2–B6+($C$2 +
$E$2)/B6)). This is longhand for ‘if [Ag
+
]<K
s0,AgBr 
/ [Br
], use (5.6-4), otherwise use
(5.6-9)’. Copy the instruction all the way down to row 206.
15 Go to the graph, and click on the curve until you get it highlighted, at which time its
formula will reappear in the formula box. In it, change the C’s into D’s to make the
formula read =SERIES(,′Fig5.6′!$D$6:$D$206,′Fig5.6′! $A$6:$A$206,1). Depress the
enter key. Done.
The above treatment can be extended to mixtures including chloride. In
the presence of all three precipitates, AgI, AgBr, and AgCl, the expression for
the progress of the titration becomes
(5.6-10)
The description of the entire titration curve requires switching from (5.6-4)
to  (5.6-9)  to  (5.6-10)  depending  on  the  value  of  [Ag
+
].  The  spreadsheet
=
C
I
+C
Br
+C
Cl
+[Ag
+
]- (K
s0,AgI
+K
s0,AgBr
+K
s0,AgCl
)/[Ag
+
]
C
t
-[Ag
+
]+(K
s0,AgI
+K
s0,AgBr
+K
s0,AgCl
)/[Ag
+
]
V
t
V
s
=
C
I
+C
Br
+C 
Cl
+[Ag
+
]-[I
-
]-[Br
-
]-[Cl
-
]
C
t
-[Ag
+
]+[I
-
]+[Br
-
]+[Cl
-
]
5.6 Precipitation titrations
197
C# extract pdf text - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
extract formatted text from pdf; copy text from protected pdf to word
C# extract pdf text - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
extract text from pdf java; copy text from scanned pdf to word
will again do this, automatically and ungrudgingly, when we use nested IF
statements.
16 Add the labels C(Cl) and Ks0,AgCl to row 1, and corresponding values to row 2. The lit-
erature value for K
s0,AgCl
is 1.8×10
–10
M
2
.
17 In row 4 enter another label Vt/Vs, this time for column E.
18 Now comes the crowning glory: a nestedIF statement. It will read, in words: if [Ag+]<
K
s0,AgBr 
/[Br
], use (5.6-4), otherwise if [Ag
+
]<K
s0,AgCl 
/[Cl
], use (5.6-9), otherwise use
(5.6-10). This is not unlike a BASIC statement If… Then…ElseIf…Else… So here goes.
In cell E6 deposit the following instruction: = IF(B6<$E$2*(1+C6)/$D$2,C6,IF(B6<
$G$2*(1+ D6)/$F$2,D6,($B$2+$D$2 +$F$2 +B6- ($C$2+$E$2 +$G$2)/B6)/($A$2
-B6 +($C$2 +$E$2+$G$2)/B6))). Copy this instruction down to row 206.
19 Go back to the graph, activate the curve, and in the formula window change the
column from D to E. Enter this change. You should now see a curve such as the colored
one in Fig. 5.6-2.
When the halide titrations are performed without additives, the transi-
tions between the various curve segments are often much less sharp than
described here. This is a consequence of co-precipitation of AgBr in AgI, and
of  AgCl  in  AgBr,  because  these  salts  can  form  solid  solutions  and/or
mixedcrystals. Such co-precipitation can be suppressed by the presence of a
198
Other ionic equilibria
Fig.5.6-2:The composite titration curve (colored line) for the titration of 0.1 M iodide+
0.06 M bromide+0.13 M chloride with 0.1 M silver nitrate in the presence of an anti-
coagulant salt. (In practice, these titrations are often performed on much more dilute
solutions, typically about 1 mM.) The black lines show the titration curves for iodide, see
eq. (5.6-4) and Fig. 5.6-1, and for iodide +bromide, eq. (5.6-9). Open circles show the
equivalence points.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; C#: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
extract text from pdf with formatting; copy highlighted text from pdf
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
extracting text from pdf; copy formatted text from pdf
coagulating agent such as aluminum nitrate (J. Motonaka, S. Ikeda, and N.
Tanaka, Anal. Chim. Acta 105 (1979) 417), in which case the experimental
titration curve indeed follows the theoretical one, and shows sharp breaks at
the  same  places  where  the  formalism  switches  from  one  equation  to
another.
In  principle  one  could  use  the  break  points  in  the  titration  curve  as
approximations  of  the equivalence  points,  although these  points  do  not
quite coincide with the true equivalence points; moreover, co-precipitation
(if not suppressed) often leads to a blurring of those points. At any rate, it is
usually a  better  practice  to  avoid reliance  on  single  points  in  a  titration
curves for the precise determination of the equivalence volumes, because
such single readings are inherently rather vulnerable to experimental uncer-
tainty.
One can of course fit  experimental data to the entire,  theoretical curve
with  a  non-linear  least-squares  routine  such as Solver.  In  this  particular
case, however, the direct, non-iterative method of using Gran plots provides
a valid, simpler alternative. As illustrated below, such plots are quite linear,
analogous to the Gran plots for the titration of strongacids and bases.
For the first part of the titration, when the only solid present is AgI, we start
from  the exact expression (5.6-4)  for the progress. As long as there is still
excess iodide present, [Ag
+
] << [I
], in which case (5.6-4) reduces to V
t
/V
s
=
(C
I
-[I
]) / (C
t
+[I
]), which we combine with C
t
V
eq1
=V
s
C
I
to
[I
] (V
t
+V
s
)≈C
t
(V
eq1
-V
t
)
(5.6-11)
In the region between the  first  and second equivalence points, we can
often neglect the terms [Ag
+
] and [I
] in (5.6-9), which then reduces to V
t
/V
s
≈(C
I
+C
Br
– [Br
]) / (C
t
+[Br
]). Upon combining this with the expression for
the second equivalence point, C
t
V
eq2
=V
s
(C
I
+C
Br
), we obtain
[Br
] (V
t
+V
s
)≈C
t
(V
eq2
-V
t
)
(5.6-12)
Likewise, between the second and third equivalence points, we can often
neglect the terms [Ag
+
], [I
], and [Br
] in (5.6-10), in which case we can write
V
t
/V
s
≈(C
I
+C
Br
+C
Cl
-[Cl
]) / (C
t
+[Cl
]). Since the third equivalence point
is given by C
t
V
eq3
=V
s
(C
I
+C
Br
+C
Cl
), we obtain
[Cl
] (V
t
+V
s
)≈C
t
(V
eq3
-V
t
)
(5.6-13)
Finally, beyond the third equivalence point, neglect of [I
], [Br
]and [Cl
]
leads to
[Ag
+
] (V
t
+V
s
)≈ C
t
(V
t
– V
eq3
)
(5.6-14)
So here we have a set of four Gran plots, three of the Gran1 type, and one
Gran2, that  are easy to apply  and  (as  already  indicated above)  unusually
linear, see Fig. 5.6-3. Note that these Gran plots are all of a similar type: a plot
of [Z] (V
t
+V
s
) versus V
t
, or as shown here as [Z] (V
t
/V
s
) versus V
t
/V
s
, where
5.6 Precipitation titrations
199
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. C#.NET Project DLLs: Insert Text Content to PDF.
extract pdf text to word; .net extract pdf text
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Different from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit can convert PDF document to text file with
extract highlighted text from pdf; copy text from pdf to word
[Z]=[I
]=K
s0,AgI
/[Ag
+
],  [Z]=[Br
]=K
s0,AgBr
/[Ag
+
],  [Z]=[Cl
]=K
s0,AgCl
/
[Ag
+
], and [Z]= [Ag
+
] respectively.
20 Add a fourth column to the spreadsheet, and in it calculate [Z] (V
t
/V
s
+1), where [Z] is
either K
s0
/[Ag
+
] for one of the silver halide salts, or [Ag
+
] itself.
21 Plot [Z] (V
t
/V
s
+1) of column D versus V
t
/V
s
of column C for the various definitions of
[Z]: K
s0,AgI 
/[Ag
+
], K
s0,AgBr 
/[Ag
+
], K
s0,AgCl 
/[Ag
+
], or [Ag
+
]. Alternatively, if you want to
graph all four Gran plots simultaneously, as in Fig. 5.6-3, you will need to make a
column for each of them.
22 Save the spreadsheet.
5.7
The von Liebig titration
A venerable and very interesting titration, first described by von Liebig in
1851, is that of cyanide with silver. For obvious reasons you will not find it in
any undergraduate laboratory manuals, but it is a good titration on which
to practice your  theoretical skills.  It  differs  from the halide titration dis-
cussed  in  the preceding section  in  that the  soluble  complex  Ag(CN)
2
is
formed first, upon addition of half the equivalent amount  of silver. Only
when more silver is added will the sparingly soluble AgCN precipitate. The
entire sequence is therefore a complexometric titration followed by a pre-
cipitation  titration. Just  this  qualitative description  might  be  enough to
scare  the  fainthearted,  but you,  my  reader,  are  by  now  a  well-seasoned
spreadsheeter, and you will  encounter  no  unsurmountable  problems in
this challenge.
For the first part of the titration, i.e., as long as no solid AgCN has formed,
we  consider  the  cyanide  complexes.  At  the  beginning  of  the  titration,
200
Other ionic equilibria
Fig.5.6-3:The four Gran plots for the titration of a mixture of iodide, bromide, and chlo-
ride with a soluble silver salt in the presence of a coagulating agent, as in Fig. 5.6-2.
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
This page is mainly designed to tell you how to read or retrieve field data from PDF and how to extract and get field data from PDF in C#.NET project.
copy and paste text from pdf to excel; delete text from pdf file
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
copy text pdf; copy pdf text to word document
cyanide is in great excess, and poly-cyano complexes may contribute signifi-
cantly to the titration curve. We will therefore include them in the formal
description. On the spreadsheet we do not need to make guesses as to what
approximations to make, assumptions that can only be justified by a com-
plete analysis anyway.
Silver  forms  cyano  complexes  up  to  Ag(CN)
4
3–
;  moreover,  CN
can  be
protonated to form HCN. Therefore we will consider the mass balance equa-
tions
[CN
]+[HCN]+[AgCN]+2[Ag(CN)
2
]+3[Ag(CN)
3
2–
]+4[Ag(CN)
4
3–
]
=C
s
V
s
/(V
s
+V
t
)
(5.7-1)
[Ag
+
]+[AgCN]+[Ag(CN)
2
]+[Ag(CN)
3
2–
]+[Ag(CN)
4
3–
]=C
t
V
t
/(V
s
+V
t
)
(5.7-2)
and subtraction of (5.7-2) from (5.7-1) leads to
[CN
]+[HCN]–[Ag
+
]+[Ag(CN)
2
]+2[Ag(CN)
3
2–
]+3[Ag(CN)
4
3–
]
=(C
s
V
s
–C
t
V
t
)/(V
s
+V
t
)
(5.7-3)
Substitutions of the type
[Ag
+
]=C
V
α
Ag+
/(V
s
+V
t
)
(5.7-4)
and
[HCN]=[H
+
] [CN
] / K
a
(5.7-5)
then yield
(5.7-6)
where
(5.7-7)
Equations (5.7-6) and (5.7-7) describe the progress of the titration as long
no  precipitate  is  formed.  As  soon  as  solid  AgCN appears  in  the  titration
vessel, we must instead use the analogue of (5.6-4) which, in this case reads
(5.7-8)
=
C
s
+[Ag
+
]-(1+[H
+
]/K
a
+K
s2
)K
s0
/[Ag
+
]-2K
3
/[Ag
+
]
2
-3K
4
/[Ag
+
]
3
C
t
-[Ag
+
]+(1+[H
+
]/K
a
+K
s2
)K
s0
/[Ag
+
]+2K
3
/[Ag
+
]
2
+3K
4
/[Ag
+
]
3
V
t
V
s
=
C
s
-[CN
-
](1+[H
+
]/K
a
)+ [Ag
+
]-[Ag(CN)]
2
-
]- 2[Ag(CN)]
3
2-
]-3[Ag(CN)]
4
3-
]
C
s
+[CN
-
](1+[H
+
]/K
a
)- [Ag
+
]+[Ag(CN)]
2
-
]+ 2[Ag(CN)]
3
2-
]+3[Ag(CN)]
4
3-
]
=
K
f1
[CN
-
]+2K
f1
K
f2
[CN
-
]
2
+3K
f1
K
f2
K
f3
[CN
-
]
3
+4K
f1
K
f2
K
f3
K
f4
[CN
-
]
4
1+ K
f1
[CN
-
]+ K
f1
K
f2
[CN
-
]
2
+K
f1
K
f2
K
f3
[CN
-
]
3
+K
f1
K
f2
K
f3
K
f4
[CN
-
]
4
F
f
=
α
AgCN
+2
α
Ag(CN)
2
-
+3
α
Ag(CN)
3
2-
+4
α
Ag(CN)
4
3-
V
t
V
s
=
C
s
-[CN
-
](1 +[H
+
]/K
a
)
C
t
F
f
+[CN
-
](1+[H
+
]/K
a
)
5.7 The von Liebig titration
201
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
|. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Search PDF Text. C#.NET PDF SDK - Search and Find PDF Text in C#.NET. C#.NET PDF DLLs for Finding Text in PDF Document.
extract text from pdf to excel; copy text from pdf without formatting
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, convert and print PDF in
PDF in C#, C# convert PDF to HTML, C# convert PDF to Word, C# extract text from PDF, C# convert PDF to Jpeg, C# compress PDF, C# print PDF, C# merge PDF files
get text from pdf into excel; extract pdf text to excel
where we have used the abbreviations K
s2
=K
s0
K
f1
K
f2 
, K
3
=K
s0
3
K
f1
K
f2
K
f3
,
and K
4
=K
s0
4
K
f1
K
f2
K
f3 
K
f4
=K
3
K
s0
K
f4
. The switch from (5.7-6) to (5.7-8)
occurs when [Ag
+
] as given by (5.7-4) equals K
s0 
/[CN
].
Instructions for exercise 5.7
Open a new spreadsheet and give it a name, e.g., von Liebig.
In the top row place labels for C
s
, C
t
, [H
+
], K
a
, K
f1
through K
f4 
, as well as K
s0 
, K
3
, and
K
4
.
Deposit plausible values for C
t
, C
s
, and [H
+
], and enter the literature values
K
a
=6.2×10
–10
M, K
f1
=8.3× 10
8
M
–1
, K
f2
=4.2×10
11
M
–1
, K
f3
=5.0 M
–1
,
K
f4
=0.074M
–1
, and K
s0
=1.2 ×10
–16
M
2
. Furthermore, calculate the numerical values
of K
3
and K
4
. Computing these here, once, rather than on every row of the spreadsheet,
will speed up the calculation. Whether or not this has a noticeable effect will, of course,
depend on the hardware used.
Enter labels for columns p[CN], [CN], denom, Ff, Vt/Vs, [Ag], denom*, Vt/Vs*, and pAg.
Let p[CN] range from 0 to 22 with increments of 0.1. In the next column, calculate the
corresponding values for [CN
].
In the column labeled denom compute the denominator of (5.7-7), e.g., in cell C6 as
=1 +$E$2*B6*(1 +$F$2*B6*(1+$G$2*B6*(1+$H$2*B6))). Alternatively you might
want to name the individual constants, and refer to them by those names.
In the next column calculate F
f
as given by (5.7-7), so that cell D6 might contain
=($E$2*B6*(1+ 2*$F$2*B6*(1 +1.5*$G$2*B6*(1+(4/3)*$H$2*B6)))) / C6.
Use (5.7-6) to calculate V
t
/V
s
in the column with that label.
In the next column compute [Ag+], while at the same time testing whether solid AgCN
can form. Since 
α
Ag+
=1/denom and V
t
/(V
s
+V
t
)=(V
t
/V
s
)/ (1 +V
t
/V
s
), the instruction
might use the following logic: if C
t
×(V
t
/V
s
) / (denom× (1+ V
t
/V
s
) is smaller than
K
s0
/[CN
], use C
t
×(V
t
/V
s
) / (denom×(1+V
t
/V
s
), otherwise use K
s0
/[CN
]. Or, in
spreadsheet code for row 6:=IF ($B$2*E6/(C6* (1 +E6))<$I$2/B6,
$B$2*E6/(C6*(1+E6)), $I$2/B6).
10 Now calculate the denominator of the right-most form of (5.7-8).
11 Calculate V
t
/V
s
*, for which you use either the earlier-computed values (as long as no
solid AgCN is formed), or equation (5.7-8). An easy code for the latter uses V
t
/V
s
*=
(C
s
+C
t
-denom*) / denom*.
12 In the next column, calculate pAg from [Ag+].
13 Plot pAg versus V
t
/V
s
. Figure 5.7-1 shows what type of result you can expect.
202
Other ionic equilibria
Analysis of experimental data can again be based on the break point in
the potentiometric curve, or on the first appearance of a visible precipi-
tate, both of which yield close  approximations to  the first equivalence
point. Moreover we can use the first derivative of the potentiometric
curve, Gran plots, or a non-linear least-squares fit of the experimental
data to the theoretical model for the entire curve. It is clear how to do the
overall fit, since we have just generated the theoretical curve. Below we
will briefly examine the Gran plots.
In order to reduce the first, complexometric part of the curve, defined by
(5.7-6) and (5.7-7), to a simple Gran plot, we must neglect the contributions
of AgCN, Ag(CN)
3
2–
, and Ag(CN)
4
3–
to the curve, in which case we obtain
[CN
] (1 +[H
+
]/K
a
) (V
s
+V
t
)=2C
t
(V
eq1
-V
t
)
(5.7-9)
For the second part of the curve, we can either neglect all species other than
Ag(CN)
2
(before  the  second  equivalence  point)  or  all  cyanide-containing
species (beyond that equivalence point) and obtain the Gran-plot approxima-
tions
K
s0
K
s2
(V
s
+V
t
) / [Ag
+
]=C
t
(V
eq2
-V
t
)
(5.7-10)
[Ag
+
] (V
s
+V
t
)= C
t
(V
t
-V
eq2
)
(5.7-11)
14 Calculate and plot the Gran plots according to (5.7-9) through (5.7-11). Your curves
should look similar to those of Fig. 5.7-2.
5.7 The von Liebig titration
203
Fig.5.7-1:The (colored) titration curve for the von Liebig titration of 0.1 M cyanide with
0.1 M silver, using the equilibrium constants given in the text. The black curve shows
how the complexometric titration curve would have continued if somehow the precipi-
tation of solid AgCN could have been prevented.  Open circles show the equivalence
points.
The initial (colored) part of the titration curve in Fig. 5.7-1, and its
(black) continuation, show that the complexometric titration curve is
quite asymmetrical, the result of the initial involvement of the tri-cyano
and tetra-cyano silver complexes. For that first part of the von Liebig titra-
tion, the Gran plot (which neglects those complexes) is noticeably curved,
see Fig. 5.7-2. However, the next Gran plots are quite linear, reflecting the
fact that, once AgCN starts to precipitate, Ag(CN)
2
is really the dominant
species until the second equivalence point, and so is Ag
+
after that second
equivalence point has been passed. Consequently, for a Gran-plot analy-
sis, the second equivalence point would be much better suited, even
though that will require the use of about twice as much silver in each titra-
tion.
5.8
The graphical representation of electrochemical equilibria
Traditionally, electrochemical equilibria are explained in terms of thermo-
dynamic cell potentials. However, in electroanalytical applications, such a
description  is  of  little  use,  because  one  almost  always  uses  a  non-
thermodynamic measurement, with a reference  electrode that  includes  a
liquid junction.  It  is then more  useful to go  back to  the  basic  physics  of
electrochemistry, i.e., to the individual interfacial potential differences that
make up the total cell potential. This is the approach we will use here.
There are two types of interfacial potential differences: equilibrium and
non-equilibrium potentials. (From now on we will use ‘potential’ as short-
hand for ‘potential  difference’.  Potentials  of  individual phases  cannot be
measured, but some potential differences can be.) The equilibrium poten-
tials can again be subdivided into two categories: electron transfer and ion
transfer potentials.  The metal/metal  ion  potentials  can  be considered as
204
Other ionic equilibria
Fig.5.7-2:Gran plots for a von Liebig titration of 0.1 M cyanide with 0.1 M silver, using
the equilibrium constants given in the text.
either of these: we can look at a silver electrode in contact with an aqueous
solution of silver nitrate as a system that allows the reduction of Ag
+
to Ag
0
and its reverse, the oxidation of Ag
0
to Ag
+
, or as the transfer of a silver ion to
and from the Fermi sea of metal ions and conduction electrons that make up
a metal. Here, and in section 5.9, we will be concerned with electron transfer
potentials. The potentials of a glass electrode, and of a fluoride electrode, are
examples of ion transfer potentials, while the silver electrode illustrates a
metal/metal ion electrode.
In  all  these  cases  of  equilibrium  potentials,  the  formal  description  is
similar, and is based on the Nernst equation. For the transfer of n electrons
between the oxidized species O and its reduced counterpart R, the Nernst
equation reads
(5.8-1)
where f =F / (RT ln(10)), or about 16.9 V
-1
at room temperature; its recipro-
cal, 1/f , then has a value of about 0.059 V. We write the Nernst equation in the
above form to emphasize its homology with the mass action law for a weak
monoprotic acid,
(5.8-2)
Indeed, by introducing the definitions
(5.8-3)
we can rewrite (5.8-1) in a form that is fully isomorphous with (5.8-2), viz.
(5.8-4)
Consider, for example, the redox equilibrium Fe
3+
+e
-
Fe
2+
. When we
define the total analytical concentration of iron in solution (regardless of its
oxidation state) as C, it follows from the Nernst equation that the fractional
concentrations of Fe
3+
and Fe
2+
are
(5.8-5)
which are isomorphous with the acid–base relations
(5.8-6)
So far we have restricted the discussion to that of a single redox step, from
Fe(III) to Fe(II), and a monoprotic acid–base system, but the analogy can be
carried much further. For example, the aqueous redox behavior of vanadium
involves  the  oxidation  states  V
2+
,  V
3+
,  VO
2+
 and  VO
2
+
 all  separated  by
thestepwise addition or extraction of one electron. This is fully analogous to
α
A
-
=
K
a
[H
+
]+K
a
α
HA
=
[H
+
]
[H
+
]+ K
a
α
Fe
3+
=
k
h+k
α
Fe
2+
=
h
h+k
ph =pk +log 
[O]
[R]
k=10
–f Eo
OR
h=10
–f E
pH =pK
a
+log 
[A
-
]
[HA]
nf E=nf E
OR
o
+log 
[O]
[R]
5.8 The graphical representation of electrochemical equilibria
205
a triprotic acid H
3
A in which each form can be converted into its conjugate
forms by the stepwise addition or extraction of single protons.
The vanadium redox chemistry involves protons, since we have the equi-
libria
V
3+
+e
-
V
2+
(5.8-7)
VO
2+
+2H
+
+e
-
V
3+
+H
2
O
(5.8-8)
VO
2
+
+2H
+
+e
-
VO
2+
+H
2
O
(5.8-9)
and this is reflected in the corresponding Nernst equations, which read
(5.8-10)
(5.8-11)
(5.8-12)
where
(5.8-13)
We now define
(5.8-14)
so that
(5.8-15)
(5.8-16)
(5.8-17)
(5.8-18)
which can be compared with the analogous relations for a triprotic acid,
(4.9-7) through (4.9-10). Below we will exploit this close analogy between
redox and acid–base behavior to make logarithmic concentration dia-
grams.
α
VO
2
+
=
k
1
k
2
k
3
h
3
+h
2
k
1
+hk
1
k
2
+k
1
k
2
k
3
α
VO
2+
=
hk
1
k
2
h
3
+h
2
k
1
+hk
1
k
2
+k
1
k
2
k
3
α
V
3+
=
h
2
k
1
h
3
+h
2
k
1
+hk
1
k
2
+k
1
k
2
k
3
α
V
2+
=
h
3
h
3
+h
2
k
1
+hk
1
k
2
+k
1
k
2
k
3
k
3
=10
–f E
V54
*
k
2
=10
–f E
V43
*
k
1
=10
–f E
V32
o
h=10
–f E
E
V54
*
=E
V54
o
+
1
f
log[H
+
]
2
=E
V54
o
-
2
f
pH
E
V43
*
=E
V43
o
+
1
f
log[H
+
]
2
=E
V43
o
-
2
f
pH    and
E=E
V54
o
+
1
f
log 
[VO
2
+
][H
+
]
2
[VO
2+
]
=E
V54
*
+
1
f
log 
[VO
2
+
]
[VO
2+
]
E=E
V43
o
+
1
f
log 
[VO
2+
][H
+
]
2
[V
3+
]
=E
V43
*
+
1
f
log 
[VO
2+
]
[V
3+
]
E=E
V32
o
+
1
f
log 
[V
3+
]
[V
2+
]
206
Other ionic equilibria
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested