how to display pdf file in asp net using c# : Cut and paste text from pdf SDK software service wpf winforms web page dnn Excel23-part194

(5.9-12)
(5.9-13)
while the electron balance for the titration of Fe
2+
will read
[Fe
3+
]=5 [Mn
2+
]
(5.9-14)
or, for the titration of V
2+
,
[V
3+
]+2 [VO
2+
]+3 [VO
2
+
]=5 [Mn
2+
]
(5.9-15)
so that the progress of these titrations will be given by
(5.9-16)
or
(5.9-17)
respectively. While it is unavoidable that the algebra gets a little messy when
there are more species involved, the general form of the progress equation
remains the same. It is therefore straightforward to extend the present for-
malism to other redox systems, and to fit their redox titrations as long as they
exhibit equilibrium behavior.
5.10
Redox bu≈er action
The simultaneous presence  of  the  oxidized and  reduced  form of  a redox
couple can stabilize the redox potential of a solution, just as the presence of
an acid and its conjugate base can stabilize the pH. The formalism (R. de
Levie, J. Chem. Educ. 76 (1999) 574) is quite similar to that of section 4.7,
except that there are no terms for the oxidation or reduction of the solvent,
because these are typically non-equilibrium processes which, moreover, are
insignificant in the usual range of potentials considered. By analogy to (4.7-
1) we write, for the redox buffer strength B of a one-electron redox couple
Ox+e
Red, such as Fe
3+
+e
Fe
2+
or Ce
4+
+e
Ce
3+
,
(5.10-1)
where Cis the total analytical concentration, C=[Ox]+[Red]. Because C
α
Ox
=[Ox] and C
α
Red
=[Red], we can rewrite (5.10-1) as B =C
2
α
Ox
α
Red
/C=[Ox]
[Red] / ([Ox]+[Red]) or
B= C
α
Ox
α
Red
V
t
V
s
=
C
s
(
α
V
3+
+2
α
VO
2+
+3
α
VO
2
+
)
5C
t
α
Mn
2+
=
C
s
(h
5
+k
t
5
)(h
2
k
1
+2hk
1
k
2
+3k
1
k
2
k
3
)
5C
t
h
5
(h
3
+h
2
k
1
+hk
1
k
2
+k
1
k
2
k
3
)
V
t
V
s
=
C
s
α
Fe
3+
5C
t
α
Mn
2+
=
C
s
k
s
(h
5
+k
t
5
)
5C
t
h
5
(h+k
s
)
k
t
=10
–f E
Mn72
*
=10
–f E
Mn72
o
+(8/5)pH
[Mn
2+
]=
h
5
C
t
V
t
(h
5
+k
t
5
)(V
s
+V
t
)
[MnO
4
-
]=
k
t
5
C
t
V
t
(h
5
+k
t
5
)(V
s
+V
t
)
5.10 Redox buffer action
217
Cut and paste text from pdf - extract text content from PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File
pdf text replace tool; copy pdf text to word
Cut and paste text from pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application
c# extract text from pdf; export text from pdf to word
(5.10-2)
For the VO
2
+
/VO
2+
/V
3+
/V
2+
system the redox buffer strength is analogous
to (4.9-12), 
B=C (
α
VO
2
+
α
VO
2+
+
α
VO
2+
α
V
3+
α
V
3+
α
V
2+
+ 4
α
VO
2
+
α
V
3+
+ 4
α
VO
2+
α
V
2+
+9
α
VO
2
+
α
V
2+
)
(5.10-3)
which reduces to
B≈C (
α
V
2+
α
V
3+
+
α
V
3+
α
VO
2+
+
α
VO
2+
α
VO
2
+
)
(5.10-4)
when the various standard potentials E
o
and conditional potentials E* are
sufficiently  far apart.  In that  case,  a  simple  relationship  such as (5.10-2)
applies in each buffer region, i.e., the range of potentials around E
o
or E*,
just as the acid–base buffer region occurs at pH ≈pK
a
. Note that the numeri-
cal coefficients 1, 4 and 9 in the products of the alpha’s are the squares of the
numbers n of electrons involved in the transition from one form into the
other, just as they are the squares of the number of protons involved in (4.9-
12).
For permanganate the intermediate redox states are not stable, and we go
almost directly from MnO
4
to either MnO
2
(in neutral or basic media) or
Mn
2+
(in acidic solutions). In that case the general expression reduces to
(5.10-5)
(5.10-6)
for the three-electron step at neutral or basic pH, or, at low pH, for a five-
electron transition,
(5.10-7)
(5.10-8)
All redox titration curves we have discussed here are independent of the
total analytical concentration C of the redox couple. (This is not always the
case: in the Cr
2
O
7
2-
/Cr
3+
couple the reduction of one Cr
2
O
7
2-
generates two
Cr
3+
ions, which leads to a concentration-dependent redox titration curve.)
Therefore,  the  above  expressions  precisely  give  C
s
/ln  (10)  times  the  first
derivative of the progress curve of the corresponding redox titration. You can
convince yourself that this is so in exercise 5.10-1.
25
B
=
1
[MnO
4
-
]
+
1
[Mn
2+
]
B≈25C
α
MnO
4
-
α
Mn2
+
9
B
=
1
[MnO
4
-
]
+
1
[MnO
2
]
B≈ 9C
α
MnO
4
-
α
MnO
2
1
B
=
1
[Red]
+
1
[Ox]
218
Other ionic equilibria
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in VB.NET. Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader component installed.
extract text from pdf java; export highlighted text from pdf to word
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
C#.NET PDF SDK - Copy, Paste, Cut PDF Image in C#.NET. C# Guide cutting. C#.NET Project DLLs: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF Page. In
extract text from image pdf file; delete text from pdf file
Instructions for exercise 5.10
Go back to the spreadsheet used for exercise 5.9-1.
Add two columns, one labeled Bs, the other 2.3Csderiv.
In column Bs calculate the buffer strength using (5.10-2), i.e., based the formula
C
s
hk
s
/(h+ k
s
)
2
.
In column 2.3Csderiv compute C
s
/ln(10) times the first derivative of the progress curve.
Calculate latter with the same simple formula used in section 4.5, i.e., the derivative
dy/dxat row i is equal to (–2y
i–2 
– y
i–1
+y
i+1
+2y
i+2
)/(10
), where the data spacing 
is
0.1 so that 10
=1.
Plot the two resulting curves versus fE. Figure 5.10-1 shows what such a curve should
look like.
Similarly extend exercise 5.9-2 to include two columns, labeled Bs and 2.3Csderiv
respectively.
Calculate B
s
from (5.10-4) as C
s
h{ k
1
/(h+k
1
)
2
+k
2
/(h+ k
2
)
2
+k
3
/(h +k
3
)
2
}.
In the next column compute C
s
/ln(10) times the first derivative of the progress curve, as
under instruction (4).
Again plot these two curves of redox buffer strength as a function of the dimensionless
potential fE, and compare your results with Fig. 5.10-2.
The redox buffer strength serves the same role for the potential of a solu-
tion as the acid–base buffer  strength serves for its pH.  In  both cases it  is
assumed that the corresponding equilibria are established quickly on the
time  scale  of  the  experiment. With  redox  equilibria,  which  often  involve
bond breaking, this condition is less often met than with acid–base equilib-
ria, where fast establishment of equilibrium is the norm.
5.10 Redox buffer action
219
Fig.5.10-1: The redox buffer strength of a strongly acidic aqueous iron solution of 0.01 M
analytical concentration, calculated from (5.10-1) or by differentiation of the progress
curve (5.9-5); the two agree to within 2%.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete text from pdf online; copy and paste text from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Page: Extract, Copy, Paste PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET DLLs: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Page.
find and replace text in pdf file; copy pdf text to word
5.11
Summary
In this chapter we have applied the methods of chapter 4 to ionic equilibria
other than those between acids and bases. Of course, complexation, extrac-
tion,  solubility,  precipitation,  and  redox  equilibria  may  also  involve
acid–base equilibria, which is why we treated acid–base equilibria first. The
examples given here illustrate that the combination of exact theory with the
computational power of a spreadsheet allows us  to solve many problems
that occur in quantitative chemical analysis, and to analyze experimental
data  accordingly.  Even  quite  complicated  titrations,  such  as  the  multi-
component precipitation titrations, the von Liebig titration, and redox titra-
tions  involving  many  species  and  complicated  stoichiometries,  can  be
handled with ease.
Again, we have not included activity corrections, because (both didacti-
cally and computationally) these are best added afterwards whenever such
corrections  are  required.  The  principles  involved  are  the  same  as  those
explained in section 4.10: activity corrections apply to the equilibrium con-
stants (such as K
fi
, K
si
, and k) but not to the mass and charge balance rela-
tions and their derivatives, such as a ligand balance or an electron balance.
Furthermore,  electrometric  measurements  must  be  corrected  for activity
effects, but spectroscopic measurements should not be. At any rate, as the
example of HgS in section 5.4 illustrates, the proper chemistry of including
all important species is always far more important than the proper physics of
making activity corrections.
The reader may wonder why the discussion in this chapter is restricted to
ionic equilibria. Are there not many other equilibria, not involving ions, sol-
ubilities  of  non-ionic  compounds,  electrochemical  processes  involving
220
Other ionic equilibria
Fig.5.10-2:The redox buffer strength of an aqueous vanadium solution of 0.01 M analyt-
ical concentration at pH=0, calculated from (5.10-3) or by differentiation of the
progress curve of Fig. 5.9-3. Again the two agree to within the computational accuracy of
the differentiation algorithm used.
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images. Supports to resize images in conversion.
a pdf text extractor; get text from pdf image
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit
delete text from pdf; cut text pdf
neutral species, etc.? The reasons for focusing exclusively on ions are (1) that
the  formalism  of  equilibria  is  often  more  complicated  when  ions  are
involved, therefore making them more in need of spreadsheet computation,
and (2) that  many equilibria involving  neutral species  are  established so
slowly that their kinetics must be taken into account. Such slow processes
are often of little analytical value, and they therefore fall outside the reach of
this book. However, chapter 9 discusses one aspect of slow reaction rates
where spreadsheets  can  be helpful,  namely in the simulation of reaction
kinetics.
Non-equilibrium  behavior may also affect some ionic reactions. In our
examples we have therefore emphasized processes involving substitution-
labile ions rather than substitution-inert ones. Problems of slow kinetics are
especially common with ionic redox reactions, in which case equilibrium
considerations  indicate what is  theoretically feasible,  but  not  necessarily
what  is  truly  factual.  This  is  why  so  many  quantitative  electrometric
methods are  based  on either silver or  mercury,  two metals  on which the
metal/metal  ion  equilibrium  is  usually  established  so  rapidly  that  the
underlying kinetics can be neglected in routine analytical measurements,
and  on  platinum,  where  the  same  applies  to  many  electron  transfer
processes between soluble redox couples.
5.11 Summary
221
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
position, such as PDF text, image and PDF table. Delete or remove partial or all hyperlinks from PDF file in VB.NET class. Copy, cut and paste PDF link to
copy text from scanned pdf; extract text from pdf using c#
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
copy, paste, cut, rotate, and save PDF page(s), etc. Class: PDFDocument. Class: PDFPage. Text Process. Following classes will be used in your program. And PDF
edit pdf replace text; extract highlighted text from pdf
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
how to copy and paste pdf text; get text from pdf online
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
c# get text from pdf; pdf text replace tool
part iv instrumental  methods
chapter
6
spe c t r om e t r y,
chr o mato g r a p hy,
an d  volta m m e t ry
This short chapter contains a somewhat disparate collection of topics, com-
monly treated in either quantitative or instrumental chemical analysis. They
illustrate a variety of methods, but their order is of no particular importance.
The reader should therefore feel free to pick and choose from them, in any
order.
In the first examples, spectrometry is used as an excuse to revisit some of
the  problems  and  methods  encountered in  earlier  chapters,  such as the
determination of the pK
a
of an indicator dye, and multicomponent analysis.
We also illustrate the still little-known absorbance–absorbance diagrams.
We use chromatography as our pretense to simulate the action of a diffe-
rential equation. In a second chromatographic exercise, we show how the
van Deemter plot can be linearized.
Our example in polarography illustrates how a spreadsheet can be used to
simulate  a  rather  complex  curve,  in  this  case  reflecting  the  interplay
between the Nernst equation, Fick’s law of diffusion, and drop growth. The
first two factors also play a role in cyclic voltammetry, where we introduce
semi-integration as an example of deconvolution.
6.1
Spectrometric pK
a
determination
Spectrometry can be used to determine the pK
a
of a weak acid. Here we will
show this with a data set that is already more than 60 years old, at the same
time illustrating that the quality of the data usually depends much more on
the experimental care taken in obtaining them than on the availability of the
latest instrumentation.
The data were taken from H. von Halban & G. Kortüm, Z.Elektrochem. 40
(1934)  502. Weighed amounts of  2,4-dinitrophenol were  dissolved in car-
bonate-free  water, and  were  compared  by  differential  spectrometry  with
similarly  weighed  solutions  of  the  same  dye  in  5  mM  NaOH,  in  which
223
2,4-dinitrophenol  is  fully  dissociated.  The  measurements  were  made  at
436 nm,wherethe acidformhas negligible absorption.The temperature was
controlled at 25 
o
C, the dye and the water were carefully purified, and the
glassware was meticulously cleaned. The measurements were made in a sta-
tionary cuvet; the various solutions were entered and removed by flushing.
The resulting experimental data are listed in Table 6.1-1.
Instructions for exercise 6.1
Open a new spreadsheet.
Enter column headings for C, [A], 
α
, K
a
, I 
1
2
, pK
a
, and pK
a,calc
.
Enter the data for Cand [A] (in M, not μM!) from Table 6.1-1.
Calculate 
α
as [A
]/C, K
a
as 
α
2
C/(1 -
α
), √Ias √[A
], and pK
a
as -logK
a
.
With a linear regression (e.g., Trendline, or T
ools D
ata Analysis  Regression) obtain
the value of pK
a
extrapolated to infinite dilution.
Compute pK
a,calc
based on the least-squares parameters found.
Plot the original data as well as the least-squares line through them. The plot should
look more or less like Fig. 6.1-1.
Note  that  we  can  use  a  linear  extrapolation  because,  at  the  low  ionic
strengths of these solutions, the Debye–Hückel limiting law is quite suffi-
cient. If all experimental data were of this quality, we could have pK
a
-values
listed to three significant decimal places!
224
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
Table 6.1-1:The total analytical concentration C of 2,4-dinitrophenol in
water,and the resulting concentration [A–]of 2,4-dinitrophenolate as
measured by differential spectrometry.
C/μM
[A]/μM
C/μM
[A]/μM
C/μM
[A]/μM
701.5
204.9
358.3
136.3
180.1
87.70
677.3
200.7
353.3
135.0
153.6
78.85
618.6
190.0
285.2
118.0
136.4
72.75
598.7
186.5
262.1
111.8
122.6
67.58
550.5
177.5
239.5
105.6
114.4
64.38
441.8
155.1
212.8
97.83
92.45
55.41
399.1
145.7
6.2
Multi-component spectrometric analysis 1
According to Beer’s law, the measured absorbance of a solution of a single
light-absorbing species is directly proportional to its concentration. For a
solution containing a mixture of  absorbing species,  the measured absor-
bance  is  then  simply  the  linear  combination  of  the  absorbances  of  all
species in that solution, each measured at the same wavelength. When the
different species in the mixture have different spectra, we can do a multi-
component  analysis  and  extract  the  concentrations  of  the  individual
species.
For a mixture of two species, the minimum requirement would be to make
measurements  at  two  wavelengths;  for  a  mixture  of  three,  at  least  three
wavelengths must be used, etc. Here we will show how Beer’s law can be used
to  determine  the  concentrations  of  four  species  by  making  absorbance
measurements at four different wavelengths. As our example we will con-
sider  the  mixture  of  ethylbenzene  and  the three  xylenes  in  cyclohexane;
we will  use  infrared  absorption  data  listed  in  R.  P.  Bauman,  Absorption
Spectroscopy, Wiley 1962 p. 408, and reproduced in Table 6.2-1.
We  notice  that the wavenumbers have been chosen judiciously, in that
each compound has a significant absorbance at one of these, while contrib-
uting relatively little  at the other wavenumbers. Indeed, the four compo-
nents have absorption peaks at precisely one of these wavenumbers, and the
mixture  shows  four  almost  baseline-separated  absorption  peaks,  one  for
each component. This, then, is an ‘ideal’ example, of which the solution is, at
least in principle, quite straightforward: we need to solve four simultaneous
equations in four unknowns.
6.2 Multi-component spectrometric analysis 1
225
Fig.6.1-1:The pK
a
-values calculated from the data (open circles) and the straight line
drawn through them by least-squares, extrapolated (thin colored line) to yield the
‘infinite dilution’ value.
We now denote the various wavenumbers by the index i, and the concen-
trations of the four species in the mixture by the index j. We have four equa-
tions of the type
x
1
=a
1,1
c
1
+a
1,2
c
2
+a
1,3
c
3
+a
1,4
c
4
(6.2-1)
x
2
=a
2,1
c
1
+a
2,2
c
2
+a
2,3
c
3
+a
2,4
c
4
(6.2-2)
x
3
=a
3,1
c
1
+a
3,2
c
2
+a
3,3
c
3
+a
3,4
c
4
(6.2-3)
x
4
=a
4,1
c
1
+a
4,2
c
2
+a
4,3
c
3
+a
4,4
c
4
(6.2-4)
where  the  x
i
represent the absorbances  of  the  mixture  at  the  four wave-
numbers i, each divided by the optical pathlength b through the solution.
The terms  a
i,j
are the measured  absorbances of the pure reference com-
pounds at those same wavenumbers, and the c
j
’s are the concentrations of
the four components in the  mixture,  i.e., the  concentrations to be deter-
mined by the experiment. These four equations can be written much more
compactly, in terms of matrix notation, as
X=A C
(6.2-5)
where X and C are vectors, and Ais a matrix,
(6.2-6)
Using the rules of matrix algebra (which are briefly reviewed in section
8.9) we left-multiply both sides of (6.2-5) by the inverse of A,
A
1
X=A
1
A C =I C =C
(6.2-7)
(where  A
1
A=I, the unit  matrix) so that we can immediately obtain the
desired result C, which contains the concentrations in the mixture, simply
from C=A
1
X. The spreadsheet will do the mathematics for us.
C=
c
1
c
2
c
3
c
4
A=
a
1,1
a
2,1
a
3,1
a
4,1
a
1,2
a
2,2
a
3,2
a
4,2
a
1,3
a
2,3
a
3,3
a
4,3
a
1,4
a
2,4
a
3,4
a
4,4
,
X=
x
1
x
2
x
3
x
4
,
226
Spectrometry, chromatography, and voltammetry
Table 6.2-1:The absorbances (per gram of compound in 50 mL cyclohexane)
of ethylbenzene and the three xylenes,at the wavenumbers listed in the first
column,and (in the last column) the absorbance of a test mixture of these
compounds,all as measured in cyclohexane.
Wavenumber
ethyl-
o-xylene
m-xylene
p-xylene
unknown
/cm
–1
benzene
mixture
696.3
1.6534
0.0
0.1289
0.0641
0.07386
741.2
0.5524
4.7690
0.0668
0.0645
0.22036
768.0
0.1544
0.0
2.8542
0.0492
0.08676
795.2
0.0768
0.0
0.0968
2.8288
0.07721
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested